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The Daily Illini’s

Graduation Guide Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Graduating students take the next step in their careers.


Tuesday, April 30, 2013

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Weekend â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we were all together and went out to eat at Legends.â&#x20AC;? MONIQUE ROSS, senior in LAS

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MOLLY HOLINGER, junior in LAS, who is graduating early

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meeting Noah (a good friend) at my fraternity house.â&#x20AC;? RISHIL CHOPRA, senior in LAS

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hanging out on the Quad when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice out; hanging out with friends.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spending time with my friends at the ballroom in the Union and at the Quad.â&#x20AC;?

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SOPHIE WU, senior in LAS

MARK TOKARSKI, senior in LAS Lyanne can be reached at alfaro2@dailyillini.com. PORTRAITS BY FOLAKE OSIBODU


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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Alma Mater Alma will live on in spirit at seniorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; graduation ceremony. PAGE C9

Green Street The 2011 Green Street fire is among the events seniors remember about their past four years. PAGE C8

YOU ARE HERE

The Daily Illini

Ringing the bells at Altgeld Hall tops seniorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bucket lists. PAGE C5

Apartments

Senior Jordan Sward reflects on her time at her college newspaper. PAGE C6

Seniors share how their definition of â&#x20AC;?homeâ&#x20AC;? has changed. PAGE C17

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Dear Annie, Wow! You just graduated from UIUC College of Business Honors, Campus Honors and the James Scholar program after three years of hard work! Congrats and GOD bless. Love, Mom, Dad and Connie

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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

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Eight things that every senior should do before graduation BY JOLIE HUANG STAFF WRITER

As the year winds down and seniors begin to count down the days until graduation, many scramble to complete the tasks they have set for themselves when they came to the University as freshmen. The following is a selection of these tasks, or “bucket list items,” that can be completed on campus.

1. Ring the bells at Altgeld Hall Unbeknownst to many, students have the opportunity to ring the bells at Altgeld Hall. Every weekday between 12:30 to 1:00 p.m., visitors can climb the steps to the top of the hall and take a tour of one of the most musical places on campus. During the tour, anyone is allowed to ring the bells or play a tune such as “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” to be heard across campus.

2. Ride the Rail

Legends offers this daunting task to customers 21 or older who strive to complete the “Ride the Rail” challenge. To complete the task, customers must drink three glasses each of 15 different types of beers, ranging from Woodchuck Draft Cider to Coors Lite. This particular bucket list item often takes months, or even semesters, to complete. For Anna Wirth, senior in LAS, the challenge took an entire academic year. “There’s just a ton of different kinds (of

beer), and honestly it was kind of expensive to buy so many beers,” Wirth said. Once the 48 beers are consumed, whether in a day, a week or the course of a couple semesters, the “Rail Riders” will receive a free t-shirt and their names will be put on a plaque next to the bar’s pool table.

the most of it before I have to be a ‘grown-up.’” Even those who have gone out frequently in their four years here may decide to frequent the campus bars and partake in KAM’S “Country Night,” The Clybourne’s “Wine Night” or Joe’s Brewery’s “EighthGrade Dance Night.”

consists of two cheeseburger patties, chicken fingers, mozzarella sticks, bacon, egg, mayo and ketchup to the infamous “Big Fat Ugly,” which consists of 25 different ingredients.

3. Rub Abraham Lincoln’s nose in Lincoln Hall

5. Explore the underground tunnels

Near the edge of campus, the University’s arboretum and art museum may be easily forgotten. The Arboretum, located at 1800 S. Lincoln Ave., is a 57-acre “living laboratory” that displays various plant collections, according to the arboretum’s website. The arboretum is open to the public. The Krannert Art Museum, located at 500 E. Peabody Drive, is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. The museum displays art from across the world, and tours are available on certain days.

Legend has it that if students rub the nose of Abe Lincoln’s bust before an exam, they will have good luck and high grades. Though this may not be true, many students on campus feel it doesn’t hurt to try. The recently refurbished bust sits in the front entrance of Lincoln Hall and has received thousands of nose rubs in the past few decades. For seniors, this is their last chance to complete the ageold tradition and get a last dose of good luck before they enter the real world.

4. Enjoy the campus night life Many students, including Susan Jean, senior in Engineering, have spent the majority of their time at the University focusing on schoolwork or studying at the library. As a result, they may want to make the most of their last few days at the University by participating in the campus’ night life. “I’m a pretty conservative person, but this is my senior year,” Jean said. “I want to make

Although this activity is not condoned by the University, a few daring students have set out to explore a series of underground steam tunnels that connect most buildings on the Quad. “My dad went to school here many, many years ago and he says that he and his friends explored them all the time,” said Marcus Sanders, junior in ACES. “He visited a few weeks ago and he told me that apparently they keep them locked up now.”

6. Eat at Fat Sandwich Company With all of the dining options available on Green Street and its surrounding area, it may be easy to overlook many restaurants outside this area. Fat Sandwich Company, located at 502 E. John, however, is not one to forget. Boasting some of the greasiest and best “drunk food” on campus, this restaurant is one place on campus that all seniors should visit, at least once. Menu items here range from the “Fat Magnum” sandwich, which

7. Visit the University of Illinois Arboretum and Krannert Art Museum

8. See a concert or play at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts Located at 500 S. Goodwin Ave., the Krannert Center has performances scheduled almost every night of the week during the school year, including plays, operas and orchestras. Student tickets cost only $10, and the center also has a cafe and “Krannert Uncorked” wine tastings almost every Thursday.

Jolie can be reached at jhuang51@dailyillini.com.


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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

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562VFUXFLDOWRFROOHJHH[SHULHQFH Time devoted to extracurriculars is worth it JORDAN SWARD Staff writer

1

early everyone working for The Daily Illini has a claim to fame, whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s earning a story on the front page, covering a Big Ten sporting event or earning one of the numerous awards received by the publications each year. Mine was getting to interview Nick Cannon on the phone. For a preview to Cannonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trip to campus, I had a five-minute phone conversation with him in which I made sure to ask about his wife, Mariah Carey, who was pregnant at the time. That was my first time speaking directly to a celebrity, and it was awesome. Although I thought my reporting career had peaked after that interview my sophomore year, little did I know the most rewarding times had yet to come. In my three years on the features staff of The Daily Illini, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve worked alongside some of the most talented people Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever met

and coached reporters who I know will continue to be great journalists. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve profiled Paralympian, faculty member and humanitarian Jean Driscoll; written a story about how Muslim students and alumni were affected by 9/11 on its 10th anniversary; and covered the annual Engineering Open House, among others. Each story and source I met along the way has inspired me in some form that I hoped to transfer to our readers. As the graduating Daily Illini staff looks back at our time spent on the third floor of the Illini Media building, we will look back on a publication we should forever take pride in. When you pick up the paper, you may not realize the late nights, ethical debates and tense news conferences that go into producing a daily newspaper. But I think we would all agree it was well worth the lost sleep and stress. What will be even more memorable is writing and editing the amazing stories, planning exciting designs and working with passionate reporters. In the five weeks since turnover, I have seen my successors begin to transform the features section into something better

than it has ever been. My faith in them, and in the publication as a whole, has never been stronger. I thank everyone I have worked with and the readers who turned to the back of the A section. As our college or undergraduate careers come to an end, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exciting to look forward to what the future has in store for us. While we all might miss the Quad, certain campus eateries and living within a few blocks of most of our closest friends, the next chapter is a time for Illini to put our skills and experience to work. For those of you lucky enough to have been a part of an organization on campus, you may have learned the same values of collaboration, dedication and hard work toward a common goal. For seniors, the time has come to not only say goodbye to campus, but to organizations that have claimed our sweat and tears â&#x20AC;&#x201D; sometimes literally. I only hope everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s extracurricular experiences have been as valuable as mine were at The Daily Illini.

Jordan is a senior in Media. She can be reached at sward13@dailyillini.com.

From your first day of school, to your last. Congratulations Mark!

Congratulations Stephanie!  K K  K& K       K   (

TIME TO CELEBRATE!!

You continue to be the intelligent and successful young lady we knew you would be. Love Dad, Mom, and Brigid

Love, Mom and Dad

Congratulations to our Orange Krusher Shelby!!

We are very proud of you. Best wishes on the next steps of your journey. Love, Dad, Mom, Hannah & Grace


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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

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6HQLRUSDVVHVOHJDF\WRLQFRPLQJVLVWHU 3. Gold sparkly gym shoes Aka the best $20 I have ever spent. If there is one thing I have learned, college will present you with a number of occasions that gold sparkly gym shoes will be appropriate. The real world might not be the same, so I leave them to you. May they add the finishing touch to your outfits during your college years.

KELLY CHUIPEK Staff writer

I, Kelly Chuipek, hereby leave the following to my younger sister, who will join the University of Illinois class of 2017 this upcoming fall, in the hopes that she enjoys her four years here as much as I have enjoyed mine.

2. Unofficial beads An even bigger event than barn dance is Unofficial St. Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like Christmas here. I leave you my collections of shamrocks, sparkly beads and plastic shot glass necklaces that I have acquired through my four Unofficials. May they bring you a day of fun and keep you far from any $310 fines.

4. Collection of cups In addition to t-shirts, college will provide you with a number of free cups and glasses. From the plastic cups I acquired on Quad Day, to mason jars from Kamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Country night, to the cups I got from Mia Zaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cafe, I have plenty to leave to you. I hope you will not have to invest in any cups when your time comes to move into an apartment. I also hope that you may even have enough to avoid dishes for a day or two.

1. Cowboy boots I invested in a pair of cowboy boots freshman year after realizing the number of barn dances I would attend in my four years at the University. If you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t already heard, barn dance is kind of a big deal here. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better than rolling around in hay and wearing plaid? While they are a little bit beat up, I think they have another four years left in them. I leave them with the hope that they bring you better luck than they brought me after I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make that bus freshmen year.

See LEGACY, Page 20

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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

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0HPRUDEOH8,PLOHVWRQHV NOV. 27 Head coach Ron Zook is fired after leading the Illini football team through a six-game losing streak. Tim Beckman is hired to replace him in December.

BY BAILEY BRYANT STAFF WRITER

As the members of this year’s senior class look forward to their graduation from the University, many also reflect on the memories that they say defined their college experience.

AUG. 7 The Alma Mater is removed and shipped to Forest Park, Ill., for repairs. While the statue’s return to campus was originally slated for early May, it will now not be back in time for graduation.

Bailey can be reached at bebryan2@dailyillini.com.

MARCH 5 Illinois is ranked No. 24 on Times Higher Education world reputation rankings of universities.

MARCH 23 A fire on Green Street leaves Mia Za’s, Zorba’s, Pitaya and other establishments in ruins.

SEPT. 23 After a five-year admissions scandal, University of Illinois President B. Joseph White resigns from his position, leaving Michael Hogan to take his place.

OCT. 1 The Red Lion opens at its current location at 211 E. Green St., replacing Station 211, the bar that previously occupied the location.

AUG. 24 Most of the class of 2013 navigates campus on their first day of class.



FEB. 2 University students enjoy a snow day.





thevineyardchurch

...a community of hope

CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATES!

MARCH 25 Students’ spring break is extended by a snow day.

JULY 1 University President Michael Hogan resigns and is replaced by the University’s current president, Robert Easter.

MARCH 9 Head men’s basketball coach Bruce Weber is fired after completing the season with a record of 17-15. John Groce later replaced him.



Saturday 6pm Sunday 9:15 & 11am www.thevineyardchurch.us

FEB. 7 Illinois men’s basketball upsets No. 1 Indiana with a Tyler Griffey buzzer-beater at Assembly Hall.

JAN. 11 After receiving several citations for serving underaged customers, KAM’S age of entry becomes 21 and over until Sunday, May 12, 2013.

APRIL 4 University alumnus and famed film critic Roger Ebert dies at age 70.

MAY 12 Seniors will graduate.



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Alma Mater with graduates in spirit BY ALICE SMELYANSKY STAFF WRITER

For 83 years, one woman dedicated more time to the University than any other faculty member, student or alumni. She greeted her children with open arms, inspired them to learn and stood valiantly by their side as they threw their caps up and transitioned from students to graduates. But this year the Alma Mater will not be present for commencement May 12. Though originally expected to return to campus in time for graduation, the restoration process of the sculpture has been extended due to unforeseen damage. “I am really disappointed that it won’t be on campus for graduation,” said Daniel Pagel, senior in LAS. “I didn’t think the process would take this long, and they should have planned this out better.” While passing the southeast corner of Green and Wright Streets, incoming freshmen on their first official campus tour often learn about the significance of posing with the Alma Mater on graduation day. For many students, this longstanding tradition that generations of alumni have participated in symbolizes more than just a photo opportunity with a campus statue. “I have looked forward to taking the picture with the Alma Mater after graduating for years,” said Brittany Freundt, senior in LAS. “It has always been impor-

tant for me because I want to look back on that picture and remember all of the good times I’ve had here.” To compensate for Alma’s absence, there will be five 6-foot tall replicas of the sculpture created by the School of Art and Design. On May 2, the students design their own versions of Alma on the lawn outside the Art and Design Building. The replicas will be placed in various areas on campus, including on the Quad, by the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and by the Alice Campbell Alumni Center. A map will be available on the commencement website for students and parents to locate the different Alma Maters. In addition, on the Thursday and Friday of commencement week from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., there will be a photo booth with an Alma Mater background at the Illini Union. Orange and blue buntings will decorate the railing in front of Foellinger Auditorium and extra landscaping at the Hallene Gateway will allow for more unique photos. Campus spokeswoman Robin Kaler said it is also possible that a green screen with the Alma Mater will also be available for students at the GradFest. “We’re thinking of as many things as we can to give you some sort of a substitute, although, we all know there’s no substitute for Alma,” Kaler said. Though Juline Lamusga, senior in

Media, was angry about Alma’s absence at first, she’s now looking forward to creating unique graduation photos. “The class of 2013 will be the first to miss out on the tradition,” Lamusga said. “But I eventually realized that even though it’s unfortunate, I’m still graduating with the same degree from the same amazing University.” Kaler hopes that students who cherish the Alma Mater understand the importance of its preservation at this time. The last time the Alma Mater underwent a restoration was during the 1980s, and water was sealed into the interior of the sculpture. As a result, the sculpture became more vulnerable to degradation. “It was in great jeopardy,” Kaler said. “If this restoration project didn’t happen now, there is a good chance there would be no Alma in a fairly short time.” The Alma Mater is expected to be back on campus for the 2013-14 school year. Until then, students will have to pay their farewells to the most influential woman on campus in spirit. “The statue symbolically ties all past, present and future students together into a string of alumni who all share an Alma Mater,” Lamusga said. “She represents the head of a family, which is what we are as students of the same University.”

Alice can be reached at smelyan2@ dailyillini.com.

ful i t u a be r u o To en, t s i you! r f o K d prou

Way to go Mike! Congratulations on the graduation milestone. We are very proud of your accomplishments and the fine young man you’ve become. Shop at Aldi...

Love, Mom and Dad

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, Love Dad , Mom vin e and K

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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

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Dearest Janelle,

You are still a bundle of joy! Congratulations on all your accomplishments and we wish you peace and happiness. Love you, Mom, Dad, Jana, Justin, and Jake

Congratulations Xochitl! You did it. I am so proud of you and all you have accomplished. Ajuuua! Con mucho amor, Miami.

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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

11

2KWKHSODFHV BY REEMA ABI-AKAR STAFF WRITER

AUSTIN BAIRD THE DAILY ILLINI

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Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; years in college always seem to zoom past, and before they know it, they are ready to graduate. Somehow, they managed to complete all of their academic requirements and a lot more along the way. They cherish each experience that makes college the crazy and fulfilling ride that it tends to be. An international internship can serve as an experience that continues to resonate with a student long after they leave his alma mater. For undergraduate and graduate students alike, there are endless opportunities to find internships all around the world. Kaori Nakamura, a senior in LAS, went to Wuhan, China, in the summer of her sophomore year to teach English to high school age students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While I was teaching English to Chinese students, I felt it was more of a cultural exchange,â&#x20AC;? she said in an email. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We talked a lot about the differences between China and America and I was able to learn just as much about Chinese life and Chinese culture as my students learnt about the U.S.â&#x20AC;?

Not only was she able to gain experience abroad, but also she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to do it alone. She found the internship through AIESEC, a student group on campus that works largely in the subject of international internships, volunteer positions abroad and global leadership opportunities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One thing thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very different about our internships is when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re (in a foreign country for an internship) â&#x20AC;Ś youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re always going to have people that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re surrounded with, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take care of you once youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re there,â&#x20AC;? said Victor Lim, president of AIESEC Illinois and junior in Business. Since AIESEC is an international organization, there are thousands of different AIESEC student groups in 113 countries around the world, Lim said, including 34 chapters in the United States. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were Chinese AIESEC members who supported me when I arrived in China by picking me up at the airport, taking me to my housing, and spending time with me throughout my time in China,â&#x20AC;? Nakamura said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were other

(student) te achers there from all over the world â&#x20AC;Ś It was my first time living in this sort of international environment and it was intriguing.â&#x20AC;? Students can bring back these experiences long after their internship is over. Nakamura said that her internship in China was a unique and valuable opportunity to â&#x20AC;&#x153;develop both professionally and personally through being in an unfamiliar environment.â&#x20AC;? Other students who wish to find an internship abroad can apply through AIESEC. If they are accepted, their name will be put into a large database of students and global internships, so they can potentially be matched up with a global employer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;AIESEC actually originated after World War II,â&#x20AC;? Lim said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was like an effort to get people more culturally aware â&#x20AC;Ś and just creating more global leaders, global citizens and stuff like that.â&#x20AC;? The four most popular internship fields are business administra-

Congratulations Ben! :LWK/RYHDQG3ULGH 0RPDQG'DG

tion, information technology, teaching (often English) and working with universities. Although historically the organization began as a business-centered organization, it has now grown to accept students in a larger range of fields. In fact, AIESEC welcomes diversity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have around 50 percent business students, but the other 50 percent are global studies, engineering, MCB (molecular and cellular biology), science, art, everything that you can think of,â&#x20AC;? Lim said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So what we look for in terms of our members is just people who want the global mindset and cul-

tural experience.â&#x20AC;? Moreover, while these internships may be p a i d or unpaid, oftentimes the students will end up breaking even, when they add up the stipend they receive abroad. Other international internship resources on campus exist; a student just has to know where to look. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Career Center can do a lot as far as pointing students in the direction of resources that can help them find international internships,â&#x20AC;? said Tori Spring, assistant director of the Career Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a good

See INTERNSHIPS, Page 20

Sydney Claire Thompson

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined.â&#x20AC;?

Love,

Dad, Mom & Jason


Tuesday, April 30, 2013

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

20

,17(516+,36 FROM PAGE 11 page on our website under â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Work Abroadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; that lists quite a few different resources where students can start to look.â&#x20AC;? Ultimately, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to the student to do the preliminary research on what field they would want to work in, which countries they have in mind and what type of internship will be most suitable for them, Spring said. Bharath Gopalaswamy is the associate director of the Program in Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security. He works with students to find internships abroad, partially on his own time. Gopalaswamy used to work in Europe, and he also has ties with the Asia-Pacific region. Through these networks, he personally helps students locate internships that interest them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Looking for an international internship) is kind of vague and open-ended to some extent, but at the same time, you can only help people who help themselves,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So what I can do is, at that time, try to locate if any of my networks and their personal networks â&#x20AC;Ś know anybody that I can link (the student) up with.â&#x20AC;? Currently, Gopalaswamy is working with a student to try to find an internship in South Korea with an international crisis group. He is also in connection with the United Nations office in Vienna, Austria to make potential connections there. Since Gopalaswamyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s area of study is international security, he often helps students who are in similar fields. However, there are international internships available in virtually any field a student can research. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Internship searches in general are very

student-specific and very interest-specific,â&#x20AC;? Spring said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So depending on what you wanted to do, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to depend on where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to look and how youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to go about that search.â&#x20AC;? Oftentimes this search would include talking to advisors, professors, the study abroad office or students who have been abroad, Spring said. A student can also look up specific international companies and organizations and contact them directly through websites like goabroad.com. Gopalaswamy said that some internship positions abroad â&#x20AC;&#x153;have to be manufactured,â&#x20AC;? meaning that the positions did not exist before the student contacted the international source or company. Through a network of communications and interactions, these positions can end up being created uniquely for the student. This same concept holds true for any internship, but global internships especially. Both Gopalaswamy and Spring said that oftentimes the positions are not posted, so the student has to do most of the digging. All in all, these experiences abroad are often rewarding and extremely memorable for students, and the preliminary research and preparation tend to be worth it, Lim said. At first, Nakamura said that she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what to expect in her international internship, but at the end, she felt that her â&#x20AC;&#x153;experience was fantastic.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;One thing thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s definitely different about international internships as opposed to domestic ones is youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re forced to adapt to the culture,â&#x20AC;? Lim said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You really get to experience their culture there. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something that we really love about the program.â&#x20AC;?

Reema can be reached at abiakar2@dailyillini.com.

/(*$&< FROM PAGE 7

5. My knowledge of queso dip at Torticaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seriously, they have best queso dip that I have ever had. Sadly, I did not find this out until senior year. I leave you with the knowledge that it exists and that it can be found at a prime location on Green Street, so that you can visit it during late night hours with your friends and probably regret it a little bit the next morning.

6. Random assortment of room decorations This collection ranges from my Harry Potter movie poster, stolen posters from bars, handmade paintings that I crafted in a freshman year art class, random sceneries that I found at Hobby Lobby and of course, a few cheesy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live, Laugh, Loveâ&#x20AC;? signs. These decorations can transform an empty dorm room or apartment into a place that feels like a home. I leave them to you in hopes that your living space looks as mismatched and random as mine did.

7. The phone number to Insomnia Cookies Because sometimes, you just need to order a delicious, warm, chocolate chunk cookie with a little bit of milk and have a night in with your friends. As you will probably live far from Insomnia during your freshman year, I leave you the number, so it may give you a little comfort should you ever grow homesick (or just get a late-night craving

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CHAD THORNBURG! â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn outâ&#x20AC;?

We are so proud of you! Love, Mom, Kalah, Kylie and Ella

It took me a decent part of college and hours of listening to the SClub7 Pandora station to compile a throwback playlist of 90s hits that I am proud of. From experience, I learned that starting a night out with a throwback playlist will always led to a fun time. I leave it to you, so that it may provide you with hours of pregame music to sing along to, and that you may add to it as you see fit.

9. Handmade Illinois memory jar My roommates and I started this at the beginning of senior year. We put a pad of Postits next to a jar on the table, and whenever something funny or memorable happened, we wrote it down and stuck it inside. At the end of the semester, we read them all out loud and laughed at all of the things we had forgotten. I give it to you, in hopes that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll start collecting memories your freshman year and have a collection of a thousand folded up Postit memories by the time you graduate.

10. A picture of me Just in case you miss me. Just kidding though ... thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creepy. Well, sis, I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enough to get you started. Enjoy your four years here and take every opportunity that you can. I hope that when your graduation comes, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have a list twice the size of mine to bestow upon the incoming freshman class.

Kelly is a senior in Media. She can be reached at features@dailyillini.com.

lations u t a r g n Co Katie DeMuro!

CONGRATULATIONS Congratulations Ernesto!

8. My throwback playlist



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Lovme, Dad & Sean Mo






The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

11

2KWKHSODFHV BY REEMA ABI-AKAR STAFF WRITER

AUSTIN BAIRD THE DAILY ILLINI

\RX¡OOJR

Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; years in college always seem to zoom past, and before they know it, they are ready to graduate. Somehow, they managed to complete all of their academic requirements and a lot more along the way. They cherish each experience that makes college the crazy and fulfilling ride that it tends to be. An international internship can serve as an experience that continues to resonate with a student long after they leave his alma mater. For undergraduate and graduate students alike, there are endless opportunities to find internships all around the world. Kaori Nakamura, a senior in LAS, went to Wuhan, China, in the summer of her sophomore year to teach English to high school age students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While I was teaching English to Chinese students, I felt it was more of a cultural exchange,â&#x20AC;? she said in an email. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We talked a lot about the differences between China and America and I was able to learn just as much about Chinese life and Chinese culture as my students learnt about the U.S.â&#x20AC;?

Not only was she able to gain experience abroad, but also she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to do it alone. She found the internship through AIESEC, a student group on campus that works largely in the subject of international internships, volunteer positions abroad and global leadership opportunities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One thing thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very different about our internships is when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re (in a foreign country for an internship) â&#x20AC;Ś youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re always going to have people that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re surrounded with, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take care of you once youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re there,â&#x20AC;? said Victor Lim, president of AIESEC Illinois and junior in Business. Since AIESEC is an international organization, there are thousands of different AIESEC student groups in 113 countries around the world, Lim said, including 34 chapters in the United States. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were Chinese AIESEC members who supported me when I arrived in China by picking me up at the airport, taking me to my housing, and spending time with me throughout my time in China,â&#x20AC;? Nakamura said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were other

(student) te achers there from all over the world â&#x20AC;Ś It was my first time living in this sort of international environment and it was intriguing.â&#x20AC;? Students can bring back these experiences long after their internship is over. Nakamura said that her internship in China was a unique and valuable opportunity to â&#x20AC;&#x153;develop both professionally and personally through being in an unfamiliar environment.â&#x20AC;? Other students who wish to find an internship abroad can apply through AIESEC. If they are accepted, their name will be put into a large database of students and global internships, so they can potentially be matched up with a global employer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;AIESEC actually originated after World War II,â&#x20AC;? Lim said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was like an effort to get people more culturally aware â&#x20AC;Ś and just creating more global leaders, global citizens and stuff like that.â&#x20AC;? The four most popular internship fields are business administra-

Congratulations Ben! :LWK/RYHDQG3ULGH 0RPDQG'DG

tion, information technology, teaching (often English) and working with universities. Although historically the organization began as a business-centered organization, it has now grown to accept students in a larger range of fields. In fact, AIESEC welcomes diversity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have around 50 percent business students, but the other 50 percent are global studies, engineering, MCB (molecular and cellular biology), science, art, everything that you can think of,â&#x20AC;? Lim said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So what we look for in terms of our members is just people who want the global mindset and cul-

tural experience.â&#x20AC;? Moreover, while these internships may be p a i d or unpaid, oftentimes the students will end up breaking even, when they add up the stipend they receive abroad. Other international internship resources on campus exist; a student just has to know where to look. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Career Center can do a lot as far as pointing students in the direction of resources that can help them find international internships,â&#x20AC;? said Tori Spring, assistant director of the Career Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a good

See INTERNSHIPS, Page 20

Sydney Claire Thompson

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined.â&#x20AC;?

Love,

Dad, Mom & Jason


Tuesday, April 30, 2013

THANKS

FOR THE

As

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

MEMORIES

13

ly put the food back, but the girl behind me in line paid for my food. I didn’t know her, she didn’t ask me to pay her back and she didn’t ask anything else of me. Experiencing a random act of kindness taught me that although students here may be divided on many issues, they still can be fundamentally good people. Part of the reason I haven’t felt lost at the University also has to do with my friends. I have lived with my friend Melanie since freshman year. We get along very well and have excessive amounts of fun together. We have “Law and Order: SVU” marathons, throw dinner parties together and encourage each other’s wasteful shopping habits. I know many people have roommate troubles, but I’m lucky to say my roommate is one of my best friends. I met one of my closest friends freshman year. Melanie and I were eating lunch in the dining hall, and two random girls, Stephanie and Emilie, asked if they could sit with us. We ate lunch together and decided to hang out again later that day. About a week after meeting each other, Emilie asked us if we thought we would be friends forever. At the time we made fun of her for asking this question so prematurely (Actually, we still make fun of her for this). But she was on to something — three years later, we are all still friends. During the first month of our friendship, Stephanie and I somehow ended up discussing our mutual love of the show “Scrubs.” We then spontaneously burst into our own rendition of “Guy Love,” and we knew we would be good friends for a long time. It seems insane that in a school of over 40,000, I was able to find someone who is identical to me in almost every possible way. I leave the University with fond memories and amazing friends. To those who aren’t graduating this year, I encourage you to treasure your friends, meet new people and enjoy being part of a tight-knit community that most people will never have the chance to experience.

Safia is a senior in LAS. She can be reached at kazi2@dailyillini.com.

I

didn’t like my freshman year of college. There are no horror stories or thoughts of transferring. I didn’t have the worst roommate; I just knew we weren’t going to be friends. I didn’t fail any classes or get in any trouble. It just took me a long time to adjust. I had a core group of friends from home that were all going to different schools. I had parents I was weirdly close with. That’s what happens when you’re the youngest; you get the most alone time with them. There were all these crazy expectations in college of finding the greatest friends you’ll ever have. I saw my sister meet her best friends of college on her dorm floor. Three of them are going to be her bridesmaids. I saw her meet her soon-to-be husband her freshman year. The expectations I had for myself were extremely high. I got to move in early as a member of Weston Exploration. All my stuff was in my room, the traditional lunch at Papa Del’s was completed and it was time for my parents and siblings to go home. The beginning of that first night was rough. I didn’t know what to do with myself. Luckily, Eminem saved me. I was invited to watch “8 Mile” in one girl’s room on that first night. That’s right, no crazy drinking story or meeting my group of friends. It was me sitting on this random girl’s bed watching a movie I knew I wouldn’t like, but I said yes to the invitation. That was the most important lesson I learned — always say yes. Or mostly say yes. It took me about another semester to say yes again. Through watching that movie, I made two great friends on my floor, and I spent most of my time in their room. I can’t imagine what would have happened if I didn’t say yes to watching that movie. But there were few friends to follow. I had done everything I was supposed to: I rushed and joined a sorority, I joined The Daily Illini, I tried to talk to people in all of my classes, but making friends was just hard. But second semester rolled around and I decided to be more aggressive. It was time I wasn’t so self-concious and said yes to going

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

JEFF KIRSHMAN

SAMANTHA KIESEL

SAFIA KAZI an incoming freshman to the University, I feared getting lost in such a large school. The campus was huge; there are so many buildings that look so similar and there are over 40,000 students here. It seemed like getting lost would be easy. During my tours of the campus, the guides used terms I was unfamiliar with, like UGL, ARC and CRCE. I feared that I would get to this school and never learn about the basics of our campus. I felt like my ignorance about such basic landmarks would isolate me from my peers. Many of my friends made the choice to go to small schools. I opted with a larger university because I thought it would give me better opportunities to meet different kinds of people. Within the first few weeks of college, I talked to several high school friends who were miserable at their small schools, mostly because the students were all relatively similar, and my friends didn’t fit in. Even though I was at a larger school, I was afraid the same thing could happen to me. But because of our school’s culture, I found that it is hard to be isolated from other students. Freshman year, I took a Champaign-Urbana MTD bus on which everyone was chanting. As people got on the bus, everyone chanted, “Welcome to the bus! Welcome to the bus!” and as students tried to get off the bus, everyone chanted, “Let them off the bus! Let them off the bus!” The bus’ next stop was the Undergraduate Library, and everyone chanted, “UGL! UGL! UGL!” Although the bus driver looked unamused, everyone on the bus was having a great time. We didn’t know a thing about each other, but we all felt like we had so much in common. Certain divisive campus issues, like the controversy surrounding the Chief, are prevalent in conversations, but don’t seem to affect the way we treat each other. It was a Friday afternoon sophomore year. I had a really rough week and just wanted to stress eat. I knew I was running low on credits for the dining hall, so I added some to my account before buying food. When the cashier scanned my card, the credits had not yet transferred. I was about to grudging-

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

12

CARINA LEE

out more, even though I was only 18. For someone so loud, I’m awfully shy. Sometimes I think of myself as a burden on people and I don’t want to disrupt anything a person is doing. But it was time I made friends in my house. I asked when a group was going to lunch the first day back spring semester. Lunch turned into buying our books, which turned into walking around the Quad. By the end of freshman year, I was actually having fun. I became more involved at the Daily Illini. That led to meeting one of my best friends of college, all because I said yes to a new position. In April, I also met a girl in my house that I wish I had talked to back in September. It turned out that we had the same sense of humor, the same sense of upbringing and the same sense of friendship. She has now been my roommate for the past two years. When I came back for my sophomore year, I was actually excited. I moved into the house, I opened up more to the girls and it turned out to be the best year. I tried to say yes as much as possible. Plus, I was finally 19, which always helps. The remaining years of college were fantastic. In comparison to all the other years, that is why I didn’t like freshman year as much. College is a weird place. You’re not quite a fully-formed adult, but it feels like you are. There are insane expectations to have fun and so many reminders that “the time will go by so fast.” During my freshman year, the time felt it was moving incredibly slow. Now, I wish I had that time back. I wish I had been more aggressive in making friends. I wish I wasn’t so timid at the beginning. I wish I got into more trouble. I wish I said yes more. But you know what? I wouldn’t exchange that movie night of “8 Mile” for anything. It led to friends I’m lucky enough to still have. And though I didn’t have the greatest freshman year, I wouldn’t change my college experience for the world.

Samantha is a senior in Media. She can be reached at kiesel1@dailyillini.com.

I’ll

remember college as the time the tables finally turned. College was the first time in my life when the amount of responsibility I was given outweighed how responsible I actually had to be. Like many of you, I had chores prior to college that required completion if I was going to be awarded spending money and, more importantly, properly built character. I had curfews, progress reports and times where mom repeatedly checked in to make sure my schoolwork got done during high school. That was over once college began. I no longer had to pack my lunch, as I had been doing since midway through fifth grade, or wash dishes and empty the dishwasher after dinner. There was no more mowing, raking or shoveling the lawn. All of that was taken care of by the dorm’s faculty. The elimination of these tasks, just as much, if not more, than the easy access to booze and opportunities to engage with members of the opposite sex, is what made entering college so fun. I was free to do basically whatever I wanted, as long as I took care of my schoolwork, which in many ways was easier than my AP-ridden schedule in high school. And then school stopped being a concern. Finding a job in journalism is as reliant on networking as any career path. I scheduled a meeting with Brian Johnson, then-interim dean of the College of Media, so that he’d put a face to my name when I emailed him and maybe eventually help me land a job. We talked about a number of things I was curious about, and the conversation eventually turned to grades. “There are no honors classes in college, so what types of grades should I be expected to get?” I asked. “What’s a good GPA in college?” “Honestly,” he said, almost unsure about whether he should continue, “I’ve never been asked what my GPA was.” So that was pretty awesome. I began devoting my time to gaining experience — what employers actually care about. More and more of my time was dedicated to The Daily Illini, where I eventu-

ally became sports editor. I learned to love journalism, and not just sports journalism, which I originally entered because it would be cool to go to games for free and talk to athletes. My fandom has died in my short time of “being in the biz.” As it turns out, athletes and coaches who commit their livelihoods to playing games and honing their muscles rather than their minds aren’t always the most intellectually stimulating. Go figure. Some of that responsibility returned upon leaving the dorms: paying bills on time, cleaning up after myself (not because my mom told me to but because I respect that other people have to live in the apartment too), and not leaving the faucet running in a cluttered sink over winter break so that you flood your apartment and lose most of your security deposit (sorry, Dylan). I’m basically an expert at apologizing for the amount of times I’ve screwed up. I don’t buy into the idea that everything happens for a reason, but I do believe in learning from your mistakes. Following that logic, I’ll be obtaining Mensa status in no time. I learned the importance of tolerance, patience and believing in myself. I learned that just because a girl talks to you doesn’t mean she necessarily likes you. I learned the necessity of time management, even if I haven’t completely figured out how to implement it into my daily routine (Hey, Prof. Dash!). I also learned that the journey is often more rewarding than the destination. This concept applies to my personal college experience. The piece of paper I receive upon graduation may serve as a coronation that I’ve completed this checkpoint in my life, but the rewarding aspects of college have already occurred. I’ve made “the friendships that will last a lifetime” and had the “life-altering experiences” advertised upon entering the university four years ago. And while there are many things I’ll miss about attending the University, I’m ready to move on. Responsibility will soon mean adapting to living on my own in a new place

See JEFF, Page 23

“Y

ou are just a normal college student,” my philosophy teacher once told me. And, thinking back through all the hardships in my college life, it was true. I am just a normal college student. No matter how bad my hardships were and how hard they were to handle, they were just circumstances I could eventually overcome. I came to the University with hopes of becoming a pediatrician, but then I decided to take the challenge of becoming a news program producer. I would make a lot of money as a pediatrician, but it was not my life-long dream. After I switched my major to journalism, I studied abroad in South Korea, where I am originally from. It was such a wonderful experience going to school while eating homecooked foods and meeting up with old-time friends. It is strange how we forget to recognize the small things in life and later on regret not noticing the true value of those things. I still miss how I used to wake up to the smell of home-cooked food and how my mom used to wake me up in the morning. To all college students: Enjoy the small things in life and make the best of what you have. After I came back from South Korea, speaking and writing in English was one of the biggest challenges I faced as a journalism student. Sometimes I would be jealous of how my friends in Engineering could use numbers to communicate, while I needed to use proper English. I was that one freshman kid who would speak Korean all the time and who would only hang out with Korean friends. But then I joined The Daily Illini. I thought working at the paper would boost my English skills and make me use English more often. I still remember how nervous I was after I looked around and realized that I was the only Korean student who had applied to be a reporter. I thought, “I’m totally not getting this job,” but I ended up getting hired. Coming up with story ideas was a challenge, but trying to get along in the news-

room was a bigger one. I was just “too Korean” for the newsroom, and I would sometimes cry in the restroom from the little critiques I would receive from my editor. But my experience improved once people began recognizing me after I stayed in Champaign during the summer of 2011. I can’t express how happy I was when people asked questions about me and would makes jokes with me. Back then, when I was awkward, my friend would ask why am I was trying so hard to succeed in journalism. Why not pursue a career path that does not make me cry, that makes me happy? Thinking back, the fact that I cried proves that I really did care. Those actions have made me recognize what I truly want. Now, it has been two years since I joined The Daily Illini. I have covered stories about the environment, university administration, crime and housing, and more. People often say how tough working at a news publication is and how it is a rapidly changing environment, but I’ve had so much fun writing these stories. If I didn’t join The Daily Illini, I wouldn’t have known the feeling of receiving a big ‘Thank you’ letter from the people affected from my stories. I wouldn’t have experienced crying while covering a story. And would my English how it is today if I declared a different major? No one knows, but I can definitely tell that my English became so much after I joined The Daily Illini. Besides The Daily Illini, I was still able to embrace my culture by being active in Korean Student Association. From freshman to senior year, I was still attached to Korean culture and worked with my fellow Korean friends to keep the community alive. Americans and Koreans are so different in terms of culture, but the fact that everyone tries so hard to succeed is one strong commonality they share. Here’s my advice to college students: never give up. Be patient and enjoy the thrill of getting close to your goal. I per-

See CARINA, Page 23


Tuesday, April 30, 2013

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

14

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We wish you the best in all that you do!


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15

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Peace Corps an alternative option for graduating seniors Volunteers show drive to help others, fearless independence BY KATIE TRAVERS STAFF WRITER

For many of the thousands of seniors set to graduate next month, the real world of work awaits with numerous possibilities. For others, graduate school, medical school or law school is the next step in life. However, some students who have a drive to help others and a fearless sense of independence hope to plunge into the Peace Corps service. The Peace Corps application process has been the pinnacle of some University seniorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; final year after some careful planning, keeping an open mind and applying their drive to make a difference. Peace Corps is a government-run volunteer program that places volunteers in communities all over the world. Volunteers can work in any number of areas, including education, youth and community development, health, agriculture, environment, HIV/AIDS, food security, and even business and communications. Peace Corps is a 27-month commitment, and provides students with a cross cultural experience that can lead to connections and help with graduate school. Students have the opportunity to take part in Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International or become a Paul D. Coverdell Fellow, both are programs that link Peace Corps experience to graduate school. Within the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Career Center, Ashlee McLaughlin, a past Peace Corps volunteer and campus recruiter, works to spread awareness and facilitate the Peace Corps program across campus. She comes into contact with

students of all academic backgrounds and interests, but all of whom share a few commonalities: a sense of independence and a passion for helping others, solving problems and cultural exchange. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Peace Corps experience did a lot for broadening my world view,â&#x20AC;? McLaughlin said of her own experience, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It forced me to identify with people in a more meaningful way.â&#x20AC;? She felt it made her more of a global citizen and appreciated how it has helped her professionally. Many graduating seniors currently await the final decision of their application. While many of the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s students wait to see if they will be doing Peace Corps, Dawn Bangert, senior in LAS, already knows she will be leaving for Botswana mid-August to begin work in HIV/AIDS education and prevention. Bangert received her official invitation to Peace Corps and will spend her summer learning Setswana in preparation for her service in Botswana in the fall. Bangert plans to graduate with a B.A. in history and minor in gender and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s studies. She was very involved on campus during her time at the University, participating in everything from different theater groups to working with Sexual Health Peers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I recognize... (that) Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m 20 years old; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m intelligent, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m mature, but I have so much to learn,â&#x20AC;? Bangert said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think being immersed in another community can be really helpful to that ... the way I problem solve is very much related to my moment and where Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m situated.â&#x20AC;?

Emily Yarno, senior in FAA, hopes to join the Peace Corps. Looking back, she is able to note how diversity impacted her experience at the University, her related steps toward Peace Corps and a strengthened social conscience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I came from a small town,â&#x20AC;? Yarno recalled, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coming (to campus) was just like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wow, there are so many different types of problems out there, so many different types of people.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? One of the factors that motivated her to join the Peace Corps was her desire to continue widening her exposure to the world in the way that the University did. As an architecture student, she has a knack for problem solving, having also realized the social implications of her field. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I came into architecture thinking it was like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh you design buildings and houses and stuff, but our professors taught us that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more like, there is this problem and these people need this problem fixed,â&#x20AC;? Yarno said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To me that was like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Woah, you can help out people through architecture.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; And that led me down the path of wanting to help people and wanting to problem solve.â&#x20AC;? Kieran Tobin excitedly awaits the results of the application process. The senior in LAS is aware of and anxious for how much lies ahead of him after graduation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned enough to know how unprepared I am,â&#x20AC;? Tobin said with a laugh. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I learned enough to know how many things I still donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know ... should you try and go learn them or should you just stay where you are?â&#x20AC;? Tobin is certainly not trying to stay in one

place. He volunteers to teach English as a second language in his free time, is a distance runner, member of the Illini Wushu club and helped found a social gaming club on campus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you look at the scope of the world ... (the University) is a very small oasis. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s go live life the way that everyone else does,â&#x20AC;? he said, speaking to his motivation to join the Peace Corps and his hope to do it. Josh Doppelt, senior in LAS, hopes to serve as well. Doppeltâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main motivation is his sense of adventure. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All of the different facets of what Peace Corps is just grabbed me,â&#x20AC;? Doppelt said, remembering his visit to an information session his freshman year of college. Anne Taylor, senior in AHS, departs from the University aware of this bittersweet point in her life, but also ready for her next step. Having spent time in Honduras, her experience abroad and ability to foster connections will help her if she is accepted to join the Peace Corps. She is excited to see what new connections come out of her experience. As these students embark on their lives post graduation, the potential to do good in the world, to connect across cultures and to step into the future with a sense of adventure, is one that they invite with a sense of duty to serve. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What else is there?â&#x20AC;? Tobin asked rhetorically. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see myself doing a job that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t helping people.â&#x20AC;?

Katie can be reached at travers7@dailyillini.com.

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CONGRATULATIONS DAN WELIN! P^Zk^lhikhn]h_rhn' Eho^%Fhf=Z]

We love you to the moon and back Mom, Dad, Kristina, Jimmy & Joey.

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come a long way baby!

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Love, Mom

Congratulations Chase; we love you! Mom, Dad, Justin, Cori and Bailey.

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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

17

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3. Through technology abroad “My home actually might just be Skype and being in connection with people. ... I would probably call (Colombia) ‘home’ and my apartment when I’m there, but I wouldn’t necessarily call it ‘home’.” – Elizabeth Villegas, senior in LAS

‘Going home’ has varying meanings for graduating students BY STEPHANIE KIM STAFF WRITER

As the semester comes to a close, the excitement for summer is shared between students and faculty alike. Soon, classes will be over and a three-month affair with freedom will begin. However, for the expected 11,104 graduating students, the end of the semester is much more than that — it marks the beginning of a new chapter in life. With a new job, lifestyle and home approaching within the next few weeks, seniors reflect upon their lives as students at the University and share what their definition of ”home” has become.

Stephanie can be reached at skim108@dailyillini.

1. Hometown “Home is defined as a place in which I feel comfortable and surrounded by people that I care about. It is a place that provides shelter and is somewhere where I can ‘get away.’ Back home (in Orland Park, Ill.), I live with my mom, dad and two brothers in a house that I have lived in pretty much all of my life. I am familiar with it, I have many memories there, and (it) is somewhere that I feel safe.” – Aden Gebeyehu, senior in LAS Gebeyehu will live with her family after graduating, as she plans to take the year off to work and study for the LSAT. She hopes to attend law school the following fall.

2. Campus “Sometime during college, I made the switch to calling U of I home. ... I’ve come here on my own and made my own friends, earned my own grades and built my own traditions here. ... This is the home that I’ve built. ... I’m excited to get an apartment and be my own person and establish my own habits. Leaving here is not on my radar.” – Laura Neubert, senior in LAS Neubert will spend two years on campus working as a staff worker for Intervarsity, a campus ministry organization. Her job will consist of oneon-one mentoring to train student leaders in teaching Bible studies and helping with the overall maintenance and structure of the organization.

Villegas further explained that Colombia would be her temporary home and that she will continue to consider her hometown of Frankville, Ill., as her true home. She will be spending a year in Bogotá, Colombia, as a student events coordinator for the El Camino Academy and plans on returning to Illinois to work afterwards.

"

4. Whatever the future holds “My idea of home has always been fuzzy. I moved around a lot growing up and now my family has moved again while I was at school. Home can be described as where you can be surrounded by the people who love and support you. You can be your true self at home. After graduation, I will have a new home, whether living with my family again or off on my own.“ – Rachel Foster, senior in FAA

Foster is in the process of finding a job for after graduation and will be living with her parents in Green Bay, Wis., in the meantime.

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STREAM US ONLINE 7KH)DFXOW\DQG6WDIIRIWKH&KDUOHV+6DQGDJH'HSDUWPHQWRI$GYHUWLVLQJ

AT WPGU.COM


Tuesday, April 30, 2013

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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

19

Career Center, fairs can help seniors Resume building, staying professional key to finding jobs BY SAHER KHAN STAFF WRITER

With graduation looming, many seniors are scrambling to find jobs or apply to graduate schools. The pressure to have something lined up in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;real worldâ&#x20AC;? haunts senior students throughout the year. But, some argue that being jobless the moment of graduation is not the end of the world. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of people in the same boat, where they find themselves jobless after graduation, but students must make sure theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing something to enhance their professional development in this off time,â&#x20AC;? said Emily Wickstrom, assistant director of The Career Center. Wickstrom said she thinks a lot of students who are struggling to secure a job after graduation usually suffer because they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exactly know that they want to do to. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the key to finding a job is to make sure that students are focused when doing a job search. Students must be aware what their skills are and what industry and job titles suit their skills best,â&#x20AC;? Wickstrom

said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once they figure that out, looking for a job gets a whole lot easier.â&#x20AC;? Arsheen Aziz, senior in LAS, has decided to take a year off after graduation. She transferred to the University last year at a time when most students are already well-adjusted. She said this was an overwhelming process, and wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fully prepared to focus on her Graduate Record Examinations (GRE). â&#x20AC;&#x153;I also still donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what I want to do exactly, so I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to waste thousands of dollars on an education I could end up not wanting to pursue anymore in grad school,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to take my time and figure that out as well.â&#x20AC;? Furqan Hadi, also a senior in LAS, took a different route than Aziz; he took his GRE in January. He plans to start graduate school at the University in the fall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew I wanted to do work in human resources, and U of Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s graduate school has an amazing program. That is why I knew this is what I wanted to do post graduation,â&#x20AC;? Hadi said. Despite the fact that Hadi has his future

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level positions to be filled.â&#x20AC;? Wickstrom encourages students to come to the career fair because they specialize in helping students through these types of problems. She discussed the various benefits that taking a filler year after graduation can provide to uncertain seniors. She said that sometimes students take years off when applying to specific schools of study, like medical schools. This break is called a â&#x20AC;&#x153;gap year,â&#x20AC;? in which students can volunteer their time to a place that they can observe and hone their skills in their preferred field of study. She said that it is important for graduates to stay connected in some form to their desired field of work, even during off time. Wickstrom and Aziz both agree that if students find themselves unemployed after graduation or are just taking a year off, the best thing to do is to build oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resume. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would advise people to keep applying to jobs, but also do other things like work for a non-profit organization or volunteer â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just do something that keeps people busy and can build a resume,â&#x20AC;? Aziz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any form of work, like a part-time job or an internship, is an excellent resume builder and will show employers that you used your time wisely. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better to be doing something than nothing.â&#x20AC;?

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plans figured out, he understands the pressure of having something lined up to do post graduation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s different and has different experiences. I know a lot of people that are put in a position where they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what they want to do so they end up not having a set plan after graduation,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I were in that position though, I would definitely work or just do anything to keep busy and maintain a good work ethic.â&#x20AC;? Hadi said taking a year off is fine as long as people keep a relationship with the professional world. Wickstrom also said that people who take a year off still need to stay in touch with their network. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make sure youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re connected to someone who is in the industry that you want to break into and can help you get a job,â&#x20AC;? Wickstrom said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just staying connected to a network and not falling off the wagon will help students land a job while away.â&#x20AC;? An often-discussed topic of concern for college graduates is the state of the job market, but Wickstrom said that the job market has improved, from The Career Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s standpoint. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had a record number of employers at the all-campus career fair, which was the first week of April,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In our perspective, that means that people are hiring a lot more than they have in the past few years and more are looking for entry-

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,17(516+,36 FROM PAGE 11 page on our website under â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Work Abroadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; that lists quite a few different resources where students can start to look.â&#x20AC;? Ultimately, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to the student to do the preliminary research on what field they would want to work in, which countries they have in mind and what type of internship will be most suitable for them, Spring said. Bharath Gopalaswamy is the associate director of the Program in Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security. He works with students to find internships abroad, partially on his own time. Gopalaswamy used to work in Europe, and he also has ties with the Asia-Pacific region. Through these networks, he personally helps students locate internships that interest them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Looking for an international internship) is kind of vague and open-ended to some extent, but at the same time, you can only help people who help themselves,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So what I can do is, at that time, try to locate if any of my networks and their personal networks â&#x20AC;Ś know anybody that I can link (the student) up with.â&#x20AC;? Currently, Gopalaswamy is working with a student to try to find an internship in South Korea with an international crisis group. He is also in connection with the United Nations office in Vienna, Austria to make potential connections there. Since Gopalaswamyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s area of study is international security, he often helps students who are in similar fields. However, there are international internships available in virtually any field a student can research. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Internship searches in general are very

student-specific and very interest-specific,â&#x20AC;? Spring said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So depending on what you wanted to do, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to depend on where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to look and how youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to go about that search.â&#x20AC;? Oftentimes this search would include talking to advisors, professors, the study abroad office or students who have been abroad, Spring said. A student can also look up specific international companies and organizations and contact them directly through websites like goabroad.com. Gopalaswamy said that some internship positions abroad â&#x20AC;&#x153;have to be manufactured,â&#x20AC;? meaning that the positions did not exist before the student contacted the international source or company. Through a network of communications and interactions, these positions can end up being created uniquely for the student. This same concept holds true for any internship, but global internships especially. Both Gopalaswamy and Spring said that oftentimes the positions are not posted, so the student has to do most of the digging. All in all, these experiences abroad are often rewarding and extremely memorable for students, and the preliminary research and preparation tend to be worth it, Lim said. At first, Nakamura said that she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what to expect in her international internship, but at the end, she felt that her â&#x20AC;&#x153;experience was fantastic.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;One thing thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s definitely different about international internships as opposed to domestic ones is youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re forced to adapt to the culture,â&#x20AC;? Lim said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You really get to experience their culture there. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something that we really love about the program.â&#x20AC;?

Reema can be reached at abiakar2@dailyillini.com.

/(*$&< FROM PAGE 7

5. My knowledge of queso dip at Torticaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seriously, they have best queso dip that I have ever had. Sadly, I did not find this out until senior year. I leave you with the knowledge that it exists and that it can be found at a prime location on Green Street, so that you can visit it during late night hours with your friends and probably regret it a little bit the next morning.

6. Random assortment of room decorations This collection ranges from my Harry Potter movie poster, stolen posters from bars, handmade paintings that I crafted in a freshman year art class, random sceneries that I found at Hobby Lobby and of course, a few cheesy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live, Laugh, Loveâ&#x20AC;? signs. These decorations can transform an empty dorm room or apartment into a place that feels like a home. I leave them to you in hopes that your living space looks as mismatched and random as mine did.

7. The phone number to Insomnia Cookies Because sometimes, you just need to order a delicious, warm, chocolate chunk cookie with a little bit of milk and have a night in with your friends. As you will probably live far from Insomnia during your freshman year, I leave you the number, so it may give you a little comfort should you ever grow homesick (or just get a late-night craving

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CHAD THORNBURG! â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn outâ&#x20AC;?

We are so proud of you! Love, Mom, Kalah, Kylie and Ella

It took me a decent part of college and hours of listening to the SClub7 Pandora station to compile a throwback playlist of 90s hits that I am proud of. From experience, I learned that starting a night out with a throwback playlist will always led to a fun time. I leave it to you, so that it may provide you with hours of pregame music to sing along to, and that you may add to it as you see fit.

9. Handmade Illinois memory jar My roommates and I started this at the beginning of senior year. We put a pad of Postits next to a jar on the table, and whenever something funny or memorable happened, we wrote it down and stuck it inside. At the end of the semester, we read them all out loud and laughed at all of the things we had forgotten. I give it to you, in hopes that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll start collecting memories your freshman year and have a collection of a thousand folded up Postit memories by the time you graduate.

10. A picture of me Just in case you miss me. Just kidding though ... thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creepy. Well, sis, I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enough to get you started. Enjoy your four years here and take every opportunity that you can. I hope that when your graduation comes, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have a list twice the size of mine to bestow upon the incoming freshman class.

Kelly is a senior in Media. She can be reached at features@dailyillini.com.

lations u t a r g n Co Katie DeMuro!

CONGRATULATIONS Congratulations Ernesto!

8. My throwback playlist



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Lindsey Morrow: A senior who means business BY JULIA MARBACH STAFF WRITER

When Lindsey Morrow puts her mind to something, she gets it done. This is the mindset that helped the senior in Business from Streamwood, Ill., take the chance of applying to Harvard Business Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2+2 Program and get accepted, making her one of about 120 admitted students for the fall of 2013. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really like how business combines working with people and working in teams,â&#x20AC;? Morrow said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But then, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also kind of solving really complex problems, and you have to use data, analytics and things like that.â&#x20AC;? Harvardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2+2 Program is a deferred admission route for college seniors, Morrow said. Students in this program first complete two years of professional work and then complete two years in the Harvard Business School MBA program. Although her major at the University is accounting, she wants to do consulting work, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once I really found out about consulting, I realized thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I wanted to do,â&#x20AC;? Morrow said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because I get bored easily and I like to solve different problems, and I like to really expand my knowledge and my skill set.â&#x20AC;? Morrow starts work in August for the consulting firm Deloitte Consulting Services, and will be working out of Chicago. As a past intern for Deloitte, Morrow said she likes the firm because they represent Fortune 500 companies in a number of fields, such as retail, utilities and financial services. This

gives her the opportunity to see a diverse number of cases and find what really interests her. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What consulting is, is youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a professional services firm, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hired by a company to solve their problems,â&#x20AC;? Morrow said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So you get to solve a diverse set of problems, like with the diversity of companies and industries.â&#x20AC;? Morrow set her sights on Harvardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business School after attending its Summer Venture in Management Program for high school students at the business school, and finding that she liked the way the classes were taught. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their classes, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not like lecture halls, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have textbooks,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have cases. So, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all case method, and no other business school does that.â&#x20AC;? Morrow said she has always had a mindset to do well, and this is what helped her get to where she is. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to do something, you might as well do it right and you might as well do it well,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s academics or, you know, in high school doing sports and things like that, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of always just been my mindset.â&#x20AC;? This drive is also apparent to her friends and family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lindsey is one of the smartest people I know,â&#x20AC;? said friend Sara Cruse, senior in LAS. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything she puts her mind to she can do it, and she actually does achieve it in the end.â&#x20AC;? She is also described by her family as driven, well-planned and well-organized. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From the time she was in elementary school â&#x20AC;Ś through third grade on, she mainly did her work on her own basically and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

really need to much help,â&#x20AC;? said Joe Morrow, Lindseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father. The love for business is not new, Morrow said, but rather, she has known since high school that it was something she wanted to pursue, which she partially credits to her parents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My dad does work with computers and things like that in IT, and my mom works in human resources,â&#x20AC;? Morrow said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My mom really pushed me to kind of explore business and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the one who kind of introduced me to what consulting was.â&#x20AC;? With her mom pushing her to get good grades and her dad reminding her to do what makes her happy, Morrow said her parents helped her to realize that life is not just about achievement, but also in loving what you do. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a good combination of having that motivation and knowing that I need to succeed, and then having that like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I should succeed, but I should be doing what I actually want to do and not just doing what everyone else is doing or what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m told to do,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Morrow said. On campus, Morrow is also a member of Students Consulting for Nonprofit Organizations and the National Black MBA Association. She also does independent work on the side. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m working with an organization called LEAD (Leadership Education and Development program),â&#x20AC;? she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and basically Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m helping to plan a program here at U of I for high school students to get accustomed to business.â&#x20AC;? Although business is a big part of her life, Morrow said she has other interest as well. Not only has Morrow studied abroad on

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CONGRATS TO OUR GRAD, CAITLIN!! May you always be blessed with walls for the wind, a roof for the rain, a warm cup of tea by the fire, laughter to cheer you, those you love near you & all your hearts desires! LOVE, MOM & DAD, PAT & BRIAN & LYNN/HOWE CLAN

Julia can be reached at marbach2@dailyillini.com.

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more than one occasion, but she also travels often in the states. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like to travel a lot. I was in Philadelphia last week. I was in Miami a few weeks ago. I was in D.C. a few weeks ago. I was in New York a few weeks ago,â&#x20AC;? Morrow said. She also enjoys spending time with friends, and playing sports, such as golf, volleyball and running. Despite having a busy semester, Morrow said that as a graduating senior, she tries to find time for herself. Some of her favorite campus activities include going to football and basketball games. Although Morrow is graduating, she advises her fellow classmates and underclassmen â&#x20AC;&#x153;to really, follow your dreams, take risks and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be afraid of what bad things that could happen, but look forward to the great things that could happen.â&#x20AC;? Ten years down the road, Morrow sees herself working in an upper level position, such as manager, at a consulting firm, and hopefully having a family. She also hopes to work for a nonprofit and is particularly interested in education. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The problems in (education) are just so steep that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just kind of go in and solve them,â&#x20AC;? Morrow said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think you have to have a background and a huge skill set to be able to see problems in variety of ways. Knowing thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of an end goal somewhere in my life or in my professional career, I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of a motivator to do well.â&#x20AC;?

Congratulations Katie!

Graduation day arrives before you know it. Now letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s celebrate!

Love, Mom and Dad, Caroline and Kelly

You may be graduating, but you can still keep up with your alma mater!

dailyillini.com

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Whether you will be hosting a celebratory graduation bash or going for a run throughout campus on your last days at the University, you’ll need some music to accompany you. Below is a list of graduation-related songs that can fit any kind of mood or environment.

Kirby Jarling’s

“Chariots of Fire” VANGELIS

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This signature song from the 1981 film, “Chariots of Fire,” will make even the most nonchalant graduate pumped up for the future.

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The end of your college years: A playlist to sum up the last 4 years on campus

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“Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)” GREEN DAY

Whether you’re feeling melancholy or contemplative, this song provides the suitable backdrop to reflect on your final days at the University.

“Rivers and Roads” THE HEAD AND THE HEART

This song is for all the friends you’ll have to part with, and the distance that will be put between you. Even though you might be moving to a completely new city or state, your friends and family will always remain in reach.

“This Will Be Our Year” OK GO

The year you graduate will a big year. Four (more or less) years of studying and plenty of allnighters will finally pay off, and this song celebrates that victory.

“Fuel Up” STORNOWAY

Wrapped up in a driving metaphor, this song is all about getting through life with your head held high. Hopefully, graduation day will be a happy memory for you down the road — a high point to hold onto when the real world challenges and shapes your future self.

“Times Like These” JACK JOHNSON

This laid-back song is a compilation of memories that almost anyone goes through in life. Once students graduate, it’s only natural to think, “what will be will be/ and so it goes,” and move on to other chapters of their lives.

“Wave Goodbye” STEADMAN

Come to Illini Media at 512 East Green to pick up your copy for only $60.

This song especially highlights the trials and tribulations that a student goes through in their college experience. On their college “stage,” they experience academic rigor and social stress that may have served as pitfalls along the way. Still, they have made it through the allegorical play and stepped off the stage to welcome their waiting futures.

“Send Me On My Way” RUSTED ROOT

This upbeat 1994 song offers the cheery encouragement needed to finish the school year strong.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

&ROOHJHJUDGXDWLRQPRUH LPSRUWDQWWKDQKLJKVFKRRO ADLAI STEVENSON Staff writer

I

remember my high school graduation: the last seven awkward hours spent in the place I had come to loath over four miserable years. My ninth period teacher tried to hold an “intimate” moment for the seniors, but it wasn’t anything special — friends complimented friends, yet kept their distance from others. The bell rang and I went off with several buddies to Taco Bell. So much for sentiment. But, like most, I am happy to say my time at the University has been much better than my time in high school, probably because it has shaped me into a different person. I am not the same self-absorbed imp from before, and I have come to value my education. After years of B-’s and attendance rates that put Ferris Bueller to shame, that means something personal to me. And as adult life (careers, taxes, pretending to vote) approaches, college graduation certainly means something even if some students continue to shrug it off like we all did in high school. I paid more attention to Chicago’s Music Box Theatre’s weekend schedule than AP courses or the ACT, and I am paying for it now. No one wants to

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

23

sound like Dad – or worse, Granddad – but our time at college will likely dictate where our lives go from here. If my rite of passage from high school wasn’t quite earned or what I had hoped, I know I can work hard over the next three years to hopefully pave myself a finer path for what lies ahead. Maybe this is just the naïve freshman in me talking — God forbid that I’m the one trying to give graduation advice, telling myself I am figuring it all out. Please. I spend more time on the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ website than any other. I’ve talked to career counselors in the last month at greater lengths than with my mom. One day, I think I could be happy as a physician. The next, a systems analyst. What’s my major again? But if I am more than a bit unsettled and indecisive with where my path should lead, I am happy that the University offers so many options to explore. Graduating from college is so much more than just another life transition. Here, we develop our passions and earn our experiences to claim our stamp on the future. A degree might only be the first step in a new stage, but it will prepare us for new expectations and goals to set for ourselves. And after a disappointing Dorito Taco, I’m ready to step up.

Adlai is a freshman in Media. He can be reached at aesteve2@dailyillini.com.

-()) FROM PAGE 11 with new people I’ve never met before. I am equal parts eager and petrified of the future, but I like to think that’s normal. That’s what makes older people so envious of the days we currently live in: that anything can happen. There are so many options and variables that play into where we’ll end up. Will I be successful? It’s hard to say, especially since I’m not necessarily sure what “successful” even means. It’s scary, no doubt. But it’s a good scary. Many of what you’ve read is considered cliché, but as former sports editor

&$5,1$ FROM PAGE 11 “success” is not as big as we may think. Goals are great when they are big, but small goals tend to keep your drive going and help you to appreciate what you have accomplished. Success is not about money. It’s about doing what satisfies yourself, and doing great things for the people you care about. I will be graduating in two weeks and, I will never forget what I have learned at the University. I have no set of goals after graduation, but I know that it will be a time for me to hone my skills and make myself more marketable.

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Alex Iniguez once wrote, its status as a cliche just validates its truth. Here’s another cliché: College is the best four years of your life. As much as I enjoyed college, I hope that saying doesn’t apply to me. I want more from life. There’s much that I’ve yet to experience and accomplish, people to meet and places to see. Was college the best four years of my life? Perhaps so far, but I’m looking forward to seeing what the next couple or so have in store. That maybe I can one day turn the tables on the world.

Jeff is a senior in Media. He can be reached at kirshma1@dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @jkirsh91.

Through this column, I want to say many thanks to The Daily Illini for the stories I got to cover and for helping me improve English. I also want to thank the Korean Student Association for appreciating my identity as a Korean student and giving me the opportunity to contribute to the community. I also want to give a big shout out to our dance team, Mixed Motions, for the great memories and for winning first place at the KSA talent show. I’d like to emphasize one last piece of advice to everyone: There is no need to have everything, but just make the best of what you have.

Carina is a senior in Media. She can be reached at lee713@dailyillini.com.

U of I Grad 2013

&RQJUDWXODWLRQV-RH\ :D\WRJR:HDUHQRZWZRGRZQDQGWZRWRJR &RQJUDWXODWLRQV We Love You! Nicole, Tyler and Olivia


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24

Thank you, seniors, for your hard work, dedication to our guests, and contribution to our hotel, conference center, and restaurant.

Congratulations and best of luck from Illini Media!

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The Daily Illini: Graduation Guide