Page 1

VIDEO: University student rapping at the Red Herring ONLINE

Nationals bound

Ebertfest

Weinstein leads Illini in West Va.

SEE 5A

SPORTS 1B

The Daily Illini

Monday April 8, 2013

www.DailyIllini.com

The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

High: 72˚ Low: 55˚

Vol. 142 Issue 133

|

FREE

Ebertfest to tribute departed host Ebert’s funeral service:

BY ALISON MARCOTTE FEATURES EDITOR

This year’s Ebertfest marks the 15th anniversary since the start of the famed film festival. It also will be the first since the passing of its esteemed host, Roger Ebert. The festival will continue, said festival director Nate Kohn, despite the news of Ebert’s recent death on Thursday in Chicago. Additionally, the festival will be continuing for years to come, said Associate festival director Mary Susan Britt in an email. “We want people to know that it was Roger’s wish that we continue the festival,” Kohn said. “And we’re going to honor his wish.” Ebertfest, which is scheduled for April 17-21, is an annual film festival sponsored by the College of Media and hosted in The Virginia Theatre in Champaign. The festival features a selection of films chosen by Ebert and Kohn. In addition to the film screenings, there are academic panel discussions at the Illini Union Pine Lounge in Urbana. Filmmakers and other special guests also speak at the annual event. This year, Chaz Ebert, Ebert’s wife, will again serve as the emcee of the event, which will act as a tribute to Ebert. The organizers also have a few surprises planned in honor of Ebertfest’s 15th anniversary, Kohn said. Steven Bentz, director of The Virginia Theatre, acknowledged the sadness that will resonate with everyone who attends the event and also throughout the ChampaignUrbana community. “It’s going to be an extremely poignant moment when almost 1,500 people come into this

»

Scheduled for Monday at 10 a.m. at Holy Name Cathedral, 730 N. State St. in Chicago. The program is open to the public, and seats are limited. More inside: Learn about

the origins of Ebertfest, Ebert’s impact on the festival and the instrumental work of Nate Kohn Page 5A

room and Roger Ebert isn’t able to be sitting with us,” Bentz said. “It can’t help but be an emotional moment, and I think we all know that we have that coming.” Betsy Hendrick, Ebert’s friend and sponsor of the event, became friends with Ebert when they were both reporters at The News-Gazette. She said that she expects a high attendance rate this year as visitors will be coming to honor the former host. “I think that people who haven’t been here for a few years would like to come back, kind of as a tribute to Roger,” she said. The week of Ebertfest also marks the grand reopening of The Virginia Theatre, which underwent an extensive renovation that cost roughly $5.5 million, Bentz said. The construction began in June 2012, and the reopening will be on Saturday, April 13, four days before Ebertfest. Bentz said the Champaign Park District kept Ebert informed about the renovations throughout the year. “We are really, really so sad he is unable to walk in that door and see the freshly restored Virginia,” Bentz said. With Ebert’s passing, visitors

SADIE TEPER THE DAILY ILLINI

Adam Booher, president and maker at Bump, and Ehsan Noursalehi, vice president and designer at Bump, speak as part of TEDxUIUC on Sunday.

TEDxUIUC inspires students BY DANIEL WICENTOWSKI STAFF WRITER

Even before the first speaker took the stage at TEDxUIUC on Sunday, Kendall Rak was thinking about Why. A junior in engineering, Rak balanced a notebook filled with functions and symbols in his lap — the result of taking a class in higher mathematics. But that class, to Rak, was the What and the How; he said he wanted more from his engineering education. He wanted the Why. Eight hours later, he would have new notes scribbled alongside the equations of his notebook, new perspectives on creativity, intuition, risk, failure and love. Eight hours later, TEDxUIUC would bring Rak closer to that elusive Why. *** TEDxUIUC is a localized version of the wildly popular TED

See EBERT, Page 3A

conference, and like many students in attendance, Rak is an avid fan of TED videos that have garnered millions of views on YouTube. Organized by students, the TEDxUIUC conference has been held since 2009, and this year’s event attracted an audience of mostly engineers and science students who were selected from among a pool of 900 applicants. The conference was split over the day into three themes: Initiate, Innovate and Inspire. The conference kicked off with Deana McDonagh, chair of the industrial design program at the University. Wearing a pair of seemingly physics-defying heelless pumps, McDonagh spoke about the nature of “design thinking,” a type of thinking that values childlike curiosity and creative problem solving.

STAFF WRITER

The grand-opening of the Urbana Landmark Hotel bar Saturday night was an accomplishment for hotel owner Xiao Jin Yuan, as hotel renovations were contested as an issue in local politics. At least 550 people attended the opening, Yuan said, which featured music by Vena, a Latin American bachata supergroup. The after-party at the bar followed an event hosted by the Alpha Chi chapter of the Lambda Upsilon Lambda fraternity at the Illini Union on Saturday night. The event included a history of bachata, a style of Dominican music and dancing, a Q&A with the group and a free live performance. Vena reserved the ballroom for the after-party and later decided to reserve rooms to stay in the hotel. The Urbana Landmark Hotel has been open since December 2012 with 45 guest rooms available. Because of delays in obtaining liquor licenses, Yuan had been unable to open the bar until last weekend. Many have eagerly anticipated the opening of the bar, including one current guest at the hotel. “I have great hopes that it (the hotel) will continue to thrive and be a presence in

Urbana,” said Richard Briscoe, University alumnus and former area resident. “I know XJ’s (Yuan’s) got it in the plan, but having the tavern open will be great.” Yuan said he has met many setbacks while renovating the hotel but still wants to bring it back to life. The hotel was designed by Joseph William Royer, an Urbana architect and engineer who designed many buildings in Urbana like the Champaign County Courthouse. “I fell in love with the building,” Yuan said. “I believe the risk of investment in this building is manageable with my current finances.” Yuan spent 12 years as a commodities trader in Hong Kong, which required him to travel extensively. He said through his travels, he saw what it means to preserve historic buildings, as well as what it means to let them go to waste. “Even today, if you travel in Europe, you will see a lot of well-maintained old buildings,” Yuan said. “People didn’t tear them down ... they maintain some of the very old walls of their cities.” Along with the historical significance of the hotel building, Urbana Mayor Laurel Prussing said she doesn’t see a much

INSIDE

BY DAN WELIN STAFF WRITER

EMILY OGDEN THE DAILY ILLINI

XJ Yuan, owner of Urbana Landmark Hotel, stands in front of the counter of his newly opened bar called Alumni Tap just inside the hotel on Saturday.

Costs to renovate the Urbana Landmark Hotel Hotel owner Xiao Jin Yuan pledged to renovate the Urbana Landmark Hotel and use his personal finances to make semi-permanent improvements to hotel rooms. The cost of upgrading the historic hotel’s furnishings and amenities proved more costly than originally planned. 1,000,000

$970,552

800,000 600,000 400,000

$525,250 $341,210

200,000 0

Expected total cost to update 128 rooms

Actual total cost of updating 45 rooms

Source: City of Urbana through a FOIA request

See LANDMARK, Page 3A

facebook — dailyillini, DailyIlliniSports

»

More online: Didn’t

make it to TEDxUIUC? See a photo essay from the conference that aimed to initiate, innovate and inspire students at DailyIllini.com incredible doors are nailed shut by other people. Are we not here to nurture and encourage and empower and enable people to live a full life?” Allowing people to live a full life was also the subject of the pair of speakers who followed McDonagh. Adam Booher and Ehsan Noursalehi founded Bump, a non-profit design studio that provides prosthetic arms to those living in the developing world. However, their presentation wasn’t about their successes, or at least not directly. It was about

See TED TALKS, Page 3A

SEIU approves 4-year contract

Urbana Landmark Hotel opens Alumni Tap bar BY JANELLE O’DEA

“We apply design common sense, which really isn’t that common,” she said of industrial designers. Two large projector screens on both sides of the stage showed examples of her students’ work: elegant high-heels made of paper and glue, a wedding dress of plastic bags, a bikini top made of CocaCola cans that left the imagination spinning. Later, during one the various networking breaks throughout the day, McDonagh explained that the nature of the current education system sometimes works to stifle that kind of free and creative thinking. “We realize that creativity has been dampened by their lifetime of education. My heart sinks when I hear a student say, ‘But I’ve been told all my life I can’t draw,’” she said. “What saddens me is that

twitter — @TheDailyIllini, @di_sports

New projected total cost to update 128 rooms SCOTT DURAND Design editor

The Service Employees International Union Local 73 ratified a four-year contract with the University on Friday after more than nine months of negotiations. The new contract guarantees yearly wage increases and a signing bonus for union members. Members voted an overwhelming “yes” on the University’s contract proposal. Food service workers voted 89 percent in favor, while building service workers had a 93 percent approval rate, according to SEIU lead negotiator Ricky Baldwin. Baldwin said the vote speaks for itself regarding union members’ opinions of the new contract. “The most important thing is these folks stuck together and stayed tough and some of the other unions on campus stayed with them,” Baldwin said. “It’s really a victory for the whole campus.” Campus spokeswoman Robin Kaler said she was also relieved. “We’re delighted,” Kaler said. “It’s great to have everybody working together to serve our students.” After the union and the University reached a tentative

YouTube — thedailyillini

agreement on March 27, the SEIU negotiating team recommended members vote “yes” on the contract. “If this vote had been ‘no,’ we would have had to go on strike again until we reached an agreement, which people didn’t want,” Baldwin said. Baldwin speculated the final contract will include terms such as fitting food and dining service workers for shoes once a year. In addition, employees will now be guaranteed to have two week’s notice before undergoing a shift change. Under the old contract, employees’ schedules were subject to change with minimal time to plan accordingly. The last time union members voted on a contract with the University was March 10. They rejected the contract, citing wage increases being too low, and went on strike for three days. The University preferred a four-year contract, but Baldwin said the union was open to a three or four-year contract as long as wage increases were high enough. With the new ratified contract, Baldwin said the University and the union will meet to review and sign the final agreement.

Dan can be reached at welin1@dailyillini.com.

tumblr — thedailyillini

Police 2 A | Corrections 2 A | Horoscopes 2 A | Opinions 4 A | Crossword 5 A | Comics 5 A | Life & Culture 6 A | Spor ts 1 B | Classifieds 3 B - 4 B | Sudoku 4 B


2A

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Monday, April 8, 2013

The Daily Illini

POLICE

512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 217 • 337 • 8300

TODAY ON DAILYILLINI.COM

Champaign

Urbana A 57-year-old male was arrested on the charges of domestic battery and possession of drug equipment in the 2000 block of S. Philo Road around 5:30 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, the suspect and victim are in a dating relationship and live together. The suspect battered the victim. During the investigation, the victim claimed the offender was smoking illegal drugs prior to police arrival. The victim revealed the location of drug paraphernalia, which she claimed was the offender’s. The paraphernalia was seized as evidence. Q A 21-year-old male was arrested on the charge of battery at Silver Bullet, 1401 E. Washington St., around 1 a.m. Saturday. Q A 25-year-old male was arrested on the charge of domestic battery in the 1900 block of North Lincoln Avenue around 7:30 p.m. Saturday. According to the report, the suspect and victim are in a dating relationship and engaged in a physical altercation. The sus-

Art director Eunie Kim 217 • 337-8345 visuals@dailyillini.com

Photo editor Brenton Tse 217 • 337-8357 photo@dailyillini.com

News editor Lauren Rohr 217 • 337-8352 news@dailyIllini.com

Asst. photo editor Hassan Khalid

A 35-year-old male was arrested on the charges of attempted burglary from a motor vehicle and trespassing at Circle K, 601 N. Neil St., around 7:30 a.m. Thursday. According to the report, the victim caught the suspect attempting to burglarize her vehicle. Q Theft was reported in the 00 block of East John Street around 4 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, the victim reported that an unknown offender stole his golf clubs. Q A 19-year-old male was arrested on the charge of theft at Home Depot, 820 W. Bloomington Road, around 5 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, the suspect is an employee of the business and stole money. He was arrested and taken to jail. Q Criminal damage to property was reported in the 400 block of East Springfield Avenue around 1:30 p.m. Friday. According to the report, an unknown offender damaged two windows on the victim’s vehicle.

Video editor Krizia Vance 217 • 337-8344 video@dailyillini.com

HOROSCOPES

Q

Copyright Š 2013 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Darshan Patel 217 • 337-8365 editor@dailyillini.com Managing editors Maggie Huynh 217 • 337-8343 Ryan Weber 217 • 337-8353 reporting @dailyillini.com

Opinions editor Adam Huska 217 • 337-8570 opinions@ dailyillini.com Design editor

Scott Durand 217 • 337-8345 design@dailyillini.com Asst. design editor

Austin Baird

Asst. news editors Tyler Davis Austin Keating Chrissy Pawlowski Daytime editor Hannah Prokop 217 • 337-8363 news@dailyillini.com Asst. daytime editor Danielle Brown Sports editor Eliot Sill 217 • 337-8561 sports@dailyillini.com Asst. sports editors Claire Lavezzorio Torrence Sorrell Jordan Wilson Features editor Alison Marcotte 217 • 337-8560 features@dailyillini. com Asst. features editors Sarah Soenke Emma Weissmann

Vidcast producer Emily Thornton

Q

pect started the altercation and was the aggressor, according to witnesses. Q A 21-year-old male was arrested on the charge of criminal damage to property at the Urbana Landmark Hotel, 210 S. Race St., around 2:30 a.m. Sunday. According to the report, the offender was a promoter for a party at the hotel. The offender got into a verbal and physical argument with someone on patrol and broke a window at the business.

University Q A 19-year-old male was arrested on multiple charges at Trelease Hall, 901 College Ct., around 1:30 a.m. Friday. According to the report, the suspect was arrested on the charges of possession of cannabis, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of MDMA, a controlled substance. Officers were called to the suspect’s room after an odor was reported coming from it.

Compiled by Sari Lesk

BY NANCY BLACK TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

Copy chief Lindsey Rolf 217 • 337-8565 copychief@dailyillini. com

Today’s Birthday

Your network motivates you to participate. Until June, communications flow with electricity. Focus on joint income, insurance and investments to grow. Keep paying debt. Release limiting habits. Work changes could occur in March and September. After summer, domestic comforts draw you in. Serving others satisfies. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Asst. copy chief Audrey Majors Social media coordinator Karyna Rodriguez Advertising sales manager Nick Langlois ssm@illinimedia.com Classified sales director Deb Sosnowski Daily Illini/Buzz ad director Travis Truitt

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)

Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

Night system staff for today’s paper Night editor: Candice Norwood Photo night editor: Kelly Hickey Copy editors: Matt Petruszak, Elliot Jersild,

Today is a 7 — You’re not afraid to make mistakes right now. That’s how you find what’s missing. Changing your mind can be a sign of strength. Handle personal issues today, tomorrow and the next day.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)

Today is an 8 — Finish up old projects for a brilliant insight. Get the numbers down. Contemplate potential outcomes. Complete what you’ve promised. Discover another source of revenue. Quick thinking pays.

Lauren Cox, Kirsten Keller, Chelsea Clark, Sean Hammond Designers: Yoo-Jin Hong, NiNi Kao, Charlotte Petertil, Hannah Hwang Page transmission: Natalie Zhang

Periodical postage paid at Champaign, IL 61821. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday in summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-of-town and out-of-state rates available upon request.

arises. Make sure what you build is solid. Sort and file. Get the word out.

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)

Today is a 9 — Write, blog, record, speak or sing; put your message out. Consider new opportunities. The rules of the game may have changed, and there’s a test. Apply yourself and succeed.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

Today is an 8 — Travel compels but could be complex. Talk it over. There are excellent conditions for group discussion. Listen to those with wisdom, wit and experience. Don’t rely on an unstable source.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

Today is a 9 — Get involved with publications, either by reading, researching, writing or publishing. Talk about the things you feel passionate about. Count funds and pay bills over the next two days. Discuss new plans. Listen.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

Today is an 8 — Talk it over with family. Friends are helpful for the next two days, and a fantastic suggestion

Today is a 7 — There’s a change in plans. Rely on partners. You don’t have to do it all; delegate! Insist on the truth. Listen graciously. Study with a passion. Keep finances private.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)

Today is an 8 — Call a compulsive talker. Work out the details. Gather

[

presents...

K (

[dj[hjW_dc[dj

  +/*K 

bjkh k Y  f e

f

Wcfk

i [m

i

information, and persuade them to accept your strategy. Concentrate on working to generate more money. Think about the outcome, which benefits both.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) Today is a 7 — You’re attractive and attracted in the Aries moonlight. There’s more time for love. Ask interesting questions as you begin a new study. Get creative.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)

Today is an 8 — Start a writing project. There’s a change at the top. The decisions you make now will last. It’s good time to make friends. You’re gaining respect. Home’s the best place for you tonight.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)

Today is a 9 — Others admire you. A new assignment’s coming. Read something very interesting. Someone offers a breakthrough suggestion. Contact the necessary parties. Learn about money; know what you’re talking about. Use this opportunity.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)

Today is an 8 — Watch for income opportunities. Revise your words. Use your own good judgment. Discuss changes. Find another way to cut costs. Start your shopping list. Okay, you can go now.

Prom service RSO hosts event

HOW TO CONTACT US

High school girls throughout Illinois attended an event hosted by The Perfect Prom Project RSO Sunday. University students who volunteered for the program helped financially troubled girls find dresses. For more information check dailyillini.com.

General contacts:

The Daily Illini is online everywhere you are. Visit DailyIllini.com Follow us on Twitter @TheDailyIllini for today’s headlines and breaking news. Like us on Facebook for an interactive Daily Illini experience. Subscribe to us on YouTube for video coverage and the Daily Illini Vidcast. CORRECTIONS In the April 5, 2013 edition of The Daily Illini, the obituary “I’ll see you at the movies� incorrectly stated that Michael David Smith said “I really thought he must be really thick to be taking a leave of any kind. “ It should have stated, “I really thought he must be really sick to be taking a leave of any kind.“ The Daily Illini regrets this error. When the Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Darshan Patel at 217-3378365.

The Daily Illini is located at 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. Our office hours are 9a.m. to 5:30p.m. Monday through Friday. Main number...........(217) 337-8300 Advertising .............. (217) 337-8382 Classified ...................(217) 337-8337 Newsroom................(217) 337-8300 Newsroom fax: ........ (217) 337-8328 Production ................(217) 337-8320

Newsroom

Corrections: If you think something has been incorrectly reported, please call Editor-in-Chief Darshan Patel at (217) 337-8365 or email him at editor@dailyillini.com. Online: If you have a question about DailyIllini.com or The Daily Illini’s various social media outlets, please email our managing editors, Maggie Huynh and Ryan Weber, at online@dailyillini.com. On-air: If you have comments or questions about The Daily Illini’s broadcasts on WPGU-FM 107.1, please email our managing editors, Maggie Huynh and Ryan Weber, at onair@dailyillini.com. Employment: If you would like to work for the newspaper’s editorial department, please contact us at employment@dailyillini.com. News: If you have a news tip, please contact news editor Lauren Rohr at (217) 337-8352 or email news@dailyillini.com. Sports: To contact the sports staff, please call sports editor Eliot Sill at (217) 337-8363 or email sports@dailyillini.com. Features: If you have a tip for a features story, please contact features editor Alison Marcotte at (217) 337-8560 or email features@dailyillini.com. Photo: For questions about photographs or to suggest photo coverage of an event, please contact photo editor Brenton Tse at (217) 337-8357 or email photo@dailyillini.com. Calendar: To submit events for publication in print and online at the217.com, click on “submit an event� at the217.com or email calendar@the217.com. Letters to the editor: Letters are limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college. The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions.

Advertising

Placing an ad: If you would like to

place an ad, please contact our advertising department. Q Classified ads: (217) 337-8337 or e-mail diclassifieds@illinimedia. com. Q Display ads: (217) 337-8382 or e-mail diadsales@illinimedia.com. Employment: If you are interested in working for the Advertising Department, please call (217) 3378382 and ask to speak to Nick Langlois, advertising sales manager.

ONLINE& CONTINUING EDUCATION

   

Summer 2013

Free for all UIUC Student Organizations.

Enter to test your knowledge and win

$150

for your RSO!

Location: Murphy’s Pub Date: Monday, April 15th Time: 7:00 - 9:00PM Email promo@illinimedia.com to register your RSO today!

Phone: 217-333-1462 | Email: oce-info@illinois.edu

House Hunting at its finest Apartment search

?? ?!  ?! ?!?B

THE CENTER FOR

UPCOMING EVENTS

Culture as Data: Wednesday Social Spaces on the Internet

April 10, 2013 4:00 pm

Knight Auditorium Spurlock Museum 600 South Gregory Urbana

LOCATION: ILLINI UNION PRIZE WON: FREE POTBELLY SANDWICH

Our secret agents are on a mission to catch students around campus reading The Daily Illini. If you didn’t get caught this time, make sure to pick up The DI Monday through Friday and you could be next!

Infinite Reality: Revealing the Blueprint of Our Virtual Lives Jeremy Bailenson

Founding Director, Virtual Human Interaction Lab and Associate Professor, Department of Communication, Stanford University

Virtual reality qualitatively changes the nature of communication. Unlike other media, avatars can alter their physical appearance and behavior in the eyes of conversational partners for strategic purposes. These transformations have a drastic impact on social, persuasive and instructional abilities, allowing avatars to achieve interpersonal goals that face-to-face humans cannot.

YEAR: SENIOR

CAUGHT READING: OPINIONS

UNIVERSIT Y OF ILLINOIS

CAS 2012-13 INITIATIVE

-*-3?A? *(+.*) MAJOR: HISTORY

ADVANCED STUDY

CAS/MILLERCOMM2013

Sex, Lies and Stereotypes

Thursday Tom Burrell April 11, 2013 7:30 pm Author of Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth Knight Auditorium Spurlock Museum 600 South Gregory Urbana

of Black Inferiority

Throughout American history, mass media has been influential in contributing to the myth of Black inferiority. In addition, media content continues to be a major factor in effecting attitudes and behavior among African Americans. This presentation will show examples of how media messages utilize sensory cues that reinforce established racial biases. With over forty years experience in advertising, Tom Burrell has built credentials on understanding how African American consumers think, feel and act. Via research from his Howard University Media Messaging Research Fellowship Program and excerpts from mainstream media, Burrell offers examples on how to challenge the myth of Black inferiority.

These presentations are free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Center for Advanced Study at 333-6729 or www.cas.illinois.edu.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

TED TALKS FROM PAGE 1A their failures and how these early miscalculations were not only instrumental, but necessary. “This is about overcoming failure, and thus overcoming the fear of starting things,� Booher said. He and Noursalehi went on to describe their various mistakes, including their initial plan to found the company as a for-profit LLC, their fixation of making the prosthetic affordable above all. What they didn’t count as a failure, though, was their complete ignorance of how to build prosthetic arms when they began working on the company. They said it gave them open-mindedness and creativity. “What it gave us was the ability to explore and innovate in a way that experts in the field simply can’t,� Booher said. Turning failure into success and ignorance into leverage are the kind of ‘Big Ideas’ that TED events are known for advancing, and attendees were encouraged to spark their own discussions during networking sessions throughout the day. During lunch, many ventured outside to sit on the grass, enjoy the sun and talk. “There’s a lot of pressure on this campus to just get in and start your life’s project, so to speak,� said Jon Schultz, sophomore in media. “I think college has done its best to stifle design and creative thinking by trying

Monday, April 8, 2013

to standardize and over-systemize every process of education.� Neha Shafizadah, senior in engineering, said the presentations made her think about the need for passion in her work. “If you don’t believe in it, if you don’t have your full heart in it, you won’t go and innovate and research,� she said. “But if you have that passion you will go miles just to get something done. You need to believe.� *** At 6 p.m., Rak reviewed what he had written in his math notebook. Most of the pages were already filled with dense stacks of partial differentials and matrices that he copied dutifully, over and over again, from his professor. Beneath them, written in faint No. 2 pencil, were messages and ideas that moved him so much that, after a few minutes of fumbling, he admitted he still couldn’t really explain how he felt, at least not now. It was still too fresh. He flipped through the pages. “Confidence, ambition, persistence.� “Help is the first principle.� He thumbed to an earlier page, where he had jotted down ideas from Noursalehi and Booher’s presentation on how embracing failure and ignorance had allowed them to provide prosthetic arms to those in need. On the very bottom of that page, squeezed in below the bottom margin, Rak had written: “Don’t let yourself be the obstacle.�

Danny can be reached at wicento1@ dailyillini.com.

ISS honors 5 instructors with awards for excellence BY LIZ AMANIEH STAFF WRITER

The Illinois Student Senate Committee on Academic Affairs hosted the Teaching Excellence Awards on Sunday honoring five instructors. The awards honored outstanding faculty instructors and teaching assistants that were selected from more than 600 nominees. Student Body President Brock Gebhardt expressed his appreciation for these teachers. “In our student’s opinions, these are the best of the best,� Gebhardt said. “Today is a day to offer them a small token of our appreciation.�

Michael Donohoe Donohoe is a professor of accountancy in the College of Business. He explains topics in class using examples and stories from his own experiences and always ensures that students understand the topic before moving on. In addition, Donohoe has inspired many students to become tax accountants and

BY JOHNATHAN HETTINGER

Dean of LAS accepts position at Utah The University announced Friday that LAS Dean Ruth Watkins has accepted the position of senior vice president for academic affairs at the University of Utah, and will be leaving the University at the end of July. Watkins has been the head of the University’s largest college since 2009.

In the interim Provost Ilesanmi Adesida said he will announce an interim dean in the next couple of weeks. LAS will join Engineering and Media as colleges with non-permanent deans. Engineering has been

EBERT FROM PAGE 1A

SADIE TEPER THE DAILY ILLINI

encouraged excitement about his field.

Michael LeRoy LeRoy is a professor in the School of Labor and Employment Relations. Students have deemed him “the most supportive professor they have had in their college career.� LeRoy teaches in a way that allows everyone to learn and benefit. Students see him go out of his way in order to ensure class material is being understood. During his career, LeRoy has inaugurated two courses. He expressed how vital it is for teachers to shape the curriculum in order for the University to grow and innovate. “Our students on this campus are not people we teach but people we learn from,� LeRoy said. “I’m a student with them.�

Jermaine Martinez Martinez is a teaching assistant from the LAS department of communications. His main research includes emotion, feel-

LAS dean to leave, University still looks to fill other dean positions STAFF WRITER

Deana McDonough, Chair of the industrial design program, speaks as part of TEDxUIUC on Sunday.

3A

may feel that the atmosphere of the event may change, but Kohn said the message will stay the same. “Obviously the tone of the festival will be different this year. But the bottom line is it still will be a celebration of films that

without a dean since Adesida took over as Provost in August, while Media has not had a permanent dean since 2009. Campus spokeswoman Robin Kaler said in March the Provost office’s limited resources prevented it from conducting a search for a permanent Media dean.

Searches continue The Office of the Provost will have to conduct a search for a dean of LAS. The office currently has three dean searches underway in the Colleges of Engineering and Veterinary Medicine and for the Library. Campus spokeswoman Robin Kaler said in March the University expects to finish these searches by early summer.

Johnathan can be reached at hetting2 @dailyillini.com and @jhett93. Roger loves,� Kohn said. Bentz said he is grateful to have worked with Ebert in the past and witness the impact he had upon the people he met. “He treated everyone in his path with such kindness and dignity. He was just an extraordinary individual,� he said.

Alison can be reached at akmarco2@dailyillini.com.

ing and the nature of selfhood. In the classroom, Martinez lives by the motto of “teaching how to learn, not what to learn.� Martinez constantly motivates his students, making students more interested in the class’s lively discussions. Many students agreed that Martinez was able to take topics discussed in class and make them relatable to everyday life.

“The students at this university are top-notch,� Rafferty said. “I have to thank them immensely for their dedication to their studies.�

Craig Zilles Zilles is an associate head in the department of computer science. Students remarked that Zilles is always prepared for class and will always put his students first. Zilles even created an interactive problem app that would generate problems which allows for immediate results and multiple attempts. Students also noted that Zilles’ assignments were not busy work, but instead posed open-ended questions that allow students to create a simulation that would best fit the scenario. In addition to office hours, web videos and extra meeting times, Zilles also teaches a discussion section himself which puts him into more contact with students and further impacts their learning.

Ryan Rafferty Rafferty is an assistant professor of chemistry in the College of LAS. His enthusiasm for teaching radiates through the material allowing for simple, yet detailed learning. Rafferty goes “old school� with his students by using a projector with pen and paper instead of a slide show in order to ensure his students are able to keep up and take detailed notes. Students have even noted that he cares more about them understanding and obtaining the material than his own research. This is evident through the fact that he holds extra office hours and provides useful review material.

Liz can be reached at amanieh2@dailyillini.com.

LANDMARK

happen.� Yuan pledged $2 million of his own investment to renovate the Urbana Landmark Hotel, with $1.45 million in TIF funds from the city of Urbana. L e sl ie S t r at to n , who challenged Prussing in the Democratic primar y for mayor, held a news conference in January regarding the “failed� renovation plans and “mismanaged� plan for the hotel by the Prussing administration. Prussing said Stratton used the Urbana Landmark Hotel issue “to satisfy his political purpose.� Stratton lost the primary to Prussing in February. Despite the charges of mismanagement from Stratton and others in the Urbana community, Yuan continues to make improvements on the hotel and deal with the numerous unexpected challenges of renovating a 9 0 -year- old building. Yuan is tired, and his family would prefer it if he could return home. However, finishing the Urbana Landmark Hotel project is his main goal. “If anyone thinks this investor got a deal from the city, please, buy me out, so I can go home,� Yuan said. “While everyone is sitting at home watching T.V. and drinking beer and having family life, I am worrying about leaks in the roof and worrying about whether or not we can get certain things done.�

FROM PAGE 1A better option regarding the old property than to support Yuan in fixing it. The hotel is attached to Lincoln Square, so destruction of the hotel would mean leaving a hole in Lincoln Square Mall, as well as demolishing a building listed on the National Register of Historic Places. “We didn’t have hundreds of people lined up to remodel this building,� Prussing said. “We could work with this guy (Yuan), who already owned a hotel and was the most responsible person who was interested. The alternative to fixing the hotel would be to let the building deteriorate.� Continuing to let the building deteriorate would have meant ignoring a fire hazard and continuing to allow homeless people to break into and steal from the hotel, she added. Instead, the city of Urbana wanted to leverage Yuan’s personal investment in the project with tax increment financing money (TIF). Tom C a r r i no, Urba na economic development manager, said when Yuan and the city tried to find a bank to finance part of the redevelopment of the hotel, it was difficult primarily because of the economic climate. “The lending environment was not good at the time, specifically for hotels,� Carrino said. “The purpose of TIF funds is to make projects like this

Janelle can be reached jnodea@dailyillini.com.

6,/0:²

THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE

WK6XPPHU,QVWLWXWHIRUWKH/DQJXDJHVRIWKH

0XVOLP:RUOG 'HSDUWPHQWRI/LQJXLVWLFV8,8& 





-XQHWR$XJXVW



/DQJXDJH2IIHULQJV DOOOHYHOV  $UDELF  3DVKWR 3HUVLDQ 6ZDKLOL  7XUNLVK  8UGX   :RORI 

$SSOLFDWLRQ'HDGOLQH$SULO 

)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQHPDLOVLOPZ#LOOLQRLVHGX

THE DEADLINE HAS BEEN EXTENDED!

YOUR FACE HERE

YOUR BFF's face HERE

,ORYH\RX %HVWIULHQGVIRUOLIH

FREE COPIES DAILY

Ő˘

Purchase a Grad Greeting for your BFF! (...so you can score an invite to their grad party.)

՚ Hurry—the deadline is April 12th! ՛ Order now at www.dailyillini.com/gradgreetings

)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQ

KWWSVLOPZOLQJXLVWLFVXLXFHGX

Don’t be left out of our annual

Graduation Guide!



April 8 - April 15

MARK YOUR CALENDARS

Softball/ DePaul: April 17 Men’s Tennis/ Indiana: April 19 Softball/ Indiana: April 19

TUESDAY, APRIL 9 ˜GC:H65@@vs. Eastern Illinois at 4PM / Eichelberger Field / FREE ° Wiffle Ball Weekdays- register your team by emailing DIAMarketing@illinois.edu ° $1 Lemon Chills ˜65G965@@vs. Eastern Illinois at 6PM / Illinois Field / FREE ° Two-for-Tuesday: Buy 1 hot dog/brat, get one free! FRIDAY, APRIL 12

˜A9B¡GH9BB=Gvs. #5 Ohio State at 3PM / Atkins / FREE

° Silver Mine Sandwich Day ° Free Silver Mine Subs to first 100 students ° Sub eating contest to win free subs for a year! ° RSO attendance competition- win $100 to Firehaus, email DIAMarketing@illinois.edu to register your RSO ˜65G965@@vs. Purdue at 6PM / Illinois Field / FREE ˜:CCH65@@Spring Game at 8PM / Memorial Stadium / FREE

SATURDAY, APRIL 13 ˜65G965@@vs. Purdue at 3PM / Illinois Field / FREE SUNDAY, APRIL 14

%-A9B¡GH9BB=Gvs. Penn State at 12PM / Atkins / FREE

° Tennis Tailgate- lots open at 11am, break out your grill before the match ° Sundae Sundays- Free ice cream for all fans ˜65G965@@vs. Purdue at 2PM / Illinois Field / FREE ° Bleacher Bum Barbecue- Free food for first 700 fans ° Face painting and balloon animals


4A Monday April 8, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

The Daily Illini

Editorial

EDITORIAL CARTOON

Be vocal about sexual assault

MONTE WOLVERTON CAGLE CARTOONS

We endorse Prussing for 3rd term as Urbana mayor

TOLU TAIWO

S

he’s done it twice now, and we think she can do it again. In the often fiery debates between incumbent Mayor Laurel Prussing and longtime Urbana resident Les Stratton, Prussing comes out on top. She has demonstrated her abilities not only in the mayoral primary debates throughout much of 2013 but also in what she has accomplished in the last eight years. She held her own then, and she can do so again in the election Tuesday against the Republican candidate Rex Bradfield. So that Urbana can continue to see the development it has in recent years, we want to see Laurel Prussing re-elected for her third term. Four years ago when The Daily Illini Editorial Board endorsed Prussing over Bradfield, there was a bit more of a difficult decision: Urbana was still making its way through a downturn in the economy, and the next mayor would be instrumental in leading the city to a successful recovery. And she did. Businesses grew (like the Common Ground Food Co-Op in the Lincoln Square Mall), the Olympia Drive project began, North Lincoln Avenue started to get the treatment it needs, and the Landmark Hotel acquired a private benefactor to restore it. She has proven herself, but there is still work to be done, especially those projects which affect University students. Urbana has given renters, a large share of whom are students, some rights that are far superior to its Champaign counterpart, but the roads surrounding them need improvements yet. This goal may be the only issue on which we side more with Bradfield. Prussing has said that her administration’s main focus has been on select core roads — those with heavy traffic — but we place high priority on them for added safety. Her efforts to remedy the crime in Urbana, especially in the southwest part of the city, have worked, and we think that she can continue to bolster public safety in another term in office. We like her efforts to beautify Boneyard Creek because the look and feel of the city are especially important to its residents. The beautification project may not add another business downtown, but it would clean up the creek, which runs through campus. Prussing has taken this election by a wide margin before, and she took down her early opponent Stratton easily in the primary. She didn’t earn those votes by sheer luck. The debates have shown that the election will largely be an issue-driven choice, giving voters a clear decision when they take to the polls. We were confident in her election in 2009, and we are again for the next term as well. But above all, we echo the same sentiment we had four years ago: We choose Prussing because we see no reason to fix something that’s not broken.

SHARE YOUR

THOUGHTS Email: opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.

Opinions columnist

I’ve

Some things are not acceptable. Period. Perhaps it wasn’t even necessary that he had seen the videotapes to make a judgment call — one set of eyes from a university official should have been enough. Turning a blind eye certainly was the wrong decision. Rice’s reprehensible misconduct was grossly disturbing to witness. But these scandals do not just pertain to universities’ respective sports programs. Academic institutions need to foster a morally conscious environment. It has become commonplace around the nation for a variety of schools to seemingly ignore practical ethics. The treatment of athletes should be no different than that of other students — athletes are students too. The atmosphere at these schools and institutions should be taken into high regard across all programs and initiatives. Rutgers failed to make the right decision from the get go – did they not take their University’s esteem into regards? Hopefully, other programs around the country understand the implications behind what has happened at Rutgers. In this way, we do not have to just look at this as a scandal related to a sports program, team, individual player or coach – we can look at this as a lesson reflective of blatant disregard for the morals and prestige of a university as a whole. After all, these are institutions of higher learning.

been waiting for this for two whole years. My friend and I ran to the quad, only to find that we were too late to make clever signs. In fact, the group started to march, so we slunk to the back and took a second to take in the mix of Amnesty International, the Women’s Resource Center, Advocates for Choice and other allies. We looked somewhat odd in our non-provocative, totallysafe-for-work clothing, but that didn’t stop me from yelling out some chants like “The way we dress is not a yes” and (my favorite) “2, 4, 6, 8, teach the rapists not to rape.” After all, this was SlutWalk 2013. I was in the midst of the protest march that started in Toronto in 2011, the protest march against slut shaming and victim blaming in rape cases. I couldn’t truly participate without some chanting. We marched down Green Street and turned left on Fourth Street, all the while being photographed and stared at intently. At first, I just basked in the glow of being in the crowd. I had missed the 2011 and 2012 SlutWalk in Chicago, and it was my dream to participate. But after my ten minutes of grinning ear to ear and screaming at the top of my lungs about consent, I started to realize that some viewers just weren’t interested. They looked bored, or annoyed that yet another group of people were screaming about sexual assault. Which is unfortunate because it’s something we’ll continue to scream about. We live in a society that is immersed in a rape culture. In Steubenville, Ohio, two football players sexually assaulted a teenage girl — and we place blame on the girl for getting too drunk. In Notre Dame, Indiana, a rape victim attending Saint Mary’s College killed herself after being threatened by her attackers not to do anything she would regret — while the police waited five days after her suicide to interview the accused. At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a student reported being raped last year and is now facing an honor code violation for creating an “intimidating environment” for her alleged rapist. And for all these highly-publicized incidents, there are probably tons more that occur in different towns. As my favorite chant suggests, we need to place blame off victims and on to perpetrators. We need to stand up and yell at our friends when they get too handsy at the bar because someone is wearing something provocative. We need to take classes that actually try to address consent — classes like FYCARE — much more seriously, and develop more educational courses that talk less about how not to be raped and more on why it’s wrong to do anything sexual with a girl without that hard, concrete “yes.” The reason that SlutWalk is, in my eyes, effective is because it’s one of the few protests that puts shame on the rapists. Dressing up in knee-high fishnets may seem ridiculous to you, but the message is simple: anyone should be able to dress, act or be anything they want because sexual consent doesn’t come from how you’re dressed or how many shots you’ve had. But although the support on Thursday was wonderful, we need to amp it up. Sexual assault shouldn’t only be the concern of women’s centers or human rights groups. More students, teachers and administrators should come along, ready to support the idea of shifting blame and stopping sexual assault. This issue isn’t just for victims or women. It affects everyone. If it takes you two minutes to skim over my whole column, by the end of it, someone in the United States has been sexually assaulted. Just yesterday morning, there was an attempted sexual assault in Allen Hall. In a residence hall. Anyone that thinks the issue of sexual assault is overreported and doesn’t affect their community has got to be kidding. At the end of the march, I had the opportunity to quickly talk to Elizabeth Mucha, one of the Amnesty International leaders. “Someone brought up the idea on working on a campaign teaching rapists not to rape,” she said. “Amnesty doesn’t really focus on it, but we were passionate against victim blaming. It just kinda snowballed from here.” Her legs were covered in sharpie-written tick-marks, starting with “whore” on her thigh, all the way down to “matronly” below her knee. She says she’s had experiences where if she wore long skirts, people would tell her that she looked “like their grandmothers” but if she sported a mini, people would ask if “that was appropriate to wear out.” “We’re damned if we do,” said Mucha, “and we’re damned if we don’t.” This is the truth, not only about the length of our skirts, but about the fight against sexual assault. So we might as well protest instead of keeping quiet.

Imran is a sophomore in LAS. He can be reached at ikhan10@dailyillini.com.

Tolu is a senior in Media. She can be reached at taiwo2@dailyillini.com.

Theses: relevant or outdated? JOSEPH VANDEHEY Opinion columnist

A

deadline quietly slipped beneath the notice of most campus residents last week. While undergraduates were busy with the latest weekly assignment, midterm or essay, many graduate students – myself included – were facing one of the biggest days of their careers: their thesis defense. Imagine every term paper and final you have ever written smashed together into a booklength monster of a project, complete with claws, fangs and a ravenous desire to consume all your spare time — that is the thesis in a nutshell. Even after writing a thesis, one must still defend it. A typical defense consists of a half-hour lecture by the thesis writer before a committee of experts, after which the committee asks questions of the speaker. I suspect that many graduate students – myself included, again – wonder why we must go through this academic ritual. The graduate thesis has its purpose: much like a term paper or final, it demonstrates a specific desired ability. A master’s thesis often synthesizes and amalgamates research done by others, and so demonstrates its writer’s advanced knowledge and scholarship. A doctoral thesis often contains original research, and so demonstrates its writer’s ability to contribute to the body of knowledge. But these abilities can be demonstrated in other ways. In some fields, graduate students do research and publish results

well in advance of writing a doctoral thesis. Then, when the time comes, they collect three or four such results, staple them together, add a unifying introduction and conclusion, and – voila! – obtain a thesis. Why go through the additional work to collect the results together for a doctoral thesis? If a student has the capability for research, that will still be evident with or without collecting the work into a thesis. One could argue that a thesis, unlike a classroom essay, is meant to be a public work. An essay is graded and discarded soon after that, but a thesis is frequently archived so that it can be of use to researchers and scholars in the future. Thus it is the duty of a student to carefully prepare his work for future generations. That sentiment might earn a laugh from graduate students and professors alike. According to one frequently shared joke, you’ll be lucky if a handful of people ever read your thesis; and you’ll be extra lucky if some of those people are actually on your defense committee. Yes, a thesis is meant to be a public work, but it very often goes unused or underused. I have found the occasional master’s thesis to be helpful in my own research (since master’s theses amalgamate research from many sources, they can be great references), but the operative word here is occasional. In fact, many graduate students are encouraged to undercut the usefulness of their thesis: they are told to publish the results of their thesis in a journal as soon as possible after writing them. For all the importance that we place onto the thesis, we still consider a simple journal publication to be

a more official place to share our work. In short, the process of writing and defending a thesis can be an immense amount of unnecessary work. Note: “can be,” not “is.” The thesis makes a very clear destination for a graduate student. It is the goal, the target, the finish line: complete it and earn your degree (plus some fancy letters to go next to your name). Students can and do schedule months or years around having enough time to research, write and defend their thesis. For many students, the thesis is useful and rewarding, both personally and occupationally. And not all students have the sort of side projects that could be used as a stand-in for a thesis. But for those that have, why not make alternate completion methods available? Ever since the recession hit years ago, departments have been trying to streamline the graduation process. Just look at the mathematics department’s recent decision to end its language requirement for graduate students. The thesis may be the last thing that people want to change; it is an institution unto itself. Forget convincing graduate students one way or another, the University itself takes an immense pride in the quality theses produced here. And we students take no small amount of pride in our accomplishment either. But for all the pride I feel at having completed my thesis, part of me is still whispering in the back of my mind: why wasn’t I spending my time discovering something new, instead of just repackaging my old work?

Joseph is a graduate student. He can be reached at vandehe2@dailyillini.com.

Scandals show institutional lack of morals IMRAN KHAN Opinions columnist

In

the wake of the Rutgers’ basketball scandal, the real question remains: How could this have gone on for so long? After tapes were released earlier this week showing Rutgers men’s basketball coach Mike Rice hurling homophobic slurs at players and ruthlessly pushing them around, the Rutgers University sports program has come under fire for the way they have handled this situation. Not only are the videotapes of their basketball practices horrifying, they are completely shocking. Now that athletic director Tim Pernetti has resigned, I can’t help but wonder how the demeaning treatment of their players by a coach went on for as long as it did. Granted, Rice was suspended last December for three games and fined $50,000 when these actions were first reported to Pernetti. Yet a suspension and fine weren’t sufficient punishments; he should have been fired immediately. The mistake not to fire Rice when the incident first occurred is disappointing, seeing as these players were attacked in a multitude of ways. A coach may try to get his players fired up with a more intense approach to practice, but there are certain lines a coach cannot cross. Hitting players with blocking mats, chucking basketballs at them and viciously assaulting their character are undoubtedly things no coach should do. He was not acting as a

mentor to these players – he was a bully in its purest form. The greatest disappointment is that University leaders enabled him to continue degrading these young men despite knowing of Rice’s erratic and shameful behaviors in the first place. Coaches at any level – be it professional or little league — have to be held accountable for their words and actions because ultimately, these people play enormously influential roles in their players’ lives. Coaches instill values. Coaches teach lessons that go beyond the playing field. Coaches support and reassure their players that if at first they don’t succeed, they need to try again. Still at a point in players’ lives where they are being shaped by the environment around them and into the adults they will become, it’s absurd to even think a coach would do this. University officials must also reexamine disciplinary procedures and reform them accordingly. Pernetti wasn’t the only school official to see the videotapes. The University’s legal counsel and human resource CFO saw them as well. Though University President Robert L. Barchi claimed that he hadn’t seen the videos until they surfaced this week, but he was aware of Rice’s behavior when it was first reported last fall. This wasn’t a case where his actions could be reversed. Rehabilitation wasn’t a plausible solution. And though students have rallied behind their school president, some even still in support of their former coach, these tragic turn of events should speak to the larger picture:


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Monday, April 8, 2013

5A

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD 1

ACROSS

1 ___-Saxon 6 Chicago winter clock

setting: Abbr.

9 Daffodil-to-be 13 Big name in plastic wrap 14 Performance for one 15 Norway’s capital 16 Legal thriller author who 18 19 20 21 22

of

25 26 27 30 33 36 40 41 42 ILLUSTRATION BY AUSTIN BAIRD THE DAILY ILLINI

Ebert’s legacy to live through future Ebertfests as reminders of his dedication, passion for movies BY ALISON MARCOTTE FEATURES EDITOR

The idea to create Ebertfest was born out of a five-day festival in March 1997 called Cyberfest, which was a birthday party for the fictional computer “Hal� from the 1968 novel and film, “2001: A Space Odyssey.� In the story, Hal became operational in 1997 in Urbana, Ill. Cyberfest was started by the University’s Chancellor’s Office, said Nate Kohn, who has been the director of Ebertfest since it started in 1999. “Because of the large computer science presence at Illinois, they thought it would be a really good idea to celebrate the computer and the film at a University-wide event,� Kohn said. Roger Ebert — who at the time was a Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times — was invited to host the Cyberfest Gala at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, and the screening of Stanley Kubrick’s film on its original 70-millimeter stereo format at the Virginia Theatre. Kohn worked with Ebert in producing the event. Kohn was born and raised in Urbana like Ebert, and he was a freshman at Urbana High School when Ebert was a senior. However, he didn’t get to know him on a personal level until they worked on Cyberfest together. After the success of the event, faculty from the College of Communications (now Media) suggested holding an annual film festival hosted by Ebert, according to Betsy Hendrick, friend of Ebert and sponsor of Eberfest. “I was really very excited when I heard about it,� said Hendrick, owner and operator of Hendrick House. “Because even though Roger loved Urbana and Champaign, all of his immediate family in this area had passed away, and I would think, ‘I wonder what will bring Roger back here again to visit?’� By that time, Ebert was very busy, traveling the world, attend-

ing multiple film festivals and doing review after review, Hendrick said. “So the idea of the film festival was just great,� she said. The first film festival, which was called the “Overlooked Film Festival,� kicked off in April 1999. The film festival was hosted at the Virginia Theatre, which has continued to house the festival for the past 14 years. “Every movie lover has shared the melancholy experience of finding a film to truly love — and then discovering that most people have never heard of it,� he wrote in his welcome mes-

“I admire him so much and how he appreciated other people and their stories and their backgrounds, and I think I picked up a lot of that from Roger.� BETSY HENDRICK friend of Ebert

sage for the inaugural event. “When I was asked by the College of Communications to host a film festival at the University of Illinois, my first thought was of such films.� The first festival was dedicated to the memory of Gene Siskel, Ebert’s former cohost on “At the Movies,� according to the website. “It was a great joy to work with him,� Kohn said. “He was very involved in every aspect of the festival. He reviewed movies like nobody else on the face of the earth. It was just such a pleasure to have him as a part of this festival.�

Kohn would help Ebert every year with choosing which movies to show at the annual festival. “It was a very informal process. Roger and I would put together a list of about a hundred movies and that we thought might be interesting to have in the festival,� he said. “We would just slowly, over the space of several months, cut down the list until we had about 12 pictures.� In 2008, the name was changed from “Overlooked Film Festival� to “Ebertfest.� In a 2009 TIME interview, he said, “Some filmmakers demurred at having their films seem ‘prematurely overlooked.’� Kohn said every festival since the original has been a tremendous success. Ebert attended every Ebertfest except for the one in 2008 because of a fractured hip. The theatre would always sell out all of their festival passes before they even announced the films, which displays the faith the audience had in Ebert’s selection of films. Hendrick said that during the festival, Ebert gave an introspective review of the movies he would discuss at the panel discussions. “We all used to enjoy when he would lead the panel discussions after the films because he would bring up things that many people that were directly involved with the film didn’t remember. He’s very good at that,� Hendrick said. “I admire him so much and how he appreciated other people and their stories and their backgrounds, and I think I picked up a lot of that from Roger.� Steven Bentz, director of the Virginia Theatre, also commented on Ebert’s impact at the theater. “Roger Ebert was such an important and good friend of this theater, always,� Bentz said. “And when he was here, there was an electricity in the air. People were always very happy to see Roger come in that front door.�

43 45 47 54 55 56 57 58 60 61 62 63 64 65

2

3

4

5

6

13 17

19

20 24

25

26 30

31

38

JOHNIVAN DARBY

DOONESBURY

GARRY TRUDEAU

BEARDO

DAILY ILLINI STAFF REPORT

A suspect was located and arrested on the charge of

33

34

35

51

52

53

42 45 48

49

46

50

55

56

58

59

61

62

64

65 38==/(%<,$1/,9(1*22'

14 One in court 17 Some Feds 21 West African nation 23 One-liner 24 Artist Vincent van ___ 27 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whateverâ&#x20AC;? 28 Ripen 29 Sporting venue 30 Fleeting craze 31 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Lord of the Ringsâ&#x20AC;? tree creature 32 Wall St. debut 34 Just fine 35 Greek letter that sounds like the end of 16-, 22-, 36-, 47- or 58-Across 37 Accounts of Scheherazade

38 Sit ___ by 39 Make over 44 Picks via ballot 45 Hair parter 46 Andress of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dr. Noâ&#x20AC;? 47 Yule song 48 Sporting venue 49 Rambunctious 50 Low-voiced chorus member 51 Deplete 52 Quest in a Monty Python movie 53 Monopoly purchase before a hotel 54 Old VHS rival 58 Homerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighbor on â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Simpsonsâ&#x20AC;? 59 CD-___

DAN DOUGHERTY

Alison can be reached at akmarco2@dailyillini.com.

4)%')%2(73'-%0.978-')0)'896)

Suspect located and arrested on charge of attempted sexual assault

12

39

CITES to change email attachment filters Starting Monday, CITES will block certain file types from being sent and received as email attachments as part of its continued efforts to protect the University from phishing emails and malware. When an attachment is blocked, a text file will be attached to the email notifying the recipient that an attachment has been removed. The file type that may cause the most impact are .zip files. Common formats of documents,

32

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

DOT. COMMON

11

21

23

wrote â&#x20AC;&#x153;Presumed Innocentâ&#x20AC;? One-named supermodel 27 28 29 from Somalia â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ see now!â&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aha!â&#x20AC;?) 36 37 End of the Greek alphabet Thyroid, for instance 40 41 Illustrious warrior returning from battle 43 44 Diner coffee container Rowing implements 47 Visitors to baby Jesus 54 Fake Laugh syllable 57 King Tut, e.g. Skirt line 60 Increase Nevada city on the 63 Humboldt River â&#x20AC;&#x153;Littleâ&#x20AC;? Dickens girl Bovine mouthful DOWN Four-time Daytona 500 1 Part of N.A.A.C.P.: winner Abbr. Cover all the ___ 2 Cantina chip Wanders 3 Body part often â&#x20AC;&#x153;No seatingâ&#x20AC;? letters on pulled in sports Broadway 4 Back muscle, for short ___ the Red (Viking 5 Traveling, as a band explorer) 6 Small Welsh dog Journalistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; office 7 M.I.T. business school Talk up name Finales 8 AAA offering Armstrong of jazz 9 Water heater Something for the needy 10 Law officer wearing a When the sun is out star Enough 11 Grassy expanse in the Southwest 12 Name said before and after James

10

18

WKHQGDQQXDO

DAILY ILLINI STAFF REPORT

9 15

Campus sexual assault suspect arrested spreadsheets, PDFs and graphic files will not be filtered. Box, a file sharing service, can be used to send and receive filtered files. A full list of files that are being filtered and more information on how to use Box can be found on the CITES Security website.

8

14

16

22

7

attempted sexual assault at Allen Hall on Sunday morning, according to two Illini-Alerts. The first alert came at 4:24 a.m., which described the offender as a black male in his 30s who is approximately 5-foot-9. According to the alert, he was wearing gray sweatpants, a gray sweatshirt and a gray T-shirt with an Eastern Illinois University logo. The second alert came at 4:53 a.m. and said the suspect had been located and arrested. The suspect was identified on a video.

Stepping in her shoes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; literally

(%2-)077%2()67

1%0%0%

6-+,8783%+-60´7)(9'%8-32 +YIWX0IGXYVIV6ERKMXEHI7MPZEHI%P[MW 

%46-0 41

(MVIGXSVSJXLI+PSFEP;SQIR´W0IEHIVWLMT-RMXMEXMZIEXXLI;SSHVS[;MPWSR -RXIVREXMSREP'IRXIVJSV7GLSPEVWMR;EWLMRKXSR('

%PMGI'EQTFIPP%PYQRM'IRXIV 70MRGSPR%ZI9VFERE-0

-R LIV VSPI 6ERKMXE PIEHW EPP [SQIR´W MRMXMEXMZIW EX XLI;MPWSR 'IRXIV MRGPYHMRKXLI;SQIRMR4YFPMG7IVZMGI4VSNIGXERHXLI'SYRGMPSJ;SQIR ;SVPH 0IEHIVW 6ERKMXE [EW JSVQIVP] XLI (MVIGXSV SJ XLI -RXIVREXMSREP ,YQER6MKLXW4SPMG]ERHXLI-REYKYVEP7YWER1G+II&EMPI]7GLSPEVEXXLI ;IPPIWPI]'IRXIVWJSV;SQIR7LIVIQEMRWJEGYPX]EXXLI1EHIPMRI%PFVMKLX -RWXMXYXIEX;IPPIWPI]'SPPIKI

8LMWTVSKVEQMW*6))ERHSTIRXS XLITYFPMG *SVQSVIMRJSVQEXMSR SV [[[WSGMEP[SVOMPPMRSMWIHY

(VHI%P[MWLEW[SVOIH[MXLEZEWXRIX[SVOSJGMZMPWSGMIX]ERHKSZIVRQIRX SVKERM^EXMSRW XS HIZIPST MRRSZEXMZI [SQIR´W VMKLXW ERH LYQER VMKLXW MRMXMEXMZIWEVSYRHXLI[SVPH,IV[SVOERHXIEGLMRKLEZIJSGYWIHSRYWMRK MRXIVREXMSREPLYQERVMKLXWRSVQWXSKYMHIPE[VIJSVQMRMXMEXMZIW (VHI%P[MWLEWEHSGXSVEXIMRPE[ 7.( JVSQ,EVZEVH0E[7GLSSPERH [EWE8IEGLMRK*IPPS[[MXLXLI)YVSTIER0E[6IWIEVGL-RWXMXYXIEX,EVZEVH 0E[7GLSSPERH[EWE6IWIEVGL*IPPS[[MXLXLI;SQIRERH4YFPMG4SPMG] TVSKVEQEXXLI/IRRIH]7GLSSPSJ+SZIVRQIRX,EVZEVH9RMZIVWMX]

'374327367 `%QIVMGER-RHMER7XYHMIW4VSKVEQ`%WMER%QIVMGER'YPXYVEP'IRXIV`'LMPHVIRERH*EQMP]6IWIEVGL'IRXIV`'SPPIKISJ*MRI ERH%TTPMIH%VXW`'SPPIKISJ1IHMGMRI`'SYRWIPMRK'IRXIV`*MVWX1IRRSRMXI'LYVGLSJ'LEQTEMKR9VFERE`0EXMRE0EXMRS 7XYHMIW(ITEVXQIRX`8LI4VSKVEQMR.I[MWL'YPXYVIERH7SGMIX]`3J½GISJ(MZIVWMX] )UYMX] ERH%GGIWW`3J½GISJ3RPMRI ERH'SRXMRYMRK)HYGEXMSR`3J½GISJXLI4VSZSWX`9RMZIVWMX]0MFVEV]`;SQIRERH+IRHIVMR+PSFEP4IVWTIGXMZIW4VSKVEQ` =;'%SJXLI9RMZIVWMX]SJ-PPMRSMW`

(ERMIP77ERHIVWMRXIVREXMSREPP]ORS[RPIEHIVMRXLIIJJSVXXSEGLMIZI[SVPHTIEGILYQERVMKLXWERHWSGMEPNYWXMGI WIVZIHEWHIERSJXLI7GLSSPSJ7SGMEP;SVOJVSQ

SOCIAL WORK

92-:)67-8=3*-00-23-7%896&%2%',%14%-+2

ALLISON DIAZ THE DAILY ILLINI

Hundreds of fraternity men strut in three-inch heels around the Quad during the 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk a Mile in Her Shoesâ&#x20AC;? on Friday afternoon. The event is part of an international effort to stop rape, sexual assault and gender violence.


6A

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Monday, April 8, 2013

Live life courtside with AT&T. Access your brackets along with high-def highlights with the LG Optimus G.™

9999

$

2-yr wireless agreement with qualified voice and data plans or Mobile Share plan req’d.

LG OPTIMUS G™ Quad-core 1.5 GHz processor 4.7” HD true-color display

AT&T is the Exclusive Wireless Partner of NCAA March Madness. ®

®

1.866.MOBILITY

U of I students

ATT.COM/Wireless

Visit a Store

Visit your local AT&T store and mention FAN #3351455 to learn more about student service discounts.

Limited 4G LTE availability in select markets. 4G speeds not available everywhere. LTE is a trademark of ETSI. Offer ends 4/8/13. LG Optimus G requires a new 2-yr wireless agreement with voice (min $39.99/mo.) and monthly data plans (min $20/mo.) or Mobile Share plan. Subject to Wireless Customer Agrmt. Credit approval req’d. Activ fee $36/line. Geographic, usage, and other terms, conditions, and restrictions apply and may result in svc termination. Coverage and svcs not avail everywhere. Taxes and other charges apply. Data (att.com/dataplans): If usage exceeds your monthly data allowance, you will automatically be charged overage for additional data provided. Early Termination Fee (att.com/equipmentETF): After 14 days, ETF up to $325. Restocking fee up to $35 for smartphones and 10% of sales price for tablets. Other Monthly Charges: Line may include a Regulatory Cost Recovery Charge (up to $1.25), a gross receipts surcharge, federal and state universal svc charges, and fees and charges for other gov’t assessments. These are not taxes or gov’t req’d charges. Visit a store or att.com/wireless to learn more about wireless devices and services from AT&T. Screen images simulated. NCAA, March Madness and Final Four are trademarks of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. All other marks used herein are the property of their respective owners. ©2013 AT&T Intellectual Property.


1B Monday April 8, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Sports

Weinstein powers Illini to nationals Third NCAA Championships for women’s gymnastics program BY NICHOLAS FORTIN STAFF WRITER

The No. 17 Illinois women’s gymnastics team huddled around each other inside the WVU Coliseum, in Morgantown, W.Va., on Saturday night. They waited in anxious anticipation of the team scores announcement. The announcer came over the loudspeaker and said: “And in second place, moving on to the NCAA Championships, the University of Illinois.” By finishing second overall at the NCAA Morgantown Regional, Illinois qualified for its third national appearance in program history, and the Illini erupted in cheer, jumping and screaming in celebration. “I think we did an amazing job at regionals,” senior Alina Weinstein said. “I couldn’t have asked for a better performance. We came up big in the clutch when it mattered, and that’s all that matters.” Illinois finished the meet with a score of 196.025, only 0.700 behind first-place Michigan

and 0.150 ahead of third-place Nebraska. The Wolverines were in control for the majority of the night, but the second qualifying spot was up for grabs until the last event. The Cornhuskers put up a 49.650 on vault forcing the Illini to score a 49.025 or higher on beam to advance. The pressure didn’t seem to faze Illinois, which had all of its competitors score above a 9.750. Weinstein and sophomore Sunny Kato led the way for the Illini with scores of 9.900 and 9.875, respectively. “I think it was clutch,” Landrus said. “We had some momentum from the last event, and they went up to beam with the mentality to think everything was normal and do what they do every day. They went out there not fazed by the pressure and showed off some really great routines.” All night, Weinstein led Illinois, finishing with three individual event titles and becoming the first-ever Illini to win

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Alina Weinstein performs her uneven bars routine during the Gym Jam against Iowa at Huff Hall on Feb. 16. three at a single NCAA meet. Weinstein took titles in the allaround with a 39.550, on floor with a 9.900 and tied for first on beam, again scoring a 9.900. She also finished fourth on bars and fifth on vault with a 9.850 and a 9.900, respectively. “Oh gosh, it was so much fun,” Weinstein said. “Honestly, I thought the same thing I think in every meet, which is to propel my team to win, and anything beyond that is a bonus

and a reward, and it was a lot of fun.” Following the meet, Weinstein was named Regional Gymnast of the Year. “She has just been a remarkable competitor who has so much talent,” Landrus said. “She represented Illinois well, being the anchor on four events, and doing what she did in such clutch situations says a lot about her character as a competitor.” Illinois was strong through-

Transfer excited to make impact for Illini football BY SEAN HAMMOND STAFF WRITER

Martize Barr is just happy to be back in a college town. For a guy from the Washington D.C. area, Council Bluffs, Iowa, was not his ideal location. After two years as a wide receiver and a safety for New Mexico, Barr spent the 2012 season in the Omaha, Neb., suburb of some 60,000 residents playing receiver for Iowa Western Community College. After racking up nearly 500 yards and five touchdowns — and winning the NJCAA National Championship along the way — Barr now finds himself in Champaign with high expectations for the 2013 season. “Coming from D.C., (Champaign has) more of a city vibe than (Council Bluffs),” Barr said. “This is a college-town feel, and I love that atmosphere. Especially when you start winning games.” Barr won’t have the chance to win any meaningful games until August, but he’ll have his first chance to showcase himself for Illini Nation on Friday under the lights at Memorial Stadium for Illinois’ Spring Game. Barr, who has been on campus since January, is likely to see a considerable amount of action on the field in 2013. And with his experience at New Mexico — he played in 10 games as a sophomore — he is no stranger to the bright lights of major college football.

“From New Mexico, (the speed of the game) is about what I had thought it would be,” Barr said. “It’s definitely faster than junior college, I adjusted to the game pretty quick and now I’m just rolling, trying to learn the offense.” First-year wide receivers coach Mike Bellamy was in a similar situation when he played in the late 1980s, transferring to Illinois after playing at the College of DuPage in suburban Chicago. “I think the transition that you make is just being able to understand that the game speed is higher, that the expectations are higher,” Bellamy said. “He’s put himself in a position where once he gets in shape and once he picks (the offense) up, he’s going to be an asset.” Bellamy went on to spend parts of six seasons in the NFL after his career at Illinois. Barr has a longer way to go. He will be on the field at receiver for the Illini next season, and has seen reps as a punt returner through the spring. Barr has even been advocating for himself as a candidate for kick returner. When asked if he’s been in his coach’s ear about returning kicks, Barr said, “(I’m) in everybody’s ear.” He hasn’t seen many kick return reps yet, but he’s been put on the scout team and expects to get a chance at returning kicks there. Head coach Tim Beckman said the biggest advantage transfer play-

ers have over high school recruits is experience. Barr is one of five junior college transfers to enroll at Illinois in January. “You’re going to go out and recruit a high school kid that’s committed to making a program better and making themselves better,” Beckman said. “It’s the same way you’re going to treat a junior college player.” It’s no secret that Beckman receives transfers with open arms. In July, he and his staff caused considerable controversy when they openly admitted to recruiting Penn State players after NCAA sanctions were administered to the Nittany Lions program in the wake of the child sex abuse scandal. The staff broke no rules, and Illnois was certainly not the only team recruiting Penn State players, but the media heavily scrutinized the fervor with which the Illini recruited. Only one Nittany Lion transferred to Illinois, that being offensive lineman Ryan Nowicki. But Barr is not transferring from a Big Ten rival, and he has come a long way from Coolidge High School in Washington, D.C. For him, Illinois is a new chapter in his book. And if he wants to see what the atmosphere in Champaign is like when the football team is winning, he and his teammates still have a lot of work remaining.

Sean can be reached at sphammo2 @dailyillini.com and @sean_hammond.

Rutgers faculty wrong to call for Barchi to resign ELIOT SILL Sports editor

H

ello there, Rutgers, and welcome to the Big Ten, where your embarrassing PR disaster that’s being dubbed a scandal — though it really is more so just another case of athletic hubris gone wild — is mere small potatoes. It’s obviously not OK for a coach to hurl vicious and profane insults — and basketballs — at his players. The coach in this case, Mike Rice, should be beyond fired. The athletic director, Tim Pernetti, should be ousted for not taking swifter action on the coach. But the university president, Robert Barchi, should not be expected to police the conduct of his basketball coach in a practice setting and should not be forced to resign from the university. Eric Murdock, Rutgers’ former director of player development who compiled the tape and was subsequently fired, informed Pernetti of Rice’s behavior last summer. The half-hour compilation showed Rice aggressively shoving and throwing basketballs at

his players, using any of the curse words you would have learned from your resident middle school bully. After the video of the practices was obtained, Pernetti described it to Barchi and now says he wanted to fire Rice, but was overruled by Barchi and “general counsel.” Barchi, who was hired in September, was never shown the video until this past week. Keep in mind here, we’re a president away from matching the house-cleaning effort that went with Penn State’s notorious sexual assault cover-up that broke in 2011. The gravity of that travesty was understanding that the scandal was not about sports, but about using sports to conduct wicked, traumatizing pedophilic activity that doubled as an overt felony. The behavior was reported to the university president, Graham Spanier, and he did nothing. Barchi, similarly, did not intervene when he heard that his basketball coach was more or less being a mean guy. While Rice’s behavior was certainly misconduct, it was not illegal. At least 50 members of Rutgers’ faculty are now calling for Barchi’s firing over this particular scandal, and, albeit inadvertently, turning this event to one compa-

rable to the Penn State scandal that cost the coach, athletic director and university president their jobs. Faculty members were calling for Barchi’s resignation even before the athletic director stepped down. That means one of two things: either they blamed Barchi more than Pernetti, or they wanted Barchi gone for some other reason. I’m no expert on administrative business at Rutgers University, but I’m aware that they’re merging two of the three schools from University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (the other will be ceded to Camden). Faculty members had concerns over a lack of hiring in the school of arts and sciences departments — Barchi’s administration was trying to save funding to help the merger. Barchi was hired this past September to help lead the school through the merger, and his focus on completing it has led to his perception as a careless, dismissive leader. Former Illinois President Michael Hogan stepped down last year due to poor leadership and a bad relationship with faculty. Barchi seems to be fitting those requirements, but whereas Hogan

See SILL, Page 3B

out the meet, putting up a 48.950 on floor, a 48.975 on vault and a 48.925 on bars before ending on beam. The team has seen its share of ups and downs throughout the season, which made the performance that much sweeter to Landrus. “It’s a truly exciting moment for this program to qualify for the third time,” Landrus said. “This group of girls has worked so hard this year and perse-

vered through a lot, so it was such a rewarding feeling that they went in there and accomplished what they set out to.” Following the announcement, the Illini went to the locker room where they surprised Landrus with a Gatorade bath. “It was cold,” Landrus said. “But it was also well worth it.”

Nicholas can be reached at goldwyn2@dailyillini.com and on Twitter @IlliniSportsGuy.

Efforts, successes of less-covered Illinois sports teams recognized JOHNATHAN HETTINGER Illini columnist

In

my two years at Illinois, the Illini have won one national championship and five Big Ten Championships. There have been five individual Illini crowned national champions. But none of this success has been in football or men’s basketball. Instead, in both football and men’s basketball, we’ve seen top-25 teams come crashing down, resulting in coaching changes. We’ve endured two years with just two total Big Ten football wins, and a men’s basketball team without any postseason in 2012. The Daily Illini covers every varsity sport and the club hockey team, but we devote thousands of words more to the 2-10 football team than we do to the four-time defending Big Ten Champion men’s golf team or one of the fastest women in the world, Ashley

1

MEN’S GYMNASTICS

2

MEN’S GOLF

3

VOLLEYBALL

4

5

The men’s gymnastics team won the national championship in 2011 but was hit hard by graduation and injuries and finished fifth at the Big Ten Championships over the weekend. The men’s golf team has won four straight Big Ten titles and is on pace for another a fifth. Mike Small has coached three straight individual Big Ten Champions and two individual national champions in the past three years. Kevin Hambly’s squad advanced to the national championship game in 2011, but fell off this season, failing to make the NCAA tournament.

Johnathan is a sophomore in Media. He can be reached at hetting2@dailyillini.com. Follow him on

10

WOMEN’S GYMNASTICS

11

MEN’S CROSS-COUNTRY

12

WOMEN’S GOLF

13

BASEBALL

WOMEN’S TRACK

The women’s track team won the 2013 Big Ten indoor championship, led by 2012 400 meter NCAA champion Ashley Spencer.

SOCCER

The soccer team won the Big Ten Championship in 2011 and made the NCAA tournament in both seasons. Vanessa DiBernardo led the U.S. to a gold medal at the under-20 World Cup.

6

MEN’S TENNIS

7

WRESTLING

8

MEN’S TRACK

9

Spencer. I understand why we do this. Readers, myself included, want to know what’s going on with the football and men’s basketball teams. People pick up the paper when they see football on the front page. But there are hundreds of other student athletes who devote their lives to the sport they love without getting the publicity, and, at Illinois, they often have more success. In my new position of Illini columnist, it will be my goal to highlight the sports that get less attention. I will highlight the success of defending NCAA champion golfer Thomas Pieters. I will make sure that readers know how awesome the men’s gymnastics team really is. For my first column, since many Illini fans have not followed the smaller sports, I have decided to rank them by the success they’ve had since I’ve been on campus. If you don’t agree with my rankings, let me know.

14

The men’s tennis team won the Big Ten Championship in 2012. Brad Dancer’s young squad is currently 11-8 overall and 4-2 in the Big Ten. Competing in the nation’s best wrestling conference, the Illini finished fourth and fifth in the Big Ten in 2012 and 2013, respectively, but seventh and ninth in the NCAA in those years. The men’s track team finished eighth in the Big Ten, but 11th in the country in 2012. So far, the team was second at the Big Ten Indoor Championships this season.

WOMEN’S TENNIS

The women’s tennis team finished third in the Big Ten last season and lost in the first round of the NCAA tournament. It currently sits at .500 this season.

15 16 17

The women’s gymnastics team finished fifth of eight teams in the Big Ten last season and fourth this season. Kim Landrus’ squad will make its 3rdever trip to the NCAA Championships on April 20.

The men’s cross-country team was in the middle of the pack in the Big Ten, finishing seventh in 2011 and fourth in 2012.

Renee Slone’s squad finished fifth in the Big Ten last season, making NCAA regionals, but has struggled this season, finishing near or at the bottom in all of its tournaments but one.

Dan Hartleb’s club failed to make the Big Ten Tournament in 2012 after finishing 28-25 overall. The Illini are 19-9 so far this season.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

The women’s basketball team struggled in 2011-12, finishing 11-19, but bounced back in Matt Bollant’s first season, making the WNIT quarterfinals and finishing 5th in the Big Ten.

SOFTBALL

The softball team failed to make the Big Ten Tournament last season after finishing 27-26 and will likely miss the tourney again because of a current 11-19 record.

WOMEN’S CROSS-COUNTRY

The women’s cross-country team finished last in the Big Ten in 2011 and ninth in the conference in 2012.

SWIMMING and DIVING

The swimming and diving team has struggled the past two seasons, finishing 10th in the Big Ten in 2012 and last in 2013.


2B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Monday, April 8, 2013

Softball swept by Wildcats in Evanston Illinois outscored 23-1 through 3 weekend games BY NICHOLAS FORTIN STAFF WRITER

STEVE SHENG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Justin Parr completes his swing during Illinois win against Oakland at Illinois Field on March 30. The Illini defeated the Hoosiers in a 3-2 victory.

After 2 losses, Illinois ends Indiana’s streak BY JAMAL COLLIER STAFF WRITER

Through the first two games of the series, it looked like Illinois had thrown everything it had at the nation’s longest winning streak. The Illini had a pitcher throw a complete game Friday, albeit in a losing effort. Then Illinois collected 10 hits Saturday, but it still wasn’t enough to beat Indiana. The Hoosiers (25-4, 8-1 Big Ten) had increased its program-best winning streak to 18 consecutive victories and hadn’t lost since March 9 as they ascended to No. 16 in the rankings. That was until Sunday, when Illinois came away with a 3-2 victory to avoid being swept in what head coach Dan Hartleb called “as good a college game as you can see.” Sunday’s victory was a consolation prize for the Illini (19-9, 2- 4), who now fall 4 1/2 games behind the Hoosiers in the conference. The Illini have now faced the top two teams in the Big Ten as projected by the Big Ten coaches in the preseason. Justin Parr led the Illini and seemed like he could single-handedly will Illinois to victory Sunday. He continued his season-long hitting clinic by going 4-for-4 Sunday, adding his second home run of the year and two runs while extending his career-best hitting streak to 16 games. He raised his average to .433, and his 52 hits on the year lead the Big Ten. Parr was at the plate for one of the turning points of the game, in the top of the sixth with the score tied at 2. After Indiana pitcher Aaron Slegers threw two straight balls to Parr, who was leading off the inning, Hoosier head coach Tracy Smith wanted to pull Slegers in favor of a left hander. So, Hartleb waited and allowed him to warmup and Slegers to go sit down as if his day was finished before he remind-

ed the umpires of the rule that once a pitcher crosses the foul line he must at least finish the first hitter he faces. It forced Slegers back into the game, and Parr would end up with a single and go on to score what would be the winning run. “Players make you look like geniuses sometimes,” Hartleb said. Parr did have help, mostly from freshman Ryan Castellanos lasting six innings Sunday in his first career start, allowing just two runs and picking up his first career victory. In his six appearances prior to Sunday, Castellanos had a 2.38 ERA and impressed Hartleb with his composure, which he did not lose even after giving up a game-tying two-run home run. He also impressed with his command and didn’t walk a batter during his start. “You get a little bit of butterflies, but most of it’s all excitement,” Castellanos said. “I was really excited.” He’s positioned himself into the starting rotation for Illinois, and Hartleb left no doubt that Castellanos is the new Sunday starter. Illinois also benefited from two big outfield assists from right fielder Davis Hendrickson, who threw out a runner at third in the second, and left fielder Jordan Parr, who threw out a runner at home in the third. “That fires me up because it just reminds me that my teammates are backing me up,” Castellanos said. “I don’t need to be perfect. I can go there and make my pitches and pitch to contact.” Kevin Johnson couldn’t end the streak Friday in front of the largest crowd in Indiana baseball history, when 2,757 fans packed a sold-out Bart Kaufman Field for the first night game in Indiana’s new stadium. Johnson would pitch a complete game, retiring 20

of the final 22 Indiana batters, but the Illini couldn’t recover after allowing three runs in the first two innings. Right fielder Will Krug was hit on the hand with a pitch in that game and missed the rest of the series. Hartleb said Krug will be out for “a while.” Hendrickson will likely be Krug’s replacement in right field going forward. However, facing a lefty Saturday meant the lefthanded Hendrickson would not get into the lineup, and it was first baseman David Kerian as the unlikely starting outfielder. Kerian approached Hartleb before the game and told him he could play the outfield and made his first career start in left field. Illinois will have to find a new leadoff hitter to replace Krug, who was hitting .305 as Illinois’ leadoff man. Last year’s leadoff man, Thomas Lindauer, reclaimed that spot Saturday, and it was Jordan Parr who led off the game Sunday. Hartleb said he’s still trying to find someone to fill that role. All of Illinois’ offense in Saturday’s game came from home runs by Lindauer (5) and third baseman Brandon Hohl (2), but the Illini went 1-for- 6 with runners in scoring position and lost the game 7-3. So Illinois came out and knew it needed to win on Sunday, and Hartleb said he still thinks the Illini are in striking distance of Indiana and able to prevent them from running away with the conference. “They remind me of us,” Hartleb said. “They’ve found a way to win 18 in a row. That’s tough, that’s a tough thing to do. I think they’re a good team, but I think we’re a good team.”

Jamal can be reached at collie10@illinimedia.com or @jamalcollier.

Men’s track wins 4 events at Tiger Track Classic 4x400 squad improves last week’s time by 9 seconds, wins event by 3-second margin BY DAN ESCALONA STAFF WRITER

Facing its toughest competition yet in the outdoor season, the Illinois men’s track and field team was led by a titlewinning performance by the 1600-meter relay squad at the Tiger Track Classic in Auburn, Ala. Overall, the Illini took home four event titles — the most of any team at the event. The 4x400 relay crew of sophomore DJ Zahn, freshmen Cam Viney and Juan Paul Green and junior Stephon Pamilton won its second title in as many weeks, finishing with in 3 minutes, 7 seconds — besting last week’s mark by nearly nine seconds.

The relay squad ran past a slew of top-level teams such as Big Ten rival Purdue, Clemson and No. 7 Auburn. The relay’s finishing time was more than three seconds ahead of second place Purdue. “All four guys in the 4x4 came ready to compete, and each one did their part,” head coach Mike Turk said. “Coming off the indoor nationals, we didn’t know where they were, but they’re in a very good spot right now.” This was the first time the four runners had raced together since the NCAA Indoor Nationals in March. Turk said the lineup that ran over the weekend is the lineup he expects to run out for the

remainder of the season. “The four of us hadn’t run together since indoors, and we were thinking it would take a few meets to get back into a groove,” Zahn said. “It all came together nicely, and we were able to put together a really good time in our first run together in over a month.” The Illini also took home titles in two long-distance events; the 5000 meters and the 3000-meter steeplechase. Senior Jannis Toepfer took home his second title of the outdoor season with a first-place finish in the steeplechase. Toepfer crossed the finish line with a time of 8:54.48 — the ninth fastest time in school history. Redshirt freshman Ian Barnett won his first outdoor season title in the 5000 with a time of 13:58.79. Barnett’s time was the fifth fastest in school history and the first top-10 finish for an Illinois runner in the

event since 2007. The event was Barnett’s first after coming off a leg injury, which he sustained during the cross-country season. “I was just looking to get back on track and used to running outdoors again after my injury, and I’m glad that everything worked out well, and I ran a solid race,” he said. Senior Ryan Lynn raced to a title in the 800 meters with a time of 1:49.08, handing Illinois its final title of the weekend. The title was Lynn’s second of the outdoor season. “Ryan is setting himself up for something special by the end of the season,” Turk said. “He dominated in the 800, and the amazing thing was that he told me afterwards that it was too easy of a race for him.”

Dan can be reached at descalo2@dailyillini.com.

(YHU\7KXUVGD\ LQ7KH'DLO\,OOLQL

UHDGEX]]FRP

It was another long weekend of conference play for the Illinois softball team (11-21, 1-8 Big Ten). Illinois was swept by Northwestern (19-14, 5-3 Big Ten) in three games in Evanston, Ill., on the weekend but showed signs of progress in each game. “It was a rough weekend for all of us, but at the end of the day, we all got better as a team,” freshman Allie Bauch said. “We made improvements but we still could do a lot better.” The Illini opened the weekend Friday with an offensive performance that featured 11 base runners in the game. Despite the Illini owning the base paths, the Wildcats stranded every single runner and won 8-0. Illinois was unable to get clutch hits in any of the games on the weekend, which shut down nearly all of its scoring threats. Northwestern, on the other hand, capitalized on almost all its chances, scoring early and often. “We have to give a lot of credit to Northwestern,” head coach Terri Sullivan said. “Any chance there was for them to make a run, they really took advantage of it.” With 30 mph winds on Saturday, the Wildcats took advantage, hitting multiple home runs on the day and winning their second game of the series by an identical score of 8-0. “They’re really good hitters,” senior pitcher Pepper Gay said. “They took advantage of our mistake pitches, had a lot of home runs, and when they had runners on, they were able to score them.” After being able to put the first two games behind them, the Illini came out swinging on Sunday and scored in the first to put themselves ahead 1-0. “We showed resiliency and fought hard,” Gay said. After Illinois’ first inning run, the Wildcats took control, scoring seven unanswered to win the game 7-1. Illinois was disappointed in the way it played on the weekend, especially in its hitting. In order to improve, the Illini will continue to work on situational hitting, trying to mimic in-game scenarios. “Our mechanics are fine, but we need to work on situational hitting with pressure on the hitter and runners on base,” Bauch said. “Anyone can hit with no runners on, but we need to get timely hits with runners on.” Sullivan said even though it didn’t look close, the difference between the Wildcats and Illini on the weekend wasn’t more than a few clutch hits. She was impressed by her team’s determination. “We got out there after getting it handed to us on Friday and Saturday,” Sullivan said. “We had great energy and enthusiasm in the third game and that was good.” Illinois will have a chance to turn it around Tuesday as they face Eastern Illinois at home. Gay said in order to win, the team will just need to keep working. “Anyone can win on any given day, so we have to get back to playing our ball and keep improving all parts of our game each day.”

Nicholas can be reached at goldwyn2@dailyillini.com or @IlliniSportsGuy.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Monday, April 8, 2013

Men’s gymnastics ends 4-year Big Ten title streak

SILL FROM PAGE 1B looked bad in wake of an email scandal last year, Barchi’s been diligently executing this merger, which is the most important task for the current Rutgers president. So here we have a House of Cards-like political ploy from faculty members at Rutgers to try and oust the school presi-

Gina can be reached at muelle30@ dailyillini.com and @muelle30.

Ali Stark spikes the ball over the net against Loyola on Saturday at Huff Hall. Illinois also played exhibitions against Northern Illinois and Indiana State.

dent for something only tangentially related to issues that really concern them. You want to tell me that economics professor Thomas Prusa, who was quoted in Friday edition of The New York Times calling for Barchi’s firing, gives a damn about the mental health of the men’s basketball team? The man teaches economics, not psychology. I’m calling BS. Prusa was quoted saying the following: “Maybe if the

president was more tuned in, he would think that we have 58,000 students, 18 to 22 years old, and what exactly is happening? He is throwing balls at students’ heads? And he’s calling them what? He was not interested in that.” And what if he was “interested in that?” The Rutgers faculty wouldn’t ask why he’s paying attention to matters the athletic director should handle capably while the College of

Arts and Sciences has its faculty’s concerns ignored time and again? I don’t have any reason to support Barchi, and I’m not writing on his behalf; he doesn’t matter to me. I’m writing on behalf of sports. The faculty members at Rutgers are attempting to exploit the popularity of athletics to initiate a move they want made for other reasons. Their deepest concerns with Barchi are

irrelevant to the basketball team, and for them to use this debacle to call for his firing is a premeditated lie. With hoops season over, the Rutgers faculty is now playing games of a political nature. And it’s cheap. This is the Big Ten — we know the difference between sports and nonsports issues. Rice’s actions are a basketball issue, not one of incompetence by the academic leadership

# BDROOMS

309 Green 309 E. Green St.

MISC.

2,4

# BDROOMS

217-366-3500

309green.com

FOLAKE OSIBODU THE DAILY ILLINI

F    Individual leasing, great value for high-end living

Eliot is a junior in Media. He can be reached at sill2@dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @EliotTweet.

Professional Property Management

MISC.

217-351-1800

www.ppmrent.com

505 E. Stoughton, C.

3

F    

2 Full Bath, Balcony

808 W. Illinois, U.

1,2,3

F    

2 Full Bath in 2 and 3 Bedrooms Spacious, off street parking

Advantage Properties, C-U

www.advproperties.com

1007 W. Clark, U.

1

F    

1BR W/ Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D

610 W. Oregon, U.

2

B    

1005 W. Stoughton, U.

1

F    

1BR W/ Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D, sec bldg

205 E. Green , C.

1

F    Large, Security Entrance

1002 W. Clark, U.

1

F    

Remodeled Units! 1BR w/ Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D

108 E. John, C.

1

B    Huge, Hardwood Floors

203 N. Gregory, U.

1

F    

1BR w/ Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D in-unit, sec bldg

1003 W. Stoughton, U.

2

F    

Engineering campus

204 N. Harvey, U.

2

F    

2BR w/ Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D in-unit, sec bldg

305/307/311 W. Birch, C.

1

B    

Close to campus, 1 parking space included

1007 W. Main, U.

1

F    

1 BR W/ Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW,WD, sec bldg

308 E. Iowa, U.

2

B    

Close to campus, 3 Level floorplan

1004 W. Main, U.

2

F    

2BR with High Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D

906 S. Vine, U.

1,2

B    

Close to campus, on-site laundry

1010 W. Main, U.

1

F    

1BR W/ Hi Speed Int, near Eng, DW,W/D, sec bldg

Rob Chambers

Group Houses

2,3,4

F    

2, 2 & 4 bedroom houses fully furnished near Engr

707 W. Elm, U.

3

F    

Balcony, $1191/mo. Free parking!

506 E. White, C.

3,4

F    

Balcony, secure bldg, $1131/mo free parking & water

Bankier Apartments

www.bankierapts.com

217-344-0394

that rightfully has its focus elsewhere. It’s shameful for Prusa and his fellow faculty members to try and blur the line between sports and life, given the context of their new conference. Maybe Barchi does deserve to be fired, but not for the wild antics of a basketball coach.

RN / LA UNF U UN DR RN A/ Y IN C UN IT PA RK IN GO UT ILI NS TIE S I ITE NC L.

The reign has ended. Heading into the Big Ten Championships this weekend, the Illinois men’s gymnastics team had won four consecutive Big Ten titles. The Illini’s streak ended, however, as they placed fifth in the competition. Illinois started on the pommel horse — usually one of its strongest events — and made detrimental mistakes. The momentum was difficult to create after a rough start. “Pommel horse is one of our best events,” Illinois head coach Justin Spring said. “We were hoping to get a four- or five-point swing on some of the other teams and we ended up posting some of the lowest scores. That’s certainly troubling for the guys to keep the

door open, and in a finals championship that is going to cost you. ... With six judges in finals, those little things can cost you big, especially when the rest of his routine is so good.” Illinois will have a little over a week to prepare for the NCAA Championships. Spring said the team needs to build more belief in itself before heading into such a big competition. “Physically we have done it,” he said. “A week ago we had an amazing inter-squad (meet), and we ran an inter-squad in February and killed it. We need to start believing that we can. Belief and selfconfidence is really all these guys need at this point. Physically they are prepared, but to hit that routine on command, you need that belief to know that you already can hit it.”

FU

STAFF WRITER

another stuck landing, Hartville secured his first place and Illinois’ only Big Ten title of 2013, scoring a 15.425. The freshman surpassed 2012 Olympian Sam Mikulak’s vault performance, ending the night at the top of the podium. “The guys kind of helped me through this because I saw them go out there and kill it,” Hartville said. “I went to vault calm and collected and just said, ‘Don’t try too hard for something, let it happen,’ and tonight it happened.” Mike Wilner finished the team competition in first place on the still rings, earning a spot in event finals where he was just shy of earning his first individual Big Ten title. Wilner (15.45) was surpassed by Iowa’s Javier Balboa (15.50), placing him second on the podium. “Mike left the door open a little bit with one giant swing to handstand,” Spring said. “The handstand was not great, so he left the

RN / LA UNF U UN DR RN A/ Y IN C UN PA IT RK IN G UT ILI ON S TIE I S I TE NC L.

BY GINA MUELLER

Volleyball hosts spring exhibitions

mindset of ‘We are in it to win it.’” The rest of the night resembled the season the Illini have had. Illinois earned a season-low on the pommel horse, scoring a 66.55, but earned a season-high on the vault with a 73.60. “We had some extreme highs and lows,” Spring said. “It was once again the inconsistency that killed us. We had some outstanding performances on what we thought were our weaker events, but high bar was the event that really knocked the wind out of us. ... We went one for five on high bar, and you can’t win a Big Ten Championship with mistakes like that.” Though the team performance was inconsistent, there were a few standout performances from Illini gymnasts. The story of the night belonged to Illinois freshman Fred Hartville. He finished in first place after the team competition, earning a spot in the event finals on Saturday. With

FU

Illini place 5th at Big Ten Championships

3B

217-328-3770

217-840-5134

www.robsapartments.com

202 E. Green, C.

1,4

F    

Balcony, elevator, jacuzzi tubs

503 E. Clark

Ef.

F    

$445-$475. Secure, quiet, campus convenient

508 E. Clark, C

1,2,3,4

B    

Laundry on site

101 W. Park, U.

1,2

U    

$510-$570. Free parking, EZ bus to campus

408 E. Green, C.

1,2,3

F    

Intercom entry, remodeled bathrooms

Roland Realty

106 S. Coler, U.

3

F    

Patio/Balcony

501 S. Sixth St

3,4

F    

55 E. Healey, C.

2

F    

Parking & internet included

33 E. Chalmers St.

2

F    Cozy 2BR w/ hardwood floors, gas stove, pool

303 W. Green, C.

1,2,3

F    

Guest parking lots, balconies off bedrooms

404 E. Stoughton

2,3

F    Updated units, dishwasher, central A/C

505 S. Fourth, C.

1,2

F    

Laundry on site, Balconies

408 E. Stoughton

1,2

F    Quiet building, near county market & engineering quad

911 S. Locust, C.

1

F    

Laundry on site

901-905-909 S. First

1

F    Spacious singles w/ great storage, pool, on 22 Illini

56 1/2 E. Green, C.

1

F    

Dishwashers

805-807-809 S. First

1

F    Free on-site laundry, spacious 1BRs w/ storage, pool, 22 bus

410 E. Green, C.

1,2,3

F    

Lots of updates, must-see units!

903 S. First

2

F    Spacious affordable 2BR, free laundry, covered parking, pool

56-58 E. Daniel

2

F    Updated units w/ dishwasher, central A/C, pool

1011 S. Locust

2

F    Most affordable apts anywhere on campus-$375/person!

304 S. Fifth

5+

F    

5BR House, hardwood, free parking, close to County Market

2

F    

Rare 2BR house, hardwd, free pking, basement & front porch

Burnham 310 310 E. Springfield, C.

www.burnham310.com St.,1,2,3

Campustown Rentals

217-239-2310

F    Fitness, theater, game room, pets OK, internet & cable campustownrentals.com

217-366-3500

101 E. Green St

2,3,4

F    

Renovated units available, laundry on site, from $509

22 E. Chalmers

207 E. Green St.

4

F    

From $549, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

Royse & Brinkmeyer

909 S. Third St.

3,4,5+

F    

From $510, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

Royse and Brinkmeyer Apts

309 E. Daniel

3,4

F    

From $499, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

Tenant Union

311 E. Daniel

3,4

F    

From $499, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

U of I Tenant Union

913 S. Third St.

3

F    

From $539, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

The Tower at Third

Country Fair Apartments

myapartmenthome.com

2106 W. White St., C.

B    FREE Heat, digital cable and high speed internet

1,2

Hunsinger Enterprises

www.hunsingerapts.com

Urbana Houses

5+

F    

Urbana Apartments

2,3,4

F    

217-359-3713 217-337-1565

302 E. John, Champaign

Luxury apts, roomate matching, 1 block to campus

1,2,3

B    Fireplaces, lofts, garages

   

Free! Check Landlord Complaint Records & Lease Review!

2

F    Starting at $699, 1 block from Green St., individual leases

Tri County Management Group

Parking $40/mo.

Urbana Approved for groups. 7, 8, and 9 bedrooms.

705 S. First, C.

3,4

F    

Parking $40/mo

Several Locations to Choose From.

Wampler Property Management 505 S. Busey, U.

2

F    

$835/mo.

U    

Heat Included

711 W. Main, U.

St.

F    

$550/mo.

712 W. California, U.

5+

U    

$2700/mo, Best Deal, Rooming House

808 W. Nevada, U.

3

F    

$1875/mo.

204 E. Clark, C.

1,2,3

B    Most Utilities Paid

406 E. Clark, C.

1

F    

$540/mo.

409 W. Elm, C.

2

U    

604 E. Clark, C.

1

F    

$595/mo.

807-809 W. Illinois, U

1

F    

$595/mo.

106 E John

1

U    

$710/mo.

217-366-3500

F    3 blocks from Green, individual leases, roommate matching

217-352-1335

www.wamplerapartments.com

2

lofts54.com

217-367-2009

www.tricountymg.com

505 W. Springfield, C.

Lofts 54

217-367-0720

www.tower3rd.com

F    

Heat Included

217-333-0112

www.tenantunion.illinois.edu

Ef. 3/4

217-367-6626

217-352-1129

www.roysebrinkmeyer.com

906 S. Locust, C.

Klatt Properties

217-351-8900

www.roland-realty.com

54 E. Chalmers St.

4

MHM Properties

www.mhmproperties.com

Champaign Houses

4,5+

F    

Free Parking, Big rooms, porch, deck, basement, remodeled...

404 1/2 E. White, C.

St.

F    

On site laundry, Pet friendly! $425/month

Champaign Apartments

1,2,3,4

F    

Free internet, balconies, lofts, intercom, private baths...

605 W. Springfield, C.

4

U    

House, hardwood floors, dishwasher, pet friendly! $1200/mo.

603 W. Green, Urbana

3

U    On site laundry, diswasher, pet friendly! $1500/mo.

305 W. Elm, Urbana

2,3

U    

607 W. Springfield, C.

1

U    On site laundry, pet friendly, $525-$570/mo.

604 W. Nevada, U.

1

U

Next Chapter Properties - 75 Armory

www.75armory.com

75 E. Armory, C.

2,3,4

F    

512 S. Neil Suite C, C.

2,3,4

F    

Professional Property Management

Weiner Companies, Ltd

217-337-8852

217-356-3511

New 9-ft. ceilings

www.ppmrent.com

217-351-1800

www.weinercompanies.com

217-384-8001

Updated kitchen with dishwasher, pet friendly, $735/mo.

  On site laundry, large units, cats allowed, $575/mo.

502 E. Springfield, C.

3

F    

2 Full Bath, Balcony

906 W. Springfield, Urbana

1

F    On site laundry, pet friendly, $525-$560/mo.

503 E. Springfield, C.

1

F    

Newer, D/W

714 S. Race, Urbana

1

U    

Pet friendly, car port, $530/mo.


4B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Monday, April 8, 2013

FOR RENT

Services

Employment

Help Wanted Full Time 010 Part Time 020 Full/Part Time 030 Seasonal Jobs 035 Job Wanted 040 Business Oppurtunities 050

DAILY ILLINI CLASSIFIEDS

Business Services Child Care Cleaning Mind, Body & Spirit Tutoring Financial

Merchandise Textbooks Clothing Computers Furniture Pets TV Garage Sales For Sale Miscellaneous

110 120 130 140 150 160

Rentals

Transportation

220 230 235 240 250 260 280 285 290

Apartments

Automobiles 310 Bicycles 320 Motorcycles/Scooters 330

Furnished/Unfurnished

Furnished Unfurnished Sublets Summer Only Off-Campus Other For Rent

410 420 430 440 450 460 500

Houses (For Rent Condos/Duplexes Rooms Room & Board Roommate Wanted Office Space Parking/Storage For Rent Wanted To Rent

Real Estate

510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590

Condos/Duplexes Houses (For Sale) Residential Property Open Houses

Things To Do

620 630 650 660

Campus Events Community Events

Classes

Announcements

710 720 750

Lost & Found

810

Volunteer Opportunities 820

Miscellaneous

830

Adoption/Egg Donation 850

Shout Outs Shout Outs Greek Shout Outs

900 901

Rates Billed: 45¢/Word Minimum $2.00 Paid-In-Advance: 38¢/Word Deadline 2pm on the day before publication. Online Ads Classifieds automatically appear online at dailyillini.com

Place your ad by phone! Call 217.337.8337 Monday - Friday, 9am - 5:30pm

Important Information About Your Ad

Report errors immediately by calling 337-8337.We cannot be responsible for more than one dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incorrect insertion if you do not notify us of the error by 2 pm on the day of the first insertion. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher.The Daily Illini shall have the right to revise, reject or cancel, in whole or in part, any advertisement at any time. The Daily Illini shall not be liable for failure to print, publish or circulate all or any part of any issue in which an advertisement accepted by the publisher is contained. The Daily Illini extends credit to classified advertisers as a courtesy.We reserve the right to set credit limits, to require cash in advance, and/or to require a completed credit application. The Daily Illini screens classified advertising to avoid misleading or false messages. Please be cautious in answering ads, especially when you are asked to send money. If you have a question or concern about any advertisement which has appeared in our paper, we will be happy to discuss it with you. Please call 337-8337. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, and similar state and local laws which make it illegal for any person to cause to be published any advertisement relating to the transfer, sale, rental, or lease of any housing which expresses limitation, specifications or discrimination as to race, color, creed, class, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status, physical or mental handicap, personal appearance, sexual orientation, family responsibilities, political affiliation, prior arrest or conviction record, source of income, or the fact that such person is a student. Specification in employment classifications are made only where such factors are bonafide occupational qualifications necessary for employment.

employment

HELP WANTED Full time

010

   ' !)# ! "     $ $"       " "  %$$)"#! #$# (!"!#&#$ $$!#  '$ $""#$   $$   

$ !(#  " %#$#!$$%$%%%!(!# !&%!!#$(!%#$%& %$ #   '  % !""!#%& %$ %# $"$ 

  !# (((!"#!!

HELP WANTED Part time

020

&+  %+,) *+, &++'$"- "&&**"*+ & $ )$/ ) +")  ! %$  ()'! **') ''% ') &   ( ) . # ."$$ ()'-" '+ & )% (,*  )*'& %,*+   -"$$        /* ( ) . # '% (,+ ) "* -"$$  !') ,*  %'# )* & &'+(($/)"- )*$" &* &  **)/ $$   ')   

HELP WANTED Full/Part time

APARTMENTS

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

 

$!" ! !     #$ "  &  !"#     % $$"#  

 

  

        



      "!-++)/% 0$0./  #0-*&.%"!(( ),0.0.".."(-'  111(&* +(*.%&-",-+, +)   





    

709 W Main, Urbana 4 Bedroom Townhouse â&#x20AC;˘ Furnished â&#x20AC;˘ 2 Full Baths â&#x20AC;˘ Central Air & Heat â&#x20AC;˘ 2 Garage Spaces â&#x20AC;˘ Washer&Dryer â&#x20AC;˘ 2 Outside Spaces â&#x20AC;˘ Dishwasher â&#x20AC;˘ 1,360 Sq. Ft Hunsinger Enterprises, Inc. 217-337-1565 | www.hunsingerapts.com

     

   

 #!"       

        "       



$GYHUWLVHLQWKH ',&ODVVLILHGV 

606 E White, Champaign

1,2,3&4 BEDROOMS

(White near Wright, Across from future ECE Building!!)

Video Intercom In Unit Washer/Dryer Granite and Tile Satellite TV*

www.BaileyApartments.com

 

 # &%$& #(!# 

   &&$%      

  '''"#!"#%$!

 

HOUSES FOR RENT



  %  "' *%!#  ( '&("%*&!"' #%(" 

   ((&'      

  )))!!$%#$%'&#!

510

                

217-344-3008

$&7,21

$'6



        

  

www.WamplerApartments.com

*Available

#$$+ (%&  #((%& #*$%") '%""%'+ ###%"$$ '#"#")&' )))$## (%&#!

   ! )#% &$!&$## &#!

   !"# !   !!"$     

Office: 911 W. Springfield, Urbana IL

GUARANTEED COMPLETION!

711 W. Main, U: LG studios â&#x20AC;˘ $550/mo â&#x20AC;˘ furnished + utilities + parking 1BRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;˘ $540/mo â&#x20AC;˘ furnished + utilities + parking

NINQSPQFSUJFTDPN 

807-809 W. Illinois, U:

Amazing 1, 2, 3, & 4 Bedrooms!

1BRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;˘ $595/mo â&#x20AC;˘ furnished + utilities + parking

202 E Green St Spring Break Special!

604 E. Clark St.:

Sign a lease at 202 E Green St before Spring Break and we will: - include a 52â&#x20AC;? TV in your apartment - include Basic Cable and Internet - call about 10 month leases! (Limited number available!) /HDVLQJ 1RZ

 



 0/$!0''3- (* ' ,0$ /./*-3 /*2)#*0. +-/( )/2$/#'*)3 '*/ $)#$./*-$-)1 -3'*.  /*(+0.#$.+-/( )/$.#0"  )$.*(+' / 2$/#''-)) 2 !0-)$/0- ' /# -*0#) 2(/ /- .. .) 2/' .1 -3/#$)"#.  )- (* ' 2**5**-$)"- + /.&$/# )$) /.++'$) .  )/-'# /)$-0)-3*) .$/ -" *-./- /+-&$)"1$' '  */ *) '*&!-*((%*-0. '$) ./*" /3*0*)(+0.,0$&'3 )*)1 )$ )/'3#*-/2'&/* *2)/*2)-)1$'' !-*( 3/#0"0./ /#  (*)/#*- + -+ -.*)) '0 ..)$//$*))2/ -  ' . *)//'-$..!*-(*- $) !*-(/$*)/$4 $''$)*$. 0*- 3+#*)      

406 E. Clark St.:

ZZZPKPSURSHUWLHVFRP

LG 1BRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;˘ $595/mo â&#x20AC;˘ furnished + utilities + parking

106 E. John St.:

Take a video tour at www.bankierapts.com or call 217.328.3770 to set up an appointment

1BRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;˘ from $710/mo â&#x20AC;˘ utilities + parking

505 S. Busey Ave., U: 2BRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;˘ $835/mo â&#x20AC;˘ furnished + utilities + parking

60,7+$3$570(176 12:5(17,1*)25 6&+('8/(<2856+2:,1*12:

808 W. Nevada, U: 3-4BRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;˘ $1875/mo â&#x20AC;˘ partially furnished + utilities + parking

510

  

           " "$   " !       ###" ! 

%!1%24",%33).')$-!7%.$/& 4'423 %!1%"/3('1!$4!3).'!.$6),,"% -/5).'3/3(%#)373/23!13/41")'')1, */"2 %.%%$3/24",%3/41!0!13 -%.3&/13(%24--%1  #!-042 ()1$3(!-0!)'. "%$1//-2  

"!3(1//-*!#488)34" 2(/6%1 !2(%1!.$17%1).4.)3 "!,#/.7/5%1,//+20!1+/.

1$ /-0,%3%,7&41.)2(%$/4#(%2 3!",%2"%$2$1%22%12$%2+2")' #,/2%321%&1)'%1!3/1-)#1/6!5% $)2(6!2(%1  (%!01%.3 0%12/.   -!),)&).3%1%23%$ %6/4,$,/5% 3/2(/67/43(%!0!13-%.3). 0%12/.  6//$6!1 ),,)./)2%$4

$!$#% ! #! $"& "      ! !'  

  

*&#$& !&!"$"  "'$&$!!$#$! #%%!'"'$$"" )& &)"'&%'++&'"!* !)%$$*$!&'!&$ !"& (!&$  " 

     

Digital Comp. Lab, Grainger, Siebel 2 1/2 Blocks

 

     

440

#$%& %$!' !&%! "#% % #))!% #!!$'!# $&$) &&$%  $  ! %"##!! # &$"# $"!%  #! %!& &$$ ")$"!(# (%# $! %% ) !#!# !#%! % !$  !$&

Close In Urbana Locations

Luxury 1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Loft Apartments with Private Baths Flat Screen TV Cathedral Ceilings Balconies Free High Speed Internet

SUBLETS

Leasing for Fall 2013 Engineering Campus

Illini Union 3 1/2 Blocks Mech. Eng. 3 Blocks

Coming in August, 2013 Wine Cooler In-Unit Wi-Fi Mirror Closet Doors Covered Parking*



Do You Want Close?

450 HOUSES FOR RENT

Summer Only

     

       *!)-',-/)"*/. "./&*-*      +-    /0!&+.  *""!-++)  2+"!-++) /+  %-"""!-++)  " 0-&/3",+.&/"-"-.+* " 0-"!0&(!&*$.2&/%"("1/+-. +0-(0*!-3-++). *!"-$-+0*!*! +1"-"!,-'&*$ &)&/"!#-"",-'&*$ (*!)-',/.. $(+(*"/ 222(*!)-'/+!3 +)

           

430 SUBLETS

Unfurnished

6(//,1* 620(7+,1*"

030

  

          %"%(+&$)*/).,3'/&- )*1 "+.&)$++'& .&*)-#*,    ,*0&!".*+)*. %-",0& ".**/, ("(",-2+",&") "&-+,"#",,"! /.1"1&''.,&).%",&$%.+",-*)- ++'3&)+",-*) ( +(  */.%,*-+" .0")/" %(+&$)

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

6YRESV [SVHEHMRXLI 7IVZMGIW1IVGLER HMWISV8VERWTSVXE XMSRGEXIKSVMIWJSV ½ZIHE]W

     (  &$$"' )!!(' )#&+'"#(    !$ &$"$)#(+& ( ))'(      

  ***""%&$%&('$"

%RHFIIPMKMFPIJSV SYVWTIGMEP%GXMSR %HTVMGI

 :RUGV'D\V 

:RUGV'D\V



ZZZVPLWKDSDUWPHQWVFXFRP

 1 /LQFROQ 8

6/RFXVW&



ä&ODUN8



ä&ODUN8



ä&ODUN8



   

SHU SHUVRQ UDWHV

DSDUWPHQW"

 ZZZEDLOH\DSDUWPHQWVFRP

410

APARTMENTS

Looking for something to do on the weekend?

           



    

 

430 APARTMENTS

Unfurnished

Unfurnished

Take a class for fun, not because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s required.

CALENDAR

                          

x:DON WR 8 RI , (QJLQHHULQJ &DPSXV Âą $SDUWPHQWV +RXVHV RQO\  WR  EORFNV DZD\ x/DXQGU\ LQ $SDUWPHQW )XUQLVKHG ,QWHUQHW

Extra Value 1,2 & 3 bedrooms, courtyards, carports, & on-site laundry $450-$845

SUMMER SESSIONS STAR T MAY 20 AND JUNE 10.

 Start planning your summer now at harpercollege.edu/summer Luxury Locations 1-2 bedrooms, beautifully appointed, oasis, -XO3DUW$6NLOO fireplaces, balconies, & garages $725-$895 6.,//  Newly Remodeled 1-2 bedrooms, some w/lofts,   spacious  floor plans, on-site     laundry, & garages $580-$840 



        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        











A S S O C

N A C H O

G R O I N

L O A N T T T O M Q U E U R N I P T I A D E L L L E Y E S C N T E S D

 C O R G I

S L O A N



T O W

B O I G L G H E O A R G N H A R E C U D O R O M S B U R L O A M

 U S M A R S H A L

L L A N O

                          

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

                          





A R E N A

R O W D Y

B A S S

U S E U P

G R A I L

        





 Daily Illini    Classifi  eds         

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        





        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        





B O N D















H O U S E





 

A R O H K O

        

         Get out. Sound off. Champaign-Urbana.





F E I A N P D T O

        

        

THE217.COM



M A G E G Y H E M N C A B A S E R I T O U A L M

        



S U E R

        





  

 









        







        











        

                 

        

x %HGURRP $SDUWPHQWV

217-352-1129







        

        

EORFNV DZD\ x %HGURRP $SDUWPHQWV x/DXQGU\ LQ $SDUWPHQW )XUQLVKHG  ,QWHUQHW ZZZDGYSURSHUWLHVFRP



6XGRNX 



        

        







        

        

&$0386 :$/. 72 &$0386

x:DON WR 8 RI , (QJLQHHULQJ &DPSXV Âą $SDUWPHQWV +RXVHV RQO\  WR  EORFNV DZD\ x/DXQGU\ )XUQLVKHG x:DON WR 8LQRI$SDUWPHQW , (QJLQHHULQJ &DPSXV Âą ,QWHUQHW $SDUWPHQWV +RXVHV RQO\  WR  ZZZDGYSURSHUWLHVFRP x %HGURRP $SDUWPHQWV EORFNV DZD\ x:DON WR 8 LQ RI $SDUWPHQW , (QJLQHHULQJ)XUQLVKHG &DPSXV Âą x/DXQGU\ $SDUWPHQWV ,QWHUQHW +RXVHV RQO\  WR 







        

 : &ODUN 8   %5  : 0DLQ 8  %5  %5  %DWK 1002 W. Clark U.  :1&ODUN & 28BR  %5 : 6WRXJKWRQ 8  %5  %5  %DWK 1003 W. Main U.  BR 82 Bath  :2&ODUN  %5   %5 1005 W. Stoughton U. :10DLQ BR8  : 0DLQ 8   %5 1007 W. Clark U.  :10DLQ BR8  %5 %5  %DWK 1007 W. Main U.  1 *UHJRU\ 1 BR 8   %5  2  %5 1010 W. Main U.  1 +DUYH\ 1 BR 8 & 2 BR Bath  1 +DUYH\ 8  %5  %DWK 203 N. Gregory U.  : &ODUN 1 BR8  %5  %5 204 N. Harvey U.  : &ODUN 2 BR8  : 6WRXJKWRQ 8  %5





        

:$/. 72 x %HGURRP $SDUWPHQWV WALK TO:$/. CAMPUS! &$0386 &$0386 :$/. 72 72

Transfer summer credit back to your home university.



        

x %HGURRP $SDUWPHQWV

Save money.



        

:$/. 72 &$0386

x:DON WR 8 RI , (QJLQHHULQJ &DPSXV Âą $SDUWPHQWV +RXVHV RQO\  WR  EORFNV DZD\ x/DXQGU\ LQ $SDUWPHQW )XUQLVKHG ,QWHUQHW

830

THIS SUMMER...

Budget Minded 1-2 bedrooms, five great locations, air-conditioning, & off-street parking $425-$660

CHECK OUT

announcements

830 MISCELLANEOUS

MISCELLANEOUS

What are you waiting for?



&DOO',&ODVVLILHGV

announcements

430

+HOSWRPDNHZHOONQRZQRIVXGRNXWRSLFDOFRP <RXOLNHWKLVZHEVLWH"7KHQUHFRPPHQGLWWR\RXUIULHQGV ,I\RXRZQ\RXUVHOIDZHEVLWHSODFHDOLQNWRVXGRNXWRSLFDOFRP ,I\RXSULQWRXWWKHVXGRNXVWKHQSULQWWKHPWZLFHDQGJLYHRQHWRRQHRI\RXUIULHQGV 7HOO\RXUDFTXDLQWDQFHVIULHQGVDQGWHDPPDWHVDERXWVXGRNXWRSLFDOFRP -XVWKHOSWRPDNHWKLVVLWHZHOONQRZQ

     !  " ! ! #!$ #"#     

   

        

                          

%( &&"#&'!$)' )'$(#"#$('   )&"'*** "# "'&$&#$ #!  

1HHGWRVXEOHW\RXU

7+5((%/2&.6727KH,OOLQL8QLRQ

)XUQLVKHGSDUNLQJDYDLODEOHODXQGU\DYDLODEOH

      



EHGEDWK EHGEDWK EHGEDWK EHGEDWK

*C as h N -in yo o re -ad u fu va m n n yo ay ds, ce ur ca bu on ad nc t ly. . el

ä6WRXJKWRQ8 

8SGDWHG  EHGURRP   EDWK KRXVH 9HU\ VSDFLRXV IXOO\ IXUQLVKHG QHDU (QJLQHHULQJ FDPSXV ZDVKHU DQG GU\HU LQ EDVHPHQW IUHH SDUNLQJ  SHU PRQWK $XJXVW   $'9$17$*( 3523(57,(6 ZZZDGYSURSHUWLHVFRP 

        

Furnished/Unfurnished



        

APARTMENTS

rentals

ä&KXUFK&



        

FOR RENT



        



                  

                

($UPRU\&

        

220

        

BOOKS

2 Bedroom

        

merchandise

 



(QWHUWKHQXPEHUVLQWKHEODQNVSDFHVVRWKDW HDFKURZFROXPQDQG[VTXDUHFRQWDLQVRQO\RQH RIHDFKQXPEHU7KHUHLVRQO\RQHVROXWLRQ VROX WLRQLQ&ODVVLILHGVDQGRQOLQHDWZZZGDLO\LOOLQLFRP 









 

 

 

 



The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 133  

Monday, April 8, 2013

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you