Page 1

St. Patrick’s Day: Corned beef, cabbage and green beer IN BUZZ

A time to heal Pride in yourself

Gophers loom

FEATURES, 6A

SPORTS, 1B

Read Melanie Stone’s fourth part

Big Ten Tournament begins as Illinois faces Minnesota

Despite pressure from the LGBT community about body image, some stay strong

AS A GIRL THINKS, 4A

The Daily Illini

Thursday March 14, 2013

The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

www.DailyIllini.com

Vol. 142 Issue 121

|

FREE

Vote results favor Chief Illiniwek

Strike over; negotiations continuing SEIU ends 3-day strike with rally in front of Union BY CARINA LEE STAFF WRITER

Negotiations between the Service Employees International Union Local 73 and the University will begin again Monday. The union ended its three-day strike Wednesday. Campus spokeswoman Robin Kaler said she is optimistic about reaching a fair deal satisfying both parties. “We are confident that our offer to the union is fair, and we are confident that we can work with the mediator and the union to reach an agreement,” she said. But Ricky Baldwin, chief negotiator for the union, which represents about 800 University food and building service workers, said they deserve more wages than what the University offered last week. “We are in a good position to expect better from the University and we deserve it,” Baldwin said. “The work they do is essential, and they are very low paid.” The strike ended with a solidarity rally at the Illini Union. Speakers from other organizations, such as the Graduate Employees’ Organization and Campus Faculty Association,

High: 39˚ Low: 31˚

Referendum shows students support Chief by 4-to-1 margin BY TYLER DAVIS STAFF WRITER ROCHELLE WILSON THE DAILY ILLINI

Building service worker Thomas Haley raises his fist in support of the Service Employees International Union Local 73. The union has been on strike for three days and will resume negotiations with the University on Monday. came to support a fair contract for union workers. Sarah Cassinelli, co-chair of the GEO, said the University needs to appreciate the union’s workers more. “I have to say that the fact that the SEIU members are forced on the picket line is a failure of a public institution,” Cassinelli said during the rally. “Workers on this campus are undervalued.” Adam Rosen, SEIU communications director, said turnout on the picket lines in the past three days was better than expected. “We’ve been out here for almost 62 hours, and they won’t stop. It’s only getting stronger,” Rosen said around noon Wednesday. “We have less than 3 percent of the membership (that) has

crossed the picket line, which is a great figure.” The University had called in volunteers to fill in for the union members until Wednesday. Kaler said normal services were not influenced throughout the period and said she did not know of any complaints. “We’ve continued normal food service — all the hours and all the choices — throughout the strike,” Kaler said in an email. “We’ve been keeping paper towels and toilet paper supplied to restrooms, cleaned every restroom in the residence halls at least once every day and emptied garbage as quickly as possible.”

“We are in a good position to expect better from the University, and we deserve it. The work they do is essential, and they are very low paid.” RICKY BALDWIN, chief negotiator for union

Carina can be reached at lee713@ dailyillini.com.

The previously withheld Chief Illiniwek referendum results show that a majority of students that voted reaffirmed their support of the mascot. The referendum question, which asked if students “support Chief Illiniwek as the official symbol” of the University, was met with 9,003 votes in favor and 2,517 against. The results had been sequestered by the Moot Court Board Judiciary, a board of College of Law students that accepts student complaints. The judiciary lifted the hold prior to hearing an appeal on the constitutionality of Illinois Student Senate enabling a campus symbol selection survey in midJanuary. The results of the survey are still being withheld until a decision is made. Justice Tyler Anthony, graduate student, said student senator Matthew Paarlberg had submitted a motion this week to remove the injunction, but it was denied. However, Anthony said this motion brought to light a defect in the original injunction; the Campus Student Election Commis-

A short history of campus mascot selections The Illinois Student Senate endorsed none of the Chief referenda questions. • Spring 2004: 70 percent (9161) of students support Chief Illiniwek as the symbol of the University. • Spring 2008: 79 percent (7718) of students support the reinstatement of Chief Illiniwek as the University. • 2011: Illinois Student Senate ascribes its support and co-sponsors the Students4aNEWmascot (later Campus Spirit Revival) search for a new mascot among the student body • Spring 2013: 78 percent (9003) of students support Chief Illiniwek as the symbol of the University.

See MASCOT, Page 3A

UI launches new farm research center College of ACES to house center for agricultural research

KENDALL MCCAUGHERTY THE DAILY ILLINI

Brooke Fairbanks, senior in FAA, takes notes while her group discusses their post-conflict urban development plan of Mogadishu, Somalia.

Architecture projects focus on Somalia Students challenged to design models tailored to an unfamiliar environment BY ABIGAIL SOLANO STAFF WRITER

University students enrolled in Architecture 476 — Architecture Design and Exploration— are designing models of structures, such as permanent houses and markets, for the 400,000 refugees in Mogadishu, Somalia. The theme for this class, taught by professor Camden Greenlee, is Post-Conflict Urban Microcosms. The project is centered on demonstrating a way of rebuilding this society, which

INSIDE

has endured civil war for 20 years and has little infrastructure and a poor economy. “The goal of the studio is to challenge students to design in an environment that they are not used to at all so that they have a heightened sensitivity towards sustainability, building practices, building materials and techniques, but also the social systems that take place, such as the culture of the area,” Greenlee said. The students’ first assignment was to research the area. They

created pamphlets that graphically represent Somali culture, climate, agriculture, economy, family and social structures. The second step was to create a site model differentiating large existing structures, rubble and demolished buildings. Danielle Tellez, senior in FAA, is building a model of a market. “My project in particular focuses on how a society can effectively rebuild a market, an essential social structure in Somali culture for distributing goods,” she said. “Once more permanent forms of housing become available, the leftover material from the tent communities can be repurposed.”

Tellez said creating this model was difficult because of a lack of geographical information. “This required a lot of guesswork on our part because there is not a lot of information aside from what we can see through Google Maps,” Tellez said. Each project will respond to a problem that the students found during their research. Adam Lewis, senior in FAA, designed a graphic of foreign aid in Somalia. “What I learned was that foreign aid is so vast that the data can act as a graphic itself to form an infographic,” Lewis said. “My individual project relates

See ARCHITECTURE, Page 3A

and University representatives will provide guidance for the center. Heather Davis, head of TIAA-CREF’s global private fixed income and equity investBY ELEANOR BLACK ments, represented TIAACONTRIBUTING WRITER CREF’s at the celebration. Representatives from a “It’s an idea that was born leading financial services pro- out of a need that we found, vider joined University fac- to have quality data and deep ulty Wednesday to celebrate research in the sector,” Davis the launch of the Farmland said. Research Center. Chancellor Phyllis Wise The purpose of this center is spoke next and established to enhance farmland research herself as a supporter of and initiatives for University TIAA-CREF and the new students and the agricultural program. “I’ve always thought of community. The Teachers Insurance TIAA-CREF as where I’d a nd A n nu put my retireity Associame nt mo n tion — College ey and never Retirement realized exactly how broad Equities Fund your interests is a nonprofare,” Wise said it founded by referring to the Andrew Carnorganization. egie in 1918 She spoke for the purabout the pose of securing retirement founding of the funds for acaUniversity in HEATHER DAVIS, 1867 as one of demics by TIAA-CREF official the first univerinvesting in farmland-relatsities built on ed projects. donated land and that because The company has been of this, the University has an working on the program for obligation to help people. two or three years and gave “Learning in the land-grant the University $5 million to tradition means that ... we help create it. work on fundamental probThe new center was lems, but you make sure that approved by the board of trust- those fundamental solutions ees March 7 and will be housed get translated into applicawithin the University’s College tions that make the world betof ACES building as a special- ter and make it a better place ized academic unit, according for people,” Wise said. to a news release. She also said the new It will also support Farm- arrangement is a collaboration doc, the University’s research that has been in the works for program on the agricultural many years. sector. An advisory board See FARMLAND, Page 3A comprised of TIAA-CREF

“It’s an idea that was born out of a need that we found, to have quality data and deep reasearch.”

Po l i ce 2 A | H o ro s co p e s 2 A | A s A G i r l Th i n ks 4 A | C ro s swo rd 5 A | Co m i c s 5 A | G re e ks & C a m p u s 6 A | S p o r t s 1 B | Cl a s s i f i e d s 3 B - 4 B | S u d o ku 4 B


2A

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Thursday, March 14, 2013

The Daily Illini 512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 217 • 337 • 8300 Copyright © 2013 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Samantha Kiesel 217 • 337-8365 editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor reporting Nathaniel Lash 217 • 337-8343 mewriting@Daily Illini.com Managing editor online Hannah Meisel 217 • 337-8353 meonline@DailyIllini. com Managing editor visuals Shannon Lancor 217 • 337-8353 mevisuals@DailyIllini. com Website editor Danny Wicentowski Social media director Sony Kassam Video editor Krizia Vance Vidcast Producer Isabel Morales News editor Taylor Goldenstein 217 • 337-8352 news@DailyIllini.com Daytime editor Maggie Huynh 217 • 337-8350 news@DailyIllini.com Asst. news editors Safia Kazi Sari Lesk Rebecca Taylor Features editor Jordan Sward 217 • 337-8369 features@DailyIllini. com

Asst. features editor Alison Marcotte Candice Norwood Sports editor Jeff Kirshman 217 • 337-8363 sports@DailyIllini.com Asst. sports editors Darshan Patel Max Tane Dan Welin Photo editor Daryl Quitalig 217 • 337-8344 photo@DailyIllini.com Asst. photo editor Kelly Hickey Opinions editor Ryan Weber 217 • 337-8366 opinions@DailyIllini. com Design editors Bryan Lorenz Eunie Kim Michael Mioux 217 • 337-8345 design@DailyIllini.com Copy chief Kevin Dollear copychief@DailyIllini. com Asst. copy chief Johnathan Hettinger Advertising sales manager Molly Lannon ssm@IlliniMedia.com Classified sales director Deb Sosnowski Daily Illini/Buzz ad director Travis Truitt Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

Night system staff for today’s paper Night editor: Samantha Kiesel Photo night editor: Zoe Grant Copy editors: Jamal Collier, Lindsey Rolf,Rob

Garcia, Jamal Collier Designers: Austin Baird, Danny Weilandt, Alyssa Peterson, Maggie McConville, Sarah Fischer Page transmission: Natalie Zhang

POLICE

Champaign Aggravated battery was reported in the 700 block of South Sixth Street around 3:30 a.m. Sunday. Q Retail theft was reported at Walmart, 2610 N. Prospect Avenue, just after midnight Tuesday. According to the report, the offender concealed merchandise and attempted to leave the business without paying. Q A 72-year-old was arrested on the charge of battery in the 100 block of West Washington Street around 3 p.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the suspect battered the victim. A notice to appear was issued. Q

Urbana Q Two 19-year-old males were arrested at South Goodwin and Springfield avenues

HOROSCOPES

around 11 a.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the suspects were arrested under the charges of domestic battery and unlawful restraint. Q A 22-year-old male was arrested on multiple charges near the intersection of North Wright and Beslin streets around 11 a.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the suspect was arrested on the charges of no driver’s license, maintaining public property forfeiture, cannabis delivery over 30 grams, intent to manufacture controlled substance and assisting a tow truck. Police saw the offender driving a vehicle on a city of Urbana street and knew he did not have a valid driver’s license. The offender was stopped and arrested during the search. Police searched the offender’s vehicle, locating cannabis and cocaine.

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)

BY NANCY BLACK

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

Today’s Birthday

Learn and study to get ahead this year. Which dream shall you turn to reality? Home temptations hold you until summer, when friendly winds blow you outside. Close financial management makes all this travel and fun possible. Bring your closest ones along. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Today is a 7 — Good news and fresh ideas come in from far away. Listen carefully, and keep your objective in mind. It’s not a good time for travel yet; wait four days for Mercury to go direct.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

Today is a 7 — Take a walk on the wild side (or at least outdoors); it will do you good. Count your winnings. Don’t let loved ones dip into your piggy bank. It will serve them well to earn their own keep.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

Today is a 9 — The Moon and Mars are in your sign today. Delight in the moment; you’ve earned it. Relax rigid viewpoints to enjoy it even more. Try to attain objectivity. Make a commitment you’ll enjoy keeping.

Today is an 8 — Throw yourself into a potentially explosive moment. Controversy could arise, or a brilliant scheme. If it’s too wild, it won’t work. Stand up for what’s right. Improve your living conditions by cleaning house. Study with passion.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)

Today is a 7 — Take on managing old problems. Whenever you’re stuck, don’t be afraid to let your partner take the lead. Provide emotional support. Listen closely to your intuition.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)

Today is a 7 — Not everything is what it seems. Watch out for strange requests; there’s no shame in turning them down. A little investment makes a big difference at home. Renew something that’s no longer functional.

Periodical postage paid at Champaign, IL 61821. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday in summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-of-town and out-of-state rates available upon request.

Today is a 7 — You have what you need. Clear confusion before proceeding. Intuition is especially strong now. Use your head and find another way. Relax at home. Ponder someone’s advice. Upgrade your equipment, maybe. You could trip over your own feet.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)

Today is an 8 — A serendipitous moment of connection occurs. Be receptive to love. Use what you know, and be open to learning. Apply your

University A 27-year-old male was arrested in the 200 block of South Neil Street at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. He was arrested on charges of driving with a suspended license and having two outstanding in-state warrants for failure to appear in court. According to the report, the suspect’s vehicle was initially pulled over for following another vehicle too closely. Q Theft was reported at the Rehabilitation Education Center, 1207 S. Oak St., at 2 p.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the offender had stolen two ladders attached to a parked maintenance truck. The ladders are estimated to be worth $600. Q

Compiled by Hannah Prokop stamp of power. Intuition steers you in the right direction. Discover another treasure.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) Today is a 7 — You’re starting to realize how much you have. It could be in a chaotic moment, with confusion reigning. Keep gathering valuable information. Let go of expectations for how it should be for a brilliant revelation.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)

Today is an 8 — Take a theory to heart. The possibility of error is high; consider the consequences before acting. More work means more savings. Discipline is required. Make the decision intuitively. Let your work inspire you. Stash away something of value.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)

Today is an 8 — Explore new work possibilities. Write it all down so you don’t forget. You’re immensely popular now. Always apply yourself to your goal. Find out how much it costs, before purchasing. Let your partner lead.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)

Today is a 9 — Go out on a limb. In a blinding insight, make an investment in your career. Associates contribute ideas. Having a meticulous partner helps. Be skeptical, although you’re right on the mark. Seek imaginative new revenue sources.

ZW_bo_bb_d_(Yec

TODAY ON DAILYILLINI.COM

Regular opinions still found online

HOW TO CONTACT US The Daily Illini is located at 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. Our office hours are 9a.m. to 5:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

General contacts:

To read the opinions of Andrew Horton, Nora Ibrahim and Joanna Rothenberg check out their columns online at DailyIllini. com.

Main number...........(217) 337-8300 Advertising .............. (217) 337-8382 Classified ...................(217) 337-8337 Newsroom................(217) 337-8350 Newsroom fax: ........ (217) 337-8328 Production ................(217) 337-8320

Tim Tebow a regular scapegoat

Newsroom

Tim Tebow is arguably the most polarizing figure in professional sports today, but as columnist Aryn Braun explains, Tebow doesn’t deserve the criticism thrown his way. To read more check out DailyIllini.com.

Living the Illini hockey lifestyle Though they compete like and live the life of a Division-I athlete, columnist Patrick Kelley explains how competing at the club level gives Illinois hockey players a unique experience of time commitment and student life unlike that of a scholarship athlete. To read more, visit DailyIllini.com.

The Daily Illini is online everywhere you are. Visit DailyIllini.com

Corrections: If you think something is incorrectly reported, please call Editor in Chief Samantha Kiesel at 337-8365. News: If you have a news tip, please contact Daytime editor Maggie Huynh at 337-8350 or News Editor Taylor Goldenstein at 337-8352 or e-mail news@DailyIllini.com. Press releases: Please send press releases to news@DailyIllini.com Photo: For questions about photographs or to suggest photo coverage of an event, please contact Photo Editor Daryl Quitalig at 337-8344 or e-mail photo@ DailyIllini.com. Sports: To contact the sports staff, please call Sports Editor Jeff Kirshman at 337-8363 or e-mail sports@dailyillini.com. Calendar: Please submit events for publication in print and online at the217.com/calendar. Employment: If you would like to work in the newspaper’s editorial department, please contact Managing Editor Reporting Nathaniel Lash at 337-8343 or email mewriting@DailyIllini.com. Letters to the editor: Contributions may be sent to: Opinions, The Daily Illini, 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820 or e-mailed to opinions@ DailyIllini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” Letters are limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. UI students must include their year in school and college. The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions. Daily Illini On-air: If you have

Follow us on Twitter @TheDailyIllini for today’s headlines and breaking news.

comments or questions about our broadcasts on WPGU-FM 107.1, please call 337-8381 or e-mail meonair@DailyIllini.com. DailyIllini.com: Contact Managing Editor Online Hannah Meisel at 337-8353 or meonline@DailyIllini. com for questions or comments about our Web site.

Advertising

Placing an ad: If you would like to

Like us on CORRECTIONS Facebook for an When The Daily Illini makes a interactive Daily mistake, we will correct it in this place. Daily Illini strives for IlliniThe experience. accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Samantha Kiesel at 337Subscribe 8365.

place an ad, please contact our advertising department. Q Classified ads: (217) 337-8337 or e-mail diclassifieds@illinimedia. com. Q Display ads: (217) 337-8382 or e-mail diadsales@illinimedia.com. Employment: If you are interested in working for the Advertising Department, please call (217) 3378382 and ask to speak to Molly Lannon, advertising sales manager.

to us on YouTube for video coverage and the Daily Illini Vidcast.





3URRI'

$G3 'HDGOLQ )LUVW5X 3XEOLFD 6HFWLRQ 6SHFV

T$S T$S T5H

,QLWLDOB

2%3%!2#( !$-).)342!4)/. -3

0(93)#)!. !33)34!.4 345$)%3 -3

2%30)2!4/29 #!2% -3

-%$)#!, ,!"/2!4/29 3#)%.#% -3

Rush University’s Master of Science in Research Administration program will prepare you for leadership roles in all areas of research administration. Develop core competencies needed for practice as a research manager and complete an investigational research project suitable for publication in an academic journal.

The Physician Assistant Studies program at Rush University combines traditional course work with advanced practice clinical experiences to prepare highly trained, primary-care physicians’ assistants – one of the most sought-after health care professions in the United States.

As the only Master of Science degree program in Respiratory Care offered in Illinois, we prepare respiratory therapists in the growing field of respiratory care. Our graduates learn and apply scientific principles to prevent, identify and treat acute or chronic dysfunction of the cardiopulmonary system.

Learn to perform hundreds of diagnostic studies to identify disease states and conditions. Medical laboratory scientists generate as much as 70 percent of the data found in a patient’s medical record. Without a doubt, they are critical members of the health care team.

Whether your professional goal is to transform lives through practice, research, service or leadership, the College of Health Sciences at Rush University can help you secure a rewarding future. We have 20 degree and certificate options that span the most in-demand health care specialties. s !UDIOLOGY !U$ s #LINICAL ,ABORATORY -ANAGEMENT -3 s #LINICAL .UTRITION -3 s #LINICAL 0ASTORAL %DUCATION #ERTIlCATE s $OCTOR OF 0HILOSOPHY IN (EALTH 3CIENCES 0H$ s (EALTH 3YSTEMS -ANAGEMENT -3 s )MAGING 3CIENCES "3 s -EDICAL ,ABORATORY 3CIENCE "3 -3 s -EDICAL 0HYSICS 2ESIDENCY

s /CCUPATIONAL 4HERAPY -3 s 2ESEARCH !DMINISTRATION -3 s 2ESPIRATORY #ARE "3 -3 s 0ERFUSION 4ECHNOLOGY "3 -3 s 0HYSICIAN !SSISTANT 3TUDIES -3 s 3PECIALIST IN "LOOD "ANK 4ECHNOLOGY #ERTIlCATE s 3PEECH ,ANGUAGE 0ATHOLOGY -3 s 6ASCULAR 5LTRASOUND "3

Scan with your smartphone for more information

Rush offers some of the best graduate health science programs in the country. If you are interested in the growing field of health care, have a desire to help others and are looking for a great career opportunity, visit our website at www.rushu.rush.edu/health or call 312.942.1721 to learn more about our upcoming information sessions.

253( -%$)#!, #/,,%'% s #/,,%'% /& .523).' s #/,,%'% /& (%!,4( 3#)%.#%3 s 4(% '2!$5!4% #/,,%'% Rush is a not-for-profit health care, education and research enterprise comprising Rush University Medical Center, Rush University, Rush Oak Park Hospital and Rush Health.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Thursday, March 14, 2013

ARCHITECTURE

FARMLAND

the students practice how to set up an exhibit, and it puts pressure on students to represent FROM PAGE 1A themselves in a good way. to the market in post-conflict Lewis said that although Somalia and how the market Architecture 476 is an optioncan become temporary and al studio, he is glad he took the transportable.� class. His design is “This stua modular shelf dio was the that folds and first on my unfolds and crelist, because it ates the ability involved a new to form a marway of thinking ket at any locaabout architection, whether it ture,� he said. be a dilapidated “Too often, we structure or a think of archiADAM LEWIS, populated street tecture in a senior in FAA corner. certain manThe class will ner and order. display the models at an exhib- This class is reversing its way it held April 29 through May 3 of thinking, and that intrigued at Temple Hoyne Buell Hall, me.� 611 E. Lorado Taft Drive in Champaign. Abigail can be reached at solaGreenlee said the studio helps no3@dailyillini.com.

FROM PAGE 1A “This new partnership that we are starting today, which really is a result of a lot of work that has gone on for several years, is such a wonderful culmination of a great deal of investment on your part and on ours,� Wise said. Robert J. Hauser, dean of the College of ACES, used basketball to describe his feelings about this development. “It’s sort of like a basketball coach being asked after a big win, ‘So, how did it feel?’ And the coach’s typical response was ‘It’s about the kids,’ and in some sense, that’s very much how I feel, except that I really mean it.� Hauser added that as administrators, all they try to do is create conditions and an environment conducive to learning. “If I can create an environment, if I can facilitate the conditions needed for faculty to thrive and to create programs like the one we’re talking about here — I’m happy,� he said.

“Too often, we think of architecture in a certain manner and order.�

MASCOT

rule, he feels his counsel has a solid case. Now that the referendum’s results have been FROM PAGE 1A released, he said his next step sion was not a part of the appeal, will be to follow this case to its meaning the court did not have conclusion. the authority to stop it from pub“Now that the students have lishing election results. shown their voice that they do Commission chair Adam not want a new mascot, and Joines released the referendum they still hold on to the Chief results following the appeal. as their unofficial mascot, the The appeal was made by grad- logical next course is to make uate student Josh Good against sure no new mascot is created David Pileski on behalf of the by either the Illinois Student Illinois Student Senate. Each is Senate, Campus Spirit Revival represented by two College of (or) the University,� Good said. Law students. Good alleges that “It’s not in the interest of the the ISS was not within its con- students, and from what I’ve stitution in supporting student heard, it’s not in the interest of group Campus Spirit Revival’s the alumni.� Pileski is also confident in mascot search, citing previous referenda queshis counsel tions from 2004 and feels that and 2008 in the senate was which students within its conreaffirmed stitutional right. their support of “I ultimateChief Illiniwek. ly feel that the According to court will go article IX of the through the ISS constituprocess they tion, the senate have to, but I’m is bound by all very confident referenda queswe will have a tions passed favorable outby the student come,� Pileski JOSH GOOD, said. body. Pileski appellant The judiciary contends that these referenda is still deliberatquestions are not binding to the ing on the outcome of the appeal. senate because they are vague When asked when a decision and not self-executing — they can be expected, Anthony said were simply a measure of stu- he could not comment. dent opinion. Good said though it’s hard Tyler can be reached at tadavis2@ to judge how the judiciary will dailyillini.com

“The logical next course is to make sure no new mascot is created. . . . It’s not in the interest of the students.�

6KDUH<RXU 7KRXJKWV

/HWWHUVWRWKH(GLWRU

FOLAKE OSIBODU THE DAILY ILLINI

Robert Hauser, dean of the College of ACES, speaks at the launch of the TIAA-CREF Center for Farmland Research on Wednesday. Hauser said at the ceremony that â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about the kids.â&#x20AC;?

Eleanor can be reached at news@ dailyillini.com.

Argentine elected 1st pope from Americas, 1st Jesuit BY NICOLE WINFIELD ASSOCIATED PRESS

VATICAN CITY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jorge Bergoglio, of Argentina, was elected pope Wednesday, becoming the first pontiff from the Americas and the first from outside Europe in more than a millennium. He chose the name Francis, associating himself with the humble 13thcentury Italian preacher who lived a life of poverty. Looking stunned, Francis shyly waved to the crowd of more than 100,000 people who packed a rainsoaked St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Square for the announcement, marveling that the cardinals needed to look to â&#x20AC;&#x153;the end of the earthâ&#x20AC;? to find a bishop of Rome. In choosing a 76-year-old pope, the cardinals clearly decided that they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need a vigorous, young pope who would reign for decades but rather a seasoned, popular and humble pastor who would draw followers to the faith and help rebuild a church stained by scandal.

The cardinal electors overcame deep divisions about the future of the church to select the 266th pontiff in a remarkably fast, five-ballot conclave. Francis asked for prayers for himself and for retired Pope Benedict XVI, whose resignation paved the way for the conclave that brought the first Jesuit to the papacy. Francis also spoke by phone with Benedict after his election and plans to see him in soon, the Vatican said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brothers and sisters, good evening,â&#x20AC;? Francis said to wild cheers in his first public remarks as pontiff from the loggia of St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Basilica. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know that the work of the conclave is to give a bishop to Rome. It seems as if my brother cardinals went to find him from the end of the earth, but here we are. Thank you for the welcome,â&#x20AC;? he said. Across the planet, Latin Americans burst into tears and jubila-

LUCA BRUNO THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pope Francis speaks from the central balcony of St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Basilica at the Vatican on Wednesday. Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, who chose the name of Francis, is the 266th pontiff of the Roman Catholic Church. tion at news that the region, which counts 40 percent of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Catholics, finally had a pope to call its own. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a huge gift for all of Latin America. We waited 20 centuries. It was worth the wait,â&#x20AC;? said Jose Antonio Cruz, a Franciscan friar at the St. Francis of Assisi church

in the colonial Old San Juan district in Puerto Rico. The speed with which Bergoglio was elected pope this time around indicates that â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even though he is 76 and has slowed down from the having a lung removed as a teenager â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he still had the trust of cardinals.

E R SHA R U O Y GHTS U THO

/(77(56 727+( (',7256

SCHOOLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S IN FOR

SUMMER.

Email: RSLQRQV#GDLO\LOOLQL FRP

SUMMER SESSIONS 2013 Enjoy all that Chicago and Loyola have to offer this summer while taking a class to lighten your load for the fall. Choose from several convenient locations and more than 300 courses. $IJDBHPt0OMJOFt4UVEZ"CSPBE $VOFP$BNQVT 7FSOPO)JMMT *-

3FUSFBUBOE&DPMPHZ$BNQVT 8PPETUPDL *-

Apply and register today at -6$FEVTVNNFS.

Daily

Express Air Coach

Non-Stop Shuttles between

â&#x20AC;˘ Express service - Direct, Non-Stop

Urbana-Champaign

â&#x20AC;˘ Reserved trip always runs, even if only 1 passenger books

and

â&#x20AC;˘ Pick-up locations right on campus, drop-off at every O'Hare Airport terminal

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hare Airport Up to Three Trips Daily

â&#x20AC;˘ Must have at least one booking 24 hrs in advance to ensure trip operates

FREE

SHUTTLE Your Direct Airport & Day Trip/ Private Charter Service

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; For Reservations â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Book online Call

3A

TM TM

& TV / DVD ExpressAirCoach.com 765-743-3120 Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Friday â&#x20AC;˘ 9am to 5pm

Providing guaranteed, reliable transportation, with each reservation.


4A Thursday March 14, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

LOOKING FOR YOUR REGULAR COLUMNIST? Want to read about early election talk, dash cams or distracting technology? Check out Opinions at DailyIllini.com.

AS A GIRL

THINKS By Melanie Stone

Editor’s note: This is the fourth part of a five-part series running each day this week through Friday. In this personal essay, Daily Illini columnist Melanie Stone combines her story with that of experts and multiple women across the country. More online: For a special presentation of this story, and for more insight on body image, visit InDepth.DailyIllini.com

best friend woke me up one cloudy morning at the end of September. Camden crawled into my bed, hugged me and began to build me back up. She spoke words of truth into my soul, reminding me that I was neither dead nor dying. I could still live fully, whether I was at home or at school. “Mel, look at it like this,” she said. “You can use this semester to do stuff you love to do. Go back to yoga. Read your Bible. Work out. Take pictures. Call friends. Visit people. Spend a day downtown. Walk around the forest preserve. ...” Cam’s list went on, and so did my life. From that day forward, God began changing my heart. In my mind, sophomore year was supposed to be my year. I was living in the sorority house, I was writing my weekly DI column, I was a small-group leader in IlIini Life — I had everything going for me, until I didn’t. When God’s plan trumped my plan, my soul shattered, and I had to let Him pick up the pieces. It wasn’t an easy surrendering. For almost two full years, my thoughts about myself had been deliberately negative. I was constantly in pursuit of perfection, all because I wouldn’t let myself think I was good enough. If I could just get down to 120 pounds, then I’ll be happy. I got to 116 pounds. If I could just avoid sugar for the next week, then I’ll feel better. I cut out sugar completely for five months. If I could just shrink a little more, then everyone will accept me. And there’s the lie I chose to believe: I’m not acceptable. I was desperate for people to love me, to love this exterior shell of my inner being. The problem stemmed from my mind. Because I believed that I was unacceptable, I worked relentlessly to make myself acceptable. To make myself good enough: for that boyfriend, for my sorority sisters, for myself. Months ago, I thought there was something horribly wrong with my brain, that my obsession with food meant I was unusual. Assuming that I’d never be free from the restriction and crazy binges, I sat back and let my flesh — my human nature — fulfill its earthly desires. It wasn’t until I withdrew that I realized something: I have choices. Once I understood the truth about the power of our thoughts, things began to change.

In November, I met with my clinical psychologist, Daniel Goodman — this time not as a client but as a writer — who told me how people often use their physical selves to try to explain their shortcomings. “If you have bad thoughts and a bad image of yourself, then you will likely do things to confirm that belief,” he said. “Doing so brings you relief from anxiety.” I must’ve looked confused because he explained even further. “If you make negative predictions about yourself, and then you engage in negative behaviors, guess how well that fits together?” He moved his hands together, as if connecting two puzzle pieces. “Like this.” It’s impossible to change your actions unless you change your thoughts. It all begins in the mind. If a girl believes the lie that she is disgusting, then she will do things to confirm that lie. Like throw up, starve herself, exercise for hours or binge. There’s a saying, “As a man thinks, so is he.” For the women in this article, it would be: “As a girl thinks, so is she.” Matt Wilcoski, campus pastor of Illini Life Christian Fellowship, pointed me toward Romans 12:2, which reads: “Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is — his good, pleasing and perfect will.” He explained to me just how important it is to renew our minds instead of going with the flow of society. “One of the most transformative skills to learn in life is to hit pause in the midst of a strong emotion, especially negatives ones, and reflect on what you are thinking at that time.” It’s hard. It’s hard to slow down and take a deep breath when all we want to do is react. And often, our reactions are abusive. We find solace in alcohol, sex, drugs, money or food — anything that might be able to numb the pain we feel. Shawna Burkhart, licensed clinical counselor based in Hinsdale, Ill., told me during one of our sessions that mental health often becomes an issue for our age group. As college students, we learn who we truly are. We must choose to say yes to the things that will uplift us and say no to the things that bog us down. What looks good for one person might not be the best decision for another. “College is the first time you’re confronting yourself as a true individual,” she said. “You have to figure out what you believe about yourself.” For some of us, we scrutinize, saying things to ourselves that we’d never say to another person: I’m worthless. I’m fat. I’m ugly. I’m different. I’m uncontrollable. I certainly told myself these lies, falling into the trap of never feeling good enough. But what does it mean to be good enough? “Good enough is being OK exactly as you are,” Burkhart said. “We are not perfect, but we are OK.” It’s easier said than done, of course. I’ve read so many books and articles on body image, all claiming that the cure to poor self-esteem is simply learning to love yourself. Well, OK. How do I do that? How can I love this mess of a person I’ve become? “You have to pause in your life to really challenge the negative beliefs you have about yourself,” Burkhart said. When people have the courage to stop and say, ‘Woah, is what I’m saying true about me?’ is the very first step to change.” She gave me a toolbox of sorts, four questions that can help us get to the bottom of all of this: What are you saying to yourself? How does it make you feel? How would you rather feel? What thought would create that feeling? The lie I chose to believe was: I’m not acceptable. It made me feel like I was garbage, like I was nothing. And so my feelings and my actions reflected that lie. I restricted, I over-exercised, I binged, I self-sabotaged. I wasn’t good enough and I would never be good enough, so I might as well let those behaviors run my life. Of course, I would have rather felt at peace with who I was. Those thoughts, the ones that lead to that feeling, look like this: I am fearfully and wonderfully made. I am a masterpiece. I am unconditionally and eternally accepted by the One who created me. By learning to alter my beliefs about myself, I found healing. So did Amanda, a recent graduate of the University of Michigan.

See AS A GIRL THINKS, Page 5A


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Thursday, March 14, 2013

AS A GIRL THINKS By Melanie Stone (continued from 4A) For years, her life was ruled by anorexia, but she was hungry for acceptance and love from others. Amanda’s turning point came during her junior year of college, when she heard her pastor tell a story about another person who was also battling anorexia. “This girl had a dream of a painting of herself,” Amanda said. “She was slowly ruining the painting, smudging it and coloring it with black. Then God told her, ‘You are my masterpiece, don’t ever paint over it.’ “I hid my face and ended up running to the bathroom and crying. Then, for Christmas, my roommate actually got me this engraved jewelry box that said, ‘You are God’s masterpiece, don’t ever paint over it.’” From that point, Amanda embarked on a journey to a different life. But it wasn’t easy,

and it is still something she must consciously work on. “Physically, I’m healed,” Amanda said. “Mentally and spiritually, I am healing but still fighting lies. The difference is: I am choosing health and life over thinness and perfection. I choose not to engage in those thoughts.” When we, as women, choose to think differently about ourselves, our attitudes reflect those thoughts. Krissy Tamburo, sophomore at Georgia State University, is a college soccer player who has devoted most of her life to the sport. For the past year, she’s been injured, forced to sit on the sidelines. Krissy can feel the consequences of her time out. “I’ve developed love handles,” she said. “My friends tell me I don’t look any different, but I feel different because my muscle is now fat.”

Krissy could let her physical changes get to her. She could choose to restrict her diet and obsess over her body. But instead, she remains positive and thankful in the middle of this trial, reminding herself that the injury is part of God’s plan for her life and is only temporary. Temporary. This is huge. Our bodies are temporary, nothing but shells. They weren’t made to be perfect: Bones break, tumors grow, illnesses sicken. No one ever promised us a perfect body, or a perfect life, for that matter. But we can still have freedom, and to find it, we must consciously take our negative thoughts captive. Then, and only then, can the true healing begin.

Melanie is a sophomore in Media. She can be reached at mastone3@ dailyillini.com and @mellystone.

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD ACROSS

1 Suitable company? 7 Model behavior 13 Veteran 16 Those created equal, per 17 18 19 20 22 23 25 28 34 38 39 40 41 43 44 46 47 48 51 52 57 60 63 64

67

69 70 71 72

JONATHAN DAVIS THE DAILY ILLINI

FROM PAGE 6A met strayed from his preconceived notions. He worried that he wouldn’t fit in with the rest of the students at the LGBT Resource Center, but he found this was not the case. Pagan became comfortable in his own skin, but he wishes that others in the LGBT community would find the same inner peace. “I have met gay men, even on this campus, who have explicitly said, ‘I work out every day because I don’t want to get fat because if I do, people will stop sleeping with me,’” Pagan said. While the majority of people who are LGBT do not have eat-

MAGIC FROM PAGE 6A Der Geist works for Psychic Joker Entertainment, a Champaign-based business he and friends Lisa Cerezo and Jason Cerezo started about four years ago. Lisa Cerezo noted the wonder and awe that can be observed in the audience when der Geist performs, a major reason for

of people in the LGBT community proves to be imperative, as Pagan said the image of the LGBT community represented in the media is only one aspect of gay culture, and body image is not the only aspect of gay identity. “Not everyone has the time, or even the desire, to go to the gym every day for three hours and sculpt this perfect body. ... There’s nothing wrong with doing that, but there are other people out there who are not doing those things,” Pagan said. “And that’s where the problem lies. The people who are not doing those things are perceived to be not real gays.”

their decision to go into business together. “To go from a sense of wonder to this explosive disbelief that ‘I really can’t have actually seen what I just saw, but obviously I did, I just saw it.’ So, there’s this huge crazy disconnect, and it’s a fun thing to experience. It’s just this wondrous sense of ‘I can’t explain that,’” Lisa Cerezo said. As der Geist continues to work locally and do more corporate events, he dreams of becoming

a household name and performing for as long as possible. “I’m hoping to become very well-known for doing escape magic and for doing mentalism, and for doing these types of things in a way that nobody’s ever done them,” he said. For more information, go online at daviddergeist.com or psychicjoker.com.

Alice can be reached at smelyan2@ dailyillini.com.

Julia can be reached at marbach2@ dailyillini.com

Phi Eta Sigma: A society for honors students to connect BY JOLIE HUANG STAFF WRITER

“Knowledge is power.” This phrase is the motto for one of the oldest honor organizations on campus, Phi Eta Sigma. Founded at the University in 1923, Phi Eta Sigma is the first and largest honor society for freshmen college students in all majors, with over 365 chapters in the nation. The organization functions according to five branches: social, tutoring, philanthropy, service and professional development. “We are welcoming nearly 1,000 members this semester at U of I alone,” said Isabella Prenta, junior in LAS and Phi Eta Sigma president. Freshmen are sent an invitation to join the organization after their first semester if they have achieved a 3.5 GPA or above. They are then required to fill out a form and pay dues before they can become a full member of the organization. After this, members are free to attend as many events as they would like. This way, they are able to mold the organization to fit their scheduling needs. However, members must achieve 50 active hours if they want to be given an honor cord for graduation. Major events for the year include an etiquette dinner and mocktail night. Members also can give back to the community

through events such as Relay for Life or tutoring locally. “My favorite aspect of Phi Eta Sigma is the impact the group has on the community and on the students at U of I,” said Kaitlyn Hull, Phi Eta Sigma senior adviser and senior in Business. “I really appreciate the opportunity to provide my peers with opportunities to participate in the community and make a difference in people’s lives.” Being such a large organization, Phi Eta Sigma also makes sure to have social events for members to bond, such as family dinners, game nights and ice skating. “The social events are my favorite because I’m able to be with people who are motivated just like I am but aren’t afraid to relax, either,” said Kelsey Engel, freshman in LAS. Many members of Phi Eta Sigma share this ambition. “Everyone just really understands their responsibilities and works hard at everything they do, which really makes the group special,” Prenta said. “We are all forward-thinkers and plan ahead to make the organization the best it can be.” Prenta joined the organization as a freshman to become more involved on campus. The resources of Phi Eta Sigma were able to help shape her decision for double majoring in English and history.

One of the benefits of being a part of the organization is having access to a peer-tutoring list. If a student is struggling with a class, he can email another member who is strong at that subject to schedule a tutoring session. This resource is especially useful because of the large and diverse membership of the society. “Phi Eta Sigma truly tries to combat the stigma of just being something that kids put on their resume,” Prenta said. “We want to tailor it to everyone’s needs and offer every student in every major the most benefits.” The society makes an effort to cater to all majors; it brings in speakers from various career fields, such as pre-law faculty or medical-school advisers so that many jobs can be discussed. Phi Eta Sigma takes consistent steps to improve their program. This year, its website was remodeled, and Facebook and Twitter accounts were launched to improve communication with students beyond the biweekly emails. “In the future, this honor society hopes to continue to build a reputation for being an active student organization whose mission is to better not only the community, but the student members themselves, both academically and professionally,” Hull said.

Jolie can be reached at jhuang51@ dailyillini.com.

3

4

5

DOONESBURY

BEARDO

6

13

7 14

15

GARRY TRUDEAU

DAN DOUGHERTY

8

9

10

11

12

31

32

33

54

55

56

16

17

18 20

21

24

25 29

22 26

27

30

38

39

41

42

43

46

47

49

50 52

60 66

61 67

62

53 63

68

70 72

14 Cartoonish cry 15 Test subj. 21 Texans are part of it, for short 24 Concentrate 26 Lowest in fat 27 N.L. East team 29 Never, to Nietzsche 30 Baseball’s Iron Horse 31 Global warming subj. 32 Pretense 33 Julie Andrews, for one 34 Wing: Abbr. 35 Equal 36 Spill 37 Mineral with high carbon content 42 N.L. West team 45 Ticket info The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

Josh Pagan, senior in LAS, stands in front of a LGBT door at the LGBT Resource Center in the Illini Union. ing disorders — according to the Austin Foundation for Eating Disorders — among gay men, nearly 14 percent appear to suffer from bulimia and over 20 percent appear to be anorexic. When faced with difficulties such as coming out or hiding their sexual orientation, gay men can be more prone to developing an eating disorder to feel a sense of control, Rogers said. Some of the strategies Rogers uses to help LGBT students fighting body image issues include focusing on the functionality of the body and becoming exposed to the wide range of people in the LGBT community. He also thinks body image concerns should be dealt with on a case-by-case basis. Experiencing different types

2

19 Jefferson Regular in Judd Apatow 23 comedies Sheer, informally 28 “Cómo ___?” State that is home to the Natl. Teachers Hall of Fame 34 35 36 37 Promises to pay 40 Came across as It can be raised or folded 44 45 Flimsy, as stitching Tinseltown terrier 48 “Sprechen ___ Deutsch?” Keys on a keyboard 51 “Geez!” Home of the Azadi Tower 57 58 59 Rice quarters Composer Shostakovich 64 65 Extreme soreness 69 Alternatively Kidney doctor 71 Some pokers Gently pulls Tiny fraction of time: Abbr. DOWN “Little” name in 1960s pop 1 Boobs Divine dish 2 Teammate of Bacteriologist Paul Robinson of the who coined the word 1940s-’50s Dodgers “chemotherapy” 3 Dull Subject of the Final 4 Religious retreat Jeopardy! question that knocked out Ken Jennings 5 Props used in “The after a record 74 wins … Good, the Bad and or a hint to this puzzle’s the Ugly” theme 6 Gerund’s end Borrower 7 Pops Like Ziploc bags 8 “Hip, hip, Jorge!”? Clay targets, informally 9 Winter jaunt Fouled (up) 10 “If ___ believe …” 11 Prime minister who gave his name to an article of clothing 12 Lion prey

QUE & ANGIE JOHNIVAN DARBY

LGBT

1

5A

38==/(%<'$9,'/(9,1621:,/.

49 Verb ending? 50 Spill 53 Big bashes 54 Ones who may annoy hoi polloi 55 Tante’s husband 56 In the flesh? 57 Flanders and Kelly 58 William Steig book on which a hit 2001 film was based 59 North Sea feeder 61 Kind of tape 62 Big source of reality TV 65 Barracks bed 66 Smash hits: Abbr. 68 Butt


Greeks campus

Phi Eta Sigma honor society helps students Phi Eta Sigma, the first and largest honor society at the University, provides students with academic and professional opportunities. Turn to Page 5A to read more about this organization.

6A | Thursday, March 14, 2013 | www.DailyIllini.com

PERSON TO KNOW

$

$

Local magician continues to innovate, amaze BY JULIA MARBACH STAFF WRITER

BRIAN YU THE DAILY ILLINI

David der Geist, a magician and co-founder of Psychic Joker, performs a magic trick Thursday at the Espresso Royale on Daniels Street.

lthough performing card tricks, communicating with the dead, reading minds, shoving nails from cheek to cheek or escaping from chains may be unusual for some, this is business as usual for David der Geist, or Jace Hoppes, if referred to by his real name. One simple title could not sum up all that this 33-year-old Texas native does. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a musician, a magician, a mentalist, an escape artist, a lecturer; the list goes on and on. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I basically play with peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heads,â&#x20AC;? der Geist said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doing stage work, I go out there and I read peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s minds. I make it look like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m contacting the dead. I do all sorts of stuff to make people uncomfortable, to make it appear that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doing things that shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be humanly possible, and then Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doing things that scare the hell out of people.â&#x20AC;? Although der Geist started doing magic in 2002, he was exposed to spiritualism â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a belief system that focuses on communication with the dead â&#x20AC;&#x201D; through his grandparents when he was a kid. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As far as sideshow and geek performance ... eating bugs for money in elementary school was kind of the start of that. I just never stopped,â&#x20AC;? der Geist said. Alchemy, astrology and tarot card reading are among a number

of the subjects der Geist studied for years under various scholars and practitioners. Not only has he incorporated what heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s learned into his performances, but he has taught various lectures and workshops across the country. One of the hardest aspects of his work is the unpredictable nature of mentalism. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a magician, you can practice the moves over and over and over and over again until your hands cannot not do them,â&#x20AC;? der Geist said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a mentalist, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to say. Every single show is different, and because of that, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of preparation that you just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do.â&#x20AC;? Although he acknowledges that men such as David Blaine, David Copperfield and Criss Angel are certainly talented, der Geist looks up to less famous men such as Joseph Dunninger and George Joseph Kresge, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Amazing Kreskin,â&#x20AC;? as sources of inspiration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Dunninger) carried magic from the stage during the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;30s, when it was vaudeville through radio into television before anybody else ever thought of it,â&#x20AC;? der Geist said. Der Geist has a number of techniques he employs when performing, which he has learned through his own study, from others in the U.S., in addition to fakirs, or ascetics in India, when he studied

there in college. Some techniques include meditation and visualization, as well as pain control and blood flow control. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s techniques that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned ... so I can control my blood sometimes, which is hilarious when I go to doctors because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make my blood pressure go up and down and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll stop and start my pulse,â&#x20AC;? der Geist said. He is also an escape artist. Not only has he managed to get out of a straitjacket multiple times, but he is currently working on an escape in which he will be chained, then locked into a bag and thrown off of a bridge into a river. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It becomes worth it,â&#x20AC;? der Geist said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No matter how grueling it is, no matter how hard it is, no matter how terrifying it is, because sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scary thinking I might not be able to get out of this. It always ends up being worth it.â&#x20AC;? Although much of what he does is illusion, a great deal is real, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not going to deny that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an element of magic and illusion in what I do. ... But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never tell somebody where that stops. When you watch me perform, a good portion of what I am doing is real, a good portion of what I am doing is not, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to the audience to decide where that line is,â&#x20AC;? he said.

See MAGIC, Page 5A ILLUSTRATIONS BY SCOTT DURAND THE DAILY ILLINI

Body image, self-esteem remain issues for men in LGBT community BY ALICE SMELYANSKY STAFF WRITER

While thumbing through an LGBT magazine, Josh Pagan, senior in LAS and vice president of the RSO Pride, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see one image that matches his reflection. He sees an â&#x20AC;&#x153;idealized versionâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one unlike the diverse LGBT community at the University, in his life and in reality. But realizing that the skinny, predominately white males

featured in the magazine are only one aspect of gay culture doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change the fact that Pagan, along with others in the community, does not feel represented. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the biggest reasons why gay men who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fit these images tend to have such horrible body image issues or just horrible perceptions of themselves,â&#x20AC;? Pagan said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re finding that

theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not fitting into these templates of gay life and they feel out of place and ashamed of themselves.â&#x20AC;? According to Michael Rogers, staff psychologist and visiting clinical counselor at the Counseling Center, gay men represent about 5 percent of the total male population. Among men who have eating disorders, however, 42 percent identify as gay. This disparity

is not as striking when comparing lesbian and bisexual women to heterosexual women, based on a 2007 study from Columbia University. One reason for the imbalance could be that men tend to be more visually stimulated than women, Rogers said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since men in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s and â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s started working out strongly â&#x20AC;&#x201D; partially because of the AIDS epidemic â&#x20AC;&#x201D; people wanted

to have bodies that looked very healthy in order to counteract the idea that they may have contracted HIV,â&#x20AC;? Rogers said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It almost created this cliche that gay men look a certain way.â&#x20AC;? Though Pagan maintains a more positive self-image now, he believed this cliche when he was younger and struggled to appreciate his body as it was. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My entire life, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always been a bigger kid. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always

been the case, even before I knew I was gay,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I came out, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really have a community or any resources to go to, so I looked at magazines and movies.â&#x20AC;? The transition came when Pagan arrived at the University in 2009. His confidence, selfimage and identity all began to align when the gay people he

See LGBT, Page5A

-!J" J-

March 14 - March 21

Softball/ Wisconsin: March 22-24 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tennis & Gym/ Nebraska: March 23

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 Â&#x2DC;GC:H65@@vs. Saint Louis University at 12:30PM / Eichelberger Field / FREE

Sign up before the first game on March 17th.

E

Baseball/ Nebraska: March 22-24

A

N YOU TA ST

MARK YOUR CALENDARS

FRIDAY, MARCH 15 Â&#x2DC;GC:H65@@8<vs. Loyola & W. Michigan at 3:30 & 6PM / Eichelberger Field / FREE ° Home Opener ° Mayor Don Gerard will throw the first pitch at the 6PM game! ° FREE orange drawstring bags to the first 100 fans at the 6PM game Â&#x2DC;:cchVU``CdYbDfUWh]WYat 5:30PM / Memorial Stadium / FREE ° Check out your 2013 Fighting Illini Football Team ° Free Parking at Assembly Hall. Enter stadium on west side.

C

%$6.(7%$//&+$//(1*(

-!J&',,

SUNDAY, MARCH 17 Â&#x2DC;%'A9B¡GH9BB=Gvs. #1 Virginia at 12PM / Atkins / FREE ° FREE shamrock shakes, green cotton candy and St. Pattyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s day activities ° Champaign Parks & Rec Irish Dancers at the break MONDAY, MARCH 18

Â&#x2DC;%'A9B¡GH9BB=Gvs. #3 USC at 3PM / Atkins / FREE

Fighting Illini Football Open Practice Friday, March 15 // 5:30PM // Memorial Stadium // FREE

Compete for bragging rights against friends and our bracketologists. Get updates, game schedules, and more. Find great deals from our sponsors.

DAILYILLINI.COM/MARCHBRACKETS


1B Thursday March 14, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Sports

WHO TO HIRE? BY ETHAN ASOFSKY | SENIOR WRITER

LET’S CALL THE NCAA’S SELECTION COMMITTEE

Illinois prepared for tournament season

A GRIZZLED CEO LOOKING TO HIRE A NEW EMPLOYEE.

T

he Minnesota and Illinois men’s basketball teams’ resumes cross his desk. For posterity’s sake, Goldy the Gopher and a giant I sit in front of the CEO as the final two candidates for the gig. The employer glances at both sheets of paper. He winces, removes his glasses and wipes the sweat from his brow. The CEO pushes his chair from his desk and stands up. “I don’t envy either of you,” he says. “You’ve both been to hell and back.” This year’s Big Ten season has been the equivalent of working for the sadistic offspring of Scrooge and Cruella de Vil. It’s been what every-

one expected, an absolute dogfight. Thursday’s opening round matchup between Illinois and Minnesota should be no different. As of now, they’re many experts’ last two Big Ten teams in the NCAA tournament. Illinois and Minnesota have similar resumes in terms of good wins and bad losses. Both have defeated No. 1 Indiana at its peak, won a nonconference game against a ranked opponent and hit horrible lulls in the Big Ten. But they’re here. Returning to the CEO analogy, he’ll no doubt give both teams the benefit of the doubt for putting in their time in poor conditions.

Minnesota

Andre Hollins: Averaging 14 PPG on the season. One of the most dangerous scorers in the Big Ten. Rodney Williams: Was injured for Illini’s win over Gophers. Presence could be the difference. Top-five dunker in the Big Ten. Austin Hollins: Averaging 10.4 points and 1.7 steals per game. Scored 16 points against Illinois in Feb. 10 loss. Joe Coleman: While he usually shoots 31% from 3-point range, Coleman lit the Illini up in the two teams’ first matchup. He scored 29 points on 7-for-8 shooting and drained 2-of-3 attempts from distance. Julian Welch: A bench player who will eat minutes. Scored a season-high 10 points against Penn State on March 2. Elliott Eliason: A 6-foot11 center who can rebound the ball. He pulled down 10 boards and had two blocks in the Gophers’ Feb. 10 loss.

Scoring offense

62.0 (4th)

Scoring defense

65.3 (11th)

Free-throw percentage

71.6% (3rd)

Field goal percentage

42.1% (9th)

39.9% (7th)

Defensive field goal percentage

42.4% (9th)

32.5% (8th)

3-point field goal percentage

32.9% (7th)

34.3% (9th)

Defensive 3-point field goal percentage

34.4% (11th)

+8.1 (1st)

Rebounding margin

-0.7 (11th)

14.8 (2nd)

Assists per game

10.4 (10th)

-.65 (9th)

Turnover margin

+2.62 (2nd)

15.0 (1st)

Offensive rebounds per game

11.7 (6th)

5.2 (8th)

3-pt field goals made per game

7.9 (1st)

SUPPORTING CAST D.J. Richardson: Averaging 15 PPG in Big Ten play. He’s been the unquestioned leader of this Illini squad since it rebounded from losing six of seven conference games in January. Tracy Abrams: Averaging 1.4 steals per game. Dropped 27 points and pulled down eight rebounds in Illini’s Dec. 29 game at the United Center. Nnanna Egwu: Averaging 1.3 blockers per game. His presence on the boards is going to be crucial in stopping Mbakwe. Must stay out of foul trouble. Tyler Griffey: When he’s on, he’s on. He’s made 37 3-pointers this season. Sam McLaurin: Must hit the boards against Minnesota. The fifth-year senior is averaging 2.2 offensive rebounds per game. Joe Bertrand: Shooting 50.8 percent this season from the field.

Paul this season:

10.0 PPG 8.7 RPG 1.1 APG 0.7 SPG 1.5 Blk/game 56.6% FG 61.8% FT

16.3 PPG 4.4 RPG 2.8 APG 1.2 SPG 33% 3pt. FG 40.5% FG 71.6% FT

PAUL’S RESUME

MBAKWE’S RESUME •

SENIOR WRITER

69.8 PPG (5th)

44.3% (5th)

Mbakwe this season:

BY ETHAN ASOFSKY

Illinois

69.1 (6th) 68.3% (9th)

SUPPORTING CAST

Minnesota slugged it out in the mailroom, using its interior toughness to lead the Big Ten in rebounding margin (plus-8.1) and total offensive rebounds (15 per game). Illinois is the temp, holding on by a thread with every timeout. The Illini shot 773 3-pointers this season, good for eighth-most in the NCAA. Their 3-point percentage as a team (33 percent) ranks seventh in the Big Ten, but they also make the most 3’s per game in the conference at 7.9. Both teams seem headed for the Big Dance, but nothing’s guaranteed. Let’s take a look at how their resumes stack up:

Compared to the Big Ten

• Scored 43 against Ohio State on Jan. 10, 2012, the thirdmost in one game in school history.

Returned from a torn ACL and made the coaches’ third-team All-Big Ten and the media’s second-team All-Big Ten.

• Named thirdteam All-Big Ten by coaches, media this season.

Led the Big Ten in rebounding as a junior with 10.5 rebounds per game, one of four Gophers players to ever lead the Big Ten in the category.

• Named MVP Maui Invitational. • One of 10 players in Illinois history to reach 1,500 points.

Repeated as the Big Ten’s leading rebounder this season, averaging 8.7 boards and 3.3 offensive rebounds per game.

Groce’s March record looks to empower Three things stick out when assessing Illinois men’s basketball coach John Groce: 1 — His energetic, caffeinated personality 2 — He can recruit with the best of them 3 — He owns March No. 3 is probably the most impressive of the bunch. Groce owned an overall record of 85-56 in four seasons at Ohio, but that margin fell to 34-30 against conference opponents. Even still, he took a mid-level Bobcats program to two Mid-American championships, twice sending his teams to the NCAA tournament. There, Ohio stunned thirdseeded Georgetown on March 18, 2010, and last season toppled fourth-seeded Michigan and 12th-seeded South Florida to reach the Sweet 16 before losing to North Carolina. Groce knows when the spotlight is on. This is his time of year. “We had a team meeting talking about how the season went and what it takes to win in the postseason at this level,” senior Tyler Griffey said before Tuesday’s practice. “Coach Groce has had some success doing that, so we’re looking forward to the challenge.” Groce has always prepared his team in terms of seasons to keep attention sharp. The first was the nonconference grind, the second the grueling Big Ten schedule and now the Illini enter season three — postseason play, which starts with Thursday’s opening round of the Big Ten Tournament at the United Center. No. 8-seeded Illinois has a tough firstround draw in No. 9-seeded Minnesota. The two teams split during the season, each winning one on the opponents’ home court. But when Illinois traveled to Minneapolis on Feb. 10, the Gophers were missing show-stopping dunker Rodney Williams due to injury. The 6-foot-7-inch forward is back now, meaning the undersized Illini will have a tough test against a Minnesota team that leads Big Ten with a plus-8.1 rebounding margin. “He certainly changes their team,” Groce said. “We’ll have to keep him off the glass. You can’t let him make highlight plays in transition. He’s very versatile.” Illinois enters Thursday’s contest as the team with questionable health this time around. Junior guard Joe Bertrand remains day-to-day with a shoulder injury and will be a game-time decision, while senior Sam McLaurin is coming off an ankle sprain. But if the Illini have an advantage, it’s Chicago. They’ve already played at the United Center and several players on the roster from the Chicago area will have their families in attendance. Chicagonative Tracy Abrams scored 27 points and pulled down eight rebounds in Illinois’ 81-79 win against Auburn on the Bulls’ home floor Dec. 29. With an 11 a.m. start, the two teams will hardly have enough time for a shootaround before taking the court for the tip. Groce isn’t too worried about that. The team travelled up to Chicago Wednesday afternoon to spend the eve of March together. His favorite time of the year is finally here. “Great time of year, March,” Groce said. “Unbelievable time of year.”

Ethan can be reached at asofsky1@dailyillini.com and @asofthesky.

MARCH MOVIE MADNESS ELIOT SILL Sports columnist

Editor’s note: These are the 32 movies selected for the pool of #MarchMovieMadness. A round will be revealed every business day for the next week. Fill out a bracket yourself and follow along and vote for your fourth-round picks on our Facebook page.

T

he Greatest of All Time stooped, hands on his knees, looking around his huddle for anyone who could help. On the other sideline, a black, blue and bloodied Rocky Balboa spat a mouthful of blood into a bowl. The referees broke up Michael Jordan’s huddle and waved Rocky back onto the court. The moment had come. In a desperate move, Rocky had recruited rival Apollo Creed to present a two-man tandem to the Toon Squad, an iron-forged unit by this point in the tournament. On the line was a trip to the finals to face “Remember the Titans,” which proved to be too culturally relevant and too stacked with up-and-coming Hollywood talent for “Bull Durham.” Defensive-end-

turned-pitcher Julius Campbell threw a one-hit shutout in a baseball exhibition between the two movies. The hit he allowed was a double to Crash Davis. “He ran to first. I said, ‘Get the (expletive) off my corner, man,’” said an off-puttingly thuggish Campbell. Davis said it was the cultural unity to which the Durham Bulls, who lost 5-0, had no answer. Back at the Ultimate Semifinal, Toon Squad trotted out a lineup of Wile E. Coyote, Stan Podilak, Sylvester, the blue Mon-Star — unfortunately the only Mon-Star that Jordan and Co. could recruit — and Jordan. Apollo and Rocky touched gloves, ready to protect their one-point lead for the final eight seconds. Jordan had no idea what the plan was. Having discovered a serious loophole in the officiating, Rocky and Apollo had mercilessly spent the whole game throwing head punches at all members of the Toon Squad. First down went Lola Bunny, who never saw the running hook from behind coming. Then it was Bugs Bunny and Porkie Pig, and then Tweetie Bird, who in an embarrassing faux pas was instantly killed and had to be redrawn in a full-body cast to maintain a PG rating. That

was just the first possession — one that ended in a Jordan dunk. After Marvin the Martian consulted with the referee from the Boxing Movie conference, it was determined that neither was particularly against the style of play. From there, it became a blood bath, with Elmer Fudd and Yosemite Sam shooting a blaze of gunfire that managed only to take a bite sized part of Apollo’s ear off before they left the game with fractured skulls and suspended brain activity, I mean concussions. Apollo laughed maniacally at the injury, saying: “We’ve got rabbits! We’ve got a chicken! We’ve got pork! Throw some human ear, cat’s blood and a pair of Granny panties and you got a stew goin’!” Wile E. Coyote and Sylvester were able to survive the onslaught of right hooks, but only because they had a supreme tolerance for beatings. The blue Mon-Star, who once again didn’t record a stat all game, went untargeted. Jordan’s height, agility and mighty aura allowed him to avoid most of the punishment, though he was still hurt. Stan Podilak entered the game only after a reinserted Bugs Bunny was punched in the head and vomited blood, I mean saw stars and had his eyes roll around in their sockets.

1

Bull Durham

The Fighter

Rudy Rocky

Rudy

2

1 5

6

4

Space Jam

3

Million Dollar Baby

Space Jam Field of Dreams

MARCH MOVIE MADNESS CHAMPION

Remember the Titans Remember the Titans

Rocky Rocky

Finding Forrester Remember the Titans

Remember the Titans

The Natural

1

4

Seabiscuit

3

Miracle

2

Miracle

Karate Kid

Rocky and Apollo’s strategy — one continuously shooting layups until scoring as the other literally boxed out potential rebounders — netted them a go-ahead bucket, after which Jordan called a time out, and for the first time all

D2: The Mighty Ducks

2

Rocky

The Natural

7

Sandlot Space Jam

Bull Durham

3

1

Hoosiers

Bull Durham

5

Hoosiers

tournament, put his hands on his knees in exhaustion. Stan inbounded the ball to Jordan near the halfcourt line, Jordan passed to the blue Mon-Star, who let the ball carom off his face before snatching it up. Apollo ran off

his man, Wile E. Coyote, and punched the blue Mon-Star in the knees, bending each one backward and causing him to drop the ball. In a scrum for the ball,

See MOVIE MADNESS, Page 3B


2B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Basketball in the future for Illini seniors Penn, GodBold BY JOHNATHAN HETTINGER STAFF WRITER

Karisma Penn and Adrienne GodBold aren’t quite done at Illinois. The seniors still have a few games to play for the Illinois women’s basketball team, whether it be in the NCAA tournament or the WNIT. But, after postseason play, Penn and GodBold don’t plan on hanging up their basketball shoes. Like many seniors, Penn and GodBold aren’t exactly sure where they’re headed after graduation in May, but both know they will be playing basketball. Illinois head coach Matt Bollant said both players are capable of achieving their dream. “Both of them will be able to play overseas, for sure,” Bollant said. “They’re both good enough to play in the WNBA, depending on the right team and the right system.” Penn was named first-team AllBig Ten this season after leading the Illini with 19 points, 9.7 rebounds and 2.9 blocks per game. Stephanie White, assistant coach for the WNBA’s Indiana Fever and ESPN and Big Ten Network analyst, has taken note. “She certainly has a future. She’s one of those players who is a little bit of a tweener, so to speak, size-wise. She’s probably not big enough to play inside like she has in college,” White said. “There is certainly going to be an adjustment period, but she’s certainly got a shot. With the way that she

plays, the way that she rebounds and the level that she plays at, she certainly has an opportunity to play in the WNBA.” White said the 6-foot-2 forward benefited from playing under Bollant. “The system that she has played in this year has helped her because she can be a little bit more perimeter-oriented. She can shoot the 3 a little bit more. It has opened more for her to take it off the dribble a little bit more, so she can showcase the skills that she would use in the WNBA.” Penn said she feels comfortable playing small forward or power forward at the next level. She has developed an outside shot, hitting 27 percent of 3-pointers this season, rather than relying solely on shots next to the basket. While Penn is a projected top20 pick in April’s WNBA draft, GodBold will likely be an undrafted free agent if she is to make a WNBA roster. “She’s definitely a player where if she can get more experience, whether it being playing overseas or not, she certainly has an opportunity to have a future in the WNBA,” White said. GodBold, the Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year, averaged 3.2 steals and 7.1 rebounds per game. “I see GodBold as a player who can come in and play defense, and now she’s starting to showcase her offensive talent, which is really good,” White said. “But on an

Penn, GodBold have potential to play professionally Illinois seniors Karisma Penn and Adrienne GodBold have led Illinois to a 16-13 record and probable postseason berth. Penn and GodBold will graduate in May, but they plan to continue to play basketball. Penn — 19.0 ppg, 9.7 rpg, 2.9 bpg, 2.2 spg GodBold — 17.0 ppg, 7.1 rpg, 3.2 spg

11-man roster, it’s awfully tough to make a team.” White said GodBold may be limited by her lack of exposure to scouts. GodBold was not a starter until this season, and she missed the first semester because of academic ineligibility. “Her question would be experience,” White said. “She hasn’t had quite the experience in terms of the level of play and the consistency of playing time she has had throughout her career.” Bollant has two former players — Julie Wojta and Kayla Tetschlag — playing overseas. Illinois’ current video coordinator, Celeste Ratka, also played overseas after playing for Bollant at Green Bay. “The hard thing over there is you think you’re going to play pro and the girls will all be serious and take it really seriously, but it’s really just a mix,” he

BRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Karisma Penn looks towards the bench after diving for a loose ball during Illinois’ loss to Ohio State at Assembly Hall on Feb. 28. WNBA assistant coach Stephanie White said Penn has a good shot at being drafted. said. “A lot of our girls at Green Bay were frustrated with the intensity level and the passion of the team because it was so good at Green Bay and our practices were so intense and team was so passionate. And they go overseas, and they didn’t find the same, and it was kind of disheartening for them.”

Bollant said that finding the right fit overseas is crucial for players, so he plans to help his seniors find a good agent. “We’re going to have them meet with some agents when we go down to the Final Four and play in a combine-type thing at the Final Four in front of the WNBA coaches,” he said.

While Penn and GodBold are concerned with their future, they aren’t finished at Illinois. They know that, more than anything, a strong finish to their careers could boost their draft stock.

Johnathan can be reached at hetting2@dailyillini.com and @jhett93.

Softball spending spring break on the diamond BY NICHOLAS FORTIN STAFF WRITER

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Alex Booker runs to first base during the game at Eichelberger Field on April 21, 2012.

In the final days before break, most Illinois students are daydreaming about traveling somewhere warm. But as they do every year over break, the Illini will be playing softball. They wouldn’t want it any other way. “Honestly, it’s right where I want to be,” freshman Kylie Johnson said. “I would rather be playing than anything else. I’m here for a reason, and that’s softball. Especially now that we’re getting ready for Big Tens, this is a good weekend to do that and get excited.” Illinois will kick off break by hosting the Fighting Illini Invitational, its first-ever non-confer-

ence invitational, at home against Saint Louis, Western Michigan and Loyola this weekend. “I think there’s a little bit of pressure because you’re expected to win on your home field, but it’s good pressure,” Johnson said. Besides nerves, another possible worry could be that the everchanging Illinois weather would affect play. According to Johnson, it won’t in the slightest. “It’s something that Illinois girls are used to,” Johnson said. “It feels like high school season. We’re used to it being cold. Plus it’s something that both teams have to play with, so it can’t be that big of a factor.” After their invitational, the Illini will travel to play at Missouri on Wednesday before coming back home to end spring break and

open their Big Ten season against Wisconsin. “Usually it’s pretty warm over spring break, so I’m not gonna complain,” junior Alex Booker said. “I actually like staying in Champaign over break. Sure I get to see all my friends going out and doing whatever they do, but we have midweek games and it’s just like any other week. We’re still doing schoolwork and getting that little chance to catch up and it’s all softball. It’s like the summer for us, we’re only focusing on softball and going into our Big Ten conference schedule.” Illinois is happy that it doesn’t have to travel as much over break as it has in the past, but wish that more students could come to its first few home games of the year.

“Our spring break always falls at a little different point in the year and this year it fell so close to Big Ten season, so we actually like that we won’t be on the road this weekend just so we can get on our own field before we host the opening weekend of Big Ten,” head coach Terri Sullivan said. “Obviously we’d love for the students to be around because it’s fun to have them in the stands, but we just want to play ball. When we step between the lines — wherever you are, home or away — you’ve got the same pitching distance, same base path and the idea is to play really good softball.”

Nicholas can be reached at goldwyn2@dailyillini.com and @IlliniSportsGuy.

Basketball is a lot like reality television romance, except not really DANIEL MILLERMCLEMORE Basketball columnist

M

arch is a magical time in the sporting world. There’s magic in the air, rivalries are heating up, nobody wants the clock to strike midnight, everyone wants a ring ... That’s right, it’s time for the season finale of “The Bachelor”! Oh, and, uhh, also the Big Ten and the NCAA tournaments will be happening again soon. If you’re a fan of basketball, competition and hilariously bad television, there’s no better time of the year than March, which combines a bit of drama from all three of these competitions. So what better way to break down the dynamics of the Big Ten heading into postseason play than through the eyes of “America’s favorite show” (according to MVP host Chris Harrison) than by handing out Bachelor comparisons for each team. Quick tangent: Before you cover your eyes and run away ashamed of my lack of pride, allow me to make a few points to my fellow men out there who might mock watching “The Bachelor.” A few questions: Do you enjoy laughing? Do you and your buddies make fun of stupid things girls say? Do you enjoy attractive women saying and doing stupid things? Do you enjoy watching the same wom-

en futilely compete and fail in physical activities? Do you enjoy gambling, drinking and furiously debating whether a kiss was open-mouthed? Do you enjoy all of those things together? Damn right you do. Allow me, then, to give you the greatest gift since that one Christmas when you got a trampoline and a BB gun: The Bachelor Fantasy League. Rules and regulations are explained in the sidebar. So without further ado, let’s take a look at the contenders for the Big Ten Championship, in no particular order. Michigan/Desiree — Just like Des, the Wolverines should take home the final rose. They’ve got it all. The looks, the easy-going smile and laugh, the least-awkward conversations. Michigan is the most individually talented offensive team in the country, more so even than Indiana, whose offense is predicated on passing and finding the open man. But something is holding the Wolverines back. It may not be as detrimental as Des’ problems, which include a deranged brother and a troubled past that apparently includes large chunks of times living in tents (which somehow didn’t even get an eyebrow raise from Sean Lowe when he visited the Desiree family mansion — I repeat, mansion — on her home date), but when Michigan’s offense becomes stagnant and overly focused on Trey Burke, it tends to get bogged down.

Michigan State/Catherine — No one saw Catherine coming. Nobody. I nabbed her with my fifth-round pick and neither of my fellow owners made a fuss. At best, I was hoping for a couple cries and maybe an early rose before a mid-season exit. And then all of the sudden — WHAM! — she’s standing there accepting Sean’s final rose. She’s basically the Tom Brady of “The Bachelor.” Michigan State does this routine every year. It struggles to start the season, and we write the team off. They might even falter in the Big Ten Tournament. But come the NCAA tourney, I fully expect the Spartans to make a run to the Final Four. Who knows, they might even somehow end up standing there, accepting a ring, while we all wonder, “Wait, how the hell did we get here?” (I can’t stress how much of an underdog Catherine was. She barely showed up in the first six episodes this season. I don’t think Sean knew her name until about a few weeks ago. She was an 8-to-1 underdog going into the season finale.) Indiana/Lindsay — This match is solely because Lindsay was unequivocally the favorite heading down the homestretch (and not because Indiana struggles to form complete sentences, hasn’t said anything intelligent all season long and is ready to get married and settle down at 24). Not only are the Hoosiers the favorite to win the Big Ten Tournament, they’ll be a favorite for the NCAA tourney, as well. And

just like Lindsay’s most ardent supporters, Indiana fans will be crushed if the Hoosiers finish the year without cutting down the nets (my roommate who rode Lindsay to the cusp of a championship has sunk into a deep depression since the finale). But hey, that’s what happens when you get out of the limo in a wedding dress. Lesson learned. Northwestern/Jackie — Just kidding. They don’t allow highschoolers on the show. Or nerds, for that matter. Wisconsin/Daniela — How did she last until the sixth rose ceremony? Why did Sean keep her around? Did he have any idea who she was? Is it required to have a buzz if you’re on Wisconsin, white and not named Mike Brusewitz? Some mysteries will remain unsolved. Ohio State/Lesley — Look, I really wanted to give this one to AshLee but her adoption, resulting trust issues, prior marriage at age 17 and exquisite breasts simply didn’t fit the bill. So the Buckeyes get one of the only normal women (which, by Bachelor standards, means she probably only had one tragic, life-altering event in her past that she constantly brings up for sympathy points. I’m convinced half these women are pathological liars.) Like Lesley, Ohio State is quietly one of the hottest teams in the country. Yes, the nose might throw you off initially, but don’t sleep on the Buckeyes as title contenders. Illinois/Tierra — Calm down. I

2013 Bachelor scoring system a hot tub, helicopter or a plane (based off Grantland’s Negative scoring system) Invited on an overnight date and Weekly scoring

Calling Sean a pet name — five

points

Crying — 10 points Giving Sean a gift/poem/note —

10 points

Mentioning Emily as the mom —

10 points

Fighting — five to 10 points per

person involved

Open-mouth making out — five

points

Nudity — five to 10 points Openly drunk — 10 points Accepting a rose — 10 points Any rose before the ceremony —

additional five points Final rose — 50 points *Points double if they take place in know, the Illini certainly don’t attract as much vitriol as the widely hated Tierra. But think about the rest of it. They both started hot (Tierra impressed Sean so much in their introduction that he unprecedentedly discounted Bachelor opening-night tradition to give her the first rose within the first 20 minutes. Illinois started 12-0.) before rapidly cooling off (Tierra was immediately hated by the rest of the women. Illinois’ went through a 2-7 start in Big Ten play). They both are unpredictable (Tierra turns on her “sparkle”, no seriously, she calls it that, on random occasions. Illinois is the most hit-

not accepting — -25 points Leaving the show or not accepting a rose — -20 points Telling Sean another girl is lying or is ”there for the wrong reasons” — -10

— Additional scoring opportunities or categories may be added by a majority vote of the league members. — The addition of any women to the show following the limousine introductions may be considered and voted on by the league members as to her inclusion on a team. — Anything that can make this league as fun as possible can be voted on by league members.

or-miss team in the conference) and have qualities they can’t seem to control (Tierra’s oh-mygod-what-is-that-it-can’t-be-hereyebrow-it’s-moving-on-its-own eyebrow, Brandon Paul’ erratic shot selection.) You wouldn’t have been totally shocked to see Tierra at the final rose ceremony despite her obvious flaws, the same way it wouldn’t shock you if the Illini reached the final of the Big Ten Tournament. But realistically, you’d be a bit crazy to bet on them.

Daniel is a senior in Media. He can be reached at millerm1@dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @danielmillermc.

Itâs Almost Here

)UDWWOHRIWKH GMÇV We hope you’re ready to ;ILSTI]SYVVIEH]XS FRATTLE! *6%880) If your house has a DJ, -J]SYLSYWILEWE(. then they can compete XLIRXLI]GERGSQTIXI for CASH this April! JSV'%7,XLMW%TVMP Sign up by MAR 15th at 7MKRYTF]1%6XLEX wpgu.com/frattle

[TKYGSQJVEXXPI

Champaign’s Alternative


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Thursday, March 14, 2013

No. 1 seed Indiana favored to win its 1st Big Ten Tournament

309 Green 309 E. Green St.

DUANE BURLESON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Indiana forward Derek Elston, right, hugs guard Kevin Ferrell after Indiana’s 72-71 win over Michigan to capture the Big Ten title during this past Sunday in Ann Arbor, Mich. part of the conference schedule, including Michigan State, Minnesota, Illinois and Indiana. If the Buckeyes claim the tournament title, it will be head coach Thad Matta’s fourth in the last seven years.

MISC.

217-366-3500

309green.com 2,4

Bankier Apartments

Residing in the bottom bracket and on the wrong side of the NCAA Tournament bubble is No. 6 Iowa. Bracket prognosticators have suggested that two wins — against Northwestern and Michigan State — would force the

F    Individual leasing, great value for high-end living

217-328-3770

www.bankierapts.com

Nogle Properties LLC. 702 W. Washington, C.

committee’s hand to give the Hawkeyes an at-large bid to the Big Dance, which would their first since 2006.

Thomas can be reached at bruch2@ dailyillini.com and @ThomasBruch.

# BDROOMS

Rocky sent Sylvester sliding across the court with yet another punch to the head, and Jordan scrambled and picked it up as Wile E. Coyote camped out in the corner, clutching his knees and rocking back and forth, mumbling, “I don’t have to do this anymore” over and over. Jordan grabbed the ball and rose for a layup. Rocky and Apollo turned toward the alltime great and threw punches at him from either side of the lane. Apollo caught him in the temple and Rocky hit him right on the chin. Jordan layed it up, but it clanged off the left side of the rim, rolling over to Wile E. Coyote. The hapless teary-eyed coyote looked at the ball, looked at the boxers, looked back at the ball and shook his head. The buzzer sounded. Rocky and Apollo embraced, on their way to the finals. “You’ve got to hand it to them,” said Jordan in a wheelchair after the game. “They played absolutely tenacious defense, and we really had no counterpunch. “Oh, and they literally murdered Bill Murray.”

Eliot is a junior in Media. He can be reached at sill2@dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @EliotTweet.

RN / LA UNF U UN DR RN A/ Y IN C UN IT PA RK IN GO UT ILI NS TIE S I ITE NC L.

# BDROOMS

FROM PAGE 1B

MISC.

FU

For the first time since an Ohio State team featuring the likes of Greg Oden, Mike Conley and Daequan Cook swept through the Big Ten en route to the National Championship game, the city of Chicago hosts the Big Ten Tournament starting Thursday at 11 a.m. Indianapolis has served as host city to the tournament for the past five years, but the most loaded and lauded conference in the nation will play 11 games in four days in the house that Michael Jordan built — the United Center. Indiana, who secured the No. 1 seed in the tournament and its first outright Big Ten regular season championship since 1993 in a win Sunday against Michigan, sits at the top of the bracket in a position to win the Big Ten Tournament for the first time in the program’s history. After the inception of the conference tournament in 1998, Indiana’s furthest run in the tournament was a runner-up appearance in 2001, and the Hoosiers overall tournament

record is one of the worst among conference teams at 9-14. If Indiana is to win that coveted first tournament championship, its path could travel through No. 5-seeded Michigan. The Wolverines were ranked in the top 10 for the majority of the year, but lost twice to the Hoosiers during regular season play. The storyline of that game might lie in the developing rivalry between the two teams, ignited by Indiana head coach Tom Crean berating Michigan assistant Jeff Meyer following the postgame handshakes in Sunday’s game. “On the way to the plane, I talked to him on the telephone. We discussed a couple of things and I apologized,” Crean explained in a conference call Monday. “In retrospect, I wish I had never addressed anything after the heat of the battle in a game, but I did and we move on. End of story.” On the bottom of the bracket at the No. 2 seed, Ohio State looms as the hottest team entering the tournament with five straight wins against its most formidable

MOVIE MADNESS

RN / LA UNF U UN DR RN A/ Y IN C UN PA IT RK IN G UT ILI ON S TIE I S I TE NC L.

STAFF WRITER

FU

BY THOMAS BRUCH

217-337-7990

www.nogleproperties.com 1

F    Free Parking, Laundry on-site

One-Illinois

www.one-illinois.com

202 E. Green, C.

1,4

F    

Balcony, elevator, jacuzzi tubs

1321 N. Lincoln Avenue, U.

1,2,3,4

F    

508 E. Clark, C

1,2,3,4

B    

Laundry on site

1601 N. Lincoln Ave, U.

2,3,4

F    

408 E. Green, C.

1,2,3

F    

Intercom entry, remodeled bathrooms

Rob Chambers

106 S. Coler, U.

3

F    

Patio/Balcony

707 W. Elm, U.

3

F    

Balcony, $1191/mo. Free parking!

55 E. Healey, C.

2

F    

Parking & internet included

506 E. White, C.

3,4

F    

Balcony, secure bldg, $1131/mo free parking & water

303 W. Green, C.

1,2,3

F    

Guest parking lots, balconies off bedrooms

503 E. Clark

Ef.

F    

$445-$475. Secure, quiet, campus convenient

505 S. Fourth, C.

1,2

F    

Laundry on site, Balconies

101 W. Park, U.

1,2

U    

$510-$570. Free parking, EZ bus to campus

911 S. Locust, C.

1

F    

Laundry on site

Roland Realty

56 1/2 E. Green, C.

1

F    

Dishwashers

501 S. Sixth St

3,4

F    

410 E. Green, C.

1,2,3

F    

Lots of updates, must-see units!

33 E. Chalmers St.

2

F    Cozy 2BR w/ hardwood floors, gas stove, pool

907 S. Third

4

F    Only 1 apt. left, across from Bromley

404 E. Stoughton

2,3

F    Updated units, dishwasher, central A/C

408 E. Stoughton

1,2

F    Quiet building, near county market & engineering quad

Burnham 310 310 E. Springfield, C.

www.burnham310.com St.,1,2,3

Campustown Rentals

3B

217-239-2310

F    Fitness, theater, game room, pets OK, internet & cable campustownrentals.com

217-366-3500

217-840-5134

www.robsapartments.com

www.roland-realty.com

217-351-8900

Luxury apts, roomate matching, 1 block to campus

101 E. Green St

2,3,4

F    

Renovated units available, laundry on site, from $509

901-905-909 S. First

1

F    Spacious singles w/ great storage, pool, on 22 Illini

207 E. Green St.

4

F    

From $549, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

805-807-809 S. First

1

F    Free on-site laundry, spacious 1BRs w/ storage, pool, 22 bus

909 S. Third St.

3,4,5+

F    

From $510, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

903 S. First

2

F    Spacious affordable 2BR, free laundry, covered parking, pool

309 E. Daniel

3,4

F    

From $499, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

56-58 E. Daniel

2

F    Updated units w/ dishwasher, central A/C, pool

311 E. Daniel

3,4

F    

From $499, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

1011 S. Locust

2

F    Most affordable apts anywhere on campus-$375/person!

913 S. Third St.

3

F    

From $539, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

304 S. Fifth

5+

F    

5BR House, hardwood, free parking, close to County Market

22 E. Chalmers

2

F    

Rare 2BR house, hardwd, free pking, basement & front porch

Country Fair Apartments

myapartmenthome.com

2106 W. White St., C.

B    FREE Heat, digital cable and high speed internet

1,2

217-359-3713

www.roysebrinkmeyer.com

Hunsinger Enterprises

www.hunsingerapts.com

Urbana Houses

5+

F    

Urbana Approved for groups. 7, 8, and 9 bedrooms.

Shlens Apartment

www.shlensapts.com

Urbana Apartments

2,3,4

F    

Several Locations to Choose From.

1102 W. Stoughton, Urbana 2,3

F    

Joe Allan Properties

joeallanproperties.com

217-337-1565

Royse & Brinkmeyer

217-359-3527

Royse and Brinkmeyer Apts

1,2,3

Tenant Union

311 E. John, Champaign

1

B    

Fourth and John, laundry on site

U of I Tenant Union

308 N. Orchard, Urbana

1

B    

Near Engineering department

The Tower at Third

315 N. Orchard, Urbana

1

B    

Free parking

302 E. John, Champaign

B    Fireplaces, lofts, garages

www.tenantunion.illinois.edu    

Tri County Management Group

301 W. Park, Urbana

1

B    

906 S. Locust, C.

Ef.

F    

Parking $40/mo.

305 W. Park, Urbana

2

B    Near bus stop

705 S. First, C.

3,4

F    

Parking $40/mo

401 W. Park, Urbana

1

B    

Northwest side of campus

Wampler Property Management

403 & 405 W. Park, Urbana

1

B    

Near Computer Science Building

505 S. Busey, U.

2

F    

$835/mo.

407 W. Park, Urbana

1

B    

Walking distance to Carle Hospital

711 W. Main, U.

St.

F    

$550/mo.

911 S. Oak, Champaign

2

F    

Near Memorial Stadium

808 W. Nevada, U.

3

F    

$1875/mo.

201 S. Wright, Champaign

1

B    

Across the street from Beckman Institute

406 E. Clark, C.

1

F    

$540/mo.

404 W. High, Urbana

2

F    

East side of campus

604 E. Clark, C.

1

F    

$595/mo.

807-809 W. Illinois, U

1

F    

$595/mo.

1

U    

$710/mo.

217-367-6626

217-367-0720

F    Starting at $699, 1 block from Green St., individual leases

F    Secured building, West side of campus

Klatt Properties

217-333-0112

Free! Check Landlord Complaint Records & Lease Review!

www.tower3rd.com 2

217-344-2901

Large flat screen TV

609 S. Randolph, Champaign 2,3,4

Crystal Lake Park across the street

217-352-1129

www.tricountymg.com

www.wamplerapartments.com

217-367-2009

217-352-1335

505 W. Springfield, C.

2

U    

Most Utilities. Heat Incl. $800-840

106 E John

712 W. California, U.

5+

U    

$2700/mo, Best Deal, Rooming House

Weiner Companies, Ltd

www.weinercompanies.com

204 E. Clark, C.

1,2,3

B    Most Utilities Paid

404 1/2 E. White, C.

St.

F    

On site laundry, Pet friendly! $425/month

409 W. Elm, C.

2

U    

605 W. Springfield, C.

4

U    

House, hardwood floors, dishwasher, pet friendly! $1275/mo.

603 W. Green, U.

2,3

U    On site laundry, diswasher, pet friendly! $1060-$1500/mo.

305 W. Elm, U.

2,3

U    

705 W. Main, U.

2

F    Modern kitchen! Large apartment!

607 W. Springfield, C.

1

U    On site laundry, pet friendly, $525-$570/mo.

906 W. Springfield, Urbana

1

F    On site laundry, pet friendly, $525-$560/mo.

704 W. Nevada, U.

1

U    On site laundry, hardwd floors, cats allowed, $530-$675/mo

604 W. Nevada, Urbana

1

U    On site laundry, large unit, cats allowed, $575/mo.

403 E. Elm, Urbana

1

U    

Rarely available, pet friendly, $585/mo, washer/dry included

714 S. Race, Urbana

1

U    

Pet friendly, car port, $530/mo.

Heat Included

Lincolnshire Properties

www.lincolnshireprop.com

714 W. Elm, Urbana

F    

1,2,3,4

Lofts 54 54 E. Chalmers St.

217-366-3500

F    3 blocks from Green, individual leases, roommate matching

Next Chapter Properties - 75 Armory

www.75armory.com

75 E. Armory, Champaign

2,3,4

F    

512 S. Neil Suite C, C.

2,3,4

F    

Nogle Properties LLC. 105 E. Chalmers, C.

Modern, 1 block to campus

lofts54.com 4

217-356-3511

New 9-ft. ceilings

www.nogleproperties.com 2

217-398-1998

F    Laundry on-site

217-337-7990

217-384-8001

Updated kitchen with dishwasher, pet friendly, $735/mo.


4B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Thursday, March 14, 2013

FOR RENT

Services

Employment

Business Services Child Care Cleaning Mind, Body & Spirit Tutoring Financial

Help Wanted Full Time 010 Part Time 020 Full/Part Time 030 Seasonal Jobs 035 Job Wanted 040 Business Oppurtunities 050

DAILY ILLINI CLASSIFIEDS

110 120 130 140 150 160

Merchandise Textbooks Clothing Computers Furniture Pets TV Garage Sales For Sale Miscellaneous

Rentals

Transportation

220 230 235 240 250 260 280 285 290

Apartments

Automobiles 310 Bicycles 320 Motorcycles/Scooters 330

Furnished/Unfurnished

Furnished Unfurnished Sublets Summer Only Off-Campus Other For Rent

410 420 430 440 450 460 500

Houses (For Rent Condos/Duplexes Rooms Room & Board Roommate Wanted Office Space Parking/Storage For Rent Wanted To Rent

Real Estate

510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590

Condos/Duplexes Houses (For Sale) Residential Property Open Houses

Things To Do

620 630 650 660

Announcements

710 720 750

Campus Events Community Events

Classes

Lost & Found

810

Volunteer Opportunities 820

Miscellaneous

830

Adoption/Egg Donation 850

Shout Outs Shout Outs Greek Shout Outs

900 901

Rates Billed: 45¢/Word Minimum $2.00 Paid-In-Advance: 38¢/Word Deadline 2pm on the day before publication. Online Ads Classifieds automatically appear online at dailyillini.com

Place your ad by phone! Call 217.337.8337 Monday - Friday, 9am - 5:30pm

Important Information About Your Ad

Report errors immediately by calling 337-8337.We cannot be responsible for more than one dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incorrect insertion if you do not notify us of the error by 2 pm on the day of the first insertion. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher.The Daily Illini shall have the right to revise, reject or cancel, in whole or in part, any advertisement at any time. The Daily Illini shall not be liable for failure to print, publish or circulate all or any part of any issue in which an advertisement accepted by the publisher is contained. The Daily Illini extends credit to classified advertisers as a courtesy.We reserve the right to set credit limits, to require cash in advance, and/or to require a completed credit application. The Daily Illini screens classified advertising to avoid misleading or false messages. Please be cautious in answering ads, especially when you are asked to send money. If you have a question or concern about any advertisement which has appeared in our paper, we will be happy to discuss it with you. Please call 337-8337. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, and similar state and local laws which make it illegal for any person to cause to be published any advertisement relating to the transfer, sale, rental, or lease of any housing which expresses limitation, specifications or discrimination as to race, color, creed, class, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status, physical or mental handicap, personal appearance, sexual orientation, family responsibilities, political affiliation, prior arrest or conviction record, source of income, or the fact that such person is a student. Specification in employment classifications are made only where such factors are bonafide occupational qualifications necessary for employment.

employment

HELP WANTED

010

Full time

Network Technician Champaign Public Library $19.85 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $25.35 per hour; excellent benefits Full-time: 11:30 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 PM, Four weekdays and on Saturdays 9 AM to 6 PM See our detailed job information & apply online at www.champaign.org

<=9<DAF=2>ja\Yq$EYj[`**$*()+Zq-2((HE

HELP WANTED

020

Part time

   "  # !   # #   !    #

APARTMENTS

Furnished/Unfurnished

410 APARTMENTS

      "!-++)/% 0$0./  #0-*&.%"!(( ),0.0.".."(-'  111(&* +(*.%&-",-+, +)   



808 W. Nevada

      

www.WamplerApartments.com

merchandise

BOOKS

220

                                        

FOR RENT

U THO

/(77(56 727+( (',7256

rentals

Email: APARTMENTS

Furnished/Unfurnished

410

RSLQRQV#GDLO\LOOLQL FRP

Leasing for Fall 2013 Engineering Campus Close In Urbana Locations

SUBLETS

1,2,3&4 BEDROOMS

Digital Comp. Lab, Grainger, Siebel 2 1/2 Blocks

THE217.COM

HOUSES FOR RENT

ZZZVPLWKDSDUWPHQWVFXFRP Efficiency ä&KXUFK&



1 Bedroom ä&KXUFK&



2 Bedroom ($UPRU\& ($UPRU\& ä&KXUFK& ä6WRXJKWRQ8 6/RFXVW& ä&ODUN8 ä&ODUN8 ä&ODUN8

       

 #" #"#"     ! !"" $    

510

 

          

  



ROOMS

 (  &$$"' )!!(' )#&+'"#(    !$ &$"$)#(+& ( ))'(      

  ***""%&$%&('$"

What are you waiting for? Budget Minded 1-2 bedrooms, five great locations, air-conditioning, & off-street parking $425-$660

PARKING / STORAGE 570              



Extra Value 1,2 & 3 bedrooms, courtyards, carports, & on-site laundry $450-$845

ĹŻĆ?ŽůÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć?Ĺ?ĹśĹ?^Ć&#x161;ĆľÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ĺ˝Ć?Í&#x2022;KĹśÄ&#x17E;Í&#x2022;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;dÇ Ĺ˝Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ć&#x152;ŽŽžhĹśĹ?Ć&#x161;Ć?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;EƾžÄ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ŽĨŽƾĆ&#x152;KĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;WĆ&#x152;Ĺ˝Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Í&#x160;>Ĺ?ĹľĹ?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;^Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ä?ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Í&#x2DC;

announcements

Luxury Locations 1-2 bedrooms, beautifully appointed, oasis, fireplaces, balconies, & garages $725-$895  Newly Remodeled 1-2 bedrooms, some w/lofts, spacious floor plans, on-site laundry, & garages $580-$840

































      

      

      

      

       

        

        

A & E

N A K E D



C O T

O N C L E



E L B E

D A M E



S HR E K

A R I

A I R S



N E D S

R O W

G N U S



A N T HR A C I T E

 N E HR U



T R I P

N F L

P O S I A L L M S E E T I O L A G E T HR E A L I C N D O E E L S T T U G S M A N R B L O A L A B M E S S



S A M E

I N E D G E N K A D I N G S I E T E HR I I L O G L S E V H H R S S



A D D N

N O O S E S



A S HR A M



M A T T E



)RUPRUHGHWDLOVFRQWDFW RUZZZNHQQHG\ZLOVRQFRPXLXF

R E E S E



Íť dĹ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;WÄ&#x201A;ĹŻĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ä&#x161;Ĺ?ƾžÍ&#x2022;Ď­ĎŹĎłÄ&#x201A;ĹśĹ?Ä&#x17E;ĹŻ^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2022;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹľĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺś Íť >Ĺ˝Ĺ&#x152;ϹϾÍ&#x2022;ϹϾ:Ĺ˝Ĺ&#x161;Ĺś^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2022;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹľĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺś Íť ĎŽĎŹĎ´ttÄ&#x201A;Ć?Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Ć&#x161;ŽŜ^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2022;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹľĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺś Íť WÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;ĹŹÇ&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ç dÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2022;ϾϏϹ^ĎŽĹśÄ&#x161;^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2022;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹľĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺś Íť dĹ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;DÄ&#x201A;ĹśĆ?Ĺ?ŽŜÍ&#x2022;Ď­ĎŹĎł^tĆ&#x152;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x161;^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2022;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹľĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺś Íť WÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;ĹŹWĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ä?Ä&#x17E;DÄ&#x201A;ŜŽĆ&#x152;Í&#x2022;Ď­ĎŹĎŹĎŽ^ĎŽĹśÄ&#x161;^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2022;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹľĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺś

A S S E S



217-352-1129

LOST & FOUND

 1 /LQFROQ 8 8SGDWHG  EHGURRP   EDWK KRXVH 9HU\ VSDFLRXV IXOO\ IXUQLVKHG QHDU (QJLQHHULQJ FDPSXV ZDVKHU DQG GU\HU LQ EDVHPHQW IUHH SDUNLQJ  SHU PRQWK $XJXVW  $'9$17$*( 3523(57,(6 ZZZDGYSURSHUWLHVFRP 



%5+286(

530

  $#%%$#!"# "    

'& &%"&$"&&" '"$*  #$(&$&+ #'%"#$!" "($%&*

  $# '"($%&**!#$ )))'"($%&**!#$

   

0RVWDSWIXUQLVKHGSDUNLQJDYDLODEOHODXQGU\DYDLODEOH

%5+286( /^KhEd&KZKsZWZ</E'&KZd,^ Ď°ZWdhE/d^/&>^^/'EzWZ/>Ď­Í&#x2022;ĎŽĎŹĎ­ĎŻÍ&#x2DC; Íť ϭϳϭώWĆ&#x152;Ĺ?ĹśÄ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x161;ŽŜÍ&#x2022;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹľĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺś



 #  &%$& #(!# 

   &&$%      

  '''"#!"#%$!

217-344-3008

60,7+$3$570(176 12:5(17,1*)25 6&+('8/(<2856+2:,1*12:

%5$376

 

Office: 911 W. Springfield, Urbana IL

21/<$)(:DQG%('522081,76/()7)25)$//

%5$376

440

  

"!-++) /%,-/)"*/ 1&(("4 /%("*" 0-" 0&"/2&/%3"- &.")""!& ++),-/)"*/# &*$,-&*$5"(! ! )+*/%

+*"/&)" )+1&*$#""(("*  '"**&#"-&/+4$)&( +) 

www.BaileyApartments.com

CALENDAR Check it out!

  ###!   "!    



RE A H S R YOU S GHT

Illini Union 3 1/2 Blocks Mech. Eng. 3 Blocks

    

   

 " !      

    

  !       



     /HWWHUVWRWKH(GLWRU

 



  

 

#$+ (%&  #((%& #*$%") '%""%'+ ###%"$$ '#"#"#(% )&' )))$## (%&#!

  * ! )#% &$!&$## &#!

 $""  %#"'% #$& !&  %& ! $! #$! ( ! &$%'!$"" (!$"" %& ##!% )%$%$*$% $%& "!&$!&$!&$%&"!&&     



  %  "' *%!#  ( '&("%*&!"' #%(" 

   ((&'      

  )))!!$%#$%'&#!

Take a video tour at www.bankierapts.com or call 217.328.3770 to set up an appointment

Do You Want Close?



6KDUH<RXU   

     

                



        

  

202 E Green St Spring Break Special!

  

510

     

       '&*$)*,&',+

+,#'*'    (*    ,-#(+ '/('"**((&+ -*-#%#'!+/#,"%.,(*+ (-*%-'*0*((&+ '*!*(-''(.*)*$#'! #&#, *)*$#'! %'&*$),++!%(%', ///%'&*$,(0(&

Sign a lease at 202 E Green St before Spring Break and we will: - include a 52â&#x20AC;? TV in your apartment - include Basic Cable and Internet - call about 10 month leases! (Limited number available!) /HDVLQJ 1RZ

430 HOUSES FOR RENT

Unfurnished

Amazing 1, 2, 3, & 4 Bedrooms!

 

      !"     "% !#$$!"

217-352-1335

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

$!" ! !     #$ "  &  !"#     % $$"#  

 

        

Please call 217-352-1335 for showing.

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

Furnished

           



    

 

3 Bedrooms plus sunroom. Partially furnished. Available August 2013.

420 APARTMENTS

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

    )*%+6.- %++.5(.//%0 .02(".3-$&0.,%026!2  /, !6(!4%1+)//%$.&&5()+%8)//)-' 3/1%!212.!##.,.$!2%25. 5(%%+#(!)01.0$0.//%$)-2(% 1#(%$3+%")- 0!22(%0!-1)2+!7!#0.11)-' 0)'(220%%22.#!2#(!-.2(%0"31   /,  !,,%0%$)+4%0!-$ )+4%0!-$1%25)2(2(0%%+)'(2 "+3%(!"!#(.-2.-%1 +$!1().-%$1)+4%0"!-$1%25)2( 0.3-$&!#%2%$#.+.0+%1112.-%  %-2),%-2!+!+3% 0%5!0$+%!1%#!++   .0   .0%,!)+032(!--',!)+#.,

6XEVFULEH WRWKH 'DLO\,OOLQL ZZZGDLO\LOOLQLFRP

MISCELLANEOUS

810

830 MISCELLANEOUS

830

THIS SUMMER... Take a class for fun, not because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s required.



Save money.

NEW RENOVATED UNITS WRXUWRGD\

GREAT LOW RATES :$/. WALK 72 TO &$0386 CAMPUS!  : &ODUN 8   %5 1002 W. Clark U. 1 & 2 BR  : 0DLQ 8  %5  %5  %DWK 1003: W.&ODUN Main8 U. BR & 2 BR 2 Bath  1%5 1003: W.6WRXJKWRQ Clark U. 8  1%5 BR  %5  %DWK  1005 W. Stoughton U. 1 BR  : &ODUN 8  %5 1007: W.0DLQ Clark8U.  1 BR  %5 1007: W.0DLQ Main8U.  1 BR  %5 1010: W.0DLQ Main8U. BR &%5 2 BR 2 Bath  1%5  %DWK 2031N.*UHJRU\ Gregory8 U.  1 BR  %5 2041N.+DUYH\ Harvey8 U.  2 BR  %5 3061N.+DUYH\ Harvey8 U. BR2%DWK Bath  2%5 808: W.&ODUN Clark8 U. BR  1%5 906: W.&ODUN Clark8 U. BR  1%5  : 6WRXJKWRQ 8  %5

VWDUWLQJDW

Transfer summer credit back to your home university.

SUMMER SESSIONS STAR T MAY 20 AND JUNE 10. Start planning your summer now at harpercollege.edu/summer

6XGRNX 6.,//   

STOP BY OUR LEASING OFFICE @ 309 E. GREEN ST.



 gI     n   















      













 

     X  Tn





 

   

(QWHUWKHQXPEHUVLQWKHEODQNVSDFHVVRWKDW HDFKURZFROXPQDQG[VTXDUHFRQWDLQVRQO\RQH RIHDFKQXPEHU7KHUHLVRQO\RQHVROXWLRQ VROX WLRQLQ&ODVVLILHGVDQGRQOLQHDWZZZGDLO\LOOLQLFRP 

 ZZZDGYSURSHUWLHVFRP

CAMPUSTOWNRENTALS.COM | 217.366.3500


The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 121  

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you