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MONDAY April 17, 2017

THE DAILY ILLINI

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Vol. 146 Issue 56

Covered in color

Student trustee ballot to reopen BY GILLIAN DUNLOP ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

After a monthlong investigation into the 2017 Student Trustee Election, a repeat election will be held from April 26 to 27. The investigation sparked after Trayshawn Mitchell, junior in LAS, claimed that the Campus Student Election Commission unfairly kept him off the ballot. Mitchell and the other candidates were required to submit documentation to confirm that they were students at the Uni-

SEE TRUSTEE | 3A

BANG NGUYEN THE DAILY ILLINI

Students celebrate Holi, the festival of colors, at the Florida and Lincoln playing fields. Saturday’s event celebrated the beginning of spring and the defeat of evil.

Visit vote.illinois.edu from April 26 to April 27 to vote. The candidates are Tommy Justison, Trayshawn Mitchell and Emily Tuttle.

Power plant upgrading old stack BY KAREN LIU STAFF WRITER

After 77 years of operation, the south energy stack at Abbott Power Plant is scheduled to be taken down and replaced with low emission natural gas boilers. The project is a part of the Utilities Production and Distribution Master Plan. Mike Larson, director of utilities production at facilities and services, said the total project budget is $22.5 million, which includes design, equipment, construction and contingency money for unforeseen circumstances. Larson said that the five-year plan includes understanding the current energy demand and predicted growth of the campus, so that the power plant can provide utility needed to meet the needs of the University. “We had boilers in place that were actually past the end of their useful lives,” Larson said. “One of (the power plant’s) main deliverables for the campus is reliable steam and electricity.” Larson said the process of taking down the old smoke stack started about a week ago, and the removal of the external material will be completed by the end of April. The new boilers are expected to be operational by December. He said that the electricity and heat-

RYAN FANG THE DAILY ILLINI

The Slice Factory storefront is located on Green Street between Zorba’s and Mid Summer Lounge. The Chicago-based pizza chain once again delayed its opening.

Slice Factory opening delayed wanting quick, affordable food.” The Slice Factory website says the restaurant will be open Sunday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. It will also operate until midnight Friday and Saturday to supply students with latenight snacks. With a more basic menu than its Chicagoland counterparts, the Slice Factory menu will include chicken wings, self-serve frozen yogurt and made-to-order salads. DiDiana said that he anticipates the restaurant to be ready for opening in about four weeks.

BY JESSICA BERBEY ASSISTANT DAYTIME EDITOR

Originally expected to begin operating in March, the opening of the Chicago-based pizza chain Slice Factory delayed opening once again due to construction. Domenic DiDiana, founder and president of Slice Factory, cited mechanical operations as the main reason for the delay. This location has been in the works since at least 2009. DiDiana said he had always wanted the restaurant to be on Green Street within a block or two of campus. “Champaign fits our demographic,” DiDiana said. “Students

SEE POWER PLANT | 3A

UI employees suffer from work visa changes

jberbe3@dailyillini.com

BY LUKE COOPER STAFF WRITER

University job positions may be empty starting this fall as the United States government has issued a temporary suspension of expedited application processing for H-1B visas, which allow skilled foreigners to work for companies and institutions within the country. This expedited processing, referred to as “premium processing,” allowed U.S. businesses and institutions such as the University to quicken the application processing time of an H-1B visa by paying an additional $1,225. The University reported that premium processing was used for 80 percent of the H-1B applica-

INSIDE

Piano man warms hearts with campus performances

Meagan McNicholas’ choice to attend Illinois has paid off

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RYAN FANG THE DAILY ILLINI

Water vapor comes out of Abbott Power Plant’s main chimneys. The original stacks, which are 77 years old, are expected to be removed by the end of April and will be replaced by December 2017.

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tions fi led last year, and that 300 to 400 H-1B visa-holding faculty members work on campus during a calendar year, with between 200 and 300 active at any given time. “(Premium processing) has been utilized heavily by this University,” said Chancellor Robert Jones at an Academic Senate meeting on April 3. “Our greatest concern is the impact that it will have on this University community if it prevents us from being able to get visas approved, so that members of our community that were planning to join us in the fall will continue to do so.” The Office of the Provost says the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services created a process by which premium pro-

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cessing is “almost mandatory.” Premium processing would require United States Citizenship and Immigration Services to take action on an H-1B application within 15 days of it being received. This then results in a shortened one-and-a-half- to four-anda-half-month timeline, starting from when a University department informs International Student and Scholar Services that it wishes to hire an international faculty member. The timeline ends when the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services takes action on the H-1B application fi led and sent by the Interna-

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Monday, April 17, 2017

THE DAILY ILLINI 512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 (217) 337-8300 Copyright © 2017 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or The Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. Editor-in-chief Lillian Barkley editor@ dailyillini.com Managing editor Joseph Longo reporting@ dailyillini.com Managing editor Jacob Singleton online@dailyillini. com Creative director Hannah Auten hauten2@ dailyillini.com News editor Jessica Bursztynsky news@ dailyillini.com Asst. news editors Gillian Dunlop Vivienne Henning Asst. daytime editors Andrea Flores Jessica Berbey Sports editor Mike Gasick sports@dailyillini. com Asst. sports editors Gavin Good Tatiania Perry Features editor Abby Paeth features@ dailyillini.com Asst. features editors Emma Palatnik Camille Baer Opinions editor Courtney Boyer opinions@ dailyillini.com Asst. opinions editor Isabella Winkler

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Night editor: Samantha Jones Toal Copy editors: Will Gerard, Ella Schindler Designers: Natalie Stephan, Billy Galant Page transmission: Brian Bauer Photo night editor: Sabrina Yan Web manager: Shankari Sureshbabu

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Champaign

An aggravated battery was reported in the 1400 block of North Market Street around 2 a.m. on Friday. According to the report, the offender was arrested for battering the victim. A 19-year-old female was arrested on the charge of domestic battery in the 600 block of East Columbia Avenue around 3:30 p.m. on Thursday. The offender and the victim reportedly got into a physical altercation. A case of criminal damage to property was reported in the 800 block of Bloomington Road around 10 a.m. on Wednesday. According to the report, an unidentified offender had broken the touch screen on a vending machine.

University

A 28-year-old male was arrested on the charge of domestic battery at State Farm Center, 1800 S. First St., around

10 p.m. on Thursday. According to the report, the police had responded to disturbances made during a concert. Damage to property was reported at Altgeld Hall, 1409 W. Green St., overnight on Wednesday. A glass door panel was cracked, and the estimated costs to repair the damage is $300. A sexual assault was reported at a University residence hall on Tuesday around 3 p.m. According to the report, the victim was a University student who reported being assaulted around 2 a.m. on Dec. 10, 2016. The assault reportedly happened at a residence hall in Champaign. The offender was a person known to the victim.

Urbana

A theft was reported in the 1900 block of South Orchard Street around noon on Friday. The victim left their laptop on an MTD bus. An unknown offender picked up and has to return

it.

A 46-year-old male was arrested on the charges of speeding, driving without a driver’s license and obstructing identification near the intersection of Briarcliff Drive and Adams Street around 11:30 a.m. on Friday. According to the report, the offender was initially stopped for speeding. They then gave officers a false date of birth. They were subsequently arrested for obstructing identification. A 23-year-old male was arrested on the charge of possessing an in-state warrant in the 200 block of Grove Street around 8 a.m. on Friday. According to the report, the offender and victim, who live together and are dating, were involved in a verbal-only domestic dispute. The offender damaged some of the victim’s personal belongings. The offender was then found to have a valid City of Champaign warrant and subsequently arrested by an officer.

University encourages sustainability with Earth Week

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BY KEVIN DELGADO STAFF WRITER

During Earth Week, the University’s oldest environmental student group, Students for Environmental Concerns, will host events encouraging students to make more sustainable choices. Earth week runs through Saturday “By having small events that are environmentally focused, we hope that students will start to implement sustainable actions into their daily lives,” said Catherine Yee, member of Students for Environmental Concerns and Institute for Sustainability, Energy, and Environment campus sustainability intern. This year, the group organized events and lectures to promote sustainable living. Though most Earth Week events take place every year, Students for Environmental Concerns added new events to the lineup. DuringFossil Free UIUC, Students for Environmental Concerns will present a water/oil separation demo and a showing of Leonardo DiCaprio’s environmental documentary, “Before the Flood.” Students for Environmental Concerns collaborated with the University’s environmental magazine, “The Green Observer,” Alpha Phi Omega service frater-

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Students browse through donated clothes during a Student For Environmental Concerns’ Earth Day clothing swap event at the YMCA on April 21. This year, Chancellor Robert Jones will bike with BikeFace to promote sustainable campus transportation. nity and the Institute for Sustainability, Energy, and Environment. Institute for Sustainability, Energy, and Environment will also offer four complimentary lectures on climate change throughout the week. “Our generation faces unprecedented challenges, both in terms of climate change, resource scarcity and growing economic and societal concerns,” said Micah Kenfield, student sustainability committee coordinator. “Earth Week is an opportunity for

us to look at solutions and a way for us to get energized to make greater change in our communities.” The events vary from a repurposing workshop — designed to teach students how to reuse items they would normally discard like coffee grounds or banana peels — to bike fix-it days on the Main Quad. BikeFace, the biking awareness group of Students for Environmental Concerns, will provide quick fixes for students as well as teach them how to fix their bikes. The group has also

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organized a bike ride with Chancellor Robert Jones to encourage environmental modes of transportation. Students can also engage in hands-on activities like the Veggie Burger Cook-Off. On Friday afternoon, competitors will create their own veggie burgers and the best will be selected. “We hope that the campus and surrounding community will realize that our actions have consequences, and we must work to make a better tomorrow,” Yee said.

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Phi Kappa Phi Announces Spring 2017 Initiates Initiation Held April 12, 2017 at the Illini Union Ballroom

Phi Kappa Phi is the nation’s oldest and most selective all-discipline honor society. Standards for election are extremely high. Membership is by invitation only to the top 7.5 percent of second-semester juniors and the top 10 percent of seniors and graduate students. Because Phi Kappa Phi is highly selective, membership is a stamp of excellence that is recognized by graduate and professional school admissions committees and employers alike. Congratulations, Initiates!

NATIONAL AWARDS Michelle Asbill, Dissertation Fellowship Alexandra Kelly Brooks, Literacy Award Kaetlin Romberg, Love of Learning Award

CHAPTER STUDENT AWARDS Haoen Cui, LAS, Junior Scholarship Jaclyn Shea, AHS, Freshmen Essay Award

FACULTY Dr. Amy Woods, Department Head, Kinesiology and Community Health

ALUMNI Dr. Laura L. Jennings

GRADUATE STUDENTS Amelia M. Adams Emily T. Adams Patrick M. Baker Christopher Dane Bando Traci Lynn Baumgardner Sara R. Benson Kirsten Berding Harold Davide Biasotti Ahmad M. Bsharat Elizabeth Marie Buehlman Ryan Chandler Xiaoying Chen Jessica L. Colbert Brianna Ashley Corleto Julie A. Cullotta Anna Cymerman Honglin Diao

Wei Du Kyle Edward Ellis Brant D. Faulkner Megan Finnegan Ruth Franklin Sosnoff Thomas C. French Karen Claire Gianacakos Grete Graf Giovanna Giulia Grilli Filippo Grondona Ruohua Han Fiona Hartley-Kroeger Marianne L. Hartman Tichenor Nichole Hemming Kyle Huizenga Shubha Jain Maria Jaromin Mark Karimi Jenna Kim Hongyi LI Ting Li Hui Lin Rosalia Lugo Hui Lyu Jian Lyu Ryan J. Maley Karen McNeely Priscilla Marie Mendez Alexandra Moll Alice Y. Moon Drew A. Newman Michael C. O’Flynn Kelsey O’Shea Ashley Marie Packer Abigail A. Peterson Alison Canada Rollins Kaetlin Romberg Tiana Royer Pedro Serna Christopher J. Sheridan Ishmeet Singh Karandeep Singh Emily R. Teitelbaum Kari An Testory Katherine Vande Pol Ruomin Wang Xilu Wang Zishu Winston Wang Meredith Wieck Chi Hang Jacky Wong

Megan Michelle Perez, AHS Joshua Perozek, ENG Emmaline G. Pool, MEDIA Margaret J. Potter, SSW SENIORS Nickolas Pudik, ENG Hongxiang Qiu, LAS Ali Alagha, AHS Zihang Qiu, LAS Karly R. Anderson, FAA Amy Catherine Radlinski, LAS Stephanie Bailen, BUS Rebecca L. Reichel, LAS Rachel L. Baits, LAS Cassandra Rynott, AHS Nathan Charles Beauchamp, ENG Mekensie Schell, LAS Corey Celeste Blumenthal, LAS Collin T. Schumock, LAS Cassidy Taylor Burke, LAS Mark P. Snider, ACES Sara Camp, LAS Wete Tittora, LAS Steven Jun Chen, BUS Jade Alexis Tyson, LAS Rebecca Katherine Clarke, LAS Jia J. Wang, LAS Isaac Cudjoe, ACES Jinghan Wang, BUS DeAnna DeHoff, LAS Laronda D. Wilson, LAS Zhuan Du, BUS Di (Andy) Wu, LAS Alexander Duman, LAS Kefei Olivia Wu, ACES Sofia Dumlao, LAS Meirong You, LAS Jane Eagleton, LAS John Michael Zahour, LAS Nicole Priscilla Evans, AHS Ziheng Zeng, ENG Jonathan Field, LAS Yuan Zhang, FAA Sarah Patrice Foster, MEDIA Yuanzhen Zhu, BUS Katelyn Gamble, FAA Yuchen Zhu, LAS Hayley Lynn Graf, ACES Kahlia Roe Halpern, SSW JUNIORS Jacob Paul Henss, LAS Derek Hoot, LAS Fadi Al Zuabi, ENG Anne Y. Hou, ACES Marie Merwyn Beasley, ENG Katie ReNae James, BUS Hannah E. Bohn, ED Kento Kanzaki, BUS Nathaniel David Kaufman, ENG Denise Branch, LAS Samuel James Koenigsberg , LAS Zewei Chai, LAS Emily Jessica Cohen, LAS Jessica M. Kordas, ACES Samantha Delia Crist, ACES Sonam B. Kotadia, LAS Taylor Crooks, LAS Gabriella Kreissler, ACES Haoen Cui, LAS Brendan M. Kuhns, ACES Joseph B. Dobbins, LAS Stirling Hobgood Lemme, LAS Wyatt Dozier, ACES Meili Liang, LAS Francesca Elaine Fridman, LAS Stephanie Martynenko, LAS Pierce M. Hadley, ENG Kelly Irene McCone, ACES Kailyn Rae Harris, BUS Michelle McGrew, LAS Samantha Heiberger, FAA Ashley Emma Milner, LAS John Henderson, ACES Faraz Mirza, MEDIA Payton Michelle Heyen, LAS Sean Moran, LAS Hyojin Kim, FAA Patrick D. Nelson, ENG Andrianna Kurzenberger, LAS Jeffrey S. Ohmer, MEDIA Claudia M. Ladzik, ACES Alexander Pandya, LAS Wenqi Yang Yilin Zhu

Samuel Paul LeRoy, BUS Evelyn Li, FAA Cameron Liss, BUS Eric Bryant Marcin, AHS McKenzie Mae Martin, ACES Brett Anthony Martino, BUS Kyle Gerald Moreau, ENG Bridget Mueller-Brennan, LAS Natalie Ann Noonan, AHS Kristin Ogle, AHS Halle Marie Paschen, MEDIA Sarah Jean Plimpton, AHS Michael Timothy Pufunt, LAS Gina Randell, MEDIA Margaret Richards, ACES Stephanie L. Santo, LAS Nathan M. Savage, LAS Laura Schultz, LAS Mika Schweizer, FAA Colleen Marie Shelton, LAS Sang Hyun Song, LAS Jeremy Ti Stutchman, ACES Jeffrey William Scott Talley, LAS Nick Thompson, LAS Tess Elizabeth Valente, AHS Priscilla H. Whang, LAS

2016-2017 OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA CHAMPAIGN CHAPTER 046

Dr. Soo-Yeun Lee, President Robert Chappell, Jr. Dr. Kim Graber Amanda Houser Jinseok Kim Molly Mclay Dr. Amy Woods


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MONDAY April 17, 2017 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

NEWS

Talk illuminates undocumented struggle BY KAREN LIU STAFF WRITER

The Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Relations hosted a discussion on Friday that addressed issues that undocumented students at the University face, ranging from recent chalkings on the Main Quad to financial situations. Diversity & Social Justice Education, a branch of the Office of Inclusion at the Women’s Resource Center, led the talk which was part of the Lunch on Us noontime discussion series. “I feel like a lot of students don’t understand undocumented students and how they experience college,” said Daven Douglas, sophomore in LAS. Ross Wantland, assistant director of the Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Relations, said that in order to provide better help for undocumented students, it’s important to understand the issues they face. Dr. Gioconda Guerra Perez, director of La Casa Cultural Latina, gave the audience a presentation that included the defi nition of undocumented students and their experiences on campus. Perez said she hopes to educate the students and provide them with accurate information regarding the issue. “I think it’s very important for our students and faculty who are learning about, or are curious about (undocumented students), to get as

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POWER PLANT ing of the University will not be affected. “The fi rst thing that we focus on is safety. The second piece we focus on is environmental compliance, and then the reliability, and lastly, cost effectiveness,” Larson said. “The plan is nobody will notice anything different.” While the University has multiple sources for electricity, Abbott Power Plant is the only provider of steam for heating, Larson said. “If Abbott stops running — if the equipment stops running — we don’t have the means to supply steam for campus,” he said. Larson said one of the biggest benefits of the new boilers is that they generate higher-pressure steam, allowing the turbines to operate more efficiently. Michael Brewer, mechanical engineer at Abbott Power Plant, said the new boilers will also be more environmentally friendly, so the new stacks do not need to be as tall as the old ones. Brewer said the engineers of the original smoke

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TRUSTEE versity. Mitchell had technical difficulties and could not submit his documentation by the deadline. A lthough M itchel l informed the Commission of his technical difficulties, he said they were not communicative with him and as a result, did not put him on the ballot. Mitchell’s complaint against the Commission led Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Renee Romano to investigate what had transpired during the election. “Typically there are complaints that CSEC reviews: if one candidate complains that another candidate violated election rules,” Romano said. “The reason why I heard this one is because this one was against the CSEC itself.” Romano talked to all three candidates one-on-one as a way to understand what happened. “I wanted to understand their perspective, their experience with the technology,” she said. “I (also) talked to the chair of the student election commission. I talked to the advisers. Then I looked through all of the documentation, the information sent to each candidate and what the communications were.” The other candidates had no knowledge of what was transpiring between Mitchell and the Commission until

much information as possible,” she said. “(That way they) can help them whenever they talk to a student (who) may (be going) through a difficult situation because of their immigration status.” Perez said she aims to share the works of La Casa on campus and highlight the resources they offer to students in need. However, Perez said there is no way to determine the number of students on campus who are undocumented since the University does not keep track of them. She also addressed the discrimination that undocumented students face on campus. Perez said she is very vocal about the discriminative chalking on the Main Quad because it is something that should not happen. “When you write a message that says ‘Stop supporting, start deporting,’ you are directly messaging a group of students who are part of our community,” she said. “That particular type of narrative is in detriment of a group of people that live in the residence halls, who walk around the Quad, who attend classes, who are our students. So attacking them directly, to me, is very hurtful.” Perez said it is a wellknown fact that there are undocumented students on campus. “We are an institution (in) which we celebrate diversity, we celebrate that we are inclusive and we celebrate

stack from 1940 wanted a certain height because the coal boilers lacked suffi cient pollution control devices. While the old smoke stack was originally over 200 feet tall, the top was shaved off, leaving it to stand at 197 feet. The new stacks are designed to be 119 feet tall and will be made out of steel instead of concrete to be more cost-efficient. “The exhaust (from our new gas boilers) has small amounts of other materials besides water, carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen (and) a little bit of sulfur dioxide or trioxide, in levels that are well below anything that will be irritating,” Brewer said. He said that the power plant is not only making changes to the structure, but they are also trying to develop staff leadership, improve overall quality of operation and become more accessible to students by offering tours of the facilities. “We try and look 15, 20 years in the future and plan for what we need to do to stay current, so we can stay reliable, environmentally friendly and be cost competitive,” said Russell Reynolds, chief utility plant

JESSICA JUTZI THE DAILY ILLINI

The Illinois Coalition Assisting Undocumented Students’ Education (I-Cause) and Phi Iota Alpha Fraternity Inc hosted “Coming Out of the Shadows,” an on April 7. The Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Relations, at a separate event on Friday, discussed the struggles of undocumented students. that we welcome everybody,” she said. “And we need to continue sending (that) message.” Another major issue Perez addressed is the financial hardship undocumented students often face. “There is hope in the near future, something could be

worked out in order for our undocumented students to request private funding,” she said. Jaime Nolasco, senior in LAS, has been working on issues regarding undocumented students for two years. He said that compared to the last few years, the Uni-

versity is now offering more resources. Nolasco said that events like the Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Relations’ discussion on Friday show that the University is taking steps in the right direction and encouraging dialogue. “It’s hopeful because folks

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Comparing Abbott Power Plant smokestacks

Capacity

130,000 lb/hr | 175,000 lb/hr

Steam pressure 350 psi | 850 psi

Steam temperature 700° F | 740° F

Stack height 197 ft | 119 ft Old smokestack

New smokestack

BERCHAM KAMBER THE DAILY ILLINI SOURCE ABBOTT POWERPLANT

operating engineer. He said that the goal of Abbott Power Plant is to serve the University, and provide the best service they can. “The good thing about a power plant is it affects everyone on campus, and really the only time when people know we’re here is

when we screw up or mess up,” Reynolds said. “For us to be reliable and provide the energy the campus needs, we need to keep our equipment in good shape and running, and that’s the reason to change the boilers out.”

the election. already spent over a month “We were all fairly campaigning for the original shocked when we first heard election, have less time than the results weren’t going to that to do a complete redo. be published,” Tommy Jus“If I would’ve been in the tison, candidate and soph- same position (as Mitchell) omore in ACES, said. “We and if I would’ve worked as were all questioning what hard as he had, I would’ve reason was behind that.” equally challenged (what Emily Tuttle, candidate happened with the Comand junior in Business, who mission),” Justison said. was the unofficial winner “(The redo) is difficult and of the first student trustee it’s much more rushed this election, was confused on if time. It’s very difficult to get she actually people motiwon or not. vated again “It was (to vote).” All three defi n itely candidates s t r e s sf u l , are in full because campaign after those mode once results I again as they wanted to try to push know what their platwas going TOMMY JUSTISON forms onto to h ap STUDENT TRUSTEE CANDIDATE the student pen. Was I body. the trustee “I am a now?” she said. third generation Illini. I’ve Romano concluded that loved this University and there was a technical issue I want to make it grow,” with the dropbox used by the Tuttle said. “My platform candidates to submit their is engagement, excellence documentation. and pride.” “The University did a very Tuttle said she wants to thorough job; Vice Chancel- help end the state budget crilor Romano should be com- sis as well as open up a dialogue on sexual assault on mended,” Justison said. The Commission, howev- campus, however she said er, is made up of students she is experiencing difficuland has often been criti- ties in talking with students cized by the candidates, said this time around. Romano. “People last election were “They are students too very receptive about having and they’re trying to do the us come in and having us best job they can,” Romano speak, and it’s a little hardsaid. “Critics don’t realize er to get out there and get what a responsibility it is support,” she said. and how hard it is.” Mitchell’s campaign is The candidates, who had focused on representation,

making sure that students know him as a person. “The fact that as a minority here on campus, we feel as if we don’t have the avenues to contribute or partake in the political atmosphere of what goes on at the University at the higher level,” Mitchell said. “I want to create a relationship where people get to know who I am.” Similar to Tuttle, Justison said he has a lot of University pride. “I grew up in a community that was 99.97 percent white, but I made the decision when I came here that I wasn’t going to stick with the same group; I wanted to expand my horizons,” he said. “I wanted to learn about different cultures. There’s such a yearning for that on campus, but there’s not a fostering from the University.” Justison’s platform is to transform, unify and ignite. He plans to do that by tackling a number of issues including student tuition. “I want to be able to dictate where that money is going and how that’s adding value to students. Education shouldn’t be exclusive to the people that can afford it,” he said. All three candidates said they see the position as a way to help students. “I see myself in the position as a medium for student concerns,” Justison said. “Students should have the opportunity to get a quality education.”

“We were all fairly shocked when we first heard the results weren’t going to be published.”

karenl3@dailyillini.com

gdunlop@dailyillini.com

VISAS tional Student and Scholar Services. With premium processing off the table, H-1B applications not submitted by April 3 — the suspension’s starting date — will have to wait seven to eight months through standard processing before the application can be approved. International faculty members who were expected to start in August or before will not be able to work at the University until November at the earliest, if their H-1B applications were not sent to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services by the suspension’s starting date. Employers are required to submit a Labor Condition Application from the Department of Labor along with their H-1B application, which is used to prevent employers from exploiting outsourced employees. Labor Condition Applications; however, cannot be issued until six months prior to an employee’s expected job start date, thus giving a maximum six-month window between when the University can actually fi le an H-1B application and when a job candidate is anticipated to start working. Due to this intrinsic time constraint, the Office of the Provost says that it is “almost impossible” to have an H-1B employee start on time without expedited processing. “It’s not business as usual, unfortunately,” said Director of International Student and Scholar Services Martin McFarlane. Prior to the suspension of premium processing, McFarlane said, International Student and Scholar Services tried to process “an awful lot” of H-1B applications to secure as many prospective international faculty members as possi-

are out here, not only students, but staff and community members are fighting for (these) type of things. So as long as we stay active in these issues, there is hope,” he said.

karenl3@dailyillini.com

ble before the deadline. Since then, he and members of both the University’s legal counsel and the Provost’s Office have been holding Q&A-format discussions for departments around campus to discuss the effects of the suspension, and alternative visas possibly available for their international job candidates. “It’s going to be individual situations that we will be looking at,” he said. “And unfortunately, for some of them we will have to say (to the departments), ‘They do not qualify for any visa at the moment,’ because we can’t get an H-1B in time.” McFarlane said that University departments and colleges will then have to make a decision to either delay hires and fi nd a way to fi ll job positions until candidates’ H-1B come into effect, or seek other options. “The University is just reacting as best as we can,” McFarlane said. “We are strongly encouraging departments and colleges not to let this factor into their hiring decisions. Identify the best person, then we’ll look at other options.” United States Citizenship and Immigration Services’ self-imposed suspension was reasoned as being a way to reduce the amount of regular H-1B applications backlogged due to the large influx and obligatory prioritization of premium processed applications. The suspension may last up to six months, and United States Citizenship and Immigration Services says it hopes to ultimately reduce the overall length of time it takes to process an application under regular processing. “It actually makes a lot of sense (the suspension),” McFarlane said. “It’s just, we had hoped (as an institution) ... that there would be an exception; unfortunately, that has proved not to be the case.”

lukeac2@dailyillini.com

H-1B Visas at the University Statistics Between 300 and 400 H-1B visa-holding faculty members work on campus during a calendar year

On March 3 the University reported to having 230 active H-1B visa-holding faculty members from 51 countries

Over 60 of these expire in 2017

Between 200 and 300 H-1B visa-holding faculty members are active on campus at any given time

80%

of all H-1B applications for the Urbana-Champaign campus were premium processed (expedited processing of visa application) in the past year

CINDY OM THE DAILY ILLINI SOURCE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS OFFICE OF THE PROVOST


4A

OPINIONS

MONDAY April 17, 2017 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

THE DAILY ILLINI

EDITORIAL

Appreciate the underdog sports

F

ootball and basketball are great sports, but they are not the only sports on this campus that students should pay attention to and appreciate. This University is home to some extraordinary athletes, and some of them partake in sports that many students don’t always bother to go watch. Men’s tennis player Aleks Vukic earned two Big Ten wins during the weekend of April 8-9 against Iowa and Nebraska. The victories earned him Big Ten Tennis Athlete of the Week — his fourth of the season. Yes. Fourth. Only Ohio State’s Mikael Torpegaard has also received the award multiple times, and that was just twice. Vukic has achieved an 84-11 singles record during his time at Illinois and was named an Intercollegiate Tennis Association AllAmerican last year. We’re guessing this is the first time many of you have heard of him (excluding the Net Nuts crew who willfully shows up to each match

Mary Jane Horth led the Illini with several individual titles on bars and the balance beam to help the team finish fourth at the NCAA Regional. Football and men’s basketball have recently made a lot of positive noise off the court and are in the process of forming a winning foundation: However, there are many other athletes and teams dominating at Illinois right now. It’s a shame that many of them go unnoticed and unappreciated on campus. So, Illinois fans, take a moment to turn away from the football and basketball teams. Attend a game, match or meet to better appreciate the talented athletes we have at the University. We strongly advise our It’s nice leaving an event readers to learn Dylan Meyer and Nick Hardy’s names here after a win — a feeling Illini fans don’t often have because they too may very after football and men’s baswell be representing the ketball games. University along with PietFans can watch Vukic and ers in a future PGA tournathe tennis team at home ment. at the Atkins Tennis CenBut it’s not just our golf ter on April 21. Our reportand tennis teams. Women’s ers and staff will be there. gymnastics also had multiple athletes bring in individ- We suggest fans go too beual honors throughout their cause trust us, Vukic is really good. seasons. Lizzy LeDuc and

FOOTBALL 2016 RECORD 3-9 APPROXIMATE SEATING: 60,000 • ISAIAH MARTINEZ WRESTLING 31-1 RECORD • TAYLOR EDWARDS SOFTBALL 12-1, 2.33 ERA • ALEKS VUKIC TENNIS 14-1 SINGLES RECORD

APPROXIMATE SEATING FOR WRESTLING, TENNIS AND SOFTBALL COMBINED: <6,000

CINDY OM THE DAILY ILLINI SOURCE FIGHTING ILLINI ATHLETICS, ESPN to support the men’s tennis team). The many accomplishments that athletes who don’t play football or basketball achieve are underappreciated at the University. Vukic, softball pitcher Taylor Edwards or even two-time national champion wrestler Isaiah Martinez aren’t household names for the majority of University students.

Fans can certainly have opinions about which sports are most entertaining, but the athletes who aren’t out on the gridiron or basketball court work just as hard. And they need your attention because they deserve it. Former Illinois men’s golfer Thomas Pieters recently finished fourth at the Masters, a major tournament in professional golf.

Don’t blindly judge Trump MATT SILICH Columnist

It

started April 7, the morning after President Donald Trump authorized missile strikes against a Syrian air base in response to the Syrian government’s use of chemical weapons against its own people. CNN’s Fareed Zakaria offered his take on TV the next morning, in what was undoubtedly a moment of high viewership for the news network as people sought to discover what happened in Syria and why. “I think Donald Trump became President of the United States,” Zakaria said. “Candidate Trump had said that he would never get involved in the Syrian Civil War … President Trump recognized that the President of the United States does have to act to enforce international laws.” Zakaria’s words were just one example of a frustrating trend in the news media, particularly the broadcast side, that occurs nearly every time the United States engages in military action: In lieu of more critical analysis and background information on the nature of the conflict, American viewers instead see pundits bloviating about various unimportant narratives. There’s no justifiable reason for news coverage to be so focused on offering empty opinions, particularly the morning after such an attack. The same phenomenon occurred Thursday when the U.S. military dropped the so-called “mother of all bombs” in Afghanistan. Americans deserve to hear the who, what, when, where and why of military action before we jump into hot takes on Trump’s legacy. A fun challenge for readers: Try to find a headline about the U.S. attack in Afghanistan on Thursday that doesn’t include a reference to the size of the bomb. I couldn’t find one. Americans are obsessed with big things that blow stuff up. That isn’t new nor unexpected, but it’s still as disappointing as ever. And the coverage of Trump after the previous missile strike falls under the same category of modern

news: romantically analyzing narratives that matter little when the world is at stake. Zakaria even knows this. His weekly column for the Washington Post, which went up the same day he said Trump “became president,” was a more measured opinion that still praised Trump for his moral compass while questioning his possibly nonexistent strategy in Syria. But instead of providing more of that analysis on the air, Zakaria instead pontificated about nothing. Some of that discrepancy can be accounted for because of the nature of live TV, and it’s understandable that one’s thoughts might not be quite as collected on air as in print. But if that’s the case, perhaps CNN and other broadcast media outlets could wait a little longer before diving into narratives. It wouldn’t be too taxing to the network’s bottom line to spend time reminding viewers of how the conflict began in Syria and why it has escalated to this point. Discussing why Barack Obama’s red line strategy with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad potentially led to this could help provide valuable context for current U.S. policy on the subject. More factbased coverage would help viewers come to their own conclusions about wheth-

er such an attack was justified. And maybe a day down the line — or at least, you know, a few hours — when the network’s journalistic responsibility to inform the public is fulfilled, one could hardly blame CNN for spending some time considering how the air strike affects Trump’s public perception. Zakaria responded to numerous complaints in a column Thursday, when he said his detractors were simply victims of “Trump Derangement Syndrome,” incapable of expressing anything other than blind outrage toward the president. Zakaria is partially right: It can be difficult not to judge everything Trump does with a broad brush when he has such a history of disturbing actions. That’s something liberals should try to be conscious of before immediately passing judgment. But Zakaria also missed his hypocrisy. Regardless of how much he’d thought about his TV take, he explained little to none of his reasoning to viewers. His reaction to the air strike in Syria instead just contributed to the media’s troubling culture of blind praise for military actions. And blind praise is no better than the blind outrage he so actively condemned.

Matt is a senior in Media. silich2@dailyillini.com

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

President Donald Trump dropped the “mother of all bombs” in Afghanistan on Thursday. Columnist Matt Silich says to not rush to judgements about Trump’s actions without first being informed.

PATRICK LI THE DAILY ILLINI

Grainger Engineering Library, located on the Bardeen Quad, is a hotspot for many overworked STEM students. Columnist Tyler says students should pursue the major they’re most interested in instead of the major they feel pressured to be in.

Find a fulfilling career, stay true to aspirations TYLER PANLILIO Columnist

My

parents hammered one piece of advice while growing up: Always do well in school. Prioritize academics, pursue a well-respected job and make a lot of money — it all seemed so simple back then. And for a lot of students here on campus, it’s likely they grew up hearing similar sentiments. Everyone wants to end up being successful in life. It’s what our parents wanted and probably what their parents wanted as well. It isn’t bad parenting to encourage your children to pursue science and technology. It is, however, more or less a social norm — especially when you take a look at this University. This is typically thought of as the best way to success, and what parent doesn’t want their kids to be rich and successful? This cycle tends to promote conformity rather than individuality. We grew up with a notion that doctors and engineers are the epitome of being successful because they make large amounts of money. As we got older, there was hardly any room for creativity: for art, literature and the rest of the humanities. Most of us naturally gravitated toward drawing or learning to play music

while growing up because it was challenging, yet fun. But beyond that, it also promoted creativity and selfexpression; it was nice to take a break from memorizing the multiplication table to draw your favorite superhero and hang it up on the fridge. There was a sense of pride there, not just because our parents patted us on the back for it, but because we actually felt it for ourselves. Then high school came along, and for the first time, a lot of students felt the competition of academics. Taking honors and AP classes, worrying about your ACT or SAT scores and eventually applying to your dream college — only to be put on a waitlist or just being flat-out rejected — are struggles we’ve all experienced. Of course, becoming an engineer or doctor doesn’t mean you’re any less creative or happy than an artist or a musician. But at the same time, it doesn’t mean that you should act like you’re better than someone who majored in graphic design. Students here on campus shouldn’t be pressured to pursue a STEM major just because everyone else is. Take a moment and think about what you really enjoy doing or what truly interests you. Don’t get me wrong, math and science are honorable pursuits. But some students — myself included — can’t see themselves being happy as an

engineer. What exactly happened to our childhood aspirations? Did reality slap us in the face and convince us that success and happiness is determined by how much money we make? It could be modern society’s favoritism of STEMoriented majors convincing us that anything else is a failure. Encouraging future generations to pursue engineering and science is good to have — there’s no doubt in that. Having a future where all careers are essentially the same, however, only continues the cycle. There needs to be variety here. Yes, we should further technology and science, but we also need the humanities. We need historians and journalists when humanity colonizes Mars. We need musicians and artists not only for entertainment, but also for addressing issues that can’t be done any other way. These pursuits provide culture and diversity that betters society. If anything, students of all majors should remember not to let the constant grind of school drain them out. Take a walk, smell the roses and remember that springtime is in full gear. Because there’s one thing we should all strive not to be: a cog in the machine.

Tyler is a freshman in Media. tylerjp2@dailyillini.com

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS | opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.


THE DAILY ILLINI | WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

5A

Monday, April 17, 2017

buz z

What Harry Styles’ new single means for boybands there’s bound to be conflict where band members can’t agree on a singular sound for the band. Thankfully, Styles has made the most of a solo career in a short amount of time and has done it in the best way possible. The problem with solo acts sounding like their original bands is that it provides little-to-nothing new. A departure can provide a fresh start and outlook, which can even turn the heads of people that never dared to listen to the band before. The fans will stick around based on the name alone, and they might even start developing an appreciation for music they normally wouldn’t have listened to. This is especially important considering how young boyband audiences usually are. So now we’re left wondering if the time of boybands is coming to an end, and they’re not showing many signs of life at this point. As of January 2016, One Direction has been on a temporary hiatus that’s supposed to last 18 months. However, Harry hasn’t even released one of the three solo records included in his latest contract. With how fast music

BY BILLY GALANT BUZZ WRITER

On April 7, One Direction’s number one heartthrob, Harry Styles, released his debut solo track “Sign of the Times.” The song is a complete departure from the stereotypical boyband sound. And that’s a good thing. It’s not pop — it’s a piano ballad with some rock elements. It’s certainly not radio-friendly — the runtime is a whopping 5 minutes and 40 seconds. The lyrics don’t talk about how cute a girl is, or even love at all — they talk about how bad the world is looking. It’s also surprisingly good. Styles’ singing is passionate and intense. There’s a grand chorus in the background, and the production is layered. It feels more like a journey with actual progression instead of a typical Top 40 song that takes a start-stop approach. Styles broke a tough mold and he only needed the one teaser track to do it. Even when his buddy Zayn started using a few more expletives in his music, Zayn was still stuck in his old ways. “Sign of the Times” provides solid ground to consider the limitations of boybands, to make the best of

FROM 6A

PIANO love to play in a rock band and tour one day. That’s the dream job.” Piano has been a huge part of Arndt’s life, but playing publicly at the University has turned piano into a tool for social change. Khadijah Coleman, freshman in ACES and current resident at FAR, compared Arndt to Billy Joel’s famous “Piano Man.” “You know that song ‘Piano Man’ by Billy Joel, when he says, ‘Well we’re all in the mood for a melody, and you’ve got us feeling alright?’ When Tad plays the piano, it puts us all in a relaxed, chill mood,” Coleman said. “It brings everyone together. It makes us forget about an exam we may have failed or deadlines coming up.” Coleman described the first night she heard Arndt playing at the Oglesby Hall lounge at FAR, and talked about how cool the experience was. “We were all studying and enjoying each other’s company and he started playing an R&B, soul type song. And he had a friend come in and play the saxophone. It just got everyone dancing and laughing and it was just a really good vibe he created,” Coleman said. Coleman said music is meant for everyone in soci-

BILLY GALANT THE DAILY ILLINI

life as a solo performer once a boyband is broken and to consider if boybands can continue to thrive in the future. It’s fairly obvious that the elements of Styles’ new track weren’t at all explored in the One Direction discography. Was One

ety; it’s versatile, non-discriminatory and transcends race, religion and gender. She also claimed Arndt’s playing does more than just create an enjoyable environment. “He was just a fly on the wall at first, and when he started playing everyone turned to look at him,” Coleman said. Tad breaks down social barriers and stereotypes because even in FAR,

“He was just a fly on the wall at first, and when he started playing everyone turned to look at him.” KHADIJAH COLEMAN STUDENT

which is a very segregated building, he showed that people from all races can come together and have fun through a language that is universal,” Coleman said. For Arndt, playing is personal and special. He doesn’t consider it a social activity. It’s something he does for himself. “Playing is literally like a drug in my mind,” Arndt

Direction holding Styles back? If Styles’ solo project is so different from One Direction, the issue could be that boybands aren’t considering the parts that make up their unit as a whole.

said. “It’s a point where I can either just vent to the piano or just not think about anything else that’s going on and just be lost in playing. If I have the time I will play for hours and hours. It’s hard to walk away from.” According to Coleman, Arndt isn’t completely unaware of the impact he is having. “I think Tad plays piano because it’s simply what he loves to do. I do believe that he knows that he is making an impact on small pockets of the campus community, but that’s not why he plays,” Coleman said. “It’s just what he loves to do. He doesn’t do it for recognition or praise.” Sheehan and Coleman both believe Arndt has the potential to realize his dreams of becoming a successful musician. Sheehan thinks that Arndt’s love for music and his minor in music will make him very successful, whether it be through the piano, or even another instrument. “He certainly has potential to go far with music and he is obviously very talented,” Coleman said. “He just has to keep nurturing it and sharing his talent with more people. If he puts himself out there and networks, he can definitely have a very successful career in music.”

aycicek2@dailyillini.com

If something becomes popular and can sell tickets, it’s viewed as more valuable than something the members would actually be interested in doing. Let’s not forget that, considering the stark differences between Harry and Zayn,

moves in this era, it’s unlikely that bringing the band back together would produce anything close to its original popularity. Not only does music move faster, but we don’t listen to it in the same way we did seven years ago when we were first introduced to One Direction. Being played on the radio doesn’t have the same power it used to, so there’s less motivation to make music that’s perfectly tailored for popular appeal. When there’s more competition than ever before, it’s more valuable to make something that allows you to stand out from the crowd. The music landscape changed too fast for boybands to catch up. The pretty face strategy simply doesn’t work as well as it used to, and Styles is just getting out while he can. With millions of streams for the single under his belt, he’s already made his claim. There’s still time for Styles to pull a 180 on us and revert to his old ways, but for now we can hope that the future for boyband members is fi nally beginning to change.

buzz@readbuzz.com

BANG NGUYEN THE DAILY ILLINI

Students and community members throw colored powders at Holi, an event hosted by Asha UIUC. Asha UIUC usually hosts the celebration in March, but this year’s celebration took place in April due to unpredictable weather.

FROM 6A

HOLI University. “I’ve been to bigger ones in the U.S., but this one is good too,” Sinha said. “It’s super fun and everyone is really nice. There’s just a lot of colors, and even if you don’t know people, everyone’s just happy to be there.” Avani Patel, freshman in Engineering, said she particularly enjoyed the friendly nature of the celebration. “I think it’s just that random people are coming up to you and are like, ‘Hi, you need some color. My name is

so-and-so,’” Patel said. “You just meet so many people.” The celebration lasted from noon to 5 p.m. Between the powder-throwing, attendees could take a break and grab a meal on the opposite side of the fields or watch one of the many shows of the day. Different Indian student organizations put on exhilarating dance performances and live DJs played Bollywood music and remixes of popular songs, keeping the crowd on their feet. One of the more popular performances was from Bellydance UIUC, an RSO dedicated to teaching the art of belly dancing. Four of the

members performed at the festival, wowing the audience with their coordinated, effortless movements and colorful attire. They were followed by several other live performers throughout the day. Rithi Anandwade, freshman in LAS, was covered head to toe in red, green and yellow gulal at the event. She said the festival at the University was essentially the same as those in India. “It’s a social event for everyone, even for people who don’t like socializing,” Anadwade said.

teresao2@dailyillini.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Across

Stunning spaceS amazing artistry down-to-earth vibe Vital support from donors and the Krannert Center U of I student fee means U of I students never pay more than $10 for a ticket, and dozens of events each year are completely free.

1 Lawyer: Abbr. 5 British sports car, briefly 8What ignorance is, they say 13 One might end “Q.E.D.” 15 A pitcher wants a low one, for short 16 “___ One: A Star Wars Story” 17 Atlantic site of strange disappearances 20 Michael who played both Batman and Birdman 21 Aid for a lost driver, for short 22 Big laugh 23 Russian jet 24 Former British P.M. Tony 26 “As is” transaction 30 Frank of the Mothers of Invention 34 WSW’s opposite 35 Jazzy Fitzgerald 36 Colorful aquarium swimmers 37 “___ my words” 39 You are here 41 Didn’t float 42 Like zombies 44Cause for being refused a drink at a bar 46 Opposite of bright 47 Four-time M.L.B. All-Star José 48 Excellent service 50 Terse 52 “That feels so-o-o-o nice!” 53 Halloween’s mo. 56 Amazement 57 Water down 60Punny description for 17-, 26- or 48-Across 64 Boredom

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puzzle by alan deloriea

65 Sup 66 Florida senator Marco 67 Band with the 2000 hit “Bye Bye Bye” 68 Just for Men offering 69 Treaty

Down

1 Alert to squad cars, for short 2 Arduous walk 3 Ripped 4 Start of a playground joke 5 Denim fabric 6 Trump’s “The ___ of the Deal” 7 Use Listerine, say 8 Victoria’s Secret measurement 9 Chaney of horror 10 Azalea of rap 11 Lieutenant on the original U.S.S. Enterprise

12 “___ and ye shall find” 14 Hopeless 18 Iditarod vehicle 19 Hoppy brew, for short 24 Nonsense, as the Irish might say 25 “Darn!” 26 Leg bone connected to the knee bone 27 Stupid 28 Passionately brainy, say 29 Chicken ___ king 31 Fashion house founded in Milan 32 Emotion causing hyperventilation 33 “___ Another” (NPR game show) 36 It’s in the stratosphere 38 Hold on to

40 Weight unit on a bridge sign 43 From east of the Urals 45 One placing a telephone call 48 Organization for Janet Yellen, informally 49 “Button your lip!” 51 Tango requirement 53 Store sign that might be flipped at 9 a.m. 54 Inmates 55 Wee 57 Lavish care (on) 58 Instrument that makes the cheeks puff out 59 Clapton who sang “Layla” 61 Habit wearer 62 “No” vote 63 “Just kidding!”

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.


6A

LIFE

MONDAY April 17, 2017 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

CULTURE

The keys to success

Tad Arndt, freshman in LAS, rests on the grand piano in Lincoln Avenue Residence Hall. Arndt writes his own music and uses his compositions as a force of social change.

RYAN FANG THE DAILY ILLINI

University freshman showcases talent for piano, promotes social change BY MERAL AYCICEK STAFF WRITER

Gliding by on his longboard, Tad Arndt, freshman in LAS, doesn’t stick out from the crowd. All of this changes, however, the moment Arndt sits behind a piano. Known for playing publicly around campus, mainly at FAR, Bromley Hall and the Illini Union basement, Arndt has

been slowly gaining attention for his musical gift. Arndt started playing piano when he was 4 years old. He didn’t like playing until he was in eighth grade and only continued initially because of pressure from his mother. “No one ever knew I played piano in my school because I didn’t like it and I didn’t really tell anyone about it,” Arndt

said. “Then my friend told me I should play it for the talent show and I did. That’s when I realized that piano is a great thing as a social tool and is a good reflection of myself.” Alex Sheehan, freshman in DGS, is Arndt’s close friend and fraternity brother. Sheehan fi rst heard Arndt playing piano on a late September night at FAR.

He said Arndt is also very good on the guitar, bass guitar, ukulele, banjo, the drums and the xylophone. “I’ve never asked him about piano specifically, but I know music has been a huge part of his life since he was a kid, whether that be percussion or string instruments,” Sheehan said. “I think that music is a way for him to express

himself.” To Arndt, piano is more than just a means of self-expression or something to pass the time. “Honestly, if I could, I would dedicate my life to music and just become a rock star or something,” Arndt said. “I’m minoring in music with an emphasis on music composition. I would

SEE PIANO | 5A

Illinois celebrates spring with Hindu festival of colors BY TESS O’BRIEN STAFF WRITER

A cloud of red, blue, yellow, green and orange powders filled the air. The continually-growing crowd began settling down to intermittent performances, ranging from belly dancers to children’s groups. Holi, the Indian festival of colors, had begun. Saturday, Asha UIUC, a nonprofit organization that works toward promoting the education of underprivileged children in India, held its annual Holi celebration at the Florida and Lincoln Fields in Urbana. The festival, which announces the arrival of spring and the defeat of evil, is the group’s primary fund-

raiser for several education projects in India. Usually, the holiday is celebrated earlier in the year, but with the unpredictable weather in the area, Asha always hosts the festival in the second week of April. During Show & Tell Central Illinois, Punit Singhvi, graduate student and member of Asha UIUC, described the mythology behind Holi. He emphasized the idea of the destruction of evil, telling the story of how the demoness Holika was burned to death by the god Vishnu. “The devil or the evil was defeated by the lord which signifies the bringing of happiness, and this is what Holi celebrates,” Singhvi said. “People were so happy after

that they expressed their joy through colors.” Thousands of students and community members celebrated the festival. After buying a ticket, attendees were given bags filled with gulal, the traditional colored powders which are characteristic of the festival. To play, people would smear or throw their gulal on anyone in sight, often wishing a cheerful “happy Holi” with the toss. Within minutes of arriving, attendees were completely covered in colors. Shruti Sinha, freshman in Engineering, attends a Holi festival every year, but this was her first one at the

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BANG NGUYEN THE DAILY ILLINI

Asha UIUC hosted Holi, the Hindu festival of colors, to support education of underprivileged SEE HOLI | 5A children in India. The festival was held at the Florida and Lincoln playing fields Saturday.


1B

MONDAY April 17, 2017 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

SPORTS

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

McNicholas brings positivity to her team BY JACOB DIAZ STAFF WRITER

A track star, an outgoing leader, a guard on the basketball team, a soccer player, a nuclear engineer, a prospective medical student, a gym rat and a valedictorian. It sounds like it could be the cast of a John Hughes coming-of-age fi lm. But if that movie was shot at Rochester High School last year, it would have been a one-woman show, and that woman would have been Meagan McNicholas. McNicholas, now a freshman in Engineering, was a threesport athlete at Rochester. She received offers to play both track and basketball in college; however, McNicholas never fell behind in her academics. In fact, she excelled in them. “(My sports) were in three different seasons,” McNicholas said. “But I actually graduated valedictorian of my class, which was a big thing for me. I knew coming into senior year that I had a shot to do that, and knowing that helped me stay on top of my school stuff.” While she admitted that her senior year schedule — which involved sleeping from midnight until 3 a.m. after basketball games before waking up to fi nish her homework before school — was an unhealthy way of life, the results are hard to dispute. McNicholas AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Meagan McNicholas (second from left) cheers on her team from the sideline against Indiana at State Farm Center on Feb. 25.

SEE WOMEN’S BBALL | 2B

BASEBALL

Matthew James helps secure win against Northwestern BY THOMAS POLCYN STAFF WRITER

It took Illinois 11 innings Friday before fi nally securing a 4-3 victory over Northwestern. Saturday was a different story, as the Illini were never really in the game, dropping it 11-4. Sunday, however, might have been one of the team’s most solid games of the season, winning the game and the series — a first against a Big Ten opponent this season. The Illini have now won seven of their last 10 games. Head coach Dan Hartleb said the win means a lot to his team, and that he has been happy with its play as of late. “It’s something we needed to get accomplished,” Hartleb said. “We put ourselves behind the eight-ball a little bit by getting swept the first one and losing the second, but to fi nally get back to winning ways, especially at home, was much needed.” A big part of the Illini victory was due to starting pitcher Matthew James. James fi nished the day with 5 2/3 innings pitched, allowing just five hits and three earned runs. The start was the

senior’s longest of the season. “He did a good job today,” Hartleb said. “Today was a big game for us, and he had a good outing on Tuesday, so he earned this start. But he went out and just produced and did a really good job. It was an important day for us and a good day for him.” Hartleb added that he thinks the reason for the team’s recent success is due to its maturation over the season and eliminating the errors it was making early in the season. The Illini took an early lead Sunday, scoring two runs in the bottom of the third for the first runs of the game. Left fielder Dan Rowbottom got the Illini on the board after walking and advancing on a Trent Hammond double. Rowbottom eventually scored on Jack Yalowitz groundout. Hammond also went on to score after freshman infielder Ben Troike knocked him in with a line drive back up the middle. Troike advanced to second on a controversial rundown — Northwestern head coach Spencer Allen argued

SEE BASEBALL | 2B

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Jack Yalowitz waits for a pitch against Northwestern at Illinois Field. The Illini took two out of three games against Northwestern this past weekend. .

SOFTBALL

MEN’S TENNIS

Rivera leads team to seventh-straight win BY JAMES BOYD STAFF WRITER

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Aron Hiltzik gets ready to return a ball against Wisconsin at the Atkins Tennis Center on April 3. The Illini defeated Michigan and Michigan State this past weekend.

Illini gain pair of road wins in Hiltzik’s return BY BRIAN BINZ STAFF WRITER

It’d been 21 days since Aron Hiltzik played in a match for the Illinois men’s tennis team, but it didn’t take him long to make an impact. The junior clinched the winning singles point Saturday, giving Illinois its first road win over a ranked team this year, defeating No. 14 Michigan 4-2 in Ann Arbor. It was not easy for Hiltzik and the Illini, as they started with their fi rst doubles point loss in

five matches. “They dismantled us in doubles,” said head coach Brad Dancer. “There’s nothing left to say about that.” However, the Illini turned it around in singles play with both Aleks Vukic and Noe Khlif winning in straight sets, making the score 2-2. The match fell on the shoulders of Hiltzik and freshman Aleks Kovacevic to gain the two points

SEE MEN’S TENNIS | 2B

Junior Leigh Farina had a big weekend for the Illinois softball team. The 5-foot-5 shortstop had 10 plate appearances in three games against Michigan State and made the most of her opportunities. She batted just over .300 and recorded seven hits against the Spartans, helping lead the Illini to their third Big Ten series sweep of the season. In the fi rst game of the weekend, Illinois jumped out to a 2-0 lead behind RBI singles from senior Alyssa Gunther and junior Maddi Doane in the third and fourth innings, respectively. But the fi fth frame was when the Illini found their offensive rhythm. With the bases loaded and one out, senior Ruby Rivera doubled to right center field, clearing the bases and bringing in three more runs. Junior Sam Acosta was next up to bat and singled to advance Rivera to third. Farina capped off the inning by bringing Rivera home on an RBI single. Michigan State fi nally got on the board in the bottom of the fi fth inning thanks to an RBI single from Melanie Long and two Illinois errors. The Spartans scored again in the sixth, but the Illini would go on to win 6-3. Senior Breanna Wonderly pitched a complete game and improved her record to 14-9. Despite giving up three runs, she tied her season-high with five strikeouts. The following afternoon, the Illini and Spartans were back for a double-header. In the fi rst game, Illinois jumped out to a quick 1-0 lead behind a sacrifice fly by Rivera. But unlike in the previous outing — in which Michigan State trailed the entire game — the Spartans responded by scoring three unearned runs in the bottom of the fi rst to take a 3-1 lead.

Michigan State extended its lead to three runs in the bottom of the second inning and led 5-3 heading into the game’s fi nal inning. But before the Spartans secured their 22nd victory of the season, the Illini proved that the game was far from over. With the game on the line, redshirt freshman Veronica Reulius stepped up to the plate. The Illini had two runners in scoring position, and the outfielder delivered by doubling to right center field. Illinois tied the game at five and went on to win by one in eight innings. The fi nal game of the series proved to be a lot less dramatic than the second. The Illini used a trio of pitchers against the Spartans, but sophomore Taylor Edwards recorded the win in Illi-

nois’ 9-5 victory. She pitched 4 2/3 innings and improved her overall record of the season to 13-1. Rivera was the fi rst to strike, crushing a two-run home run in the fi rst inning. Senior Nicole Evans joined in on the scoring by recording her 14th long ball of the season. The home run also marked the 49th of her career, which is two away from tying the all-time program record. The Illini have now won seven-straight games and are 10-2 in conference play. The series sweep also moves the team to 6-3 on the road and 31-10 overall. Illinois will have a few days off until it plays at home Wednesday against Butler.

jeboyd2@dailyillini.com @RomeovilleKid

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois third baseman Annie Fleming looks to throw a ball to first base against Minnesota at Eichelberger Field on April 1. The Illini are on a sevengame winning streak.


2B

Monday, April 17, 2017

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WOMEN’S TENNIS

Illini split road trip with win against Penn State, loss against Ohio State BY CHRISTIAN EVANS STAFF WRITER

The Illinois women’s tennis team went 1-1 during its short homestand, losing to No. 4 Ohio State on Friday and beating Penn State on Sunday. In the first doubles match, the Illini lost on Court One to the Buckeyes. Ohio State’s Francesca Di Lorenzo and Miho Kowase defeated sophomore Ines Vias and senior Louise Kwong, 6-1. Sandy Niehaus and Olivia Sneed clinched the doubles point on Court Three for Ohio State in a 6-4 win over Illinois’ sophomore Daniela Pedraza Novak and senior Alexis Casati. The Buckeyes carried the momentum from doubles into singles matches. In the first singles match, Sneed defeated Illinois’ junior Grace Tapak 6-0, 6-1 at the No. 6 position. Ohio State’s Anna Sanford followed that up on Court Two in a 6-2, 6-3 win over Casati to extend the Buckeye lead to 3-0. Niehaus clinched the Buckeyes win in the next match. She won 6-2, 6-4 at the No. 5 position over Novak. Kowase extended her win streak to 19 in the next match, defeating Illini senior Madie Baillon on Court Three 6-2, 6-3. Kwong took on the No. 1 singles player in the nation, Di Lorenzo, in the next match. Kwong stayed close for a bit, but Ohio State’s star won 6-2, 6-3. Ferny Angeles Paz won on Court Four against soph-

FROM 1B

BASEBALL that he was out of the base path — but the Illini could not capitalize on the opportunity, eventually stranding him on the base path. But, that would not keep the Wildcats out of the game, as they quickly answered on a solo-shot by designated hitter Joe Hoscheit in the top of the fourth. The home run was Hoscheit’s second of the series and fourth of the season. The Illini were quick to get that run back in the sixth inning with Yalowitz launching his seventh home run of the season and third in his last four games. After heading into the sixth with a 3-1 lead, James looked ready to settle in and

omore Jaclyn Switkes 7-6 (7-5), 6-2 to give the Buckeyes a 7-0 win over the Illini. Illinois had little time to learn from its match against Ohio State, playing Penn State less than 48 hours later. Despite that, the Illini started off well against the Nittany Lions. They won at No. 1 and No. 3 doubles to win the valuable doubles point. On Court One, Kwong and Vias beat Penn State pair Devan McCluskey and Bennett Dunn, 6-1. Casati and Novak clinched the doubles point in a 6-3 win over Katia Blik and Samantha Smith. With a 1-0 lead, Illinois did not let up in singles. Switkes started things off on Court Four against the Nittany Lions’ Dunn. Switkes deafeated Dunn 6-0, 6-1. At No. 5 singles, Novak fought to extend the Illini lead to 3-0. She won 6-2, 2-6, 6-2 over Penn State’s Smith. Baillon battled for a 4-6, 6-3, 6-1 win over Penn State’s Jacqueline Zuhse at the No. 3 position. Baillon’s win gave Illinois a 4-0 victory over Penn State. The Illini improved to 12-11 overall and 6-3 in conference play with the win. The Nittany Lions fell to 5-14 overall and 2-7 in conference. Illinois will play two of its three remaining regular season matches this weekend. Illinois faces Michigan State on the road Friday and return to the Atkins Tennis Center on Sunday to play AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI Michigan. Illinois’ Madie Baillon gets ready to return a ball against Nebraska at the Atkins Tennis Center on April 3. The Illini lost to Ohio

clevans2@dailyillini.com shut Northwestern down, but the Wildcats had a different idea. Northwestern catcher Jack Claeys and third baseman Connor Lind each picked up RBIs in the sixth to tie the game, knocking James out of the game. Again, the Illini were quick to answer and did so with five runs in the bottom of the sixth. Doran Turchin, Yalowitz and freshman Michael Massey collected RBIs to extend the lead to five. After Ryan Schmitt held the Cats scoreless in the top of the seventh, the Illini continued to see the ball well and added an additional two runs after sacrifice flies from Hammond and fi rst baseman Pat McInerney. But, even with a sevenrun deficit facing them in the top of the eighth, the

State and defeated Penn State this past weekend.

Wildcats were not done. After loading the bases, Schmitt allowed a baseclearing double to the gap by Lind to collect his second, third and fourth RBIs of the game. Following a single to right, Schmitt was taken out after throwing 1 1/3 innings, allowing four earned runs on six hits. Illini closer Joey Gerber came in and immediately induced a double play, which was promptly followed by a walk before Hammond made a diving stop at third, throwing the runner out at first. The ninth inning brought even more chaos. After quickly retiring the fi rst batter in the top of the ninth, Gerber gave up backto-back doubles to allow the Wildcats back within two runs. He followed that up by

“Today was a big game for us, and he had a good outing on Tuesday, so he earned this start.” DAN HARTLEB HEAD COACH

hitting the next batter in the back. But, despite the sticky situation, Gerber punched out the next batter before a grounder to second ended the game.

polcyn2@dailyillini.com @TPolc

FROM 1B

WOMEN’S BBALL found time for three sports in her busy schedule and did well enough to receive scholarship offers in her sport of choice. Heading into her fi nal year at Rochester, McNicholas had her heart set on running track in college. But as the year went on, she had a change of heart. “I was set on running in college until senior year when I realized ‘I don’t really like this that much,’” McNicholas said. “I had kind of put basketball on the backburner because I knew that I could run somewhere better; I knew academics were going to be a big thing for me.” McNicholas told her coach to fi nd her a spot on a basketball team somewhere, fully aware of how late she was to the recruiting process. She knew that the best she could hope for was a walkon spot, and she almost took one at Eastern Illinois. But after conferring with her family, she decided the academic opportunity at Illinois was too good to pass up. “I got into the engineering program (at Illinois),” McNicholas said. “And my dad was like, ‘you’re going to need to get a job someday, and you’re gonna be about as set up as you can be there.’” And so she arrived on campus in the fall, her schedule, once chock-full of as many athletics and academics as she could handle, looked rather bare. McNicholas began life as something she had never been before — an average student. The freshman said she had no issues adjusting to the college workload, but despite all the extra time she had, she began reverting to her senior year sleep schedule. With all her newfound time, McNicholas gravitated toward activities many of her peers enjoyed. She went to class, joined a sorority, hit the gym regularly, but still felt like something was missing. “I was kind of mad for a while,” McNicholas said. “I

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Alex Wittinger takes a jump shot against Indiana at State Farm Center on Feb. 25. Wittinger got to know McNicholas after rooming together on road trips. want to play sports; I don’t want to just hang out. What am I gonna do?” Luckily for her, McNicholas had the right team behind her. Derek Leonard, Rochester’s head football coach, who coaches her younger brother, put in a good word on Meagan’s behalf with then-Illinois women’s basketball head coach Matt Bollant. This culminated in an interesting walk home for McNicholas from chemistry class one day. “Coach Bollant got my number and called me, and I thought it was a joke,” McNicholas said. “When he called me, I remember I was outside chemistry and I was like, ‘Who is this?’ I was really confused.” McNicholas tried out for a spot on the team shortly after. She was apprehensive heading into the tryout; while she had kept relatively in shape, it had been a long time since she had stepped on a court. The tryout was, however, a success, and McNicholas

joined the team as a walkon in early December, just after the season started. She made her debut against Fort Wayne on Dec. 2, 2016, playing one minute in front of the State Farm Center crowd. But before she hit the floor, before she even entered the arena as a player, she had to go through something that all walk-ons go through.

Meeting her second family

“The fi rst reaction (to a walk-on) is like, ‘we don’t know how we feel about this,’” said McNicholas’ teammate Cydnee Kinslow. “But when she came in and fit right in, right away we were like ‘she’s defi nitely gonna be a part of us.’” McNicholas was nervous the fi rst time she met her new teammates. She knew she had quite a loud, outgoing personality, and she didn’t want to scare away her team with it. But once she began to get more comfortable with them, her teammates said they all connected.

“She’s outgoing. She’s nice, just a really enjoyable person to be around,” sophomore forward Alex Wittinger said. “So right away when she got here, people liked her.” Wittinger, in particular, got to know McNicholas well, as the two shared a room on many road trips. The sophomore is also an engineering student. One might expect that she would have helped McNicholas adjust to managing a rigorous course load and college athletics, however, Wittinger admitted that it wasn’t necessary. “I haven’t had to do much,” Wittinger said about helping McNicholas adjust. “She’s figured it out pretty well for herself.” McNicholas also has found a fan in Kinslow. She described McNicholas as a long-lost sister, whose personality matches the self-professed laid-back Californian. “She’s always at our house; she sleeps on our couch sometimes,” Kinslow said. “She’s like our lit-

FROM 1B

MEN’S TENNIS the Illini needed. Kovacevic rallied after losing the first set to take the next two, winning 7-6 (7-4), 6-3, leaving the Illini one point away from the road victory. Hiltzik delivered, beating the Wolverines’ Alex Knight in three sets, 6-2, 3-6, 7-5, and won the last three games in the decisive third set after falling behind 5-4. “I’m proud of Aron for continuing to give himself a chance when he was nowhere near his best,” Dancer said. “That match was all mental for him today, and he gutted it out for the team.” Illinois traveled to Michigan State on Sunday, where they delivered a resoundtle dog that is always in our apartment; she goes everywhere with us.” The redshirting Kinslow and McNicholas spent a lot of time together on the bench this season, but their relationship really grew in the weight room, where both were members of a group that called themselves the ‘Swole Squad.’ The ‘Swole Squad’ is a group of mostly role players who, throughout the season, volunteered for extra weight training with assistant strength and conditioning coach Emily Esselman. The group swelled in size throughout the season, but Kinslow said that McNicholas has always stood out from the crowd. “She’s an absolute beast in the weight room,” Kinslow said. “You would never believe it, but she can outlift anybody.” Esselman completely agrees. “To put it very bluntly, she’s a stallion in there,” Esselman said. “It’s very black-and-white in the weight room — you either can do it, or you get crushed by the weight. She’s what we call a highly trained athlete in the weight room. She’s done it from a young age — high school or maybe even before then.” McNicholas said that she is more comfortable in the weight room and that it is her domain. “I really like the weight room just because it’s not basketball skills,” McNicholas said.

Leading from the bench

Coming in as a walk-on, McNicholas knew that she would not see significant time on the floor. In fact, in the seven games she played this season, she totaled eight minutes, one assist, one steal and one foul. However, McNicholas was not going to let that stat line defi ne her season. She worked hard to improve herself in practice and in the gym, knowing that her game days were essentially days off. But she found a way to have an impact despite spending most of her games with a long-sleeved shirt over her jersey. “I just think one thing

ing follow-up performance as Dancer won his 100th Big Ten match with the program. The Illini gave Vukic and his 16-straight singles wins a rest, defeating the Spartans 7-0 behind five freshmen singles players. Hiltzik got his second win of the weekend, joining Khlif, Gui Gomes, Kovacevic, Zeke Clark and Vuk Budic in the win column Sunday. The Illini have won five matches in a row after suffering a four-match losing streak in March. The team now boasts a 6-2 Big Ten record. Illinois looks to continue the winning streak next weekend at home, taking on Penn State and Ohio State on Saturday and Sunday, respectively.

brianb2@dailyillini.com @binzy_20 that I can bring personally is that I try to be a really good teammate,” McNicholas said. “I can’t lead with minutes on the court or points, but you can always be a better teammate. It’s really important to me to let my teammates know that I want them to do well.” McNicholas has found a voice on the team, despite not spending much time on the floor and has used her positive personality to pick up her teammates and motivate them to improve. Esselman noticed this about McNicholas and thinks that she is the perfect person for the role. “She has the kind of personality that you just can’t hate,” Esselman said. “If something bad does happen, she’ll always see the positive side in it, and it’s contagious.” Esselman stressed that on a team comprised of more than half freshmen, having someone with McNicholas’ personality is crucial. She said that McNicholas is serious when she needs to be, but that having her around when things go wrong helps keep her teammates from burying their heads in their hands. And on a team that lost its last 11 regular season games, McNicholas’ ability to keep spirits up was needed often. Aside from the freshmen, McNicholas’ older teammates also have grown to appreciate her positivity on the bench. “I’ve never seen her really down,” Wittinger said. “Even though she doesn’t play a ton, she’s super important because she gets people going.” Going forward, McNicholas is looking to grow her game individually, but her motivation to improve comes from a selfless perspective. “I want to get better, obviously, but not even to get minutes,” McNicholas said. “I want to be good enough to help the team in practice, playing good defense and offense. I want to get better so I can help my team get better.”

jvdiaz2@dailyillini.com @Jacob_Diaz31


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Monday, April 17, 2017

3B

WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD

Three Illini set personal records over weekend BY MEGHAN REST STAFF WRITER

Senior Valerie Bobart and junior Nicole Choquette traveled to California and set new personal records, likely qualifying for the NCAA West Prelims. Junior Janile Rogers followed suit at the University of South Carolina’s Gamecock Invitational, collecting a personal record in the 200-meter dash. Bobart finished with a time of 10:27.46 in the 3000-meter steeplechase at the Bryan Clay Invitational. The veteran runner fi nished seventh in the 53-athlete fi eld, shaving three seconds off her previous best of 10:30.70, which she set at the Drake Relays last year. Bobart was the second Big Ten runner to cross the fi nish line behind Michigan’s Claire Borchers, who won the event. Choquette cut down on her personal record time, too. She clocked a 2:06.56 in the 800-meter run at the Bryan Invitational following Bobart’s performance. The time was two-tenths of a second better than her previous record of 2:06.70, which she set at the Rankin Invitational in 2015. “This past weekend was for (building speed); we’re happy it worked out in the sequence. It’s all part of the jigsaw puzzle of overlapping meets,” said distance coach Scott Jones. “I think we want to have balanced training, especially for a

middle distance runner, which is a blending of both speed and endurance, so we’re not too far on either side of the spectrum.” Choquette said she has focused heavily on the 800-meter race, even while competing in other distance events. Jones thinks this weekend’s personal record may be attributed to training emphasized on stamina rather than shorter speed work. “Nicole (Choquette) was blessed to be hard-wired to run fast, so we really haven’t spent as much time focusing on that this season,” Jones said. “Doing things that are a little more stamina-based and 800-specific rather than shorter and faster.” Choquette said she has worked on performing well through the entire race, especially with the postseason less than a month away. “The difference is that she’s an experienced athlete now,” said head coach Ron Garner. “She just needs to get some competitions under her belt so that she can run different rhythm of races depending on how the particular race goes out.” The distance duo aimed at running fast times, and Garner said the progress is putting the athletes in a good place. In South Carolina, Rogers clocked a 200-meter personal record of 23.90 seconds. Garner said Rogers is ahead of schedule and also shows

promise for the postseason. “We now have two people that have run sub-24.00 second 200 meters with Pedrya (Seymour) and Janile, which is a month ahead of schedule from last year,” Garner said. “We didn’t have anyone do that until Big Ten Championships.” Sophomore Briana Driver also accompanied Rogers in South Carolina. Although the pair’s primary focus was to jump in South Carolina, they found more success in the running events. Driver fi nished in 11.86 seconds in the 100-meter dash but faltered when it came to her jumps. “We didn’t quite get accomplished what we came to do. They did everything I asked of them,” Garner said. “The thing that I’m most pleased with is the process. We came up a little short from a performance standpoint, but our effort was there.” Rogers le ap e d a 5.68-meter jump, while Driver nailed down a 5.81-meter effort on her fi nal attempt. “She kept working through the very end of competition and got the 19’0.75” (5.81m) on the last jump to make it a solid day,” Garner said. The Illini host the Illinois Twilight meet on Saturday. The fi rst event is set to begin at 3 p.m.

merest2@dailyillini.com @meghan_rest

MEN’S TRACK AND FIELD

THE DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Illinois’ Janile Rogers competes in the long jump at the Illinois Orange and Blue Open in the Armory on Feb. 20, 2016. Rogers set a personal record in the 200-meter dash this weekend.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Head coach Fahey announces Robins as team’s first signee BY TATIANA PERRY STAFF WRITER

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Michael Hyc winds up during the weight throw event at the Orange and Blue Open on Feb. 20, 2016. Michael won the weight throw with a distance of 19.21 meters. He set a new personal record in the shot put over the weekend, throwing 17.74 meters.

Twelve track athletes set personal records in California competitions BY GAVIN GOOD ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

It was a weekend full of personal bests for the Illinois men’s track team members, as the Illini — split between three events in California — broke barriers across the board. At the Mt. SAC Relays in Torrance, California, hurdler David Kendziera won the 110-meter hurdles and the 400-meter hurdles, sweeping both hurdle events for the second time this season. The redshirt junior ran a 13.71-second time in the 100 hurdles, beating Cornell’s Max Hairston by .08 seconds. Within an hour, Kendziera captured the 400 hurdles title as well with a time of 50.17 seconds, improving on his personal record of 50.35 seconds. Thrower Michael Hyc set a new personal record in the shot put, throwing 17.74 meters to finish seventh, and followed that performance with another personal best with a 55.66-meter total in the hammer throw. Matsen Dziedzic set a

personal best of 59.77 in the hammer throw, and pole vaulter Jacob LaRocca cleared 5.05 meters to earn a new high mark Saturday. At the Bryan Clay Invite i n A zusa, C a lifornia, d ista nce r u n ner Jon Davis ran Illinois’ secondfastest 5,000-meter time in school history, finishing at 13:49.55. The freshman only trails Craig Virgin’s time of 13:35.02 in the event and has more than three years to surpass it. Sophomore Jesse Reiser clocked the sixth-fastest 1,500-meter run in Illinois history with a time of 3:42.37 to finish in the top 10 for the event. The 5,000-meter event

Illinois at the Mt. SAC Relays, Bryan Clay Invite and Beach Invite Summary: Illinois men’s track had an eventful weekend out in California with its team members setting 12 new personal records. Key athlete: Redshirt junior David Kendziera

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saw three Illini runners set new bests, as junior Dan L athrop ran for 14:12.29, while redshirt fresh ma n Zach Da le finished at 14:25.04 and redshirt sophomore Zack Smith ran a 14:34.67. Other Illi ni to set personal bests over the weekend included distance runner Sean Pengelly, who ran for 29:38.62 in the 10,000 -meter event. Middle distance runner Konrad Eiring earned a 1:50.41 time in the 8 0 0 -meter run, while Doug Wilson ran a 48.47 second 400 -meter race.

gavinrg@dailyillini.com @itsallG_O_O_D swept hurdles, winning the 110-meter and 400-meter events. It was his second time sweeping hurdles this season. Up next: The Illini will head home for the Illinois Twilight, which will be on Saturday at 3 p.m. at Illinois Track Stadium.

Illi nois w o m e n ’s basketball head coach Nancy Fahey announced Lyric Robins as her fi rst signee Thursday. Robins averaged 11.3 points and 7.0 rebounds per game during her senior season. She was a nominee for the 2017 McDonald’s All-American game. “ We are extremely excited about the addition of Lyric to our Illini family,” Fahey said in a press release. “Her upbeat attitude and positive outlook are contagious, and she possesses a work ethic that will allow her to be successful both in the classroom and on the court. Lyric’s speed and ability to defend multiple positions will be a huge asset to our team.” The Illini added six freshmen to the roster last season and has continued the trend into the 2017-18 season. Robins joins three other recruits who had signed under former head coach Matt Bollant: Channise Lewis of Miami, Addaya Moore of Granite City, Illinois, and forward Jnaya Walker of Bolingbrook, Illinois. Standing at 5-foot-8, Lewis helped lead her high school to three consecutive state championships and is a two-time Class 3A fi rstteam All-State honoree. This helped her earn the No. 77 ESPN recruiting ranking. Ranked as ESPN’s No. 19 forward, Walker turned down offers from Wisconsin and Nebraska before signi ng with Illinois. She brings a passing and defensive skillset to Illinois. According to MaxPreps, Robins is the No. 161

PHOTO COURTESY OF ILLINOIS ATHLETICS

Illinois announced head coach Nancy Fahey as its new women’s head basketball coach March 24. Fahey signed her first recruit, Lyric Robins of Texas, on Thursday. recruit in the country and No. 18 in Texas. She helped lead Plano West High School to a 25-9 record this year and said she is excited to continue her career as an Illini. “Illinois is a dream come true,” Robins said in a press release. “I get the opportunity to play for coaches who care about the development of the

team, as well as about me as an individual. That’s something you can’t fi nd just anywhere.” Illinois went 9-22 last season. The Illini ended their season after losing to Purdue in the second round of the Big Ten tournament.

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New low spring rates, ZEro DowN, refer a friend for $250 giftcard

204 E. Clark, C.

1-3

F/U

4 4 4

$785-890, laundry on site, most utilities included

309 E. Green, C.

4 STD

F

44 4 4

Fall rate Drop! $240 Giftcard or lwr. rates. Min. full 4b/2b units remain. Tour & get $10

505 w. Springfield, U.

2

F/U

4 4 4

$890, laundry on site, most utilities included

309 E. Green, C.

4 DLX

F

44 4 4

1 full unit avail., ZEro DowN SpriNG, private balc., 200 ext. sq. ft w/dining rm table

409 w. Elm, U.

2

F/U

4 4 4

$890, laundry on site, most utilities included

309 E. Green, C.

4 DLX

F

44 4 4

Fall rate Drop! $240 Giftcard or effective. rates, private balconies. Tour & get $10

603 w. High, U.

5

309 E. Green, C.

2

F

44 4 4

1 bed space left at a great price! Great size bdrms w/study desk & chair

710 w. California, U.

1-6

309 E. Green, C.

2

F

44 4 4

Min. vacacies left, rmmate matching avail., ind. liability lease, balcony w/view!

Advantage Properties

217-344-0394

www.advantageproperties.com

4

4

$450/bedroom, can be split into 2 apts

4

4

House- $400/bedroom

712 w. California, U.

10 bed F/U 4

4

House- $375/bed

705 w. California, U.

7 bed

F/U

4

4

$450/bed

7 bed

F/U

4

4

$450/bed

F/U

203 N. Gregory, U.

1,2

F

44 4

1Br & 2Br with Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D, sec bldg

707 w. California, U.

204 N. Harvey, U.

1,2

F

44 4

1Br & 2Br with Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D, sec bldg

Lincolnshire Properties

306 N. Harvey, U.

2

F

44 4

Luxury 2Br 2BA Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D

714 w. Elm, U.

1003 w. Main, U.

2

F

44 4

Newest Luxury 2Br 2BA Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D

Lofts 54

1003 w. Clark, U.

1

F

44 4

1Br with Hi Speed int, near Engr, w/D

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 TH F

44 4 4

oNE spring space remains, $0 down, no sec. dep., just blocks from ArC

1005 w. Stoughton, U.

1

F

44 4

1 Br Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D, sec bldg

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 A

F

44 4 4

FALL 2017 - short term leases avail, $240 gift card to red. rates, great location

1010 w. Main, U.

1,2

F

44 4

1 Br & 2Br 2BA with Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D, sec bldg

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 B

F

44 4 4

FALL 2017 - short term leases avail, $250 refer a friend, pET FriENDLY complex

Group Houses

2,3,4

F

44 4

2,3, & 4 bedroom houses fully furnished, advantageproperties.com

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 B2 F

44 4 4

FALL 2017 - short term leases available, reduced rates, largest flat in senior land

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 TH F

44 4 4

FALL 2017 - short term leases avail, new low rates or $240 giftcard, pet friendly complex!

Bailey Apartments

217-344-3008

www.baileyapartments.com

217-398-1998

www.lincolnshireprop.com

2

F

4 4

Lofts, Townhouses, 1 block to University, Modern, $625-$1350

217-366-3500

www.lofts54.com

1010 w. Springfield, U.

3+4

F

4 4

Totally remodeled 2.5 blocks to the Quad

MHM Apartments

111 S. Lincoln, U.

2

F

4 4

3 blocks to Quad corner Lincoln + Green

314 E. Clark, C.

3

F 44 4

Huge lofts, FrEE iNTErNET, Flat-screen TV, by County Mkt.

911 w. Springfield, U.

1

F

4 4

Quiet Building/office location

303 S. Fifth, C.

2,3,4

F

44 4

NEw! private baths, FrEE iNTErNET, TV, Garage

901 w. Springfield, U.

1+2

F

4 4

Large units

606 E. white, C.

3

F

44 4

Bi-Level Lofts, private Baths, FrEE iNTErNET, TV

1004 w. Springfield, U.

1

F

4 4

Super balconies from $595

102 S. Lincoln, U.

2,3,4

F

4 4

FrEE internet, Balconies, Sundeck, walk to Engineering

808 S. oak, C.

2,3,4

F

4 4

Lofts, Balconies, FrEE internet, From $385

Bankier Apartments

217-328-3770

www.bankierapartments.com

217-337-8852

www.mhmproperties.com

106 S. Coler, U.

3

F

44 4

Near the Engineering Quad. 2 Full Baths. patio/Balcony

Old Towne Apartments

202 E. Green, C.

1,2,4

F

44 4

Gym. Balcony, jacuzzi tubs, 50" TV

204-206 w. washington, U. 2

303 w. Green, C.

1,2,3

B 44 4

private gated community with spacious apartments

Shlens Apartments

410 E. Green, C.

1,2,3

F

44 4

Conveniently located in the heart off campus. Lots of updates

1004 w. Stoughton, U.

4

F

4 4

Carpeted, onsite laundry, Flatscreen TVs, leather furniture, Buses close

519 E. Green, C.

2

F

44 4

First class living in an unbeatable location. LEED certified. Gym

1002/904 w. Stoughton, U. 4

F

4 4

Carpeted, onsite laundry, Flatscreen TVs, leather furniture, Buses close

1107 S. Second, C.

4

F

44 4

Balconies off every bedroom. Close to Memorial Stadium and the ArC.

Smith Apartments

Burnham 310

217-239-2310

www.burnham310.com

217-778-9498

www.oldtowneapts.com U

44 4

Large, quiet 2Br; $680; Free parking; race at washington

217-344-2901

www.shlensapt.com

217-384-1925

www.smithapartments-cu.com

1106. S. Second, C.

1

F

4 4

$585 includes water, parking $60-$70, on site laundry

310 E. Springfield Ave., C

1

F

44 4 4

507 w. Church, C.

1

B

4 4

$530-550 includes water and one parking, on site laundry

310 E. Springfield Ave., C

2

F

44 4 4

511 w. Church, C.

1

B

4 4

$570-600 includes water and one parking, on site laundry

310 E. Springfield Ave., C

3

F

44 4 4

53 E. Chalmers, C.

2

F

44 4

$1550, parking $50-70

310 E. Springfield Ave., C

Studio

F

44 4 4

58 E. Armory, C.

2

F

44 4

$1100, includes one parking

1004 S. Locust, C.

2

F

4 4

$740-930, parking $50-70, on site laundry

$240 Gift Card or New Low rates, minimal full apartments remain

1009 w. Clark, U.

2

F

4 4

$870, includes one parking, on site laundry

Campustown Rentals

217-531-2255

www.campustownrentals.com

101 Green, 309/311 Daniel

4

F

44 4

109 John, 515 Bash, 913 Third

3

F

4 4

$240 Gift Card or New Low rates, Strategic locations close to Green St.

1012 w. Clark, U.

2

F

4 4

$870, includes one parking, on site laundry

305 Green, 306.5 Green

3

F

4 4

$240 Gift Card or New Low rates, heart of campus, balconies

511 w. Church, C.

2

B

4 4

$765-825, includes water and one parking, on site laundry

101 Green, 207 Green

4

F

44 4

Spring 2017 – $299 first month, last month free

The Suites at Third

Campustown rentals

1-5

F

4 4

5 Month Leasing, pet Friendly Fall 2017

707 Third Street, C.

4

F

44 4 4

private bathrooms and $0 upfront fees!

707 Third Street, C.

3

F

44 4 4

private bathrooms and $0 upfront fees!

707 Third Street, C.

2

F

44 4 4

Save $160 with zero upfront fees!

Joseph M. Thompson 512 1/2 E. John, C.

217-493-8603

jthompson.55@comcast.net

3

F

JSM

44

Best Location only $420. only 1 Block From Quad. Must see.

217-359-6108

www.jsmliving.com

The Tower at Third

508 E. John St., C.

4

F

44 4

New 60" Smart TV's, renovated Kitchen, Granite, Stainless Steel Appliances, Secure Entry

601 w. Green St., U.

4

F

44 4

Great Urbana Location, Completely renovated, open Floor plans, parking included

107 E. Chalmers St., C.

3

F

44 4

Completely renovated, Stainless Steel Appliances, New Security Gates for Fall 2017, Great Location

707 S. Sixth St., C.

1,2

F

44

Great Location, Nearby parking, Beverage Chillers, Queen Bed (1Br), Secure Entry

701 S. Gregory St., U.

1,2

F

44 4 4

Granite Countertops, LED Lighting, TV's (2Br), Near Krannert, Covered parking Available

1

2

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY ILLINI

9

3

Help Wanted

- $10.00 to $15.00 Per Hour - Local-Household Goods/ Industrial/Office Moving - Must Be Able To Lift 75-100lbs - Student Seasonal Jobs Available - Free Weekends - Along Bus Route

www.dailyillini.com/page/classifieds Sign in to set up an account with us. Pricing is available on the site upon login. You can place ads in The Daily Illini print publications on Mondays and Thursdays, or on our dailyillini.com website, or both.

9 7

F

18. Jun 2010

8

Help6Wanted

4

3

Part A

2

5 2

Top-rated sports camp needs fun loving counselors to teach all land, water & adventure sports. Great summer in Maine!

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Rentals

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4 BED/2 BATH FULLY 1FURNISHED. 8WALK TO

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CAMPUS. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT:

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apartmentsatcampusoaks.com

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Merchandise 8

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55K miles. New tires. 4 cvl. 30+ mpg Full bluetooth. XM radio prepaid 2017. Holding good title.

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Steve 618-210-8501

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WE O

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FIRST MONTH RENT FREE

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1.com 5

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SKILL:

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Some 9 mo. leases on 3 BDRM

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@thedailyillini

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TW I T T

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18. Jun 2010

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107.1

N

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WPGU

217-819-2232 or 217-317-0345

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$8.25/hour + mileage + leasing bonuses Please email your resume to sjackson.neves@gmail.com

3

$560 mo. w/ some utilities $460 security deposit

6

JAMS

Punctuality is mandatory.

7

8

2

THE

9

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OUT

2

1 Bedroom Apt Near Campus/ Downtown Urbana

5

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1

4

1

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Rentals

217.840.5134 6 8 9 4

Sudoku 4 7

KICK

20-25 hours/week (starting date is flexible, end date is 7/31) Must be 18, have a valid drivers license and reliable transportation This is a sales position. Your primary function will be to show properties for rent and follow up with potential tenants.

4

9

FOR RENT

Efficiencies, 2 2 1,5 2, 3 & 4 BDRMS

5

Summer Leasing Agent

5

Visit http://groundwarehousejobs. fedex.com or call 217-363-5142 for more information!

2

rschambers@gmail.com

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L I S S O G U E N G L E Y U K R A P P A T R A S S A N K D I M S A C E H U T E T U R N U B I O P A C T

3

YO!

A S I A T I C

J A G B E R A R D A T R I A O N G P S G B L A I S A L E Z L L A T E E A R T H D N O I D T E N N I T H Y A A W E D I L O F N O R E E A T R D Y E

TO

4

FedEx is hiring package handlers with a starting wage of $11.60 12.60 per hr. FedEx has flexible scheduling & tuition assistance.

ER

F U T I L E

TIME

5

Rentals 3

6

9 2 8 5 Leasing for August 7 2 6 9

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VISIT ·DAILYILLINI.COM·

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www.

6

Package Handler Now Hiring!

For More Information Contact: Nick Baker (217) 352.5123 Nick.Baker@federalcos.com Or Apply In Person 401 W. Kenyon Rd. Champaign, IL 61820 8:00AM-5:00PM

IT’S

217 - 337 - 8337

1

9

2

For more info or help placing your ad, contact us at: diclassifieds@Illinimedia.com

A T T Y P R O O B E R M K E A M F I N A E N E M A R K U N D E R E Y E P O C T P O I N E N N U N S Y N

4

5

FOR RENT

9

Deadline: 2:00 p.m. one business day prior to publication

Skill:

2

4

FOR RENT

Call (888) 844-8080; apply at www.campcedar.com

We are looking for neat and dependable people who are not afraid to work to help service our customers both now and during summer months.

Newly renovated amenities! $0 upfront fees!

Contact us at: diclassifieds@illinimedia.com or call 217-337-8337

Help to make well known of sudoku-topical.com! You like this website? Then recommend it to your friends. If you own yourself a website, place a link to sudoku-topical.com If you print out the sudokus then print them twice and give one to one of your friends. Tell your acquaintances, friends and teammates about sudoku-topical.com. Just help to make this site well known.!

In addition to PAID ads for commercial businesses, we offer FREE ONLINE ads to UIUC students who sign into their accounts with “Illinois.edu” addresses.

44 4 4

WANT TO LIST YOUR PROPERTY?

PLAY SPORTS! HAVE FUN! MAKE MONEY!

SUMMER HELP WANTED!!!

Classified advertisers can now place print and online classified ads directly at:

217-367-0720

www.tower3rd.com

302 E. John St. Ste.100, C. 2

5

5

217-367-0720

www.suites3rd.com

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5

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9

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Enter the numbers 1-9 in the blank spaces so that each row, column and 3x3 square contains only one of each number. There is only one solution. (solution in Classifieds and online at www.dailyillini.com).


6B Monday, April 17, 2017

Make this r e m m u s so much more than just a . n o i t a c va

THE DAILY ILLINI  |  WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

Flexible schedules, online courses and affordable tuition mean you can have your summer and earn transferable credit, too! For more information visit http://bit.ly/iillinoissccsum mmer

The Daily Illini: Volume 146 Issue 56  
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