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Monday March 25, 2013

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Local startup aims to enter app market

Miami knocks Illinois out of NCAA tourney

Champaign-based Cupcloud co-founded by UIUC alumnus BY AMAYA ADAMS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Almost a year after the local startup company Cupcloud was founded, the business’s creators are now aiming to bring their product to market later this year. Cupcloud is a productivity app that caters to students and other computer-heavy users. By allowing users to “cup,” or save, windows of various programs with one click, Cupcloud simplifies desktop multitasking. “Let’s say you have 20 web browsers; if you just want to save them, you have to hit every single save button for each web document,” said Yeaji Ham, co-founder of Cupcloud and University alumnus. “With Cupcloud, if you click the Cup button, it’ll save everything you have on the desktop.” With the prototype up and running for nearly a year, the team is now focusing on the beta version, which was launched March 3, along with the release of a user feedback survey.

ERIC GAY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois’ Brandon Paul reacts as he walks off the court after playing Miami on Sunday in Austin, Texas. Paul led the Illini in scoring with 18 points despite 2-of-9 shooting from beyond the arc. Miami won 63-59.

Seniors die hard. It’s what John Groce has said all year about his senior-laden team. The seven-seeded Illini fought to the end against second-seeded Miami on Sunday in a game in which they came in as heavy underdogs. Ultimately, it wasn’t enough to send the Illini out of the Austin regional and into the Sweet 16. A season marred by

streaky play came to a close at the hands of the ACC champions in a 6359 loss in the third round of the NCAA tournament, and few would say it was for lack of effort. With 43 seconds remaining in the game and Illinois down two points, a questionable out-of-bounds call during a rebound scramble gave the ball to Miami. From there, the Illini

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were forced to foul. Miami hit 6-of-6 free throw attempts to close the game. Brandon Paul finished with 18 points, and Tyler Griffey closed with 12 points. Paul headed to the locker room after the game wit his jersey draped over his face and his hands clasped to his head. Seniors die hard.

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More inside: For a full recap and basketball columnist Daniel MillerMcLemore’s take, turn to sports on Page 1B. More online: Visit

DailyIllini.com for an onair postgame podcast and recap from Austin, Texas.

» » » » » » Company » progression of alumnus’ startup app » » » » » » » » More on-air: Listen to Illini Drive at 6 p.m. on WPGU 107.1-FM for anaysis of the Illini’s NCAA tournament run.

» » » » » » » » » » » » » » »

Lingering arctic air makes for chilly March

PROTOTYPE

BY SARI LESK STAFF WRITER

At least 100 more security cameras are expected to be installed around campus by this time next year, according to the University Police Department. The police department’s security camera project has been growing since its start in 2008, when the first 13 cameras were installed. Now, almost 900 cameras are watching the campus, and UIPD has about 25 more projects open within the security camera project. These projects are requested by individual departments and buildings at the University. Detective Tim Hetrick, of the UIPD Technical Services division, said Campus Recreation and the Illini Union have requested help from UIPD to install security cameras in the past. “I go in and help them identify their security concerns and find out if there are any special areas that they want to cover,” Hetrick said. The internal departments pay for the cameras out of their own budgets. “We don’t have the money in our budget just to pop these things up all over town,” said Skip Frost, UIPD deputy chief. The security cameras run on a system maintained by Campus Information Technologies and Educational Services. Ken Felsman, life safety engineer for CITES, said his department is

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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AUSTIN BAIRD Assistant design editor

UI security camera presence » » » » » » » » to reach 1,000 by end of 2013

BY ARIELL CARTER

Police

CUPCLOUD INCORPORATED

Source: Yeaji Ham, Cupcloud CFO

Month’s average 10 to 20 degrees below normal temperatures

INSIDE

See CUPCLOUD, Page 3A

Cupcloud, a local startup company and productivity app, was founded more than a year ago. The company is now receiving feedback on its app through their beta that will contribute to its next version

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Warm temperatures are expected to return to the Champaign-Urbana area in April, despite a colder-than-average March that saw winter storm warnings and abundant snowfall. Following Sunday’s winter storm, Provost Ilesanmi Adesida sent a massmail discouraging students who had not yet returned to campus from returning due to hazardous conditions on Interstate 57. Temperatures in the area have been around 10 to 20 degrees lower than the average high for this time of year, which is about 50 degrees Fahrenheit. The low temperatures are due to cold air circulating between Champaign-Urbana and the North Pole, said Eric Snodgrass, an atmospheric sciences professor. He said this cold air usually shifts through the uppermost part of the Northern Hemisphere during the winter, but this winter it remained over the area. The reason for the shift, Snodgrass said, is due to what is called a blocking high — an area of high pressure which usually stays in one place for a few days. “Over the past two weeks, a

“The survey allows us to pay more attention to actual feedback and details from live users because most of them were feasible modifications or upgrades,” said Jina Kwon, the company’s chief marketing officer. “Since the concept and framework of Cupcloud may be new to the market, we are trying our best to come up with strategies to naturally merge Cupcloud into the segment.” The survey will be open until March 31 and will provide insight into their work on the Cupcloud beta, which is expected to run thru April. Ham said the next version of Cupcloud will be released later this year, although a release date has not been determined. A premium version could also be added, for which users will pay a monthly fee, Ham added. The creators originally came up with the idea in early 2011 because they were dissatisfied with other applications, like Dropbox, said Hojoong Rhee,

FOLAKE OSIBODU THE DAILY ILLINI

Emily Siner, senior in Media and former Illini Media employee, and Matt Entler, senior in Engineering, use the snowfall as an opportunity to make a snowman. large blocking high has been and a senior in AHS, said she is sitting over Greenland bring- worried about her teammates not ing warm air there and cold air wanting to play in the cold. here,” he said. “I have no problem with the Snodgrass said Greenland’s cold, but we can’t play in the blocking high snow,” she said. is expected With games to move eaststarting next ward by March week, she said 31, leaving the this may be an Ch a mpa ig nissue. Urbana area Atmospherwith warmer ic scientists temperatures. can predict The dropthe lengths of ping tempercold weathatures are er periods by affecting stuusing the Arcdents across tic oscillation campus, espeindex, a meaJIM ANGEL, cially those sure of climate Illinois State climatologist involved in outpatterns of door sports. wind circulatNicole Druktenis, the captain ing the arctic. When the index of a co-ed intramural soccer team is positive, the cold stays con-

“It’s ironic that after sailing through winter without much cold or snow that in March we get so much snow and cold weather.”

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fined to the north and south poles and when it is negative, as it has been this winter, the cold moves southward. “It’s ironic that after sailing through winter without much cold or snow that in March we get so much snow and cold weather,” said Illinois State climatologist Jim Angel. Arctic oscillation has a strong impact on the climate of our area, causing these fluctuations, Angel said. When the index is far in the negative, the temperatures can drop up to 20 or 30 degrees lower than usual. Angel said there is a battle between warm air from Mexico and cold air from Canada. At this time, he said, the cold from Canada is prevailing.

Ariell can be reached at news@dailyillini.com.

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responsible for the operational fitness of the network on which the cameras run, but the Division of Public Safety views the footage. Although none of the camera feeds are actively monitored, Hetrick said the department uses the camera to solve crimes. Security camera footage was used in the investigation of the Feb. 7 arson outside the Oak Street Library Facility, 809 S. Oak St., which was initially thought to be an accidental dumpster fire, he said. “We go back 99.9 percent of the time and look for a crime that’s already occurred,” Hetrick said. “We’ll look for somebody walking through the area or someone who fits the description of a suspect.” Frost said he expects at least 1,000 cameras to be watching the campus within the year. “They have shown to be extremely valuable,” he said. “They will continue to pop up.” Given the number of departments and the ongoing construction at the University, Hetrick said he does not see an end to the security cameras project. “Different departments decide maybe last year (they) didn’t want anything, and maybe this year they’ve got an issue they want to address with security cameras,” he said. “Honestly, I don’t expect for it to ever end.”

Sari can be reached at lesk2@dailyillini.com

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The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com

Monday, March 25, 2013

The Daily Illini 512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 217 • 337 • 8300 Copyright © 2013 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Darshan Patel 217 • 337-8365 editor@dailyillini.com Managing editors Maggie Huynh

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Austin Baird

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Photo editor Brenton Tse 217 • 337-8357 photo@dailyillini.com Asst. photo editor Hassan Khalid Video editor Krizia Vance 217 • 337-8344 Vidcast producer Emily Thornton Copy chief Lindsey Rolf 217 • 337-8565 copychief@dailyillini. com Asst. copy chief Audrey Majors Social media coordinator Karyna Rodriguez Advertising sales manager Nick Langlois ssm@illinimedia.com Classified sales director Deb Sosnowski Daily Illini/Buzz ad director Travis Truitt Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

Night system staff for today’s paper Night editor: Sari Lesk Photo night editor: Nathalie Rock Copy editors: Matt Petruszak, Crystal Smith Designer: Stacie Sansone Page transmission: Kit Donahue

Periodical postage paid at Champaign, IL 61821. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday in summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-of-town and out-of-state rates available upon request.

POLICE

Champaign Theft was reported at Chester Street Bar, 63 E. Chester St., around 2:30 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, an unknown offender stole the victim’s wallet, which contained two identification items. n Disorderly conduct was reported at Davidson Park, 1108 W. Church St., around 2 p.m. Wednesday. n A 23-year-old male was arrested on multiple charges in the 2600 block of West Springfield Avenue around 4 a.m. Saturday. According to the report, the suspect was arrested on the charges of domestic violence, n

resisting, obstructing and disarming an officer and domestic dispute.

Urbana Disorderly conduct was reported at Circle K, 1501 N. Lincoln Ave., around 12 p.m. Friday. According to the report, an unknown offender threw a drink at the victim. n Retail theft was reported at Harbor Freight Tools, 1508 N. Cunningham Ave., around 10:30 a.m. Friday. According to the report, an unknown offender stole a DVR from the business. n

TODAY ON DAILYILLINI.COM

University A 36-year-old male and a 28-year-old male were arrested on multiple charges in the 1200 block of West Green Street around 6:30 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, the 36-year-old male was arrested on the charges of possession of drug paraphernalia and an outstanding warrant from Champaign County for failure to appear in court. The 28-yearold male was arrested on the charges of possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of cannabis. Both suspects were passengers in the same vehicle. n

of the picture. Get out of the clouds and ride.

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)

Today’s Birthday

The year begins with communications, invitations and opportunities to participate. Pace yourself, and use the energy to forward a dream. Around summer, the focus shifts to domestic activities, with family comfort a priority. For satisfaction, serve others. Budget, save, pay debt and reduce clutter. Listen to intuition. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)

Today is a 9 — The competition is fierce, but you can handle it. You’ll feel better as feelings and logic align. Travel is now an emotional experience. Don’t touch your savings.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)

Today is an 8 — Explore new boundaries in places where you didn’t think to look before. Take the time to get your ideas across. What you’re learning clashes with your old routine. Find quiet.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)

Today is an 8 — It’s a big mistake to think you’re the smartest. That’s irrelevant, anyway. There’s still work to be done. Dedication is part of the solution. Horses may be part

Today is an 8 — There’s less than you thought, but the opportunities for more are wide open. Ignore a rude remark, or anything that distracts from your commitments. There’s plenty of work to do. Dive into it.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

Today is a 6 — Stay outside of the controversy; you have bigger and better things to worry about. If you really think it will make a difference, wait a while. Anticipate criticism. Otherwise, keep to your commitments.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

Today is a 7 — Listen. What you learn today helps you in the long run. Put your confidence and power behind a great cause. Don’t throw your money around, though; not even for love. Give your heart instead.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

Today is a 7 — Listen to a roommate carefully and without losing your temper. There’s gold to be found in those words. Remember your manners. Being silent can be fine. Respond later. Imagine your home filled with harmony.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)

Today is an 8 — Read emails and respond to phone messages to avoid a misunderstanding. Make

The Illinois women’s gymnastics team is hitting its stride at the right time this season. The Illini recovered from a slow start to finish fourth in the Big Ten Championships with a score of 196.450. For more information, check out DailyIllini.com.

Compiled by Sari Lesk

HOROSCOPES BY NANCY BLACK

Women’s gymnastics finishes 4th

new friends on social media, but don’t believe everything you see. Stay cautious in the digital world. Check your privacy settings.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)

Today is a 7 — Stand up for what is right, even in the face of disagreement. But watch out so you don’t come off as obnoxious. Your dedication may be stronger than your words. Mold your message, edit and put it into action.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)

Today is an 8 — Ride out the storm, and calm another’s fears. Take a moment to catch your breath. Then conjure ideas for an additional income stream, now and for the long run. Invest in tangibles, rather than fiction.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)

Today is an 8 — Work out your differences so that you can move forward with ease. You can really handle it. It’s worth taking the time. Postpone parties and committee meetings. It’s not a good time to shop, either.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)

Today is a 9 — State your position firmly, and be willing to be flexible, up to a point. An objective perspective helps. Enough talking about it; now’s the time to get active. Boost morale with music and good food.

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CORRECTIONS When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editor-inChief Darshan Patel at 337-8365.

HOW TO CONTACT US The Daily Illini is located at 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. Our office hours are 9a.m. to 5:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

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Newsroom Corrections: If you think something has been incorrectly reported, please call Editor-in-Chief Darshan Patel at (217) 337-8365 or email him at editor@dailyillini.com. Online: If you have a question about DailyIllini.com or The Daily Illini’s various social media outlets, please email our managing editors, Maggie Huynh and Ryan Weber, at online@ dailyillini.com. On-air: If you have comments or questions about The Daily Illini’s broadcasts on WPGU-FM 107.1, please email our managing editors, Maggie Huynh and Ryan Weber, at onair@dailyillini.com. Employment: If you would like to work for the newspaper’s editorial department, please contact us at employment@dailyillini.com. News: If you have a news tip, please contact news editor Lauren Rohr at (217) 337-8352 or email news@dailyillini.com. Sports: To contact the sports staff, please call sports editor Eliot Sill at (217) 337-8363 or email sports@dailyillini.com. Features: If you have a tip for a features story, please contact features editor Alison Marcotte at (217) 337-8369 or email features@dailyillini.com. Photo: For questions about photographs or to suggest photo coverage of an event, please contact photo editor Brenton Tse at (217) 337-8344 or email photo@ dailyillini.com. Calendar: To submit events for publication in print and online at the217.com, click on “submit an event” at the217.com or email calendar@the217.com. Letters to the editor:  Letters are limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college. The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions.

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WHERE PASSION MEETS PROFESSION.

Based on the most recent rankings of U.S. News & World Report’s America’s Best Graduate Schools, Rush University was ranked 10 times in the Health Specialties category, and Rush is a top-ranked university with an exclusive health science focus. Rush University is known for its: • Practitioner-teacher model • Nurturing academic environment • Translational research • Focus on community and global health To learn more about Rush University, ask a question, register for an open house or apply for admission, please visit: admissions.rushu.rush.edu

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The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com

Monday, March 25, 2013

Pressure on Syrian Alawites to realign

UC SENATE

Committee to vote on proposals, policies Senate plans to decide 3 proposals on educational policy during meeting BY JOHNATHAN HETTINGER STAFF WRITER

Minority sect largely made up of Assad loyalists BY AYA BATRAWY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAIRO — Dozens of people from Syrian President Bashar Assad’s own minority sect met in Cairo on Sunday to send an unusual message to their fellow Alawites back home: Join the opposition before it is too late. The Alawites have long been seen as a backbone of the Assad regime, and a decision to support the rebel force in Syria is complicated by the fact that many see their own futures interlocked with Assad’s survival. The pressure on Alawites who dare oppose Assad comes not only from the regime, but also from within their own families. Nearly all of the 50 Alawites at the opposition conference have been arrested, abused or threatened for their political views. One participant said he received an email threatening his life if he attended the conference. The Alawites, an offshoot of Shiite Islam, are a tiny sect, representing roughly 12 percent of Syria’s population. Many live in towns and villages along the mountainous Mediterranean coast. Most have either rallied behind Assad or stayed quietly on the sidelines of the 2-year-old civil war, which has killed more than 70,000 people. The opposition meeting — the first of its kind for Alawite Syrians since the war began — reflects

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AMR NABIL THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Nour, 30, a Syrian who was injured during clashes in Aleppo, Syria and treated in Cairo, listens to members of the Syrian Alawite sect who are opposed to Syrian president Bashar Assad at a meeting in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday. fears that they would fall victim to revenge killings and assassinations should Assad’s regime fall. Some are particularly worried about the influx of foreign jihadist fighters into Syria who view Shiites as heretics. Many minority Alawites see the war in Syria as a fight for survival against the Sunni majority. Alawites hold key posts in the army alongside some Sunnis and members of other groups that have been given top government and military positions to foster loyalty to the regime. A statement by the Alawite opposition group said “the Syrian regime has no identity except that of tyranny.” “The Syrian regime lies when it says it protects minorities, particularly the Alawites ... in an attempt to portray to the world that it is fighting Islamic extremists and terrorism,” the statement said. Rita al-Suleiman, 29, said she had to flee Syria last year after her brother told her that he had been questioned in prison about her anti-regime activities in Homs.

“I was at first careful not to attend meetings, but then my family said they have nothing to do with me so I grew bolder,” she said. “It’s been very hard to leave them behind.” Like others at the conference, she said many Syrians are no longer afraid to voice their opinions, but that Alawites are under greater pressure from members of their own community not to speak out. Bashar Aboud, 40, said his relatives warned his parents they would burn their house down if he continued defying the regime. The 40 year-old father of two, who now resides in Cairo after fleeing Syria during a 2001 crackdown on opposition figures, said his parents were forced to go on Syrian TV and disown him. Those at the conference stressed that Alawites have long been and want to continue to be a part of the fabric of Syrian society. “In the end we are all on the same boat and it’s sinking,” Aboud said, referring to Syria’s precarious situation. “We are part of the team that is trying to save this boat.”

One participant described the conferees as a real opposition movement that does not want to be separated from the homeland. He said he opposed dividing Syria along sectarian lines or the possibility of a breakaway enclave for Alawites as was the case under French mandate for a few years in the late 1930s. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he feared reprisals against his family in Syria. Despite efforts by the participants to frame the conflict as a despotic regime against its people, signs of sectarian warfare are rife in Syria. The army is being reinforced by pro-regime militias, packed with Alawites who have been accused of conducting massacres in which hundreds of civilians, including women and children, were killed. The Syrian government claims gunmen driven by the agendas of foreign countries are responsible for the killings, but the United Nations and other witnesses have confirmed that at least some were carried out by pro-regime vigilante fighters.

The Urbana-Champaign Senate will vote on three proposals involving educational policy at its meeting Monday. The College of ACES would like to establish a new option under the Master of Science in agricultural and applied economics degree. In addition, the English department has proposed curriculum changes and the College of LAS would like to establish a graduate concentration in second lan-

guage acquisition and teacher education. Also at the meeting, senators will consider the nominations of four students and four faculty members for two student and two faculty spots on the Athletic Board. If the senate does not have any additional nominations, the eight nominations will be forwarded to Chancellor Phyllis Wise, who will make the final decision.

Johnathan can be reached at hetting2@ dailyillini.com.

SEIU awaits response from University regarding wages UI considers union’s counter to proposal, further negotiation scheduled for later date DAILY ILLINI STAFF REPORT

Following a three-day strike of building and food service workers, the Service Employees International Union Local 73 resumed negotiation Tuesday with University administration and a federal mediator. The union provided a counter to the most recent proposal from the University regarding service workers’ wages. According to a press release, the union is waiting for a response from the University, and further negotiation has been scheduled for Wednesday. Campus spokeswoman Robin Kaler said in an email the University was evaluating the counter proposal offered by SEIU. Adam Rosen, SEIU communications director, said progress

was made in the negotiation, “but nothing specific.” “I think both sides are showing a willingness to come forward to give a fair contract more than ever,” Rosen said. “It’s progress.” SEIU chief negotiator Ricky Baldwin reiterated there was progress, adding “there is hope for an agreement,” and the ultimate decision lies with the union’s members. SEIU has been looking for better wages for service workers on campus, and the delayed negotiations pushed the union to strike last Monday to Wednesday, Baldwin said. “We’re hopeful that when negotiation continues on Wednesday, we can bring this to a vote,” Rosen said.

Federal regulators, Obama urge Supreme Court to stop ‘pay for delay’ BY JESSE J. HOLLAND AND LINDA A. JOHNSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Federal regulators are pressing the Supreme Court to stop big pharmaceutical corporations from paying generic drug competitors to delay releasing their cheaper versions of brand-name drugs. They argue these deals deny American consumers, usually for years, steep price declines that can top 90 percent. The Obama administration, backed by consumer groups and the American Medical Association, says these so-called “pay for delay” deals profit the drug companies but harm consumers by adding 3.5 billion annually to their drug bills. But the pharmaceutical companies counter that they need to preserve longer the billions of dollars in revenue from their patented products in order to recover the billions they spend developing new drugs. And both the large companies and the generic makers say the marketing of generics often is hastened by these deals. The justices will hear the argument Monday. Such pay-for-delay deals arise when generic companies file a challenge at the Food and Drug Administration to the patents that give brand-name drugs a 20-year monopoly. The generic drugmakers aim to prove the patent is flawed or otherwise invalid, so they can launch a generic version well before the patent ends.

Brand-name drugmakers then usually sue the generic companies, which sets up what could be years of expensive litigation. When the two sides aren’t certain who will win, they often reach a compromise deal that allows the generic company to sell its cheaper copycat drug in a few years — but years before the drug’s patent would expire. Often, that settlement comes with a sizeable payment from the brand-name company to the generic drugmaker. Numerous brand-name and generic drugmakers and their respective trade groups say the settlements protect their interests but also benefit consumers by bringing inexpensive copycat medicines to market years earlier than they would arrive in any case generic drugmakers took to trial and lost. But federal officials counter that such deals add billions to the drug bills of American patients and taxpayers, compared to what would happen if the generic companies won the lawsuits and could begin marketing right away. A study by RBC Capital Markets Corp. of 371 cases during 20002009 found brand-name companies won 89 at trial compared to 82 won by generic drugmakers. Another 175 ended in settlement deals, and 25 were dropped. Generic drugs account for about 80 percent of all American prescriptions for medicines and vaccines, but a far smaller percentage of the $325 billion spent by U.S. consumers on drugs each year. Generics saved American

patients, taxpayers and the healthcare system an estimated $193 billion in 2011 alone, according to health data firm IMS Health. But government officials believe the number of potentially anticompetitive patent settlements is increasing. Pay-for-delay deals increased from 28 to 40 in just the last two fiscal years and the deals in fiscal 2012 covered 31 brand-name pharmaceuticals, Federal Trade Commission officials said. Those had combined annual U.S. sales of more than $8.3 billion. The Obama administration argues the agreements are illegal if they’re based solely on keeping the generic drug off the market. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli, speaking at Georgetown Law School recently, noted that once a generic drug gets on the market and competes with a brand-name drug, “the price drops 85 percent.” That quickly decimates sales of the brand-name medicine. “These agreements should actually be considered presumptively unlawful because of the potential effects on consumers,” Verrilli said. In the case before the court, Brussels, Belgium-based Solvay — now part of a new company called AbbVie Inc. — reached a deal with generic drugmaker Watson Pharmaceuticals allowing it to launch a cheaper version of Solvay’s male hormone drug AndroGel in August 2015. Solvay agreed to pay Watson an estimated $19 million-$30 mil-

RICK BOWMER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jeremy Lazarus, president-elect of the American Medical Association (AMA) speaks in Portland, Oregon on Aug. 12, 2011. The Supreme Court will struggle this week with whether it is legal for patent-holding pharmaceutical companies to pay rivals, who make generic drugs, to temporarily keep those cheaper versions of their brand-name drugs off the market. lion annually, government officials said. The patent runs until August 2020. Watson agreed to also help sell the brand-name version, AndroGel. AndroGel, which brought in $1.2 billion last year for AbbVie, is a gel applied to the skin daily to treat low testosterone in men. Low testosterone can affect sex drive, energy level, mood, muscle mass and bone strength. The FTC called the deal anticompetitive and sued Watson, now called Actavis Inc. The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta rejected the

government’s objections, and the FTC appealed to the Supreme Court. The federal district and appellate courts both ruled against the government, AbbVie, which is based in North Chicago, Ill., said. “We are confident that these decisions will be upheld by the Supreme Court.” The Generic Pharmaceutical Association’s head, Ralph Neas, said the settlements are “proconsumer, pro-competition and transparent.” He said every patent settlement to date has brought a generic drug

Pope Francis celebrates 1st Palm Sunday mass with overflowing crowd in the square BY FRANCES D’EMILIO THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis celebrated his first Palm Sunday Mass in St. Peter’s Square, encouraging people to be humble and young at heart and promising to go to a youth jamboree in Brazil in July, while the faithful enthusiastically waved olive branches and braided palm fronds. The square overflowed with a crowd estimated by the Vatican at 250,000 people. Pilgrims, tourists and Romans jostled each other in an eager effort glimpse Francis as they joined the new pope at the start of solemn Holy Week ceremonies, which lead up to Easter, Christianity’s most important day. Keeping with his spontaneous style, the first pope from Latin America broke away several times from the text of his prepared homily to encourage the faithful to lead simple lives and resist the temptation to be sad when life’s obstacles inevitably come their way. “Don’t let yourselves be robbed of hope! Don’t let yourselves be robbed of hope!” Francis told the crowd, in an apparent reference to the economic difficulties peo-

ple are grappling with as they try Francis even climbed down to find adequate work amid a poor from the vehicle, kissed a womjob market in much of the world. an in the crowd and chatted briefAt the end of the two-hour Mass, ly with her, and another man in Francis took off his red vestments, the crowd leaned over a barrier and wearing his plain white cas- to squeeze the pontiff on a shoulsock and skull cap, climbed into der — an unheard of familiarity an open-topped popemobile to cir- in the previous pontificate of the cle through the excited crowd. He reserved Benedict XVI. leaned out to shake hands, kissed In keeping with his stress on and patted the giving examples heads of infants of humility, Franpassed to him by cis kissed the bodyguards, and hand of an elderoften gave chilly woman who had dren the thumbsoutstretched an up sign. arm to him. His securi“There is no ty detail seemed doubt that there to be reluctantwill be a new ly dealing with spring for the SISTER EMMA, this get-close-tochurch, a renewArgentine nun the-people ponal” with this pope, tiff, scrambling said Sister Emma, around the vehicle to pick up this an Argentine nun in the crowd. child or that one. At one point, Palm Sunday recalls Jesus’ the chief bodyguard, Domenico entry into Jerusalem but its Gospel Giani, was sent back to the mother also recounts how he was betrayed of a child he had greeted to con- by one of his apostles and ultimatevey a message from the pontiff, ly sentenced to death on a cross. and the ever-tense Giani broke Francis presided over the Mass into a smile after his mission was at an altar sheltered by a canopy accomplished. on the steps of St. Peter’s Basilica.

“There is no doubt that there will be a new spring for the church, a renewal.”

Recalling the triumphant welcome into Jerusalem, Francis said Jesus “awakened so many hopes in the heart, above all among humble, simple, poor, forgotten people, those who don’t matter in the eyes of the world.” Cardinals, many of them among the electors who chose him to be the Roman Catholic church’s first Latin American pope, sat on chairs during the ceremony held under hazy skies on a breezy day. He quoted from Benedict when he told the cardinals that while they are “princes” of the church, their leader is the crucified Christ, a further admonition against attachment to temporal power. The pope ticked off a litany of evils afflicting the world, including wars, “economic conflicts that hit the weakest” as well as corruption. In the final stretch of Benedict’s papacy, the Vatican was embarrassed by a leak of documents from the papal apartment, indicating corruption, ambition and rivalries among upper ranks of the Holy See’s management. Francis told an off-the-cuff story from his childhood in Argentina. “My grandmother used to tell

us children, ‘burial shrouds don’t have’ pockets,” the pope said, in a variation of “you can’t take it with you.” Since his election on March 13, Francis has put the downtrodden and poor at the center of his mission as pope, keeping with the priorities of his Jesuit tradition. In his homily, Francis said Christian joy “isn’t born from possessing a lot of things but from having met” Jesus. That same joy should keep people young, he said. “Even at 70, 80, the heart doesn’t age” if one is inspired by Christian joy, said the 76-year-old pontiff. A few young olive trees were inserted in dirt placed around the central obelisk in the square. Holy Week will see at least one break from tradition with this new papacy. Instead of washing priests’ feet in a basilica in a symbolic gesture of humility on Holy Thursday, Francis will wash the feet of young inmates at a juvenile detention center. Other appointments in public will include the Way of the Cross procession at the Colosseum on Good Friday night. Next Sunday, Francis will celebrate Easter Mass in the square.

to market before the relevant patent ended, with two-thirds of the new generic drugs launched in 2010 and 2011 hitting the market early due to a settlement. “By doing what the FTC wants, you’re going to hurt consumers rather than help them,” said Paul Bisaro, CEO of Actavis of Parsippany, N.J. Bisaro said consumers will save an estimated $50 billion just from patent settlements involving Lipitor, the cholesterol-lowering drug made by Pfizer Inc. of New York that reigned for nearly a decade as the world’s top-selling drug.

CUPCLOUD FROM PAGE 1A co-founder and CEO of Cupcloud. “I just didn’t want to click 100 times to reopen the files, programs and webpages to continue my work,” he said. “Dropbox kind of saved me because of its multidevice syncing function, but (it’s) not the way I wanted it to be. I needed something to capture my desktop.” The prototype was released last April, and within ten days, 366 users joined. After that, Ham and Rhee, whose company is based in South Korea, decided to come to the United States. “We actually visited UIUC at that time to see if students would like Cupcloud or not,” Ham said. “We came back to the states to incorporate Cupcloud as a business in the states legally, as well.” Hoping to gain awareness of the company, Ham said Cupcloud representatives will be at the Research Park Career Fair on March 27 and the All Campus Career Fair on April 3.

Amaya can be reached at amadams4@ dailyillini.com


4A Monday March 25, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

The Daily Illini

EDITORIAL CARTOON

Editorial

Movies distort sense of reality, experiences

RANDALL ENOS CAGLE CARTOONS

Smoking ban is detrimental to campus, community

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state-wide ban on tobacco at public university campuses was passed by the Illinois Senate committee on Tuesday. If passed by the Senate, it would ban smoking from all publicly funded universities. This line of legislation is not only an infringement of individual rights, but a decision that we think should be made university by university, not mandated by the state. While the overarching reason for the ban seems to be to encourage people to quit smoking, this reasoning maintains little logic. According to the American Lung Association, most smokers develop the habit well before reaching 18 years old. Because most students, faculty and staff on college campuses are older than 18, their choice to adopt smoking, or not, has already been made. If the ban’s focus is to stop smokers before they start, it is clear that the wrong age group is being targeted. There are unquestionably intelligent students who would be deterred from attending state-funded schools because of the ban. There are current and potential students, faculty and staff who maintain the habit. They should not be made to feel unwelcome at their own school. While we are a state-funded institution, private schools will use a case-by-case method to determine if a smoking ban is appropriate for their campuses. Essentially, the way that the private schools determine if a smoking ban is appropriate for them is the same way that public state-funded institutions should also decide. In an October editorial, we said that individual freedoms would be infringed upon with a smoking ban — similar to the one passed last year. If passed, amendments to the legislation should be implemented. Designated smoking areas should become a presence on campuses like our own, giving those who wish to smoke a place to do so, and those who wish to keep away from secondhand smoke, the ability to do that. The line where campus ends and begins will become blurred for smokers. There will be many campus community members fined for their habit, which would be dealt with through the implementation of smoking areas. Removing the right for campus community members to smoke publicly has the potential to foster an asocial community; smokers may be inclined to stay off campus because their habits would not be supported. We wholeheartedly support measures that promote health and decrease the likelihood that someone will start smoking, but a statewide ban of tobacco at publicly-funded schools is not the way to do that. It is an overbearing policy that does not factor in the unique qualities of each campus, and legislators should consider the detrimental effects to campus and surrounding communities. A ban is not a solution.

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THOUGHTS Email: opinions@dailyillini. com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.

IMRAN KHAN Opinions columnist

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things, like checking for cockroach signs, are harder to do if you haven’t had previous experience. This is a little difficult, because the University isn’t directly responsible for our housing when we leave the dorms. Because, well, their first priority is residential life. But I argue that while we are not on University property, we are still students and the University should be able to help us in terms of non-university housing. Plus, a major element of U of I is to teach us life skills that we’ll need post-graduation — and what better skill is there to have than learning how to be a skilled apartment hunter? But of course, the main burden of proof is on the cities of Urbana and Champaign. The incident with the East Silver Street apartments has the city of Urbana talking about an ordinance that lays down the responsibilities for landlords and spells out the city-enforced consequences that will occur if expectations aren’t met. While I’m surprised that an ordinance like this is just now starting to take flight, I’m glad it’s something the government is taking seriously. The city needs to do more than just create ordinances for landowners, though. They should also create some kind of checks-and-balances and consequence system for their inspectors so that there are painstakingly careful examinations within the apartments and houses. We don’t need to make a mass exodus back to the dorms. We have a right to feel at home at our apartment or house, cockroaches and bad landlords be darned.

elevision and movies are forms of entertainment that create their own universe. By and large, different genres of entertainment consume our imagination. The ride along a TV show’s plotline or a movie’s story, we become mesmerized by an illusory reality that we wish to be a part of. We keep wanting and coming back for more. We connect with the emotional highs and lows of the narrative. We relate to the characters. But why do we become so attached to these characters and their stories? Why do we find pleasure in watching Bruce Willis escape a fiery building explosion and rescue the day? Alternatively, why do 40-something-year-old housewives watch “General Hospital” and spend the next hour willfully buddied up to a box of Kleenex? The answer isn’t so tough. Television and movies create an escape that allows for dreaming, wonderment and relaxation. It’s an escape from the boring nothingness that accounts for much of our unplanned days or from the daily hassles of work. The escape is much needed and often justified. However, the emotional crux of which we envision fabled universes is virtually subjective. Harmony Korine’s recent release “Spring Breakers” was inspired by his own twisted, conjured idea of what spring break might have looked like had he participated in the trips. Highlighted by a lucid array of colors blended into the debauchery that ensues between a drug-dealing rapper and four college girls, the dream-like sequences of the film are perplexing yet so engaging. What’s truly interesting isn’t the actors involved – although Selena Gomez by a pool is a pretty enticing reason to see it. It’s Korine’s exploration of a fictitious fantasy, a story we allow ourselves as observers to fully embrace that causes us to zone out of our personal realities. Or maybe you’re a fan of the show “Dexter” like myself. Following Dexter’s daily encounters at Miami Metro and the season’s plotline of what pits Dexter as the serial killer versus deranged murderer, for 50 minutes nothing exists except for Dexter Morgan’s life. As the fan and observer, we enjoy the bits of sarcasm and black humor equally as much as the empathy we feel for the confusion and struggles Dexter deals with in his life. From pain to pleasure and belief to deceit, we are immersed into the abstract existence that is only possible in television and movies. It’s what helps us get through a dreadful Sunday or long Monday night. We plan our weeks around allotting a specific amount of time to bask in our favorite shows and movies. Nobody can be told what to watch or why to watch something. We just enjoy entertainment of all sorts because it captures our imagination uniquely. I can’t help but think that if we enjoy what we see, why don’t we actually do what it is that we see our favorite characters doing? Comic book heroes are a stretch – I guess we could all keep dreaming about slinging a web around or flying through the sky. I’m not suggesting that someone go and be the next Hannibal Lecter – I highly advise that you save this route for Anthony Hopkins. But I am suggesting that if artistic forms of entertainment appeal to you emotionally or physically, do not let them entrap you within a false reality. It’s easy for someone to get wrapped up in the story, living vicariously through the release of a fantasy. But to actually go out and act like our lives are similar to TV shows or movies is much more difficult. But there are ways that anyone can realistically incorporate elements of their fantasy into their own lifestyle. You don’t have to wield a heavy hammer and dawn unworldly armor to be a superhero - you just have to be willing to do the right thing. Instead of experiencing happiness through an imaginative lens, make your fantasy your own reality. When you are aware of what you are passionate about and what makes you feel a certain way, everything unfolds as how you wish to see it.

Tolu is a senior in Media. She can be reached at taiwo2@dailyillini.com.

Imran is a sophomore in LAS. He can be reached at ikhan10@dailyillini.com.

Open ears could help GOP’s chances JOSEPH VANDEHEY Opinions columnist

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t’s time to grab a bucket of popcorn and find a comfy place on the couch. The latest round of political theatre is about to begin! No farce today, though. No, today’s theatre is an earnest drama of a political party struggling to adapt to changing times. In this case, the Republican party, and the theme of today’s show is empathy. Our story begins with the election of 2006. There, and in the elections of 2008 and 2012, Democratic victories have forced greater and greater introspection by the Republican party over why they lost. Were their positions too extreme or too moderate? Do the positions need to be changed or just advertised differently? One topic that has received a lot of attention in the wake of last November’s election is the “empathy gap.” Voters whose most important quality in a candidate was “cares about people like me” turned out for Obama over Romney by 81.2 percent to 17.6 percent. Romney beat Obama on all the other qualities, but by far smaller margins. This empathy gap was reinforced by many of the notorious Republican gaffes of 2012 – like Romney’s “47%” or Akin’s “legitimate rape”: bad things, so the gaffe narrative went, don’t really happen to good, hard-working people like us (so if they happened to you, then you must have done something to deserve it). Efforts to shrink the empathy gap have come in various forms. Immigration reform, to appeal to

Latino voters, has seen serious consideration, and in the lead-up to the Supreme Court cases regarding marriage equality, a number of influential Republicans have signed an amicus brief in favor of equality. To cap it off, the Republican National Committee’s new “Growth and Opportunity Project” report, which recommends changes to build a new – more successful – course for the party in the future, emphasizes outreach to people with different viewpoints. But will the RNC’s attempt to shrink the empathy gap actually work? Pollster par excellence Nate Silver had his doubts over whether the empathy gap was actually responsible for Obama’s win. Whether or not one sees a candidate as empathetic can be a consequence from, not a reason for, who we want to vote for; for example, 83 percent of Democrats saw Obama as empathetic, but 82 percent of Republicans saw Romney as empathetic. We often make our decisions based on party affiliation or a particular stance on a particular issue, and then rationalize why we did so afterwards. The debate over empathy recently returned to the forefront due to Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio. Around the time the RNC’s report was released, Portman announced his newfound support for marriage equality, due in large part to the fact that his son is gay. Many bloggers and commentators on the left were astounded that Portman needed a gay family member in order to understand the importance of marriage equality. They accused him of lacking empathy. This caused some moderate and conservative writers to point out that we all have our biases and

sometimes it takes events that hit close to home to make us change our mind. To which, liberals retorted that it was Portman’s job as a senator to consider all those difficult issues for his constituents. Conservatives responded that it is now the liberals who are lacking empathy about Portman’s position. And so on. I have trouble figuring out which side I agree with more, or whether I think Portman is just being opportunistic in coming out on this issue prior to the Supreme Court hearing on marriage equality. What’s notable here is that Portman did more than put on political theatre, call a press conference and profess his understanding of the plight of LGBT Americans. He actually changed his position. And that, far more than the mere appearance of empathy (which seems not to have changed anyway), is likely to impact perceptions of him. Remember, party and issues often influence our decisions first. So I believe that the RNC’s fight to close the empathy gap will improve their electoral chances, but not for the reason many commentators think. The very act of trying to appear empathetic requires listening to new voices and hearing new stories from different people; and that can inspire changes on actual issues, in the same way that Portman, speaking with his son, was inspired to change his stance on marriage equality. I think the best advice here comes from one of the Republican’s own, former Bush speechwriter David Frum: “Show up and listen.”

Joseph is a graduate student in mathematics. He can be reached at vandehe2@ dailyillini.com.

Apartment hunt easier with University help TOLU TAIWO Opinions columnist

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t some point in our college lives, we all take that forever awaited leap from dorm life to apartment and house living. OK, lies. Not all of us. We can’t forget the resident advisor and multicultural advocates ­­­— those wonderful soldiers, defenders of the halls and makers of the door decorations. Plus, there are people who stay in the residence halls into their upperclassmen years, and there’s no shame. But most of us make that transition. It’s not so much because the residence halls are awful, with their sense of community, the dodgeball tournaments and close proximity to Leafy! (Allen Hall is where the fun is at, people!). It’s just that apartments and houses bring the freedom of decorating your living room just the way you like it. Throwing parties whenever you want! Baking cakes with your own kitchen utensils. Dealing with cockroaches and buckling floors. If this has never happened to you, thank your lucky stars. However, this isn’t just a page from the worst apartment story ever. About three weeks ago, 18 occupants from East Silver Street apartments were relocated because of poor apartment maintenance, such as an infestation of cockroaches. Their landlord was charged with criminal housing management on Feb. 14, and is scheduled to appear in court in a couple of days. This sounds like the extreme

nightmare of every and any college renter. Most of us will hopefully never have to move due to a bug infestation. But many of us may deal with just as annoying little problems, such as dishwashers that constantly break down or slight but concerning water damage in the ceiling. What can we do to make sure that our dream apartment doesn’t turn into the reason why we allow our children to only live in residence halls? Well, for starters, we can inform ourselves about the city’s housing laws before we become Champaign-Urbana renters. Case in point: know that if your complex is condemned, you are legally entitled to get completely new housing. However, we’re not the only ones responsible for our housing bliss. The University, for example, can play a role in our apartment or house hunting. They already give us the Tenant Union, the office on the third floor of the Illini Union that deals with renters’ needs for apartments and houses, which includes learning about each housing unit and landlord history. But it’s just as important to thoroughly check the space when you’re on the initial tour. When my roommates and I were getting our first apartment, we checked for broken hinges, water damage and termite bites. And three out of the four of us wouldn’t have explored the place as hard as we did; we were lucky that our fourth roommate came with extensive apartment know-how. The University could set up a series of constant mini-courses through the Tenant Union that go in depth about what to look for when touring potential housing. Some


The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com

Monday, March 25, 2013

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD 1

AcroSS

HOPKINS AUTOMATIVE GROUP ASSOCIATED PRESS

A bright flash of light, top center, streaks across the early-evening sky in what experts say was almost certainly a meteor coming down, Friday in Seaford, Del. Bill Cooke of NASA’s Meteoroid Environmental Office said the flash appears to be “a single meteor event.” He said it “looks to be a fireball that moved roughly toward the southeast.”

Meteor streaks across East Coast, experts say BY JAKE PEARSON ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — East Coast residents were buzzing on social media sites and elsewhere Friday night after a brief but bright flash of light streaked across the early-evening sky —in what experts say was almost certainly a meteor coming down. Bill Cooke of NASA’s Meteoroid Environmental Office said the flash appears to be “a single meteor event.” He said it “looks to be a fireball that moved roughly toward the southeast, going on visual reports.” “Judging from the brightness, we’re dealing with something as bright as the full moon,” Cooke said. “The thing is probably a yard across. We basically have (had) a boulder enter the atmosphere over the northeast.” He noted that the meteor was widely seen, with more than 350 reports on the website of the American Meteor Society alone. “If you have something this

bright carry over that heavily populated area, a lot of people are going to see it,” he said. “It occurred around 8 tonight, there were a lot of people out, and you’ve got all those big cities out there.” Matt Moore, a news editor with The Associated Press, said he was standing in line for a concert in downtown Philadelphia around dusk when he saw “a brilliant flash moving across the sky at a very brisk pace... and utterly silent.” “It was clearly high up in the atmosphere,” he said. “But from the way it appeared, it looked like a plane preparing to land at the airport.” Moore said the flash was visible to him for about two to three seconds — and then it was gone. He described it as having a “spherical shape and yellowish and you could tell it was burning, with the trail that it left behind.” “Set as it was against a cloud-

less sky over Philadelphia, it was amazing,” he said. Derrick Pitts, chief astronomer at Philadelphia’s Franklin Institute, agreed that the sightings had all the hallmarks of a “fireball.” These include lasting 7-10 seconds, being bright and colorful, and seeming to cross much of the sky with a long stream behind it. He said what people likely saw was one meteor — or “space rock” — that may have been the size of a softball or volleyball and that fell fairly far down into the Earth’s atmosphere. He likened it to a stone skipping across the water — getting “a nice long burn out of it.” Robert Lunsford of the American Meteor Society told USA Today “it basically looked like a super bright shooting star.” The newspaper reports that the sky flash was spotted as far south as Florida and as far north as New England.

  1 Thin opening   5 Economist Smith who  coined the term “invisible  hand”   9 Planet’s path 14 Biblical ark builder 15 “The ___ ranger” 16 “Alfie” star Michael 17 Zenith 18 Stringed instrument for a  madrigal 19 Kind of steak 20 Home of the groundhog  Punxsutawney Phil 23 carry with effort 24 Drowsiness-inducing drug 28 Simply adorable 32 “oh, man!” 33 Zoo enclosures 34 Maximum number of terms  for a U.S. president 35 Hoedown females 36 High-pitched warble 37 Speaker’s stand 38 Fitting 39 Green with the 2010 hit  “Forget You” 40 Shiites or Sunnis 41 Underhanded commercial  ploy 44 Los Angeles district near  Sherman oaks 45 china’s chairman ___ 46 Set of people receiving a  placebo, perhaps … or  what the ends of 20-, 28-  and 41-Across belong to? 53 Lessen 56 Dubuque’s state 57 In addition 58 Arctic or Antarctic 59 Singsongy cadence 60 Like games that head into  overtime 61 ones at the top of the  corporate ladder 62 “what ___ is new?” 63 concludes

QUE & ANGIE JOHNIVAN DARBY

DOONESBURY GARRY TRUDEAU

Winning Powerball lottery ticket sold in New Jersey ASSOCIATED PRESS

DES MOINES, Iowa — A single ticket sold in New Jersey matched all six numbers in Saturday night’s drawing for the $338.3 million Powerball jackpot, lottery officials said. It was the 13th drawing held in the days since a Virginia man won a $217 million jackpot Feb. 6. Thirteen other tickets worth $1 million each matched all but the final Powerball number on Saturday night. Those tickets were sold in New Jersey and 10 other states. Lottery officials said there was also one Power Play Match 5 winner in Iowa. The New Jersey Lottery said Sunday that details about the winning ticket would be released Monday, declining to reveal where it had been purchased and whether anyone had immediately come forward. Lottery officials say it was the fourth largest jackpot in Powerball history. The numbers drawn were 17, 29, 31, 52, 53 and Powerball 31. A lump sum payout would be $221 million. Lottery officials said the 13 tickets worth $1 million apiece — matching the first five numbers but missing the Powerball — were sold in Arizona, Florida (2), Illinois, Minnesota, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania (2), South Carolina and Virginia. Powerball said on its website that the grand prize jackpot has now been reset to an estimated $40 million or a lump sum cash amount estimated at $25 million

BEARDO DAN DOUGHERTY

ORLIN WAGNER ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this Nov. 23 file photo, a Powerball form and purchased ticket are on the counter at the Jayhawk Food Mart in Lawrence, Kan. for Wednesday’s next drawing. No one had won the Powerball jackpot since early February, when Dave Honeywell in Virginia bought the winning ticket and elected a cash lump sum for his $217 million jackpot. The largest Powerball jackpot ever came in at $587.5 million in November. The winning numbers were picked on two different tickets — one by a couple in Missouri and the other by an Arizona man — and the jackpot

was split. Nebraska still holds the record for the largest Powerball jackpot won on a single ticket — $365 million. That jackpot was won by eight workers at a Lincoln, Neb., meatpacking plant in February 2006. Powerball is played in 42 states, Washington, D.C., and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The chance of matching all five numbers and the Powerball number is about 1 in 175 million.

Two Icelandic sky divers die after parachutes did not deploy BY KELLI KENNEDY ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIAMI — Two Icelandic skydivers who died during weekend jumps at a popular southwest Florida camp did not deploy their main parachutes, the co-owner of the facility said Sunday. Deputies found the bodies of the skydiving instructor and a student Saturday after the two didn’t return from a jump with a group, setting off an hours-long air and ground search around the Zephyrhills facility, about 30 miles northeast of Tampa. Pasco County sheriff’s authorities identified the victims as 41-year-old instructor Orvar Arnarson and 25-year-old student Andrimar Pordarson of Iceland. The men

jumped separately, not in tandem. The fact that the men didn’t deploy their main parachutes could mean that they lost altitude awareness and didn’t know where they were during the dive, which is unusual, said T.K. Hayes, coowner of Skydive City. Both men had backup automatic activation devices, which deploy if the main parachutes are not deployed in time. “Those devices activated on both of them ... but the reserves did not have time to deploy fully,” Hayes said. “They were out of the containers but not inflated in time before they impacted.” Hayes was at the scene with officials Saturday, sorting through the men’s gear to deter-

mine whether all parts had been functioning properly. “Like most accidents, most of the time it’s human error,” he said. “I doubt there’s an equipment problem here, to be honest.” But he stressed that authorities are still investigating. The two men had successfully completed two other jumps Saturday morning with 20 other people. But when they didn’t return from their third jump, their disappearance tipped off a search, Pasco County sheriff’s spokeswoman Melanie Snow said. The bodies were discovered by spotters from the air early Saturday evening in woods south of the Zephyrhills Municipal Airport, Snow said.

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63 puzzle by jeffrey harris

Down

  1 Get caught on  something   2 Plumb crazy   3 Poetic foot   4 Low spirits, as  experienced by St.  Louis’s hockey team?   5 State without proof   6 Gloomy   7 Kitchen pests   8 Timid   9 Sea creature with  suckers 10 See 43-Down 11 who’s who entry,  briefly 12 Quaint lodging 13 Golf peg

21 Skating jump 22 ___ Peace Prize 25 Add to an e-mail, as a  file 26 “Specifically …” 27 Deputy sheriff in “The  Dukes of Hazzard” 28 Boston n.B.A.’er 29 Like wealthy  landowners 30 Goes to sea 31 Shining 32 Tokyo’s home 35 Kaplan of “welcome  Back, Kotter” 36 Mortise’s partner, in  carpentry 37 Put ornaments on

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

39 ones paddling down  a river,   say 40 Male deer 42 Breath mint brand 43 The white 10-Down’s  cry in “Alice in  wonderland” 47 Scrabble piece 48 Agitate 49 Big-eyed birds 50 Actress Lena 51 Like thrift store  merchandise 52 Pea holders 53 Gorilla 54 Emulate Muhammad  Ali 55 Brewery product


6A

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Monday, March 25, 2013

Library of Congress selects music for preservation BY BRETT ZONGKER ASSOCIATED PRESS

AP FILE PHOTO

This 1969 file photo shows musicians Art Garfunkel, left, and Paul Simon of Simon and Garfunkel. Simon and Garfunkel’s song “Sounds of Silence” is to be one of 25 recordings selected for preservation at the Library of Congress.

WASHINGTON — Simon & Garfunkel‘s song “The Sound of Silence,” written amid the turmoil following President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, and Chubby Checker’s 1960s dance hit “The Twist” are among 25 recordings selected for preservation at the Library of Congress. These are just a few sounds of the 20th century being added to the National Recording Registry on Thursday for long-term preservation for their cultural, artistic and historic importance. The library said Checker’s rendition of “The Twist” became a symbol of the energy and excitement of the early 60s after “American Bandstand” host Dick Clark chose Checker to record a new version of the song. Later, the 1966 album “Sounds of Silence” by Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel was a hit in its day but not before the duo struggled and split early on. Their song “The Sound of Silence” from the aftermath of President Kennedy’s assassination 50 years ago this year had initially flopped — but it became a hit after it was re-edited as a single. Garfunkel, 71, told The Associ-

ated Press he’s thrilled and flattered to have his work preserved in the Library of Congress. He said the hit album was a life changer for him and Simon. “When you look at the little mesh, wire microphone ... and you address people on the other side of the mic, you hope that your performance will be special, and you hope that it will have lasting power,” Garfunkel said. He said he remembers thinking in the 60s that “if we do really good and give a very special performance to these great Paul Simon songs, we might last right into the next century and be appreciated.” This is the kind of impact the library was looking to preserve, “to celebrate the richness and variety of our audio heritage,” said Librarian of Congress James Billington in announcing the selections. The recording that received the highest number of public nominations for this year’s registry was Pink Floyd’s “The Dark Side of the Moon.” Recordings by Will Rogers, Jimmie Davis and President Dwight D. Eisenhower capture part of the political climate of their eras.

In 1931, Rogers’ radio broadcast at a low point in the Great Depression included a folksy chat with President Herbert Hoover to kick off a nationwide unemployment relief campaign. Davis’ 1940 recording of “You Are My Sunshine” became his election campaign theme song while running for governor of Louisiana. It became one of the most popular country songs of all time and the state song of Louisiana in 1977. Eisenhower’s voice was carried in a prerecorded message in 1958 by the first communications satellite launched on a U.S. rocket. Eisenhower’s message of peace to the world transmitted from space was touted as a victory in the space race after the Soviet Union launched a satellite the year before. Van Cliburn’s Cold War piano performance in Moscow when he won the prestigious Tchaikovsky International Piano Competition at 23 also was selected. At the time in 1958, Time magazine noted his appearance and tour of the Soviet Union “has had more favorable impact on more Russians than any U.S. export of word or deed since World War II.”

Tree saplings will serve as symbols of Anne Frank’s legacy in US BY PAMELA ENGEL ASSOCIATED PRESS

INDIANAPOLIS — Saplings from the chestnut tree that stood as a symbol of hope for Anne Frank as she hid from the Nazis for two years in Amsterdam are being distributed to 11 locations in the United States as part of a project that aims to preserve her legacy and promote tolerance. The tree, one of the Jewish teenager’s only connections to nature while she hid with her family, was diseased and rotted through the trunk when wind and heavy rain toppled it in August 2010. But saplings grown from its seeds will be planted starting in April, when the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis will put the first one in the ground. The 11 U.S. locations, which also include a park memorializing 9-11 victims in New York City, an Arkansas high school that was the heart of the desegregation battle and Holocaust centers in Michigan and Washington state were chosen by The Anne Frank Center USA from 34 applicants.

Winners were selected based on their commitment to equality, demonstration of the consequences of intolerance or historical significance to civil rights and social justice in the U.S., according to a news release from the center. “The heart of our mission is tolerance. ... Tolerance is really essential for being able to bring better welfare to everybody,” said center spokesman Mike Clary. The tree is referenced several times in the diary that Anne Frank kept during the 25 months she remained indoors until her family was arrested in August 1944. “Nearly every morning I go to the attic to blow the stuffy air out of my lungs,” she wrote on Feb. 23, 1944. “From my favorite spot on the floor I look up at the blue sky and the bare chestnut tree, on whose branches little raindrops shine, appearing like silver, and at the seagulls and other birds as they glide on the wind.”

A global campaign to save the chestnut was launched in 2007 after city officials deemed it a safety hazard and ordered it taken down. The tree was granted a last-minute reprieve after a battle in court, but age and nature ultimately brought it down. Jeffrey Patchen, president and chief executive officer of the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, said the sapling planted in the museum’s Peace Park will stand next to a limestone carving of a podium with Anne’s diary on it. A mock chestnut tree looms over the entrance to the museum’s permanent Anne Frank exhibit, which features live performances in a space that teaches visitors about life in the Secret Annex where the Franks hid. “We’re taking the lead in producing the educational materials that will go along with the tree,” Patchen said. “We’re producing this unit of study ... that focuses heavily on the humanities and presents the tree through selections of her diary and ... as a symbol of renewal.”

Central High School in Little Rock, Ark. plans to plant its sapling in September, on the 56th anniversary of the previously segregated high school’s integration. A group of black students called the Little Rock Nine, who braved angry mobs in the fall of 1957 to integrate the school, became a symbol of the civil rights movement. “Both (Anne Frank and the Little Rock Nine) dealt with hatred from ignorant people,” said Nancy Rousseau, the school’s principal. “All of them displayed great bravery and courage, which wasn’t necessarily seen then or now, also, in adults. They were all children.” Other states that have sites receiving saplings are Massachusetts, Idaho and California. The Anne Frank Center wants the sapling project to go beyond the initial planting of the trees. The center is launching an education initiative called Confronting Intolerance Today that will encompass a “teaching and discovery” website to create dia-

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Actress Julie Mauro portrays Miep Gies, one of Anne Frank’s protectors and the woman who preserved her diary at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum. logue and show how the sites are using the sapling project to advance tolerance, a distinguished speaker series and temporary exhibits from the center that will show the history of Anne Frank. “We know that the tree was a

sign of hope of Anne Frank who was unable to leave her living quarters,” said Yvonne Simons, executive director of The Anne Frank Center USA. “She wrote about it in a diary. For us, the tree portrays a symbolism of hope and growth and renewal.”


1B Monday March 25, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Sports

DAVID J. PHILLIP THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois players look up at the scoreboard to watch a replay during the closing moments of the game against Miami (Fla.) on Sunday in Austin, Texas.

BITTER, NOT SWEET Illini fall to Hurricanes following controversial call in final minute BY THOMAS BRUCH

A

STAFF WRITER

USTIN, Texas — Clutching their sides and hiding their faces to control watering eyes, the Illini walked off the court at the Frank Erwin Center in a haze of disbelief, trying to grasp at anything as the clock struck zero on their season. In a basketball game where underdogs sought to overcome heavy favorites, seniors pushed to limits unknown to defy the ends of their careers and the team that no one thought could win took a lead into the final minutes, a dubious call from a referee and a world-beating shot from one of the nation’s best point guards downed Illinois in a heartbreaking 63-59 loss to Miami (Fla.) in the third round of the NCAA tournament.

The two plays in question were in crunch time — a Sweet 16 berth in the balance. Down one with a minute remaining and with D.J. Richardson hounding him, Miami point guard Shane Larkin took the shot clock down to its final seconds and then stepped back with just enough space to bury a 3-pointer and give Miami a 57-55 lead. On the next possession, D.J. Richardson tried to answer with a 3-pointer of his own, but missed badly. The resulting scrum for the rebound near the basket ended in a ball being tipped out of bounds. The referee in front of the scrum determined the ball tipped off Nnanna Egwu’s fingertips. However, replay showed clearly that the ball went of Miami’s Kenny Kadji, much to the ire of Illinois players and staff.

Under NCAA rules, the play was not reviewable, and no other referee attempted to overrule the original call. Miami took possession and proceeded to connect on all six of its free throw attempts in the final minute to ice the game. Illinois head coach John Groce paused for a moment in the postgame press conference before addressing the referee’s decision, chewing his mouth while mulling his impending response. “Well I had two thoughts,” Groce said. “One, I thought the officiating Friday, and today was tremendous. These are the best of the best. I thought they did a good job as you saw. “And my second thought is you saw the same video I did.” The questionable call was a tough reality for the Illini, but an even tougher reality might be the lead — and momentum — Illinois possessed with such little time left in the game.

See MBBALL, Page 3B

“After the game was over, I was still kind of stunned and when I shook hands with John Groce, I was speechless. I thought his kids played their heart out.” JIM LARRANGA, Miami head coach DAVID J. PHILLIP ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois’ Brandon Paul, left, goes up for a shot as Miami’s Julian Gamble (45) and Durand Scott (1) defend during the third-round of the NCAA tournament Sunday.

Paul made right decision, has nothing to hang his head about DANIEL MILLER-MCLEMORE Basketball columnist

A

USTIN, Texas — It was all too much. As Brandon Paul exited the court for the final time of his collegiate career, he simply couldn’t stand the bright lights he so frequently shines under. Overcome with emotion, Paul covered his face with his jersey and slowly made his way into the bowels of the locker room. The senior guard and the No. 7-seeded Illini were on the wrong end of another March thriller, falling just short to No. 2 Miami, 63-59. Illinois hung tough against a loaded Canes team that will contend for an NCAA Championship in the next few weeks, even leading to the final minute of the game, and Paul was one of the major reasons why. In his final game, Paul put forth maybe the gutsiest effort of his career. Time and time again during the second half, Paul carried the Illini offense, refusing to allow it to suffer through one of the droughts that has haunted it throughout the season. His energy and aggressiveness flowed through the team and the crowd, with two thunderous dunks thrilling the arena and proving Illinois belonged on the same court as the much-hyped Hurricanes. And yet, following the loss Paul will face questions from critics who believe he let his team down by not taking the most important shot of the game. Illinois led 55-54 with 1 minute, 24 seconds remaining following a Tracy Abrams free throw, and Miami put the ball in the hands of its best player, point guard Shane Larkin. The sophomore utilized a ball screen on the right wing, probing toward the baseline before planting with his

See MCLEMORE, Page 3B

Delgado earns 125-pound national championship BY DAN BERNSTEIN STAFF WRITER

After holding off Penn State’s Nico Megaludis in the final seconds of the match, Illini sophomore Jesse Delgado ran to the side of the mat and jumped into the arms of assistant coach Jeremy Hunter and associate head coach Mark Perry, who bearhugged the newly crowned 125-pound national champion. The Illinois wrestling team had not crowned an individual champion in 10 years, and had never had a 125-pound champion in its history — until Saturday night. The Gilroy, Calif., native ended his season with a 27-3 overall record, adding a national title to his Big Ten championship. Senior Conrad Polz earned his second All-American honor for the Illini by placing a careerbest fifth place in the 165-pound

weight class. Meanwhile, senior Jordan Blanton earned his third All-American honors by placing seventh at 174 pounds. Polz ended his career with the Illini with an 81-42 overall record, while Blanton finished his career with 115 wins and 43 losses. Despite a season plagued by injuries to 141-pound B.J. Futrell and heavyweight Pat Walker, the Illini were able to place ninth in the team championship this weekend in Des Moines, Iowa, behind four Big Ten teams: Ohio State, Iowa, Minnesota and Penn State. “This year has been really hard with losing guys from injury,” head coach Jim Heffernan said. “Leaving here with a national champion and three All-Americans makes it feel a little better. Our goal was to finish in the top 10, and we did that this year.”

After defeating Utah Valley’s Jade Russer 14-4 in the first round, Brown’s William Watterson 20-5 in the second and North Carolina’s No. 7 Nathan Kraisser 10-7 in the third, Delgado found himself in the semifinals against Cornell’s No. 6 Nashan Garrett. Delgado never trailed during the entire seven minutes, as he recorded two takedowns in the first period to Garrett’s two escapes, taking a 4-2 lead into the second. Delgado chose to begin the second period down and escaped to push the lead to 5-2. After recording one more takedown in the second period and another in the third, Delgado never looked back and reached the final with a 10-5 decision. The sophomore standout attributes much of his success to assistant coach Jeremy Hunter, a former 125-pound national

champion at Penn State. “There are times where him and I will have individual workouts where nobody else will be there,” Delgado said. “We put in a lot of extra time together and work on technique and stuff. He doesn’t kill me all the time, but could if he wanted. He’s better than anyone else I wrestle.” Penn State’s Megaludis was soon the only wrestler standing between Delgado and a national title, as the two prepared for their third match of the season. The first ended in a victory for Megaludis by fall in 6 minutes, 45 seconds. The second match between the two came in the semifinals of the Big Ten Championships, and Delgado wrestled to a 6-3 victory. The rubber match would be for the national

See WRESTLING, Page 3B

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTINE ABBOTT

Jesse Delgado wins his match against Nico Megaludis of Penn State, earning the NCAA title at 125 pounds Saturday night at NCAA’s.


2B

The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com

Monday, March 25, 2013

Illini basketball heads into 2nd round of WNIT BY MICHAEL WONSOVER STAFF WRITER

Heading into the second round of the WNIT, the Illinois women’s basketball team will have to accomplish something it hasn’t done all season: win against an in-state opponent at home. After defeating Miami (Ohio) in the first round of the WNIT on Thursday, Illinois will face its fourth in-state opponent, Eastern Illinois, in the second round of the WNIT on Monday. Illinois is 0-3 against in-state opponents at Assembly Hall this season. Bradley was the first to knock off the Illini, winning by a score of 83-77 on Nov. 15. Illinois State left Champaign with a 69-68 victory on Dec. 21, while

Northwestern squeezed out a 62-58 win on January 20. Eastern Illinois heads to Assembly Hall from Charleston, Ill. which is only about an hour away from Champaign. The Panthers of the Ohio Valley Conference advanced to the second round of the WNIT behind a jumper with 19 seconds left by senior guard Ta’Kenya Nixon in a 60-58 win over Missouri in Columbia, Mo., on Wednesday. The victory was the school’s first postseason win in program history. Nixon, who scored 27 points, will be a focus of the Illini defense. “The point guard was unbelievable last night (on Wednesday),” Bollant said of Nixon. “She shot 13-of-17 from the

court, hit the game winner, and obviously we gotta limit her.” Senior forward Mariah King is Eastern Illinois’ other double-digit scorer, averaging 13.9 points per game on the season. She is also one of four Panther’s to average 5.8 rebounds or better. Eastern Illinois is one of the best rebounding teams in the country, averaging 43.0 rebounds per game compared with only 33.0 from Illinois. The Panthers also own a rebound margin of +6.5, which is top 30 in the country, whereas Illinois is outrebounded by its opponent by 4.7 on average. Illinois will attempt to combat its rebounding woes with its advantage in the turnover department. Coming off a game in which Illinois forced 26 turn-

overs, Illinois improved its turnover margin to +6.7, which is among the leaders in the nation. Eastern Illinois, meanwhile, turns it over as often as its opponent, holding a +0.1 margin. Although turnovers have been a strength of Illinois throughout the season, Bollant thinks the Illini can improve their effectiveness on offense after forcing a turnover. “That hasn’t been a strength of ours, taking advantage when we get turnovers, but it’s something we can grow and get better at,” Bollant said. Junior guard Amber Moore will try to build on her first round performance against Miami where she scored a season high 25 points and five 3-pointers.

Moore also hit numerous timely anytime on Monday. shots to fend off a Miami run. “Really thrilled to be playing “I was just in rhythm,” Moore at home, big advantage to be playsaid after her ing at home,” performance Bollant said. on Thursday. “We’re thrilled “My teammates we get to play at found me in the home. Hopefulright spots in ly Monday we’ll the offense and get some more Illinois Eastern Illinois I was just in fans out, and we (17-13) (20-11) rhythm.” need that.” To boost The winner of Monday, 7 p.m. attendance Monday’s game Assembly Hall for Monday’s will face ToleThe Illini are looking for their first ga me, the do, who won C o u r t s i d e r s home win over an in-state opponent. 61-43 against booster club Yo u n g s t o w n is buying tickets for the first 100 State on Saturday. students. The tickets can be claimed at Michael can be reached at the Assembly Hall ticket office wonsovr2@dailyillini.com.

at

Nebraska defeats Illinois baseball 2-1 in weekend series BY JAMAL COLLIER STAFF WRITER

In a team huddle down the right field line, the Nebraska baseball team let out a collective “woo” that could be heard by everyone remaining at Illinois Field. Most of Illinois’ players weren’t around to hear the celebration; the Illini made a beeline for their clubhouse after they had finished shaking their opponents’ hands. The Cornhuskers (8-14, 2-1 Big Ten) had just won two out of three against the Illini, who came into the series winners of 12 of their last 13 games, with their confidence high and aspirations higher. This was a chance to prove how good Illinois could really be, facing a Nebraska team Big Ten coaches picked to place second in the conference. Nebraska’s sub-.500 record shouldn’t be scoffed at, as it faced an early schedule filled with tournament regulars such

get

as Cal-State Fullerton, Southern California, Texas, Louisiana Tech and UC-Irvine. Instead, it turned out to be a series that magnified what problems Illinois head coach Dan Hartleb had been prodding his team to correct. All three games featured back-and-forth action with lead changes and a lot of offense, as both teams had double-digit hits in each game over the cool, breezy weekend. With the completion of the series, Nebraska had played seven games in the past nine days, so Illinois would’ve seemed to have the advantage, especially after incoming inclement weather forced the teams into a doubleheader Saturday. But the Illini left a staggering 30 runners on base during the three-game series. The Illini pitching staff, especially its bullpen, was a large reason why Illinois (14-6, 1-2) had been playing so much better, posting an identical 1.86

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ERA during the past two weekend series, both sweeps for the Illini. Nebraska scored 22 runs in the three games with 39 hits, and a normally solid Illinois defense committed five errors on the weekend that allowed eight unearned runs to score. “We just weren’t a disciplined team,” Hartleb said. “It was a number of guys, and some guys that we’ve asked to make adjustments and do certain things, and it shows up in tight games.” The lone Illinois victory came in Game One of Saturday’s doubleheader in the last at-bat of the ninth. The hero was catcher Alex Lincoln — nicknamed “Abe” because of his last name — who hadn’t had an RBI all year, with just two at-bats. The redshirt junior entered the game in the eighth, and his first at-bat came with the bases loaded and no outs. Assistant coach Eric Snider put the sign on while Nebraska was meeting on the mound with its pitcher — a squeeze bunt that scored

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the game winning run. Lincoln raised his arm in the air as he crossed first and waited to be mobbed by his teammates. It was Illinois’ first walk-off victory since May 21, 2011, against Indiana, a win that clinched the Big Ten regular season championship. “It’s always a good feeling when the guys come running out,” Lincoln said. Freshman pitcher Tyler Jay emerged as one of Illinois’ most reliable relief pitchers during the start of the season and led the team in ERA. Jay was tagged for both losses in the series after entering both Friday and Saturday’s second game with the game tied, but walked the leadoff hitter before the Cornhuskers came around to score the eventual game-winning run in both instances. Illinois pitchers seemed to pitch from behind in the count most of the series, giving Nebraska a chance to be aggressive with a lot hitting and running on the base paths.

Some members sit out weekend with suspensions Redshirt sophomore Drasen Johnson started Game Two on Saturday, after head coach Dan Hartleb revealed that his two freshman starters Kevin Duchene and Nick Blackburn would not be available during the weekend. “They need to do things that are expected as far as team rules,” Hartleb said. “We had a number of guys that didn’t, so they weren’t available and put us in a bind.” When asked to elaborate That’s exactly how Nebraska manager Darin Erstad wants his team to play. Erstad, a former two-time MLB all-star with the Los Angeles Angels, played and learned from manager Mike Scioscia, who has never been afraid to be aggressive on the base paths. “Well, you’re a creature of all the things you learned along the

exactly who else wasn’t available, Hartleb repeated: “We had a number of guys.” Blackburn had started five games this year for Illinois, tied for the most on the team, posting a 2-0 record and 4.44 ERA. Duchene had three starts but appeared in all five weekends, also with a 2-0 record and 3.98 ERA. Redshirt freshman Anthony Mamlic benefited from the suspensions, pitching in his third appearance on Friday and going 2 2/3 innings while allowing only one run. way,” Erstad said with a smile at the mention of his former manager. “College baseball is all about putting pressure on defenses and making them screw up. Whoever screws up more usually loses.”

Jamal can be reached at collie10@ dailyillini.com and @jamalcollier.

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The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com

Brandon Paul, who led Illinois with 18 points, hit back-to-back 3-pointers to bring the game to 50-48. Later, successive dunks by Tracy Abrams and Brandon Paul gave Illinois a 54-52 advantage with 3:23 remaining. A jumper by Miami guard Durand Scott knotted the game back at 54, followed by Abrams connecting on one of two free throws to give Illinois its last lead at 55-54. That’s when Larkin delivered the dagger, but the degree of difficulty on the shot was microcosmic of Illinois’s staunch defense throughout the game. “Our hats are off to Illinois,” Miami head coach Jim Larranaga said. “I thought they played the best defense on us that we have seen. “After the game was over, I was still kind of stunned and when I shook hands with John Groce, I was speechless. I didn’t even know what to say to him. Because I thought his kids played their heart out.”

Thomas can be reached at bruch2@ dailyillini.com and @ThomasBruch.

# BDROOMS

MCLEMORE FROM PAGE 1B left foot and draining a near impossible step-back 3-pointer with D.J. Richardson’s hand in his face. On the ensuing possession, with Illinois trailing by two and with less than a minute to play, Paul found himself with the ball on the left wing. He knifed into the lane as he had done with great success all game, slicing across as the Miami defense shifted to contain him. Paul lifted into the air, poised to shoot. But spotting Richardson open in the opposite corner, Paul fired a pass out to his fellow senior. Richardson rose up and promptly air balled the three, and the Hurricanes managed to secure possession when the ball bounced out of bounds on a questionable call. Two plays, two vastly different results. On one end, Larkin commands the ball and the moment, stepping up like the star that he is and sending Miami to the Sweet 16.

One the other, Paul chooses to put his teammate in a position to succeed, but the Illini are going home for the year. Critics killed LeBron James for years for consistently making the same decision as Paul did. These critics are fools. Paul made the right basketball play, the play that gave his team the best chance to win. He dished the ball to one of his team’s most prolific shooters in Richardson, a fellow four-year senior who has gone through thick and thin with Paul. The fact that Richardson missed, and by a mile, doesn’t mean Paul was wrong. You can’t judge if a decision is right or wrong by the ultimate outcome. Basketball is a team game — a game that requires utmost trust of your teammates and knowledge of each individual’s role on the team. Paul’s role is to generate offense for the Illini. Richardson’s role is to knock down threes. Paul trusted his teammate and was unfortunate in the result. But in trusting Richardson

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in one of his final decisions in the college game, Paul proved once and for all his transformation as a player from a mefirst scorer, who didn’t know how to be a leader, to a consummate teammate and creator. His legacy at Illinois has always been that of an inconsistent player, a player that will rise to some moments but fade from others, a mercurial underachieving talent. Paul’s performance Sunday night altered that. The Illini fell short of their goal, but Paul carried them far beyond where anyone expected them to be and carried them to the wire against one of the finest teams in the country. He helped lay the foundation for what figures to be a promising tenure for John Groce. Paul has nothing to hang his head about. He answered every question any critic ever raised with his performance Sunday night.

Daniel is a senior in Media. He can be reached at millerm1@ dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @danielmillermc.

# BDROOMS

WRESTLING FROM PAGE 1B title. Medaludis was able to set the tempo early, but Delgado fought off multiple shots to end the first period with a scoreless draw. Delgado chose down to begin the second and escaped to take the 1-0 lead, which lasted until the third period. Megaludis started down to begin the third and escaped to tie the score up 1-1 with 1:54 remaining. Late in the period, however, the tides began to turn. “I took a shot, got the scramble and ended up turning him on his back for the takedown and three back points,” Delgado said. After recording a takedown and adding three more back points, Delgado carried a 6-1 lead into the final 30 seconds of the match and never backed down. He held off Megaludis 7-4 and earned the title of national champion. “It’s really a surreal feeling,” Delgado said. “It hasn’t sunk in yet.”

Dan is a freshman in LAS. He can be reached at daberns2@dailyillini.com.

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F 4 4 4

Parking & internet included

108 E. John, C.

1

B 4 4 Huge, Hardwood Floors

303 W. Green, C.

1,2,3

F 4 4 4

Guest parking lots, balconies off bedrooms

1003 W. Stoughton, C.

2

F 4 4

Engineering campus

505 S. Fourth, C.

1,2

F 4 4

Laundry on site, Balconies

305/307/311 W. Birch, C.

1

B 4 4

Close to campus, 1 parking space included

911 S. Locust, C.

1

F 4 4

Laundry on site

308 E. Iowa, U.

2

B 4 4

Close to campus, 3 Level floorplan

56 1/2 E. Green, C.

1

F 4 4

Dishwashers

906 S. Vine, U.

1,2

B 4 4

Close to campus, on-site laundry

410 E. Green, C.

1,2,3

F 4 4 4

Lots of updates, must-see units!

Rob Chambers

www.robsapartments.com

Burnham 310

www.burnham310.com

707 W. Elm, U.

3

F 4 4

Balcony, $1191/mo. Free parking!

310 E. Springfield, C.

St.,1,2,3

506 E. White, C.

3,4

F 4 4

Balcony, secure bldg, $1131/mo free parking & water

503 E. Clark

Ef.

F 4 4 4 $445-$475. Secure, quiet, campus convenient U 4 4

Campustown Rentals

F 4 4 4 4 Individual leasing, great value for high-end living

217-328-3770

(217)239-2310

F 4 4 4 4 Fitness, theater, game room, pets OK, internet & cable campustownrentals.com

217-366-3500

3B

FU RN / LA UNF U UN DR RN A/ Y IN C UN IT PA RK IN GO UT ILI NS TIE S I ITE NC L.

FROM PAGE 1B

Defense and rebounding, traits that weren’t always apparent in this Illinois team, were calling cards, evidenced by a career-high 12 rebounds from Egwu and seven from Griffey. But offense, particularly 3-point shooting from the Illini’s go-to seniors, abandoned Illinois. Paul went 2-of-9 from 3-point land and Richardson, in his final game in an Illinois uniform, shot 1-11 from the field and 1-10 from 3-point range. “It’s not easy because I believe in D.J.,” Groce said. “I know he believes in himself. They just didn’t go in.” The lasting image of the 20122013 Illinois basketball team will be Paul, pulling his jersey over his eyes as he slowly walked off the court, four years of bigshots, wins and memories suddenly falling back into a permanent past. “When the clock hit zero, it kind of hit me faster than I thought it would that that was the last game of my college career,” Paul said.

FU RN / LA UNF U UN DR RN A/ YI C NU NI PA T RK IN G UT O NS ILI TIE I S I TE NC L.

MBBALL

Monday, March 25, 2013

217-840-5134

101 E. Green St

2,3,4

F 4 4 4

Renovated units available, laundry on site, from $509

101 W. Park, U.

1,2

207 E. Green St.

4

F 4 4 4

From $549, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

Roland Realty

www.roland-realty.com

909 S. Third St.

3,4,5+

F 4 4

From $510, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

501 S. Sixth St

3,4

F 4 4 4

309 E. Daniel

3,4

F 4 4

From $499, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

33 E. Chalmers St.

2

F 4 4 Cozy 2BR w/ hardwood floors, gas stove, pool

311 E. Daniel

3,4

F 4 4

From $499, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

907 S. Third

4

F 4 4 4 4 Only 1 apt. left, across from Bromley

913 S. Third St.

3

F 4 4

From $539, renovated units, laundry on site, walk to class

404 E. Stoughton

2,3

F 4 4 4 Updated units, dishwasher, central A/C

408 E. Stoughton

1,2

F 4 4 4 Quiet building, near county market & engineering quad

901-905-909 S. First

1

F 4 4 4 Spacious singles w/ great storage, pool, on 22 Illini

805-807-809 S. First

1

F 4 4 4 Free on-site laundry, spacious 1BRs w/ storage, pool, 22 bus

Country Fair Apartments

myapartmenthome.com

2106 W. White St., C.

B 4 4 4 FREE Heat, digital cable and high speed internet

1,2

217-359-3713 217-337-1565

$510-$570. Free parking, EZ bus to campus

2173518900 Luxury apts, roomate matching, 1 block to campus

Hunsinger Enterprises

www.hunsingerapts.com

Urbana Houses

5+

F 4 4

Urbana Approved for groups. 7, 8, and 9 bedrooms.

903 S. First

2

F 4 4 4 Spacious affordable 2BR, free laundry, covered parking, pool

Urbana Apartments

2,3,4

F 4 4

Several Locations to Choose From.

56-58 E. Daniel

2

F 4 4 4 Updated units w/ dishwasher, central A/C, pool

Joe Allan Properties

joeallanproperties.com

1011 S. Locust

2

F 4 4 4 Most affordable apts anywhere on campus-$375/person!

311 E. John, Champaign

1

B 4 4

Fourth and John, laundry on site

304 S. Fifth

5+

F 4 4 4

5BR House, hardwood, free parking, close to County Market

308 N. Orchard, Urbana

1

B 4 4 4

Near Engineering department

22 E. Chalmers

2

F 4 4 4

Rare 2BR house, hardwood, free pking, basement

315 N. Orchard, Urbana

1

B 4 4 4

Free parking

Royse & Brinkmeyer

www.roysebrinkmeyer.com

217-359-3527

217-352-1129

609 S. Randolph, Champaign 2,3,4

F 4 4 4 4 Secured building, West side of campus

Royse and Brinkmeyer Apts 1,2,3

301 W. Park, Urbana

1

B 4 4 4

Shlens Apartment

305 W. Park, Urbana

2

B 4 4 4 Near bus stop

1102 W. Stoughton, Urbana 2,3

401 W. Park, Urbana

1

B 4 4 4

Northwest side of campus

Tenant Union

403 & 405 W. Park, Urbana 1

B 4 4 4

Near Computer Science Building

U of I Tenant Union

407 W. Park, Urbana

1

B 4 4 4

Walking distance to Carle Hospital

The Tower at Third

www.tower3rd.com

911 S. Oak, Champaign

2

F 4 4 4

Near Memorial Stadium

302 E. John, Champaign

2

201 S. Wright, Champaign

1

B 4 4 4

Across the street from Beckman Institute

Tri County Management Group

www.tricountymg.com

404 W. High, Urbana

2

F 4 4 4

East side of campus

906 S. Locust, C.

Ef.

F 4 4

Parking $40/mo.

Klatt Properties

217-367-6626

705 S. First, C.

3,4

F 4 4

Parking $40/mo

505 W. Springfield, C.

2

U 4 4

Heat Included

Wampler Property Management

www.wamplerapartments.com

712 W. California, U.

5+

U 4

$2700/mo, Best Deal, Rooming House

505 S. Busey, U.

2

F 4 4

$835/mo.

204 E. Clark, C.

1,2,3

B 4 4 4 Most Utilities Paid

711 W. Main, U.

St.

F 4 4

$550/mo.

409 W. Elm, C.

2

U 4 4

808 W. Nevada, U.

3

F 4

$1875/mo.

Lofts 54

lofts54.com

217-366-3500

406 E. Clark, C.

1

F 4 4

$540/mo.

54 E. Chalmers St.

4

F 4 4 4 4 3 blocks from Green, individual leases, roommate matching

604 E. Clark, C.

1

F 4 4

$595/mo.

MHM Properties

www.mhmproperties.com

807-809 W. Illinois, U

1

F 4 4

$595/mo.

805 S. Locust, C.

2

F 4 4

Free internet

106 E John

1

U 4

$710/mo.

101 E. Daniel, C.

1,2,4

F 4 4 4

Free internet, lofts, balconies

Weiner Companies, Ltd

www.weinercompanies.com

808 S. Oak, C.

2,3,4

F 4 4

Free internet, lofts, balconies

404 1/2 E. White, C.

St.

F 4 4 On site laundry, Pet friendly! $425/month

102 S. Lincoln, U.

2,4

F 4 4

Balconies, skylights, big rooms

605 W. Springfield, C.

4

U 4 4 4 House, hardwood floors, dishwasher, pet friendly! $1275/mo.

605 E. Clark, C.

1

F 4 4 4

Free internet, balconies

603 W. Green, U.

3

U 4 4 4 On site laundry, diswasher, pet friendly! $1500/mo.

Houses

4,5+

F 4 4 4

Free Parking

305 W. Elm, U.

2,3

U 4 4 Updated kitchen with dishwasher, pet friendly, $735/mo.

311 E. Clark, C.

2

F 4 4 4

Free internet, quiet

705 W. Main, U.

2

F 4 4 4 Modern kitchen! Large apartment!

606 E. White, C.

2,3

F 4 4 4

New! With private baths , lofts, balconies, TV

607 W. Springfield, C.

1

U 4 4 4 On site laundry, pet friendly, $525-$570/mo.

906 W. Springfield, U.

1

F 4 4 4 On site laundry, pet friendly, $525-$560/mo.

704 W. Nevada, U.

1

U 4 4 4 On site laundry, hardwood floors, cats allowed, $530/mo

604 W. Nevada, U.

1

U 4 4 On site laundry, large unit, cats allowed, $575/mo.

714 S. Race, U.

1

U 4 4

Next Chapter Properties - 75 Armory

Crystal Lake Park across the street

Heat Included

217-337-8852

www.75armory.com

75 E. Armory

2,3,4

F 4 4 4

512 S. Neil Suite C

2,3,4

F 4 4 4

New, 9-ft. ceilings

(217)356-3511

B 4 4 4 4 Fireplaces, lofts, garages

www.shlensapts.com

217-344-2901

F 4 4

www.tenantunion.illinois.edu

Large flat screen TV

217-333-0112 Free! Check Landlord Complaint Records & Lease Review!

217-367-0720

F 4 4 4 Starting at $699, 1 block from Green St., individual leases

217-367-2009

217-352-1335

217-384-8001

Pet friendly, car port, $530/mo.


4B

The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com

Monday, March 25, 2013

FOR RENT

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220 230 235 240 250 260 280 285 290

Houses (For Rent Condos/Duplexes Rooms Room & Board Roommate Wanted Office Space Parking/Storage For Rent Wanted To Rent

Apartments

Automobiles 310 Bicycles 320 Motorcycles/Scooters 330

410 420 430 440 450 460 500

Furnished/Unfurnished

Furnished Unfurnished Sublets Summer Only Off-Campus Other For Rent

Real Estate

510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590

Condos/Duplexes Houses (For Sale) Residential Property Open Houses

Things To Do

620 630 650 660

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710 720 750

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810

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Rates Billed: 45¢/Word Minimum $2.00 Paid-In-Advance: 38¢/Word Deadline 2pm on the day before publication. Online Ads Classifieds automatically appear online at dailyillini.com

Place your ad by phone! Call 217.337.8337 Monday - Friday, 9am - 5:30pm

Important Information About Your Ad

Report errors immediately by calling 337-8337.We cannot be responsible for more than one day’s incorrect insertion if you do not notify us of the error by 2 pm on the day of the first insertion. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher.The Daily Illini shall have the right to revise, reject or cancel, in whole or in part, any advertisement at any time. The Daily Illini shall not be liable for failure to print, publish or circulate all or any part of any issue in which an advertisement accepted by the publisher is contained. The Daily Illini extends credit to classified advertisers as a courtesy.We reserve the right to set credit limits, to require cash in advance, and/or to require a completed credit application. The Daily Illini screens classified advertising to avoid misleading or false messages. Please be cautious in answering ads, especially when you are asked to send money. If you have a question or concern about any advertisement which has appeared in our paper, we will be happy to discuss it with you. Please call 337-8337. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, and similar state and local laws which make it illegal for any person to cause to be published any advertisement relating to the transfer, sale, rental, or lease of any housing which expresses limitation, specifications or discrimination as to race, color, creed, class, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status, physical or mental handicap, personal appearance, sexual orientation, family responsibilities, political affiliation, prior arrest or conviction record, source of income, or the fact that such person is a student. Specification in employment classifications are made only where such factors are bonafide occupational qualifications necessary for employment.

employment

HELP WANTED

020

Part time

Illini Tower Summer Assistants Kitchen & Maintenance Assistants Leasing & Accounting Assistants Required to work 25 hrs/week. Free room and board. Contact sara.hotze@clvusa.com

APARTMENTS

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

John/Healey

Furnished 1 & 2 bedroom near John & Second Studios on Healey and First. $375/mo. Available August 2012. Call 356-1407

Hysteria Molt echoes the great writers in Clumsy Hearts, a slightly misguided romance. They may never forgive her for it. Some people cannot take a joke. Available via Amazon.com FOR RENT

APARTMENTS

Furnished/Unfurnished

Apartment search

202 E Green St Spring Break Special!

Sign a lease at 202 E Green St before Spring Break and we will: - include a 52” TV in your apartment - include Basic Cable and Internet - call about 10 month leases! (Limited number available!)

Take a video tour at www.bankierapts.com or call 217.328.3770 to set up an appointment

Coming in August, 2013 Luxury 1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Loft Apartments with Private Baths 606 E White, Champaign Flat Screen TV Cathedral Ceilings Balconies Free High Speed Internet

Video Intercom In Unit Washer/Dryer Granite and Tile Satellite TV*

430 SUBLETS

Unfurnished

www.WamplerApartments.com 711 W. Main, U:

217-384-1925

www.smithapartments-cu.com

406 E. Clark St.: 1BR’s • $540/mo • furnished + utilities + parking

807-809 W. Illinois, U: 1BR’s • $595/mo • furnished + utilities + parking

604 E. Clark St.:

LG 1BR’s • $595/mo • furnished + utilities + parking

106 E. John St.: 1BR’s • from $710/mo • utilities + parking

505 S. Busey Ave., U: 2BR’s • $835/mo • furnished + utilities + parking

808 W. Nevada, U: + utilities + parking

(217)337-8852

217-352-1335

GUARANTEED COMPLETION!

*Available

Efficiency 507 W. Church, C.

$365

1 Bedroom 507 W. Church, C.

$490 - $520

2 Bedroom 58 E. Armory, C. 201 E. Armory, C. 511 W. Church, C. 604 W. Stoughton, U. 1004 S. Locust, C. 1009 W. Clark, U. 1010 W. Clark, U. 1012 W. Clark, U.

$890 $950 $685 - $745 $1000+ $660 - $870 $775 $865 $775

APARTMENTS

HOUSES FOR RENT

NOW LEASING FOR FALL 2013 FREE HEAT AND WATER PLUS TRASH PICKUP Landmark Apartments 502 West Main Urbana, IL 217-384-5876 or 217-841-9940 Studios One, Two and Three Bedrooms Secured buildings with elevators Four laundry rooms Underground and covered parking Limited free parking landmark-apts@sbcglobal.net www.landmarktoday.com

www.mhmproperties.com

1,2,3 Bedroom Apartments

mhmproperties.com 217-337-8852

Furnished Houses Furnished 4 and 5 bedroom houses on campus near Stoughton and Sixth. Fall 2013-2014 Call 356-1407 311 S. Randolph August Beautiful furnished 5 bedroom, 3 bathroom home $1650/month Ted Pfeffer 766-5108

4 Bedroom House

STREAM US AT WPGU.COM

312 E. Clark, C. Recently remodeled 2 Full baths, Laundry, Basement Porch, Sundeck, AC Free Parking! August 2013 (217) 337-8852 www.mhmproperties.com

5 Bedroom House 314 E. Clark, C.

What are you waiting for?

2 Full baths, Laundry, Porch Free Parking! August 2013 (217) 337-8852 www.mhmproperties.com

Budget Minded 1-2 bedrooms, five great locations, air-conditioning, & off-street parking $425-$660

Help to make well known of sudoku-topical.com! You like this website? Then recommend it to your friends. If you own yourself a website, place a link to sudoku-topical.com If you print out the sudokus then print them twice and give one to one of your friends. Tell your acquaintances, friends and teammates about sudoku-topical.com. Just help to make this site well known.!  

8

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306 N. Lincoln, U.

4

Updated 4 bedroom 1 1/2 bath house. Very spacious, fully furnished, near Engineering campus, washer and dryer in basement, free parking! $1600 per month August 2013 ADVANTAGE PROPERTIES www.advproperties.com 217-344-0394

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Take a class for fun, not because it’s required.

29. Jul 2010

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The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 123  

Monday, March 25, 2013

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