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MONDAY March 13, 2017

THE DAILY ILLINI The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

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Vol. 146 Issue 48

LGBTGreek provides safe space BY KAREN LIU STAFF WRITER

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Illinois athletic director Josh Whitman fired men’s basketball coach John Groce on Saturday. Whitman announced an immediante national search for the next head coach.

Groce’d out

BY MATT GERTSMEIER ILLINI HOOPS COLUMNIST

Illinois Director of Athletics Josh Whitman announced the fi ring of John Groce on Saturday. Groce was in the midst of his fifth season as head coach for Illinois. The Illini were (18-14, 8-10) under Groce this season. Until a replacement is found, assistant coach Jamall Walker has been elevated to the role of interim head coach. Whitman thanked Groce

for his leadership in a press release. “Under his leadership, regrettably, we were not able to sustain the level of competitive excellence that we expect at the University of Illinois,” Whitman said in the release. “But that should do nothing to detract from the many wonderful things John has done on behalf of Illinois Basketball during his tenure. We wish John, Allison, and their three children nothing but the best,

and we thank his staff and their families as well for their many contributions to our program. All will be missed.” Groce, Illinois’ 17th coach in program history, had an overall record of 95-74 and 37-53 in the Big Ten. Amongst Illinois coaches, Groce had the seventh worst win percentage. In five years Groce never had a winning Big Ten record. Illinois’ best Big Ten regular season under Groce was seventh place.

The Illini appeared in one NCAA Tournament with Groce during his fi rst season as head coach. Groce, hired in late March 2012, had a roster entirely composed of Bruce Weber players and commits during the 2013 tourney appearance. Illinois qualified for two NIT postseason tournaments in the last five years, but its best result was advancing to the second round.

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Four sorority members are working to help LGBT women feel more comfortable in the Greek community. Claire Oosterbaan and Sarrah Spohnholtz from Alpha Chi Omega, Teresa Anderson from Kappa Delta and Devin Weiss from Alpha Delta Pi founded LGBTGreek last semester. LGBTGreek provides a safe space for LGBT members within the Greek system, Oosterbaan said. LGBTGreek is trying to make the Greek system more open toward students identifying as LGBT. “We just keep hearing these really moving narratives of individuals being like, ‘I’m gay and in Greek life. I don’t know if there’s more out there or are those two mutually exclusive,’” Weiss said. However, not everyone shared positive experiences of being queer in the Greek system. Oosterbaan said she had a relatively hard time coming out. Oosterbaan said a girl who identified as an LGBT member from Alpha Chi Omega had to drop out of the sorority because she felt unwelcomed. The national headquarters of Alpha Chi Omega recently released an inclusive message toward LGBT members, Oosterbaan said; however, the University has no resources specifically for LGBT members in the Greek system. The founders hope that through an organization like LGBTGreek, members of the LGBT community would be less hesitant to join the Greek system, and instead fi nd support and acceptance. “A sorority, by defi nition, is

SEE SORORITY | 3A

Divestment rejected, voter turnout increases BY GILLIAN DUNLOP STAFF WRITER

JESSICA JUTZI THE DAILY ILLINI

The model of the new Siebel Center for Design is displayed in the Link Gallery in the Art and Design Building.

Siebel Center will connect students on campus BY KAREN LIU AND LUKE COOPER STAFF WRITERS

University Professor Andrew Singer from the department of electrical and computer engineering has been appointed the interim director at the Siebel Center for Design. As an entrepreneur, Singer founded two communication network technology companies. He is the Fox Family Professor in electrical and computer engineering and the director of the College of Engineering’s Technology Entrepreneur Center. An international search will be conducted for the center’s inaugural director. “We’re looking for someone who is dynamic, someone who is excited about design thinking, someone who is excited about

helping the University of Illinois to have a one-of-a-kind center like no other at any other university of its scale,” Singer said. Singer will guide the development of the center’s signature programs, help foster design thinking and education throughout the University and lead the planning of the center’s $48 million home. The Siebel Center for Design is a campus-wide hub for studentfocused thinking and learning, founded in October 2016 as a $25 million gift from the Thomas and Stacey Siebel Foundation. The center is planning to undergo construction beginning this summer, which is estimated to last 18 months. The center aims to create an environment that emphasizes

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technology, creativity, purpose and collaboration. The planned location for the center is between Huff Hall and the Art and Design Building, which Singer said is not without a reason. The facility is being made for all students on campus to have access to it. “Its location was chosen to really be central to where students are across our campus, and it is not an engineering facility,” Singer said. “It’s meant to stitch together students from LAS, Engineering, Business, Art and Design and ACES, so its location is really central to a lot of the design activities that already go on across campus.”

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Unofficial election results predict Raneem Shamseldin, junior in Business, will be the next student body president. Shamseldin and her running mate, Joe Domanski, received 2,638 votes, while Bobby Knier, junior in LAS, and his running mate, Laura Saldivar, received 1,992 votes. “Raneem is definitely qualified; she has the best interests of the students,” said Ron Lewis, current student body president. “You have people who do it for the name or title, but I’m 100 percent sure Raneem did this for the students and she wants to make it a better place.” This is the first year since 2004 that the student body president was elected by the students. Previously, only student senators were allowed to elect the president. The change comes from the implementation of

the new constitution within the Illinois Student Government. Voter turnout increased significantly this year. Knier said that voter turnout is usually 3,000 to 4,000 people. This election, however, had almost 6,400 in total. Although the increased turnout may be because of the student body president being elected at large, it could also be due to the divisive referendum questions. “There was a huge focus on connecting the community more,” Lewis said. “Having (almost) 5,000 people vote (for student body president) adds legitimacy and builds the connection we hope to have.” Even though Knier lost the election, he was also pleased with the turnout. “I cannot complain about getting 2,000 people engaged in what I believe in,” Knier said. “I’m doing my thing and people are respond-

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Monday, March 13, 2017

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Copyright © 2017 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or The Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. Editor-in-chief Masaki Sugimoto editor@ dailyillini.com Managing editor Michal Dwojak reporting@ dailyillini.com Managing editor Annabeth Carlson online@dailyillini.com Creative director Hannah Auten hauten2@dailyillini.com News editor Claire Hettinger news@ dailyillini.com Asst. news editors Jason Chun Samantha Jones Toal Joseph Longo Asst. daytime editors Aaron Navarro Vivienne Henning Sports editor Charlotte Carroll sports@dailyillini.com Asst. sports editors Mike Gasick Thomas Polcyn Hunter Warning Eli Schuster Features editor Lillian Barkley features@dailyillini.com Asst. features editors Abby Paeth Opinions editor Matt Silich

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Disorderly conduct was reported in the 1900 block of Moreland Boulevard around 3:30 a.m. Saturday. According to the report, the offender was attempting to make unwanted contact with the victim. A burglary from a motor vehicle was reported in the 900 block of North Walnut Street around 6:30 a.m. Friday. According to the report, an unknown offender stole purses, identification items and credit cards from the

victim’s vehicle.

made contact with the two victims. No injuries were reported, and the offender was arrested and transported to the Champaign County satellite jail.

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Nothing to report.

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A 20-year-old female was arrested on the charge of aggravated battery in the 100 block of Main Street around 8 a.m. Saturday. According to the report, there was an ongoing feud between the offender and victims on Facebook. During a verbal argument, the offender sprayed mace and

A domestic dispute was reported in the 1300 block of Beech Street around 1 a.m. Saturday. According to the report, the offender and victim were involved in an argument about the victim’s car keys. The offender and victim are married and live together.

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Student takes a break to find her ‘voice’ … you’re singing and you know he turned around and you’re so incredibly elated in that moment, and I almost wanted to break down in that moment but you have to keep singing. You can’t stop just because they turned their chairs around. But it was a huge wave of relief and excitement. I remember saying to myself, “Don’t look at him, don’t look at him! Ignore him, keep going, keep going!”

BY ANNABETH CARLSON MANAGING EDITOR FOR ONLINE

University student Micah Tryba gave her school a shoutout on national TV after singing on the show “The Voice,” with a performance leaving country singer Blake Shelton saying, “I love Champaign.” Tryba is taking a break from studying veterinary sciences to continue on the show. The Daily Illini talked with Tryba to fi nd out more.

It was so difficult, honestly. Both of them had such amazing things to say. They edited a lot that was said out of the episode for time reasons obviously. She (Stefani) was so nice. Her and I connected on a lot of things not only musically ... But then Blake also had some amazing arguments and was like picturing me in the fi nals of the show which was huge to hear. I think what sealed the deal is the whole time I was there preparing at the audition at the show I heard so many wonderful things about Blake as a coach and as a mentor.

How did participating in a cappella in college help you prepare for this?

Out of all of my experiences singing and performing, I think my time with “No Comment” (University a cappella group) was defi nitely the most helpful in terms of preparing for this. We got to travel all over the place and perform at all kinds of venues and ... singing a cappella, you don’t have any instruments, so ear training was a huge part of what I learned. And the performance end of it — a cappella is very flashy, and you have to have a lot going on onstage since you don’t have any instruments.

Why did you choose the song “I’m Every Woman” for your audition?

Whitney Houston has always been a huge influence musically for me. She’s always been my number one in terms of artists that I look up to and inspire me. It’s a high energy song. I was a little nervous taking that on at the same time because it’s such an iconic song, but it’s one that I’ve known forever and am familiar with it, which is important when preparing for a moment like this. There’s just so many nerves involved, and

How did you feel when that first chair turned around?

Insane! It’s a very weird

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Why did you decide to try What was it like choosing out for “The Voice?” between Gwen and Blake? It was actually a funny story. My mom and I were actually in New York just for a weekend. “The Voice” happened to be in town doing their on-call auditions, and it was something that we both kind of always wanted to do so we were like, “Ok why not, we’ll take an afternoon and go audition for ‘The Voice.’”

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Micah Clare Tryba, veterinary sciences student at the University, tried out for “The Voice” on a trip to New York. it’s nice to know a song like the back of your hand.

fully stick around in this competition.

How are you preparing for the next episode?

What do you miss most about the University right now?

The battles are coming next. I’ve learned a lot through this experience. I’ve learned about my voice, outside of what I’ve done in a cappella. I’ve realized how important it is to really be singing every day. Now that I’m in the real world I have to be conscious every day to do those warm-ups and to keep preparing and bettering myself and hope-

Cracked is defi nitely on that list, and I hear they are opening a store, which makes me mad that I’m not there to experience it. I think what would be number one on that list is my friends from “No Comment.”

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MONDAY March 13, 2017 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

NEWS

Engineering Open House brings science to life BY SABRINA YAN, KAREN LIU AND LEON LI STAFF WRITERS

Among the 40 plus exhibits that were showcased at the Beckman Institute open house this past weekend, one was comprised of elementary school students. A group of third, fourth and fifth grade students from Stratton Elementary School in Champaign presented their research on coral reefs. They worked with Justin Rhodes, associate professor in the department of psychology, and a group of his researchers. “We have this collaboration with Stratton Elementary School,” Rhodes said. “These guys are now raising some clown fish in their school. We have field trips for the kids to come to the Beckman (Institute) to see the lab and we talk a little bit about our research.” Collaboration between the Institute and Stratton on a coral reef project began two years ago. “What we do in our classroom is that we have a coral reef ecosystem,” said Brandon Rutherford, third grade teacher at Stratton Elementary School. “Through taking care of these ecosystems, they learn engineering, all the social skills to go with research in collaboration, a lot of physical chemistry and biology all mixed together.”

This was the 14th year of the open house. Started in 1997, it was an annual event until 2003, when it changed into a biannual event. “Some exhibits go away and some come back, but we have new exhibits every year,” said Doris Dahl, communication specialist of the Beckman Institute. Some of the exhibits had activities for different age groups. “I know one group plans an exhibit where you put your face in and you could take a photo,” Dahl said. “One group has sand art where you can make a necklace or keychains.” Along with the Beckman open house, the 97th annual Engineering Open House at the University was held this weekend as well. “We open the doors in engineering to show the community how exciting engineering and the sciences are,” said Richard Kubetz, spokesman for the College of Engineering. One featured exhibit is a net-zero model home, presented by Meridan Markowitz, junior in mechanical engineering. The exhibit displays a house that uses renewable and green energy sources for all of its energy needs. “It would be awesome if we could inspire kids or even adults to get excited about green and renewable

RYAN FANG THE DAILY ILLINI

Engineering students explain their project to visiting guests during the Engineering Open House at the University on Friday. energy,” Markowitz said. Ash Busse, junior in computer engineering, also hopes to make a difference. Busse’s project analyzes sounds and transforms them onto an LED displayer.

With the addition of the second annual Startup Showcase, the open house highlighted not only technological innovations, but also the entrepreneurial aspect of engineering.

Both the Beckman open house and the University’s open house provide a handson approach for younger kids to get involved in the science and technology field.

“I think one of the big thing is that when they are young, it is important to get kids inspired and excited about science,” Rhodes said.

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recognized human rights violations of marginalized groups worldwide.” “It was cool having two campus-wide office elections and I think they all did their part,” said Alex Villanueva, current student body vice president of Illinois Student Government. “But, of course, the big turnout was the divestment referendum question. ProPalestine and Pro-Israel sides got people out to vote.” The question of whether the University should divest from certain companies became an Israel versus Palestine issue on campus. Opposing groups advocated before the election in the hope to persuade students. The full list of elected student senators can be found on the Campus Student Election Commission website. The results from the trustee election have not been released yet. Shamseldin did not respond to repeated attempts for comment. Gina Lee-Olukoya, associate dean of students and advisor of the election commission, did not respond for comment.

ELECTION

BRIAN BAUER THE DAILY ILLINI

Students receive sorority bids at Foellinger Auditorium on Sept. 12. A new group provides resources for LGBT Greek women.

FROM 1A

SORORITY women coming together to empower other women,” Weiss said. “That is why I joined a sorority, and I feel very empowered within my own sorority.” Anderson and Weiss both said that being an LGBT member in the Greek system is an overall positive experience. “I just recently came out last year, and I’ve faced zero hatred or any sort of thoughts towards me because of my sexuality,” Anderson said. Weiss said she received more negative remarks from the LGBT community about being in Greek life rather than people in the Greek system disaffirming her because she is a part of the LGBT community. “It’s such an affirming place,” said Weiss. “I have nothing but exceptional experiences of being gay and in Greek life.” “The four of us are all seniors, and we found through our time at U of

FROM 1A

GROCE His firing was highly anticipated this season. His win column decreased each season with the Illini. As this year progressed, boo’s rained down on Groce during his introduction.

I that we are a part of recent estimates have two organizations that shown that anywhere from are seemingly completely 3 to 5 percent of the popuseparate,” Anderson said. lation is LGBTQ,” Weiss “People don’t necessari- said. “I personally know ly put the two together. If six or seven women who you’re in one, you can’t be are not comfortable comin the other or vice versa.” ing out yet.” According to Anderson, Weiss referred to a study the orga published by nization is Washington m a i n ly a Week titled social group. LGBT AmerIt hopes to ican: “By the nu mbers ,” provide a which stated casual setting where that approximately 3.5 p e o p l e percent of ca n come together and A meric a ns talk about identify as things their lesbian, gay straight or bisexuDEVIN WEISS al while 0.3 f r i e n d s CO-FOUNDER OF LGBTGREEK percent are m ay not understand. transgender. L G B TThe 19 panGreek has over 30 mem- hellenic chapters on cambers from various sorori- pus have an average of 200 ties. On a campus with the girls per sorority, accordlargest Greek system in ing to Weiss. the country and a promi“I would put my life on nent LGBT community, it saying that there’s at least is not uncommon for the one LGBTQ member in two to overlap, Weiss said. every single panhellenic However, the exact num- chapter on this campus,” ber cannot be determined. Weiss said. “Sexuality is fluid and Anderson said many

people end up feeling like they don’t belong in either the LGBT community or the Greek system. “There’s definitely still a substantial amount of women who may not feel comfortable, and that’s kind of the purpose of this group, which is to say, ‘We’re here, and we can be here for you if you need it,’” Anderson said. Oosterbaan said the founders are hoping the organization can gain consistency by becoming a registered student organization. “We want to leave a legacy behind that our community is exceptionally accepting and warm,” Weiss said. “We want to break the stereotype that Greek life is just heteronormative and very exclusive.” Spohnholtz said LGBTGreek hopes to incorporate fraternity members who identify as LGBT in the future. Although the group is targeted toward LGBT members, allies are also welcome.

In terms of recruiting, Groce managed to secure a strong class of 2017 recruits. It consists of three-star guard Javon Pickett, four-star guards Trent Frazier and DaMonte Williams and the No. 26 player in the class of 2017, Jeremiah Tilmon. One scholarship remains

that national search for the next head coach will begin immediately. Groce has two years remaining on his contract and will receive the balance due, which is approximately $1.7 million.

“We want to break the stereotype that Greek life is just heteronormative and very exclusive.”

for Illinois’ class of 2017. There is no word on what will happen to Illinois’ signees with the firing of Groce. Before coming to Illinois Groce was the head coach for Ohio. At Ohio he went 85-56 and 34-30 in the MidAmerican Conference. Whitman announced a

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ing to that.” However, some students experienced trouble voting when the website didn’t work, said Richard Gonigam, Illinois Student Government technology coordinator. Students who experienced trouble were notified in an email that after voting they could resubmit their ballots. The unofficial results of the referendums are also available. A majority of students voted in favor of student fees that allow for students to ride MTD buses. The other referendums that passed include continued funding for the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts and the Collegiate Readership student fee, which provides free electronic and paper copies of at least three of the following newspapers: The New York Times, USA Today, Wall Street Journal and Chicago Tribune. The only referendum question that failed to pass was whether the University should divest from companies “that actively normalize, engage in or fund

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Raneem Shameldin, pictured at a debate on March 6, is predicted to win the election for student body president.

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OPINIONS

MONDAY March 13, 2017 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

THE DAILY ILLINI

EDITORIAL

Groce’s firing difficult but justified

S

aturday was a tough day for a good guy. The cliche of nice guys finishing last was on display Saturday when athletic director Josh Whitman fired basketball coach John Groce. It wasn’t a surprising move — many fans agree that it was time — but that doesn’t mean it was an easy move to make. This became clear when Whitman talked about Groce at his press conference Saturday. The athletic director talked about how he chose to get close to Groce even though he ran the risk of having to fire a friend. Like Whitman said, although there was one tough day, there were around 365 other good days, and he didn’t regret his decision of connecting with his basketball coach. If you want to know what type of character Groce has, all you had to do is see how he spoke to the media after the announcement. Many reporters and fans know how difficult it must be to speak after los-

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois head coach John Groce shouts instructions to his team from the sideline during the game against Iowa at State Farm Center on Jan. 25. Groce was fired on Saturday after his fifth year with the Illini.

ing a tough game or the job of your dreams. That’s the type of person Groce is. He was a perfect example of what a school should want in its coach. He’s respectful, led his team with poise and taught them how to be better people off the court. There’s a reason why

Whitman had such a difficult time firing his friend and talking about him in front of the media. But the fact of the matter is, the results weren’t there. Illinois only made the NCAA tournament once during his five years as coach, and that was in

his first year with most of his predecessor’s players. The Illini haven’t made the NCAA tournament for the fourth-straight season — something that hasn’t happened since 1980 — while Northwestern just made its first tournament appearance.

This is unacceptable for Illini fans. Change was needed, especially after Thursday’s blowout loss to eventualchampion Michigan in the Big Ten Tournament. We also want to reaffirm our confidence in Whitman. Boy, did the group of interim administrators hit a — pardon the cliche — home run. They couldn’t have chosen a better ambassador for Illinois sports. We know the next hire likely won’t have Lovie Smith’s stature, but we and other Illini fans should be confident that Whitman will do whatever it takes to land the big fish and bring Illinois basketball back to what it was a decade ago. So yes, it was time to say goodbye to Groce, but we’d like to thank him for representing our community the right way. We wish him and his family nothing but the best with whatever comes next. He could’ve taken the negative route, but like he has most of his time here, he chose to be the better man.

Campus community can’t ignore hazing ISABELLA WINKLER Opinions columnist

I THE DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

The Illini Republications disrupted a reading group for the Black Students for Revolution, pictured above at a protest, on Sunday. Columnist Tatiana Rodriguez says the illini republicans didn’t want to discuss anything, but only to make the students feel unsafe.

Illini Republicans attempt to crash book club TATIANA RODRIGUEZ Opinions columnist

R

acial tensions sparked between two organizations on campus — Black Students for Revolution and the Illini Republicans — shows that the protection of spaces for people of color are yet again being disrupted by so-called political organizations. The Illini Republicans took issue with The Assata Shakur Reading Group — the Black Students for Revolutions’s biweekly book club for people of color that focuses on radical, black activism — citing segregation and a glorifying terrorist. However, the Illini Republicans never meant to make a political stand or make change, but rather sought to taunt and disrupt a space where its opinions were never invited in the first place. The Illini Republicans originally took to Facebook, creating an event opposing the reading group and saying Black Students for Revolution had created “a racially exclusive fan club for convicted cop-killer and domestic terrorist Assata Shakur.” The Illini Republicans have taken such a stand against Assata Shakur that Jack Johnson, freshman and Illini Republicans secretary, compared Shakur to Osama Bin Laden saying, “I don’t think I would ever start a club in the name of a terrorist, per say — like ‘the Osama Bin Laden Reading Club.’” Though naming a group after an individual on the FBI’s Most Wanted list is certainly bold, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the group aligns themselves

with everything Shakur has done or said. Additionally, the Illini Republicans comparing Shakur to Bin Laden shows they never intended to understand the Black Students for Revolution’s reasons for naming the group after Shakur since they made extreme comparisons without having considered the other side of the story. On March 2, the Illini Republicans’s Facebook page created an event entitled the “Joanne Chesimard Fan Club Visit,” in which the group planned to disrupt the reading group, deliberately using Shakur’s legal name. University senior and Illini Republicans Vice President Timothy Kilcullen said that the organization wanted “to highlight the Black Students for Revolution as a racist group who has prejudice against white people.” Clearly the Illini Republicans had no intention of actually learning or making a stand, but wanted to oppose spaces that are for people of color. Additionally, since the Black Students for Revolution is not an RSO, they are free to include whoever they please. Despite the criticism, the Black Students for Revolution went forth with their event on Sunday, appointing white allies as security guards in front of the Independent Media Center’s Theatre and having its director turn away “unauthorized individuals.” The Illini Republicans said the reading group was discriminating against

white people. After being denied entry along with Johnson and Illini Republicans President Jonathan Heideman, Kilcullen said: “They’re violating the Civil Rights Act. They’re segregating.” However, the fact that the Illini Republicans was so opposed to the Black Students for Revolution’s choice to refuse entry to white people is hypocritical considering that Republicans often defend the right to refuse entry to a number of marginalized individuals such as the LGBT community. Black Students for Revolution always welcomes people of color and has many white allies participating in its events. But this specific event was meant to be a space for people of color to speak freely. But if The Assata Shakur Reading Group is about reading literature related to black culture, why were the Illini Republicans so determined to ask questions and speak out? The purpose of the group is to act as a space for people of color to heal together, away from individuals who might scrutinize said culture. Though the Illini Republicans kept vocalizing their dissatisfaction with not being allowed into the club to learn, listen or engage in meaningful discussion, they never really wanted to make peace with The Assata Shakur Reading Group. The questions the Illini Republicans had for the reading group were not only argumentative and accusatory, but they

The Illini Republicans’ attempt to crash the reading group was never about learning

referred to Shakur by her legal name, Joanne Chesimard. Two out of the six questions the Illini Republicans brought to the book club were, “Werner Foerster left behind a wife and two children. If one of those children were here today, what would you tell them?” and “Chesimard claims that she was shot in the gunfight with Foerster and Harper and was ‘left there to die.’ How does this match up with the fact that she was actually found four miles down the road from where the murder occurred?” The Assata Shakur Reading Group was reading passages from Malcolm X’s autobiography, which they mentioned in their advertisement, and relating it to their own lives — not discussing the intricacies of Shakur’s legal history. Additionally, I wonder if the Illini Republicans are just as outraged about black and brown people being murdered by law enforcement as they are about Foerster’s death. The Illini Republicans’ attempt to crash the reading group was never about learning or listening, but was actually about inserting their opinions that nobody asked for, asserting their dominance in a space that was not theirs to begin with and instilling shame, confusion and anger in the hearts of black youth. “I think (the Illini Republicans) just saw an affirmation of blackness that was so proud and intellectual, that white racists, Republicans and conservatives have always been resistant toward and have tried to hinder black people coming together and communally learning,” Ture said.

Tatiana is a freshman in Media. tlr2@dailyillini.com

f you’re a part of Greek life on campus, you’re probably familiar with the concept of hazing. And if you live in a sorority house, you’ve probably been hearing knocks on your door a little more often lately. This past week, at least three groups of men have showed up at my sorority house dressed in costumes. They asked to take a picture inside our house, and then they were gone and onto the next house. We usually just roll our eyes and laugh it off, but it started to strike me how unusually we treat the practice of hazing. There’s an unspoken awareness whenever you see blacked-out fraternity house windows, boys walking around in hot dog costumes or a group of guys picking up beer cans off the lawn. As much as everyone knows that it happens, nobody seems to question it. Perhaps because the pledges are sworn to secrecy: They’ll tell you they “lost a bet” if you ask them why they had to shave their legs. And when they show up at your sorority house every other day, you become accustomed to them and wondering what it’s really like to be a fraternity pledge becomes exhausting. But we should consider the repercussions of turning a blind eye to the suspicious actions we see. The University defines hazing as “an act that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of any person OR that defaces, destroys, or removes public or private property, for the purpose of initiation into, admission into, affiliation with, or continued membership in, any group or organization.” Justifications for hazing include character building,

teaching discipline and strengthening the bonds of brotherhood. “Hazing is good for you,” wrote one anonymous columnist on Total Frat Move. “It taught me discipline, it taught me strength and it helped me check my vastly overinflated freshman ego.” He claims hazing is important because it instills a rite of passage and compares it to the virtues of “the early days when we were still cavemen” doing tribal things. Because doing blindfolded wall-sits while reciting the creed is equivalent to hunting lions for survival. Regardless of most fraternity bylaws condemning the practice, hazing still happens and nobody seems to care unless someone is seriously hurt. Since 1970, there has been at least one hazing-related death on a college campus each year. The notion that a chapter only functions if hazing is permitted is purely an excuse to keep around pledges who submit to every demand. Perpetuating these humiliating and sometimes dangerous practices just so active members can be driven to class and not have to clean beer-soaked floors speaks to the lack of dignity that hazing supposedly exhibits. And the appeal to tradition fallacy is sometimes the only justification for continuing hazing: Hazing has occurred at every college that has ever existed, so why stop now? When it comes to the University, most of the hazing that occurs in the public eye seems innocent enough, but what happens behind closed doors remains beyond the business of any non-fraternity member. Hopefully we won’t have to wait until a tragedy occurs to change the climate that surrounds fraternity pledgeship.

The notion that a chapter only functions if hazing is permitted is purely an excuse to keep around pledges who submit to every demand.

Isabella is a sophomore in ACES. iwinkle2@dailyillini.edu

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS | opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.


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5A

Monday, March 13, 2017

BUZZ

Staples raps diverse show BY JUSTIN KAMP BUZZ WRITER

I went to the Vince Staples show at Foellinger last week. There was a certain surrealness to it — the place where I never paid attention during econ lectures — now fi lled with smoke and light as kids crammed the area directly in front of the stage. The sea of students was nodding and vibing at fi rst, and eventually moshing and headbanging while jumping over one another. One person actually stagedove off the Foellinger stage. Can you imagine? And, at the helm of this weird little trip, alone on stage in a black concert hoodie, puffi ng periodically from his inhaler: Vince Staples. It was defi nitely one of the more diverse shows I’ve attended: Everyone was friendly, and when we moshed the pit was full of helping hands. But there was something about the whole scene that was itching at the back of my mind the whole show. Maybe it was the hall, maybe it was the visuals Vince played behind him. With few exceptions, everything on screen was from the dark depths of the sea: sharks, kelp forests and jellyfish floated by while Vince rapped his brains out. The fi rst thing onscreen was a betta fi sh, a notorious fi ghter, suspended in blackness. "It’s probably just tying in with the surf imagery of Summertime 06," I thought, "but maybe there’s something more to the

PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL KAZMIERCZAK

The Illinettes perform at a football game and must audition for spots before each performance.

FROM 5A

ILLINETTES be prepared for anything that may happen. “A lot of times, we have to throw things together and do things on the spot, and sometimes we’ll have last-minute additions we’re not super prepared for. But we still have to perform it and do a good job, too,” Stubenfoll said. For basketball games, the Illinettes prepare a feature for the game, which is a choreographed routine to their song choice, but aside from this set dance, every other time out during the game is entirely improvised or planned out about an hour before the game. “We aren’t aware of what time-outs we get for basketball season until the 45-minute mark before the game, so we basically don’t know what’s going on until we get there, and then we only have about a half hour to plan out everything we need to do for each timeout until the end of the game,” Stubenfoll said. Even with the stress of feeling unprepared before games, Stubenfoll and other dance team members

still try to give their best performance. “As an underclassmen, it is hard to perform for every game, just because there is a bit of a preference toward juniors and seniors, which is totally understandable because they’ve been a part of the team longer,"said Liz Kazmierczak, Illinette and sophomore in ACES.

each week for a spot during a game. “We spend so much time together so, inevitably, we’ve become a family. I’ve never felt a sense of competition against my team members. My best friend, who’s also my roommate, might make a game that I won’t and vice versa, so I never feel competitive toward her. I feel

“I truly love it though, and love being involved in something so much bigger than myself.” MARYALLISON MAHACEK SOPHOMORE IN LAS

"But everyone still gets the experience of performing at a game.” There are 28 members on the Illinettes Dance Team, with 24 girls who perform at halftime and pregame for football, and 16 girls who perform at basketball games. Because not every member of the team performs for every game, the girls are required to audition

competitive toward the people who make the decisions for who performs at what game more than anything,” Kazmierczak said. If a dancer doesn’t happen to be chosen for that game, they still must remain a face of encouragement for the other teammates as well as the football players. Positivity and support are two of the most impor-

tant aspects the dancers keep in mind when on and off the field. “You have to keep a positive outlook," Mahacek said. "It’s a mentality we need to stay focused on. I feel like college dance teams in general have a negative stigma that it’s all about the look and the way your body looks, but I feel like in terms of the Illinettes, it’s so much more than that." When dancers first audition, Barry Houser, the Marching Illini band director, looks for students who will foster a positive reinforcement to the team, will remain optimistic in the face of defeat and who truly want to be there, Mahacek said. “I want to be a better dancer always and feel like I can always take improvements, but I also want to be better for our team. There’s less of a competitiveness with others, but more-so with myself and how I can personally grow. I truly love it though, and love being involved in something so much bigger than myself,” Mahacek said.

underwater theme here." In the midst of a crowd freak out to “Hands Up,” I had a little realization. The blue and red lights were fl ashing while videos of police violence played onscreen. Somebody was yelling “Yeah Vince, go Vince!” while he put down bars about his neighbors being killed without reason, about the way his neighborhood has been torn apart from the inside out. I realized that we were all looking in on what most of us have never experienced. I’m not gonna pretend to speak for the whole audience, but I think a lot of the people there probably had better circumstances growing up. Maybe that’s what the undersea imagery was about: we were looking in on a foreign environment. Moshing and dancing and vibing, but still outside of it, away from the sharks. That’s what music is supposed to do: connect, tell stories, make you question, make you feel. But when he sang “Lift Me Up,” and came to the line “All these white people chanting when I ask em where my n****s at,” you could feel the crowd cringe a little. Accusatory questioning is built into his music, and when he fi nished with “Summertime,” the slowest, and probably most important song on the album, some of the crowd was already fi ltering out. It felt weird, voyeuristic almost, looking in on the fi shbowl. But maybe I’m just overthinking it.

buzz@dailyillini.com

BRIAN BAUER THE DAILY ILLINI

cabaer2@dailyillini.com

Vince Staples performs on March 6 at Foellinger Auditorium.

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Across

Stunning spaceS amazing artistry down-to-earth vibe Vital support from donors and the Krannert Center U of I student fee means U of I students never pay more than $10 for a ticket, and dozens of events each year are completely free.

1 Submissive 5 Heading on a list of errands 9Moon-related 14 Church recess 15 Iris’s place in the eye 16 Make amends (for) 17 Food grown in a paddy 18 Transport for Huck Finn 19 Days of the week in a calendar heading 20 “Keeping my fingers crossed” 23 Chilled jelly dishes 24 Philosopher and social activist West 28 Follow 30 Gabriel García Márquez novel “Love in the Time of ___” 31 Chunk of ice in the ocean 33 Exercise area for convicts 35 Prefix with skeleton 36 Dictator ___ Amin 37 ___ v. Wade 38 First satellite to orbit Earth 43 Swiss capital 44Attaches by rope, as a ball to a pole 45 Rolling Stones album “Get Yer ___ Out!” 47 Place to wear one’s heart, in a phrase 48 Employee at a perfumery 51 Common security device … or a feature of 20-, 33or 38-Across 55 Edible mushroom 58 Out on the ocean 59 Graph line 60Dentist’s tool

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puzzle by andy hinz

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1 Santa ___ (one of Columbus’s ships) 2 “Iliad” and “Odyssey,” for two 3 Means of getaway 4 Loudly lamenting 5 Appears after being lost 6 Egg-shaped 7 Challenge 8 Inauguration recitation 9 National ___, bygone humor magazine 10 Downright

11 Immediately 12 Aardvark’s morsel 13 Coin flipper at the Super Bowl, informally 21 Mil. training academy 22 Spanish eight 25 Something to look for in an emergency 26 Goof 27 Weighed down (with) 29 Actor Estrada and others 30 TV procedural set in the Big Apple 31 Defeats 32 Kick out of school 34 Words at the altar 39 2011 Oscarnominated picture set in 1960s Mississippi

40 1930s British P.M. Chamberlain 41 Ticked off 42 What Marie Antoinette supposedly said to “let them” do 43 Indian variety of 17-Across 46 Nay’s opposite 49 Brockovich and Burnett 50 Many a reggae musician, informally 52 Send to hell 53 Biblical son of Isaac 54 Jock’s antithesis 55 Summer hours in Denver: Abbr. 56 Bobby who played 10 seasons with the Boston Bruins 57 ___ Grande

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.


6A

MONDAY March 13, 2017 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

LIFE CULTURE

THE DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Students at the University attend the annual Relay for Life to fight against cancer at the Armory.

Community rallies for a cure

Colleges Against Cancer puts on 16th-annual Relay for Life at the Armory BY MERAL AYCICEK STAFF WRITER

Jane Akin sat in the middle of the Armory on Saturday night gazing proudly at her daughter, Grace, the vice president of Colleges Against Cancer, the RSO responsible for putting on Relay for Life 2017. Akin is a cancer survivor and said her daughter worked hard to make Relay for Life a success to honor her struggles. An indoor fundraising event for the American Cancer Society, the 16th annual Relay for Life took place on Saturday at the Armory from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. Money raised for Relay for Life benefits research, patient programs and outreach services. “I think that when you know someone that’s had cancer, it has a whole different meaning because there is an emotional attachment to it," Akin said. "You can do (Relay for Life) for service hours and you can do it for fundraising

or just to hang out with friends, but when you have a friend or loved one that has had cancer, it changes everything.” As a survivor, Akins said it was especially important to know that there is a whole community of people supporting and fighting for her. She said that is what makes Relay for Life so special. Relay for Life was established in 1985 by Gordy Klatt of Tacoma, Washington. Klatt ran around a track for 24 hours and collected donations to support cancer patients. Today, there are over 500 colleges that have a Relay for Life event. Each year about $400 million dollars are raised. Megha Mathur, president of Colleges Against Cancer, said the University had the first chapter of Colleges Against Cancer in the nation. She said this is another way in which the University is a leader in the fight for cancer awareness and treatment.

This year, the event is bigger than ever and Colleges Against Cancer wanted to celebrate 2017 as a coming of age for Relay for Life. T h is ye a r's event included performances from No Strings Attached and Rip Chords, both

programs since high school and has experience with Colleges Against Cancer on the local and national level. She said she believes the most rewarding part of events like Relay for Life was empowering individuals and communities.

“I think it is a great way to, not only bring together the community, but also raise money to help people who have been affected by cancer.” ANNA FABBRI

SOPHOMORE IN ACES

campus a capella groups. The on-site fundraisers also included henna tattooing, face painting and the University held a sweet sixteen birthday party for this year's event. Mathur has been involved with cancer awareness

“It is a night that the community can come together to celebrate, remember and fight back," Mathur said. "So we celebrate all of the important milestones that we’ve made in cancer and remember those that we

have lost or are still fighting their battle with cancer, and then we fight back and figure out ways that we can come together to make sure that nobody has to hear those words again.” Anna Fabbri, sophomore in ACES, is in the Alpha Gamma Delta sorority with Akin’s daughter. AGD’s team walked for one of their members who was recently diagnosed with cancer. “I think it is a great way to not only bring together the community, but also raise money to help people who have been affected by cancer, whether that means getting them a wig or helping them feel better, give them a sense of community,” Fabbri said. The motto behind Relay for Life is "celebrate, remember and fight back." The highlights of the evening were the Survivor Walk at the opening ceremony and the Luminaria, which was held at 11 p.m. The Luminaria is the portion of the night where

the lights are dimmed, and everyone lights paper bags filled with glow sticks. This ceremony is meant to be a moment of silence for all cancer patients. M at hu r s a id t he Luminaria is one of the most moving parts of Relay for Life and is part of the reason people return to the event year after year. “The lights will be shut off and there will be sort of like a candlelight vigil for everybody that we may have lost or that are still battling cancer and it’s really a moment for everybody to come together and heal as a community,” Mathur said. Fabbri said she was excited to be a part of a team that shows support for something bigger than herself. “I’m very proud of U of I that we can come together and do something so great and raise so much money for a great cause,” Fabbri said.

aycicek2@dailyillini.com

Illinettes provide positivity through performances BY CAMILLE BAER STAFF WRITER

Nearly every day of the week in the fall and spring season, 28 girls work hard to perfect their routines and feature numbers for football and basketball games. These girls make up the Illinettes Dance Team, which is merged with the Marching Illini, who serve as a source of strength and

positivity during performances at games, parades and more. In the fall, the team practices by itself or with the band on Mondays and practices with the band Tuesday through Friday before games. With almost every ounce of free time spent toward their practices and games, the dancers have to be conscious of finding ways to

include time for both academics and a social life. “The hardest part about being on the team is just maintaining balance in your life," Mahacek said. "I’m in a sorority, too, so a lot of times it just feels like ‘Ah, I’m spending so much time at practice I never have time for anything else.' I’ll get home and be too tired to want to go out, so I’ll just end up finishing

“Look on YELP! before buying Bus Tickets to the Chicago Suburbs”

my homework. It’s really hard to fit in a social life sometimes.” While the Illinettes aren’t officially considered student athletes, the same rules do apply for them. “ M a i nt a i n i ng go o d grades is really important for us, so time-management plays a huge role in our daily lives — even during winter break, as well as when we still have games,”

Mahacek said. Even when the going gets tough, whether that means a team is losing or it’s been a difficult week for a dancer personally, the girls on the team try to remain immensely positive and optimistic when performing. “For the majority of us, when the camera comes by, we’ll all start smiling and cheering and make

sure that we still have that school spirit, even if we’re not doing too well. It reminds us of how cool the actual event is,” said Amy Stubenfoll, Illinette and senior majoring in architecture. The football games are televised, so when mishaps occur, the team has to think on their feet and

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1B

SPORTS

MONDAY March 13, 2017 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

GROCE GONE

ON BASKETBALL

Looking back at the last five seasons

Groce showed true morale at his firing CHARLOTTE CARROLL Sports editor

J

ust over a year ago, Illinois Director of Athletics Josh Whitman fired head football coach Bill Cubit, after a tumultuous year for the football program. On Saturday, Illinois fired its men’s basketball head coach John Groce. Some big differences? There’s still playing time for the basketball team, and Groce showed up to his farewell press conference. It was clear that this was a different and much more difficult decision for Whitman after he had gotten to know Groce well over the year. At Saturday’s press conference, Whitman seemed visibly upset, almost breaking down toward the end. A year into Whitman’s own tenure, he’s confident and secure in his decisions. Rightfully so, as he seems to be making all the right moves, satisfying fans and Illini observers alike. Bringing in Lovie Smith as head coach for the football team was the best move for the program and brought the most excitement, likely since the the 2007 Rose Bowl squad. There was a sellout game against North Carolina and a massive outpouring of fans unseen in my years at Illinois. There was

NCAA tournament appearances: 1 – 2013 Best NCAA tournament finish: Round of 32 – 2013 NIT appearances: 1 – 2014 Best NIT finish: Second Round: 2 – 2014, 2015 Big Ten tournament record: 4-5 Best Big Ten tournament finish: Quarterfinals – 2013, 2014, 2015 Best Big Ten regular season finish: 7th place – 2013,

a genuine excitement to the future. But the basketball program didn’t undergo the massive scandal that the football team had gone through. Some players were arrested last season, but the main issue was failing to perform and make NCAA tournament. A four-year drought is too much for Illini fans, and they made that clear from the start. Even Whitman said that Groce knew it was a big year for the team. Groce had the recruits in the bag and seemed to be close enough with Whitman where he’d give him the extra year. Illinois would also save some money in the process. But that’s why I’m a journalism major and not an athletic director. And that’s why Whitman has put Illinois in good hands on the business front, and the people front. Like football, the basketball program will require a multimillion-dollar replacement. One

Record against strong basketball conferences: ACC: 2-6 Big East: 0-2 Big 12: 1-2 Pac 12: 3-1 SEC: 5-2

Important Records:

Overall: 95-75 Big Ten: 37-53 Home: 54-24 Away: 18-36 Neutral: 23-15 Top 25: 10-30

SEE FIRING GROCE | 2B

ON BASKETBALL

Who will be the next Illinois basketball head coach? MATT GERTSMEIER Illini hoops columnist

I

llinois men’s basketball coach John Groce has been fi red after five years coaching the Illini. He fi nished his career at Illinois with a record of 95-75, going 37-53 in conference play. Groce constantly battled with inconsistency on his teams, and this last season was a prime example. Things just never ended up clicking for Groce, and near the end of most seasons, attention was shifting toward the next year. This time, there won’t be a next year for Groce. It’s time for a change. Now, all eyes are on Director of Athletics Josh Whitman to see who will be the new coach for men’s basketball, and there has already been some speculation, as Groce’s departure has been a long time coming. I expect Whitman to make a splash. He shocked a ton of people when he hired Lovie Smith for football and impressed many when he hired Chris Tamas after Kevin Hambly’s departure from the volleyball program. Here are some names I expect to be in the running:

Archie Miller

Miller has spent six years as head coach at Dayton and has never had a losing season. His overall record is 139-62 and his team is about to make a fourth

straight NCAA tournament appearance. As a mid-major school, Miller has had the Flyers ranked in the AP Top-25 three of his six seasons. I think Miller would do wonders for the culture of Illinois basketball, and switching from the Atlantic 10 to the Big Ten is a huge upgrade for him. He’s one of my favorite names being bounced around, and I don’t see why he would feel inclined to stay at Dayton. I really don’t see any roots or ties that would cause him to feel pressured into staying. If Miller were to come to Illinois, I would be excited to see what he can do with recruiting. At Dayton, he did a good job of going out and getting guys that fit his system. Most of the recruits he snagged were rated three stars by recruiting services, but have shown potential to grow as players. At a bigger school like Illinois, I think he would have a larger pool of candidates to attract and in turn, would secure strong recruiting classes. Going after Miller might take some time as the 24-7 Flyers are expected to receive a tournament berth. I’m expecting a solid run from Dayton and can see the team reaching the Sweet 16. Miller reached the Elite Eight in 2014.

Dan Muller

While the Illini have struggled this season, the Redbirds of Illinois State have been playing strong basketball 45 min-

utes away in Normal. Muller boasts a 27-6 record this season, and his team could potentially slip into the NCAA Tournament’s field of 68. What I like about Muller is that his teams have shown consistency and gradual improvements. Illinois State hovered around 18 wins in Muller’s fi rst two years as head coach, but has since improved, notching two 20-win seasons in the last three years. Muller is young, yet he has lots of experience, serving as an assistant coach at Vanderbilt from 2001-2012 before becoming Illinois State’s head coach. While he may not be coming from the most glamorous of basketball schools, he is a name that needs to be strongly considered. After the run Illinois State has put together, I think he is going to be looking for an opportunity to make a jump from the Missouri Valley Conference. My only concern with Muller is that he could be Groce 2.0. Making a jump from a smaller conference to the Big Ten is not the easiest thing in the world. At Ohio, Groce had multiple tournament appearances before coming to Illinois. We all know how that success ended up transferring over to Illinois.

Gregg Marshall

Marshall has almost monopolized the Missouri Valley Con-

SEE COACHES | 2B

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Valparaiso University head coach Bryce Drew puts his team through drills March 20, 2013 in Auburn Hills, Michigan. The crusaders will face the Illini in the first round of the NIT.

BASKETBALL

Illinois doesn’t receive NCAA call; selected, will host as No. 2 seed in NIT Illini face off against Valparaiso in opening round of NIT BY LUCAS WRIGHT STAFF WRITER

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Fans hold up the flashlights on their phones for a light show before the game against Minnesota at State Farm Center on Saturday, Feb. 4. The Illini lost 68-59.

As expected, Selection Sunday came and went for the Illinois men’s basketball team without getting the call for the NCAA tournament. But the Illini did earn a postseason berth, just not in the tournament they had hoped for. For the third time in the last four years, Illinois will be

headed to the NIT. The Illini earned one of four No. 2 seeds in the field of 32, consisting of teams that did not earn at-large bids for the NCAA tournament and mid-major teams that won regular season conference championships. Illinois will face off with Valparaiso in the opening round in Champaign on Tuesday. The Crusaders are 24-8 out of the Horizon League and were co-champions along with Oakland in their conference. Valparaiso is led by senior Alec Peters, who has averaged a double-double with just over 23 points and 10 rebounds per game on the season. Illinois has the opportunity to

play at the State Farm Center through the semi-fi nal round, as long as the Illini are the higherseeded team. Ahead of the Illini, the No. 1 seeds in the tournament are California, Illinois State, Iowa and Syracuse, as these four teams were the “First Four Out” of the NCAA tournament. The past has not been kind to Illinois in the NIT, with the Illini falling in the second and fi rst rounds in 2014 and 2015, respectively. Along with Illinois and Iowa, Indiana rounds out the Big Ten teams in the field.

Lswrigh2@dailyillini.com @LucasWright95


2B Monday, March 13, 2017

THE DAILY ILLINI  |  WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

BASKETBALL

Whitman addresses future of basketball program BY LUCAS WRIGHT STAFF WRITER

Two days removed from the Illinois men’s basketball team’s 20-point loss against Michigan in the Big Ten tou r n a me nt , I l l i noi s Director of Athletics Josh Whitman made the move many expected to come in the offseason: firing head coach John Groce on Saturday W h itma n sa id the decision had to be made so that Illinois can get back up to the high expectations of the storied basketball program. “For us we have a basketball program that we all expect to compete for Big Ten and National Championships year-in and year out,” Whitman said. “I was here at the peak, I was here ten years ago. I saw the energy; I felt the environment at the State Farm Center… That’s what we’re striving for.” Whitman said he made his decision Thursday, but he decided to act Saturday. He met with Groce around 1 p.m., before a n nou nci ng officia l ly Groce’s firing just before 3 p.m. Groce was on hand for Saturday’s press conference, giving him one last chance to address the media. He said he was unaware that his job was on the line until he received

the decision from Whitman. “Obviously, a lot of different thoughts over the past few hours as you try to digest all of it, but the one thing, I’ve certainly told my wife this, I unequivocally feel like this is a much better place than when we started March 29, 2012,” Groce said. “You start by pointing the finger at yourself and you take responsibility for everything when you’re a leader, and so that’s what I’m going to do.” W h itma n sa id the coaching search begins immediately, but not to expect as quick a turnover as with the Lovie Smith hiring. He stated this search will be a “process” and will be more like a traditional coaching search, but Illinois will not use a search firm in the process. “We understand what is necessary to be competitive in today’s environment, and we are willing to do what we need to do on the financial side of this to be sure we get the best coach for our program,” Whitman said. Some concern had been raised over the incoming recruiting class for the Illini, as Illinois sports the ninth overall recruiting class in the nation, and the incoming group has not been shy with its support

ELISABETH NEELY THE DAILY ILLINI

Former Illinois men’s basketball coach John Groce addressed the media Saturday. Athletic director Josh Whitman announced an immediate national coaching search. . for former coach Groce. W h it m a n s a id he contacted each of the recruits this afternoon, and plans on speaking with each of them this weekend.

Jamall Walker will serve as the interim head coach for the remainder of the season, as the Illini prepare for a likely spot in the NIT.

Despite his firing, Groce said he will still be rooting for his former players. “There’s not going to be anyone that’s a bigger fan of those guys than me,”

Groce said. “They’ve got to come out and fight, and I am confident they will.”

Lswrigh2@dailyillini.com @LucasWright95

BASEBALL

Illinois drops two against defending national champs BY MIKE GASICK ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

The Illinois baseball team was three outs away from taking two games against defending College World Series champion Coastal Carolina. The Illini received one of their best pitching performances this season from Ty Weber on Saturday. The freshman threw 7 2/3 innings of no-hit ball, leaving it up to the bullpen to preserve a 2-1 lead. Zack Jones inherited a runner on second after head coach Dan Hartleb pulled Weber. The righthander caught Coastal Carolina’s Kieton Rivers looking on a 3-2 pitch to keep the lead heading into the ninth. The Illini failed to score in the top-half of the inning and brought Ryan Schmitt in to close out the game. The freshman had to go through the Chanticleers’ heart of the lineup in hopes of preserving twostraight Illini wins over the weekend. After getting Coastal Carolina’s Wood Myers on a sharp lineout, Schmitt yielded a solo shot off the

FROM 1B

FIRING GROCE who will generate lots of publicity and the same caliber of athletes. As he said, the two sports pay the bills for the whole athletic department. While unhappy fans weren’t the deciding factor, he seemed aware that many were discontent with the program’s future. So when Groce showed up to his goodbye, many were shocked. There was even a pause after he made his opening statement, as reporters struggled to think of a question. “Surprised you guys didn’t I?” Groce said, followed by a version of “didn’t think I’d show up, did you now?” It was an example of what made the decision so hard for Whitman. Groce got the last laugh in terms of image, as

bat to tie the game at two. Peyton Isaacson followed with another home run off of a 1-2 pitch to walk it off for Coastal Carolina. Dan Hartleb did not like the end result, but was pleased with Weber’s performance to keep his team in the game. “We thought he did very good,” Hartleb said. “I thought he competed well and continues to get better

“Right now, we’re making too many mistakes to get over the hump.” DAN HARTLEB BASEBALL HEAD COACH

and better, so we are very pleased with his progress and his performance.” The Illinois head coach was also happy with another one of his starting pitchers in the previous game. Cole Bellair took the mound in the opener, going six innings and giving up six runs on seven hits and four how many coaches and administers have come to their firings in the past 18 months? He proved his moral stock, but he just couldn’t get it done on the court. As he thanked loyal fans, you couldn’t help but think that some were a part of the reason he was fired. The former basketball coach talked about how thankful he was for his opportunities, taking responsibility and saying there was always a plan behind everything he did. The problem is the plan just wasn’t executed in the way Whitman would have liked. Now let’s see where Illinois stands a year from now, and how Whitman’s own plan takes shape.

Charlotte is a senior in Media. cmcarro2@dailyillini. com @charlottecrrll

walks. The bullpen took care of the rest Friday, pitching three scoreless innings to solidify a 7-6 victory for the Illini. The team could not repeat its performance in the second game of its doubleheader Saturday. The Illini went up against Costal Carolina’s Jason Bilous, who did not allow a run in his first start of the season against Albany. Bilous had an almost identical performance against the Illini, going seven innings and striking out nine. Hartleb said he expected to see some of his players have difficult at-bats because of Bilous’ strong breaking ball and fastball that touched 94-96 mph. The Illini could not get anything off the Chanticleers’ bullpen, dropping the final contest of the series, 6-0. Illinois now stands at 4-9 on the season and have failed to win a season series. Through 111 innings pitched, the Illini pitching staff has posted a 7.14 ERA, while hitters have put up a .268 batting average. Hartleb did not believe

FROM 1B

COACHES ference with the success of Wichita State basketball. The Shockers have won four regular season championships in the last six years thanks to Marshall. Wichita State has become a household name because of the brand of basketball Marshall has instituted. Marshall boasts a record of 260-89. Before coaching the Shockers, he spent nine seasons at Winthrop. In 19 seasons of being a head coach, he has a win percentage greater than 70 percent. The man knows how to win and that winning culture has been absent in the Groce era. I would sure like Illinois to get back to winning basketball and I have no doubt Marshall can achieve

THE DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Cole Bellair pitches in game against St. Louis University on April 17 at Illinois field. Bellair’s performance against Coastal Carolina earned him praise from head coach Dan Hartleb. his team was fazed by the competition this weekend but said he would like to see his players make fewer mistakes. that goal. My biggest concern with Marshall is his loyalty to the Shockers. He’s spent 10 years at Wichita State while dominating the Missouri Valley and consistently making the NCAA Tournament. Why should he feel so inclined to uproot the sweet gig he already has and come to Champaign? If he were to come to Illinois, I could see Illinois making the NCAA Tournament in about three years. It might take a bit of time for Marshall to adjust and get his feet wet, but when he does, it would be a great sight to see. Wichita State is about to make a sixth straight appearance in the Big Dance. He’s reached a Final Four with Wichita State, so who’s to say he couldn’t do that with Illinois?

Bryce Drew

“I don’t think our guys were in awe (of Coastal Carolina),” Hartleb said. “Right now, we’re making too many mistakes to get

over the hump, but I think each week we see progress in a lot of areas.”

Drew is a stretch of a candidate, but still one that I think should be considered. Securing Drew would be a challenge for Illinois as Drew is just wrapping up his first season with Vanderbilt and is under contract through 2022. But, if it’s a possibility, I think it’s one the Illini should pursue. Drew has proven his success as a head coach. He took over the head coaching role at Valparaiso in 2011 after his father retired. Drew reached the NCAA Tournament twice while posting a 124-49 record in five seasons with the Crusaders. Now, in his first season with Vanderbilt, Drew finished 19-14 in the regular season with upsets over Florida and South Carolina, losing to Kentucky by six points on two separate occasions.

Illinois is an attractive destination for Drew because the Big Ten is historically a better basketball conference and Illinois is better known for its basketball than Vanderbilt. But, one major element that Drew possesses is his assistant coaching staff. Vanderbilt’s associate head coach is a name that many Illinois fans recognize: Roger Powell Jr. A forward for Illinois from 2001-2005, Powell was a crucial part of the 2005 Illinois Final Four run. Powell became an assistant coach at Valparaiso in 2011 when Drew was hired as head coach, following him to Vanderbilt. If Drew were to come to Illinois, Powell would be right alongside.

gasick2@dailyillini.com

Matt is a Junior in Business. gertsme2@dailyillini.com


THE DAILY ILLINI  |  WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

3B

Monday, March 13, 2017

# BDROOMS

FU RN / LA UNF U UN DR RN YI A/ C NU NIT PA RK ING UT ON ILI S TIE S I ITE NC L.

FU RN / LA UNF U UN DR RN YI A/ C NU NIT PA RK ING UT ON ILI S TIE S I ITE NC L.

Rental Quicklist # BDROOMS

MISC.

309 Green

217-366-3500

www.309Green.com

Joseph M. Thompson

MISC.

217-493-8603

jthompson.55@comcast.net

309 E. Green, C.

4 STD

F

44 4 4

New low spring rates, ZEro DowN, refer a friend for $250 giftcard

512 1/2 E. John, C.

3

F

44

Best Location, Spacious Bedrooms, Great price

309 E. Green, C.

4 STD

F

44 4 4

Fall rate Drop! $240 Giftcard or lwr. rates. Min. full 4b/2b units remain. Tour & get $10

514 1/2 E. John, C.

3

F

44

Best Location, Best Deal, Starting at $1,200 (400 per)

309 E. Green, C.

4 DLX

F

44 4 4

1 full unit avail., ZEro DowN SpriNG, private balc., 200 ext. sq. ft w/dining rm table

JSM

309 E. Green, C.

4 DLX

F

44 4 4

Fall rate Drop! $240 Giftcard or effective. rates, private balconies. Tour & get $10

508 E. John St., C.

4

F

44 4

New 60" Smart TV's, renovated Kitchen, Granite, Stainless Steel Appliances, Secure Entry

309 E. Green, C.

2

F

44 4 4

1 bed space left at a great price! Great size bdrms w/study desk & chair

601 w. Green St., U.

4

F

44 4

Great Urbana Location, Completely renovated, open Floor plans, parking included

309 E. Green, C.

2

F

44 4 4

Min. vacacies left, rmmate matching avail., ind. liability lease, balcony w/view!

107 E. Chalmers St., C.

3

F

44 4

Completely renovated, Stainless Steel Appliances, New Security Gates for Fall 2017, Great Location

707 S. Sixth St., C.

1,2

F

44

Great Location, Nearby parking, Beverage Chillers, Queen Bed (1Br), Secure Entry

1,2

F

44 4 4

Granite Countertops, LED Lighting, TV's (2Br), Near Krannert, Covered parking Available

Advantage Properties

217-344-0394

www.advantageproperties.com

217-359-6108

www.jsmliving.com

203 N. Gregory, U.

1,2

F

44 4

1Br & 2Br with Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D, sec bldg

701 S. Gregory St., U.

204 N. Harvey, U.

1,2

F

44 4

1Br & 2Br with Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D, sec bldg

Klatt Properties

306 N. Harvey, U.

2

F

44 4

Luxury 2Br 2BA Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D

204 E. Clark, C.

1-3

F/U

4 4 4

$785-890, laundry on site, most utilities included

1003 w. Main, U.

2

F

44 4

Newest Luxury 2Br 2BA Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D

505 w. Springfield, U.

2

F/U

4 4 4

$890, laundry on site, most utilities included

1003 w. Clark, U.

1

F

44 4

1Br with Hi Speed int, near Engr, w/D

409 w. Elm, U.

2

F/U

4 4 4

$890, laundry on site, most utilities included

1005 w. Stoughton, U.

1

F

44 4

1 Br Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D, sec bldg

603 w. High, U.

5

4

4

$450/bedroom, can be split into 2 apartments

1010 w. Main, U.

1,2

F

44 4

1 Br & 2Br 2BA with Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D, sec bldg

710 w. California, U.

1-6

F/U

4

4

House - 400/bedroom

Group Houses

2,3,4

F

44 4

2,3, & 4 bedroom houses fully furnished, advantageproperties.com

712 w. California, U.

10 bed

F/U

4

4

House - 375/bedroom

705 w. California, U.

7 bed

F/U

4

4

450/bedroom

7 bed

F/U

4

4

450/bedroom

Bailey Apartments

217-344-3008

www.baileyapartments.com

1010 w. Springfield, U.

3+4

F

4 4

Totally remodeled 2.5 blocks to the Quad

707 w. California, U.

111 S. Lincoln, U.

2

F

4 4

3 blocks to Quad corner Lincoln + Green

Lincolnshire Properties

911 w. Springfield, U.

1

F

4 4

Quiet Building/office location

111 S. Busey, U.

3

F

44 4

901 w. Springfield, U.

1+2

F

4 4

Large units

714 w. Elm, U.

2

F

4 4

1004 w. Springfield, U.

1

F

4 4

Super balconies from $595

Lofts 54

Bankier Apartments

217-328-3770

www.bankierapartments.com

217-367-6626

www.klattproperties.com

217-398-1998

www.lincolnshireprop.com www.lincolnshireprop.com; $1,200 www.lincolnshireprop.com; $850-$950

217-366-3500

www.lofts54.com

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 TH F

44 4 4

oNE spring space remains, $0 down, no sec. dep., just blocks from ArC

106 S. Coler, U.

3

F

44 4

Near the Engineering Quad. 2 Full Baths. patio/Balcony

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 A

F

44 4 4

FALL 2017 - short term leases avail, $240 gift card to red. rates, great location

202 E. Green, C.

1,2,4

F

44 4

Gym. Balcony, jacuzzi tubs, 50" TV

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 B

F

44 4 4

FALL 2017 - short term leases avail, $250 refer a friend, pET FriENDLY complex

303 w. Green, C.

1,2,3

B 44 4

private gated community with spacious apartments

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 B2 F

44 4 4

FALL 2017 - short term leases available, reduced rates, largest flat in senior land

410 E. Green, C.

1,2,3

F

44 4

Conveniently located in the heart off campus. Lots of updates

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 TH F

44 4 4

FALL 2017 - short term leases avail, new low rates or $240 giftcard, pet friendly complex!

519 E. Green, C.

2

F

44 4

First class living in an unbeatable location. LEED certified. Gym

MHM Apartments

1107 S. Second, C.

4

F

44 4

Balconies off every bedroom. Close to Memorial Stadium and the ArC.

314 E. Clark, C.

3

F 44 4

Huge lofts, FrEE iNTErNET, Flat-screen TV, by County Mkt.

217-239-2310

303 S. Fifth, C.

2,3,4

F

44 4

NEw! private baths, FrEE iNTErNET, TV, Garage

606 E. white, C.

3

F

44 4

Bi-Level Lofts, private Baths, FrEE iNTErNET, TV

Burnham 310

www.burnham310.com

217-337-8852

www.mhmproperties.com

310 E. Springfield Ave., C

1

F

44 4 4

310 E. Springfield Ave., C

2

F

44 4 4

102 S. Lincoln, U.

2,3,4

F

4 4

FrEE internet, Balconies, Sundeck, walk to Engineering

310 E. Springfield Ave., C

3

F

44 4 4

808 S. oak, C.

2,3,4

F

4 4

Lofts, Balconies, FrEE internet, From $385

310 E. Springfield Ave., C

Studio

F

44 4 4

Old Towne Apartments

Campustown Rentals

204-206 w. washington, U. 2

$240 Gift Card or New Low rates, Strategic locations close to Green St.

1004 w. Stoughton, U.

4

F

4 4

Carpeted, onsite laundry, Flatscreen TVs, leather furniture, Buses close

F

4 4

$240 Gift Card or New Low rates, heart of campus, balconies

1002/904 w. Stoughton, U. 4

F

4 4

Carpeted, onsite laundry, Flatscreen TVs, leather furniture, Buses close

4

F

44 4

Spring 2017 – $299 first month, last month free

Smith Apartments

1-5

F

4 4

5 Month Leasing, pet Friendly Fall 2017

1106. S. Second, C.

1

F

4 4

$585 includes water, parking $60-$70, on site laundry

507 w. Church, C.

1

B

4 4

$530-550 includes water and one parking, on site laundry

511 w. Church, C.

1

B

4 4

$570-600 includes water and one parking, on site laundry

53 E. Chalmers, C.

2

F

44 4

$1550, parking $50-70

58 E. Armory, C.

2

F

44 4

$1100, includes one parking

1004 S. Locust, C.

2

F

4 4

$740-930, parking $50-70, on site laundry

1009 w. Clark, U.

2

F

4 4

$870, includes one parking, on site laundry

1012 w. Clark, U.

2

F

4 4

$870, includes one parking, on site laundry

511 w. Church, C.

2

B

4 4

$765-825, includes water and one parking, on site laundry

44 4

109 John, 515 Bash, 913 Third

3

F

305 Green, 306.5 Green

3

101 Green, 207 Green Campustown rentals

Capstone Quarters

217-367-7368

www.capstonequarters.com 1,2,3,4 B 4 4 4

$240 Gift Card or New Low rates, minimal full apartments remain

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Contact us at: diclassifieds@illinimedia.com or call 217-337-8337

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217-384-1925

www.smithapartments-cu.com

PLAY SPORTS! HAVE FUN! MAKE MONEY!

Help Wanted CampusTown Urgent Care is seeking a student to do very basic advertising. Please contact Lindsey at 217-344-9909.

217-344-2901

www.shlensapt.com

FOR RENT

Help Wanted

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E S C A P E R O U T E

Large, quiet 2Br; $680; Free parking; race at washington

4 4

F

E P I C S

44 4

Shlens Apartments

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M A R I A

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$240 Gift Card or New Low rates, minimal full apartments remain

101 Green, 309/311 Daniel

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217-531-2255

www.campustownrentals.com

217-778-9498

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4B Monday, March 13, 2017

THE DAILY ILLINI  |  WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES Gain knowledge and skills for the future.

Gain knowledge and skills for the future.

Whether your professional goal is to transform lives through practice, research, service or leadership, the College of Health Sciences at Rush University can help you secure a rewarding future. We offer degree and certificate options that span the most in-demand health care specialties. Audiology (AuD)

Audiologists are involved in the prevention, evaluation, diagnosis and management of hearing impairment; they administer and interpret various tests of auditory and vestibular function, fit hearing aids and other special devices and provide rehabilitative services. Traditional coursework and clinical experience combine in this four-year doctoral degree program that is ranked among the best in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. www.rushu.rush.edu/aud

Clinical Nutrition (MS) and the Combined MS/Dietetic Internship

Clinical nutritionists focus on improving patients’ nutritional health by addressing the relationship between food and well-being; they work closely with the patient and the health care team to design an individualized nutrition plan that suits the patient’s needs and/or medical condition(s). This program prepares students to become leaders in the field of nutrition and dietetics and apply evidence-based nutrition knowledge, advocate for nutrition issues, and contribute to the body of knowledge in the field. www.rushu.rush.edu/nutrition www.rushu.rush.edu/cndi

Doctor of Philosophy in Health Sciences (PhD)

This program is designed to prepare health care professionals for advanced leadership, research and educational roles within their professions by offering core coursework in education, research, statistics and leadership. Specialization tracks in select health professions are available. www.rushu.rush.edu/hs_phd

Health Sciences (BS)

Students in this program are prepared for competitive application into graduate degree programs in a variety of health care professional areas. These professions include, but are not limited to, graduate degree-granting programs in allied health, nursing, medical school and graduate biomedical sciences. www.rushu.rush.edu/bshs

Health Systems Management (MS)

Health care administrators are professionally trained in management, and they help to ensure that their organizations have the medical, operational and financial resources to serve a wide variety of health care needs. This program covers all facets including finance, operations, quality, strategy and marketing, organizational change and human resources management and is consistently ranked as one of the best in the nation by both U.S. News & World Report and Modern Healthcare. www.rushu.rush.edu/hsm

Imaging Sciences (BS)

Radiologic technologists, or radiographers, perform imaging examinations that aid in the diagnosis, intervention and treatment of diseases and medical conditions. Registered radiologic technologists can advance their education and skills with this program by gaining the knowledge and professional competencies needed to perform advanced-level imaging in Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Cardiac-Interventional (CI) or Vascular-Interventional Radiology (VI). An entry-level MRI track, for students who are unlicensed in radiography or nuclear medicine, is also available. www.rushu.rush.edu/imagingsciences

Medical Laboratory Science (MS)

Medical laboratory scientists are a vital part of the health care team; they collect and perform tests to analyze bodily fluids, which aids in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. This program is built around a core of basic and advanced theoretical knowledge and clinical practice in hematology, clinical chemistry, immunology, molecular diagnostics, immunohemotology and clinical microbiology. www.rushu.rush.edu/mls

Occupational Therapy (OTD)

Occupational therapists assist people of all ages to develop or regain daily living and work skills through therapeutic activities. This doctoral program integrates hands-on experience with an innovative curriculum and outstanding clinical affiliates to fully prepare graduates to practice in today’s advanced health care settings. www.rushu.rush.edu/occuth

Perfusion Technology (MS)

As integral members of the cardiovascular surgical team, perfusionists are in the operating room in any situation where it is necessary to support patients’ cardiopulmonary and circulatory functions. The program combines classroom knowledge, diverse clinical experiences and research in adult and pediatric settings. Students learn to operate lifesupport equipment such as heart-lung machines and intra-aortic balloon pumps and ventricular-assist devices. www.rushu.rush.edu/perfusion

Physician Assistant Studies (MS)

A physician assistant (PA) is a health care professional licensed to provide medical care with physician supervision. PAs make medical decisions and provide a broad range of diagnostic and therapeutic services. This nationally ranked program combines traditional coursework with advanced-practice clinical experiences and prepares students to become highly-qualified physician assistants in leadership roles in clinical practice, research and service. www.rushu.rush.edu/pa-program

Respiratory Care (MS)

Respiratory therapists are critical members of the health care team who apply scientific principles to prevent, identify and treat acute or chronic dysfunction of the cardiopulmonary system in a diverse patient population, from newborns and children to adults and the elderly. This program has a uniquely designed curriculum that offers outstanding leadership and advanced practice preparation in multiple areas, including critical and neonatal care and cardiopulmonary diagnostics. www.rushu.rush.edu/respiratorycare

Specialist in Blood Bank Certificate and Clinical Laboratory Management (MS)

Specialists in blood bank technology perform standard and specialized tests in blood donor centers, transfusion services and other laboratories. Clinical laboratory managers serve supervisory roles in labs in hospitals, public health and government agencies and in a variety of other clinical settings. This combined certificate and master’s degree program provides students with comprehensive instruction in blood group serology, transfusion medicine and laboratory management. Students gain advanced knowledge of immunohematology and its related disciplines with online graduate level courses. www.rushu.rush.edu/sbb www.rushu.rush.edu/clm

Speech-Language Pathology (MS)

Speech-language pathologists are involved in the prevention, evaluation, diagnosis and management of communication disorders associated with speech, voice, language and cognitive and swallowing impairments. Innovative coursework and outstanding clinical experience combine in this nationally ranked program to provide the practical and scientific knowledge and skills required by today’s speech-language pathologists. Research opportunities are available. www.rushu.rush.edu/slp

FOR MORE INFORMATION.

To learn about the admissions requirements and application process for your program of choice, or to register for an information session, visit www.rushu.rush.edu/health. For questions about admissions, contact the College of Health Sciences at CHS_Admissions@rush.edu.

Vascular Ultrasound (BS)

Vascular sonographers play a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with blood vessel disorders using ultrasound. This hands-on program gives students the opportunity to learn to perform vascular ultrasound exams in the classroom, student laboratory and on patients under the direction of credentialed vascular sonographers. www.rushu.rush.edu/vastech

The Daily Illini: Volume 146 Issue 48  
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