Issuu on Google+

VOLLEYBALL SPIKES THE SPARTANS

VISIT SALARYGUIDE.DAILYILLINI.COM TO SEARCH UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEE SALARIES

Tying up a sweep week after beating Michigan mid-week

See how your money is being spent

SPORTS, 1B

INSIDE

THE DAILY ILLINI

MONDAY November 11, 2013

The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM 

47˚ | 23˚ Vol. 143 Issue 44

|

FREE

Systematic review program to include external evaluators BY MARYCATE MOST

University tests new

STAFF WRITER

systematic review program

The University is rolling out a new process this year for systematic reviews of the University’s 80 academic departments with help from external reviewers, according to University officials. At a Campus Town Hall meeting last April, Provost Ilesanmi Adesida spoke about this new review process, which will begin this academic year with three “pilot” departments. “We are going to provide our departments and colleges functional and useful methods to gauge their effectiveness and to identify areas where they can continue to improve,” he said. Prior to the reform, departments, such as the department of agricultural and consumer economics, were evaluated through a self-review process, said Paul Ellinger, head of the department. But this year, special committees from other universities will begin reviewing each department. These committees will talk to students, faculty and staff and will assess the strengths and weaknesses of the respective departments, he said. “A lot of universities do this,” Ellinger said. “This isn’t that unique. This is something that is probably overdue, but it is also something that is difficult to start up ... and get in that routine of doing.” He noted that external reviewers from other institutions have perspective on the types of changes departments can reasonably make that may not occur to University employees. “I think that does give us some direction at this point in time,” he said. “We can sometimes have a bit of tunnel vision from the inside so it is helpful to get someone looking in from an outsider standpoint.”

The new systematic review program will be tested on three “pilot” departments this year: Q Department of mechanical science and engineering Q Department of sociology Q Department of agricultural and consumer economics SOURCE: STIG LANESSKOG, ASSOCIATE PROVOST FOR STRATEGIC PLANNING AND ASSESSMENT

From an administrative perspective, the use of external reviewers will also ensure that these reviews are consistent across departments, said Stig Lanesskog, associate provost for strategic planning and assessment, in an email. However, Matthew Ando, chair of the department of mathematics, said individual departments also see benefits to these reviews. Even before the University revised its review process, his department had made the decision to conduct an external review this year, he said. “External reviews are a very healthy way for the department to get some feedback on what it is doing,” Ando said. “And they are a very valuable way for the administration to see how the department is functioning.” Each department will be reviewed externally once every eight years. This year, three departments — sociology, agricultural and consumer economics, and mechanical science and engineering — will act as “pilot reviews,” allowing the Office of the Provost to assess the new sys-

VICTORIA PAI THE DAILY ILLINI

Tianyang Qin, a senior in psychology, signs the Peace Paper Project petition against domestic violence and rape on Thursday.

Pulping promotes consent culture BY ZILA RENFRO STAFF WRITER

Hannah Smith, freshman in LAS, smiled as she pulled the paper she made by hand from its mould. The large pink sheet was covered in roses, a peace sign and the phrase, “Equality is the only option.” No one would guess that this paper was made from women’s underwear. An organization called Peace Paper Project brought papermaking to Allen Hall last week from Nov. 4-7 in the form of “Panty Pulping,” or cutting up women’s underwear into pieces to transform them into paper. Margaret Mahan and Drew Matott co-created the Vermontbased Peace Paper Project. Mahan explained that Panty Pulping focuses on papermaking by hand as art therapy. “The idea is that we’re using the unmentionables to address

SEE REVIEW | 3A

the unmentionable,” Mahan said. “We are inviting people to come together and take a stand against sexual and domestic violence on college campuses to promote consent culture.” Elise Lanker, president of the Sexual Health Peers registered student organization,said consent culture was a term coined to oppose lack of consent, the objectification of women and aggressive sexuality. “Consent culture came about as a way to oppose rape culture and bring about this more sex-positive, more consent-positive message,” Lanker said. “Consent is not just the absence of a ‘no,’ but the presence of a very enthusiastic ‘yes.’” Lanker said the most common time for women to be at risk for sexual assault is their freshman year of college, and she said one in 12 college-aged men, when sur-

veyed, said that they had committed sexual assault as defined by the law. “It’s a very important topic to talk about anywhere, but especially on the college campus environment because of those numbers,” Lanker said. Mahan said the activity of hand papermaking is a healing process for victims of sexual assault or domestic violence. After the paper is created, it is often used in art projects to create books or to use as paper for letter writing. The Peace Paper Project also does papermaking for other communities with people in need of healing, such as survivors of trauma and people with physical disabilities. The first time Mahan said she encountered papermaking as a healing experience was when she met a veteran with PTSD who was transforming his uniform

into paper. “He said to me, ‘Papermaking saved my life,’” Mahan said. Students who tried panty pulping affirmed its calming nature. Parichay Swarup, freshman in Media, said that, in addition to recycling and social justice, papermaking is good because it can be peaceful. “I had a lot of work to do, so it was relaxing in so many ways,” Swarup said. About 40 pairs of underwear were pulped in the three days that the Peace Paper Project was on campus. Aside from the papermaking, a petition was available at the project’s desk that promoted consent culture. In that way, students could “still be engaged with the intention of the project by taking this vow to themselves to use their pow-

SEE PAPER | 3A

ROTC honor veterans with ceremony

Slicing up the cooking competition

BY STANTON POLANSKI STAFF WRITER

KELLY HICKEY THE DAILY ILLINI

Student sous chef, Jeff Sada, from the food science and human nutrition program, prepares a meal during University Housing’s Chefs’ Challenge on Thursday night at Ikenberry Commons. Sada worked with University Housing Dining Services Chef Brenda Welch to compete against other teams to prepare the best meal from a mystery basket of ingredients.

University ROTC honored veterans at the Armory track Sunday afternoon for Veterans Day with a 21-gun salute, a wreath bearing and a moment dedicated to veterans in attendance. ROTC students faced the crowd on the opposite side of the track — Army in camouflage, Navy in black, Air Force in blue and a small group holding salute guns stood in precise positions behind the podium at the edge of the track. The student military personnel systematically walked into position and sang each branch’s song. The methodical practice that went into their preparation was clear. For a week, each branch had 6 a.m. practice to prepare for the ceremony. “We’re all sleep deprived,” said Baxter Reed, an Air Force ROTC member and senior at the University. For the ROTC members who will enter the service after graduation, the age difference between themselves and some of the veter-

SARI LESK THE DAILY ILLINI

Members of the Air Force ROTC listen to a presentation at the TriServices Veterans Day Ceremony on Sunday at the Armory. The event was organized by the Navy ROTC.

»

ans does not matter. They simply see people who have gone through an experience that they will share very soon. “It’s like the changing of the guard,” Baxter said. “We’re looking ahead, and they’re looking

» » » » »

More inside: The campus community has taken November to honor veterans. To learn more turn to Page 6A.

SEE CEREMONY | 3A

Ground broken on center to provide services for veterans to continue their higher education » » » » »

BY DANIELLE BANKS STAFF WRITER

Local University and state officials met at an event Friday at the corner of Lincoln Avenue and Nevada Street to break ground on a new center for wounded veterans. The Chez Family Foundation Center for Wounded Veterans in Higher Education will be constructed by fall 2015 and is funded by various gifts, including the top gift of $6 million from the Chez Family Foundation. Another $4 million donation was given

through the Illinois Jobs Now! program. “It will provide services to the families of veterans, counseling, financial assistance, and also have living facilities for severely wounded veterans to continue their higher education,” said Ron Chez, president of the Chez Family Foundation. “It’s everybody’s responsibility (and) obligation to honor those who have served their country so bravely. ... We just try to fi nd ways to fi ll a need.” Tanya Gallagher, dean of

DAILYILLINI, DAILYILLINISPORTS

INSIDE

Police

2A

|

AHS, said she planned the center’s development and is helping to organize its programs. She said she hopes the center will be equipped to help veterans with the most severe disabilities. She said the University has a long history of working with disabled students; the Division of Disability Resources and Educational Services was founded by Dr. Tim Nugent in 1948 to aid World War II veterans with disabilities. “We are the college that has been running the Beckwith pro-

gram as a part of Nugent Hall, which is a program for students with severe disabilities that require assistance with activities and daily living,” she said. “We have unique expertise and a long history as a national leader in disability, so it was really within our vision to move forward and reach out to the best group of veterans.” Gallagher said she is confident that the Center will contribute to veterans’ successes post-college, despite any disabilities they may have.

2A

|

Opinions

4A

|

Letters

4A

|

Crossword

5A

|

Comics

5A

|

Life

rest of the nation, and through its breakthroughs, will set an example that other organizations can follow. “On behalf of the entire campus community, I extend my sincere appreciation to Ron Chez and the Chez Family Foundation, Governor Quinn and the important donors who have stepped up to make this important project a reality,” she said in a press release.

Danielle can be reached at dmbanks2@dailyillini.com.

@THEDAILYILLINI

THEDAILYILLINI

@THEDAILYILLINI, @DI_OPINION, @DI_SPORTS Horoscopes

“Five to 10 years from now, I’m envisioning we’ll see more of these graduates moving on to careers and contributing wonderful talents to the nation, and that more of the nation will see that they have a very bright future. Their future will not be defi ned by the severity of their disability,” she said. “The center will be groundbreaking for innovations relative to assisting individuals with the disabilities that these veterans are presenting.” She added that the center will serve as a locus for the

&

Culture

6A

|

Sports

1B

|

THEDAILYILLINI Classifieds

4B

|

Sudoku

4B

»


2A

Monday, November 11, 2013

THE DAILY ILLINI 512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820

217 • 337-8300 Copyright © 2013 Illini Media Co.

The Daily Illini is the independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. Editor-in-chief Darshan Patel 217 • 337-8365 editor@DailyIllini.com

Managing editors Maggie Huynh Ryan Weber reporting@dailyillini.com

Creative director

Eunie Kim visuals@dailyillini.com

News editor

Lauren Rohr 217 • 337-8345 news@dailyillini.com

Asst. opinions editor Nicki Halenza

Brian Yu 217 • 337-8350 technograph @dailyillini.com Brenton Tse 217 • 337-8560 photo@dailyillini.com

BY NANCY BLACK

Hasan Khalid

Today’s Birthday

Asst. photo editor Video editor

Emily Thornton

Hannah Prokop 217 • 337-8350 news@dailyillini.com

Scott Durand 217 • 337-8320 design@dailyillini.com

Danielle Brown

Lindsey Rolf 217 • 337-8356 copychief@dailyillini.com

Asst. daytime editor the217 producers Lyanne Alfaro Imani Brooks

Sports editor

Advertising sales manager Nick Langlois ssm@illinimedia.com

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)

Vidcast producer Design editor

Copy chief

Asst. copy chief Audrey Majors

Web editor

Asst. sports editors

Folake Osibodu 217 • 337-8350 online@dailyillini.com

Nicholas Fortin Torrence Sorrell J.J. Wilson

Social media director

Karyna Rodriguez

Alison Marcotte 217 • 337-8343 features@dailyillini.com

Asst. features editors

Classifieds sales director

Sarah Soenke Emma Weissmann

Deb Sosnowski

Adam Huska 217 • 337-8250 opinions@dailyillini.com

Travis Truitt

Opinions editor

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

Honor service. Indulge your passion for creative projects this year, and your career will thrive. Follow inspiration. The money comes easily when the fun level is high. Romance flavors all this expression, and partnership increases between January and July. Share, exhibit and launch. Rest and restore balance next October, before a busy, profitable winter. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Eliot Sill 217 • 337-8344 sports@dailyillini.com

Features editor

Q Criminal damage to property was reported in the 300 block of East Armory Avenue around 6:30 p.m. on Nov. 1. According to the report, an unknown suspect broke the side view mirror of the victim’s vehicle. Q Criminal damage to property was reported in the 1300 block of South Mattis Avenue around 3 p.m. Saturday. According to the report, an unknown suspect damaged the victim’s front storm door. Q Battery was reported at Merry Ann’s Diner, 1 E. Main St., around 2 a.m. Sunday. According to the report, an

WEATHER unknown male suspect battered a male victim. Q A 23-year-old male was arrested on the charges of possession of cannabis and possession of drug paraphernalia in 400 block East White Street around 4 a.m. Saturday.

University Q Theft was reported in campus lot D-15, 1201 W. Oregon St., on Thursday night. According to the report, a laptop was stolen from the victim’s unlocked car between 5:15 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Thursday. The laptop has an estimated value of $1,000. Q A 25-year-old male was

arrested on the charge of possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver at an apartment on East John Street at around 11 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, offi cers found powder cocaine packaged for sale, MDMA, two ecstasy tablets and more than $5,000 in cash in the suspect’s apartment. Q Theft was reported at Lundgren Hall, 1201 S. Fourth St., on Wednesday. According to the report, the victim left his unlocked room for around 10 minutes and $19 was taken from his wallet.

Compiled by Hannah Prokop

HOROSCOPES

Emily Waldron

Daytime editor

Champaign

Photo editor

Tyler Davis Austin Keating

Newscast director

POLICE

Technograph editor

Krizia Vance 217 • 337-8560 video@dailyillini.com

Asst. news editors

THE DAILY ILLINI | WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

Advertising director

Production director Kit Donahue

Publisher

Lilyan Levant

Night system staff for today’s paper Night editor: Sari Lesk Photo night editor: Kelly Hickey Copy editors: Kirsten Keller, Sean Hammond, Rebecca Kapolnek, Brittney Nadler, Stephanie Medina, Kat Boehle, Amelia Mugavero Designers: Taylor Carlson, Siobhan Cooney, Natalie Gacek, Daniel Chung Page transmission: Franklin Wang Periodical postage paid at Champaign, IL 61821. The Daily Illini is published Mondays through Thursdays during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and Mondays in summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-oftown and out-of-state rates available upon request.

to push them. Write down an adventure or two for your autobiography.

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) Today is an 8 — Write down long-term goals, and get philosophical. Don’t sweat the small stuff. Keep track of spending. You could even let others decide. With an extra dose of confidence, you’re fired up for an adventure.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) Today is an 8 — Join forces to get the funding. Bring it all back home. You’re even more attractive now. Give yourself credit for the work done. Make sure you have the facts to clear up any confusion.

Today is an 8 — Pay close attention to your dreams over the next few days. Get them down in writing for future reference. It’s okay if you can’t take action yet. Have compassion for yourself. And don’t overlook a major issue.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

Today is an 8 — Being especially sensitive to the opinions of others is key. Express yourself clearly, but mostly listen. Your intuition reveals what you need to know. Relax with friends.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) Today is a 9 — Set new goals together. This requires patience. You’ll make money in the long run. Investigate your personal outer limits, and be willing

Today is an 8 — Collaboration flows. There’s plenty to do. It may require some effort and dedication to complete everything, but it’s possible and worth it. Romance is still part of the picture. Write a love letter. Today is a 9 — More work lands, to the point that it could get hectic. Put a commitment in writing to save time. Achieve your main goal, and then indulge a fantasy. Include something delicious.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) Today is an 8 — All work and no play can be exhausting. Take frequent small breaks, or one sizable one where you

Today is an 8 — Stay close to home for a couple of days, and save. Ask for help from a natural researcher. You can be quite persuasive. Offer encouragement. Your spiritual practices clear your mind. You know just what to say.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) Today is an 8 — You’re smart and getting smarter. And you’ll find it easier to focus. Just when you thought it wasn’t possible, more money comes in. Keep it from going back out by diverting to savings.

WEDNESDAY 40˚ | 24˚ Sunny THURSDAY 49˚ | 32˚ Partly Cloudy FRIDAY 48˚ | 34˚ Mostly Cloudy

The Daily Illini is online everywhere you are. VISIT dailyillini.com

FOLLOW @TheDailyIllini @DI_Opinion @DI_Sports @DISportsLive @technograph @the217 LIKE thedailyillini dailyillinisports readtechno the217 TUMBLR thedailyillini PINTEREST thedailyillini

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) Today is an 8 — Have faith in your own imagination and your ability to creatively bring home the bacon. Think through all the possibilities. Travel boosts your self-esteem, although home fires can be very nice. You’re stronger than you thought.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) Today is a 9 — You’re entering a two-day innovation phase. Use your talent. Go ahead and throw your hat over the fence. Make a crazy promise you have no idea how to keep. Your power is increasing. Talk about it. Support comes from mysterious sources.

INSTAGRAM thedailyillini YOUTUBE thedailyillini LINKEDIN thedailyillini

CORRECTIONS When we make a mistake, we will correct it in this place. We strive for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editor-in-Chief Darshan Patel at (217) 337-8365.

General contacts

Main number .......... (217) 337-8300 Advertising ............. (217) 337-8382 Classified................ (217) 337-8337 Newsroom .............. (217) 337-8350 Newsroom fax: ....... (217) 337-8328 Production .............. (217) 337-8320

Newsroom

Corrections: If you think something has been incorrectly reported, please call Editor-in-Chief Darshan Patel at (217) 337-8365. Online: If you have a question about DailyIllini.com or The Daily Illini’s social media outlets, please email our Web editor Folake Osibodu at online@dailyillini.com. On-air: If you have comments or questions about The Daily Illini’s broadcasts on WPGU-FM 107.1, please email our managing editors, Maggie Huynh and Ryan Weber, at onair@dailyillini.com. Employment: If you would like to work for the newspaper’s editorial department, please fill out our form or email employment @dailyillini.com. News: If you have a news tip, please call news editor Lauren Rohr at (217) 337-8345 or email news@ dailyillini.com. Calendar: If you want to submit events for publication in print and online, visit the217.com. Sports: If you want to contact the sports staff, please call sports editor Eliot Sill at (217) 337-8344 or email sports@dailyillini.com. Life & Culture: If you have a tip for a Life & Culture story, please call features editor Alison Marcotte at (217) 337-8343 or email features@ dailyillini.com. Photo: If you have any questions about photographs or to suggest photo coverage of an event, please call photo editor Brenton Tse at (217) 337-8560 or email photo@ dailyillini.com. Letters to the editor: Letters are limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college. The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions. Email opinions@ dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.”

Advertising

Placing an ad: If you would like to place an ad, please contact our advertising department. • Classified ads: (217) 3378337 or e-mail diclassifieds@illinimedia.com. • Display ads: (217) 337-8382 or e-mail diadsales@illinimedia.com.

  ]  

‘•‹†‡”‹‰ ”ƒ†…Š‘‘Žˆ‘”



‹ƒ…‹ƒŽ‰‹‡‡”‹‰ǫ ‘‡–‘–Š‡ 

ˆ‘”ƒ–‹‘‡••‹‘

GRAB YOUR FREE COPY DAILY Nov 11 - Nov 18

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 ˜KCA9B·G65G?9H65@@vs. Valparaiso at 7PM / State Farm Center ° FREE FOR U OF I STUDENTS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13

MARK YOUR CALENDARS

˜A9B·G65G?9H65@@vs. Valparaiso at 6:30PM / State Farm Center

Women’s Basketball/ SIU: Nov. 21

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14 ˜KCA9B·G65G?9H65@@vs. Mississippi Valley St. at 7PM / State Farm Center ° FREE FOR U OF I STUDENTS

Volleyball/ Northwestern: Nov. 27

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)

TUESDAY 37˚ | 19˚ Sunny

The Daily Illini is located on the third floor at 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. Our office hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

WPGU 107.1

THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE

Men’s Basketball/ Chicago St.: Nov. 22

disconnect and completely relax. You’d benefit from a little romance, too. Let imagination replace money.

HOW TO CONTACT US MONDAY 47˚ | 23˚ Rain and Snow Showers

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15

˜JC@@9M65@@vs. Indiana at 7PM / Huff Hall / FREE FOR U OF I STUDENTS

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16 ˜:CCH65@@vs. Ohio State at TBA / Memorial Stadium ° Honor Our Military Game- FREE American Flag bandanas will be given out to the first 7,500 fans ˜JC@@9M65@@vs. #16 Purdue at 7PM / Huff Hall / FREE FOR U OF I STUDENTS ° Get in FREE with your Illinois vs. Ohio State football ticket stub SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17 ˜KCA9B·G65G?9H65@@vs. Alcorn St. at 1PM / State Farm Center ° FREE FOR U OF I STUDENTS ˜A9B·G65G?9H65@@vs. Bradley at 5PM / State Farm Center ° Halftime- America’s Got Talent Semifinalist- The Chicago Boyz CfUb[Y?fig\.7caYhch\YKcaYb·g[UaYUbXfYWY]jYmcifCfUb[Y?fig\ @]bY7UfXZcfh\YAYb·g[UaYUZhYfkUfXg


THE DAILY ILLINI | WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

Monday, November 11, 2013

Insurers required to cover mental illness BY CARRIE TEEGARDIN AND MISTY WILLIAMS MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

ATLANTA — Rosalynn Carter has tried for decades to convince the world that mental illness is no different from physical illness. On Friday, Carter’s longheld conviction became part of federal law. U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, speaking at the former first lady’s mental health symposium in Atlanta, announced a new federal rule requiring insurers to cover mental illness and addiction in the same way they cover other health problems. Congress passed the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act in 2008. But until now, the government had not written detailed regulations in support of the law. The long-awaited pages of fine print recognized the completion of a public policy ideal for Carter. “I often have said that if insurance covered mental illness the way other diseases like cancer or diabetes are covered, there would be less stigma against these diseases, and we all would benefit from healthier mothers, brothers, workers and friends,” Carter said. Advocates say that the parity requirements, combined with new requirements for mental health coverage under the Affordable Care Act, represent a profound cultural shift for the nation. “This has been a dream of Mrs. Carter’s for over 20 years,” said Dr. Thomas H. Bornemann, director of the Carter Center’s Mental Health Program. “It has been her No. 1 public policy goal. I can’t tell you what meaning that gives to her and to all of us at the Carter Center that after this long road — we got it.” Since the passage of the Parity Act in 2008, most health

plans started making changes to achieve compliance. But the rules will spell out exactly what is required to abide by the law. Attorneys, consultants and advocates said they needed to closely study the regulations to determine exactly how they might change the experience of patients seeking mental health and substance abuse treatment. The rule is supposed to guarantee that insurers won’t charge more for co-pays, deductibles and visits for mental health or addiction treatment. Among its provisions, the government said: —Ensuring that parity applies to mental health treatment that may or may not be covered under current policies, including residential treatment and intensive outpatient care. These are especially important in the treatment of addiction. —Requiring greater transparency by health plans. —Clarifying that parity applies to all parts of the plan, including geographic limits, facility-type limits and network adequacy. “This is excellent news,” said Dr. Nadine Kaslow, a professor at the Emory University School of Medicine and the presidentelect of the American Psychological Association. “It’s one thing to say there’s parity. It’s another thing to put concrete realities behind that.” Kaslow said the rule should make sure that insurers offer more robust lists of health care providers to treat mental illness and addiction, so that patients do not find that all of the providers on a list are booked up and not accepting new patients. “This should provide real and much quicker access to care,” she said. As Carter noted, Kaslow and others said the rule will reduce the stigma associated with seeking treatment. “It’s just a wonderful recognition that mental health is a big

KENT D. JOHNSON MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius talks about the Affordable Care Act at the Southside Medical Center in Atlanta on Friday. She was in town to discuss enrollment options available to Georgia residents. A focus of the event was to emphasize that mental illness is no different than physical. issue,” said Ellyn Jeager, director of public policy and advocacy at Mental Health America of Georgia. “Voices are being heard.” Jeager, who attended Friday’s Carter Center event, noted, however, that there is still much work to be done. Georgia’s dearth of mental health providers presents a big hurdle, said Cynthia Wainscott, a mental health advocate in Bartow County. Less than half of Georgia’s counties have a psy-

chiatrist, she said. Too many people with substance abuse and mental health problems don’t get the appropriate care they need — if any at all, Wainscott said. “We’ve got to fi x that and (the parity rule) is a step in the right direction,” she said. Mental health care in Georgia has had a troubled history. In 2010, after disclosures of abuse and deaths of dozens of patients at state mental hospitals, the state struck a settle-

ment agreement with the Justice Department that calls for Georgia to move to a community-based system of care. The Carter Center helped to craft that agreement, alongside mental health advocates and others. Since then, the state has closed at least two psychiatric facilities and has added dozens of new community services, such as crisis stabilization units, which provide short-term care in the event of a mental- or behavioral-health crisis.

Syrians fight to keep educating future leaders BY HANNAN ADELY MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

HACKENSACK, N.J. — Syrian students and professors, some who risked death and imprisonment just to get to school, have now had their lives transformed by scholarships and fellowships that brought them to college campuses around the world to study and teach. Montclair State University, Felician College and Fairleigh Dickinson University are among 40 colleges in several countries that joined a partnership launched by the Institute of International Education a year ago called the Syria Consortium for Higher Education in Crisis. The effort, with support from the nonprofit group Jusoor and the Illinois Institute of Technology, was designed to give aid to Syrians amid an “academic emergency” where war has made it impossible or highly dangerous for students and professors to go to school. “The situation for higher education in Syria right now is catastrophic,” said Daniela Kaisth, vice president of external affairs for the Institute of International Education. “Actual physical buildings have been damaged, destroyed and are filled with refugees.” Students and academics trying to get to school have faced gunfire, military checkpoints and bombings in the streets. Two major universities that tried to stay open were bombed during exams. Scholars have also been threatened, arrested and killed for speaking out against the government or participating in protests. Mohamad Bassel Khair, who

is earning a graduate degree at Montclair State University, said his scholarship took him and his wife away from a place where death always loomed. In July 2012, a bomb blew in the windows of the clinic where he worked, and he suffered a hand injury. He and his wife were threatened for aiding refugees and because his wife, a journalist, had posted opinions on her Facebook page against violence, he said. Relatives were arrested, and one was tortured, he said. Khair fled to Egypt, but work was scarce. That’s where he got the news about the full scholarship for graduate studies at Montclair State University. “When I got the email, I started crying. My wife was crying. It was a dramatic moment. I was so happy,” said Khair, 26, who enrolled this semester and is studying nutrition and food science. “When we arrived here, we started to sleep better, eat better,” he said. “We are relaxed now, but every day you hear about someone (who has been killed).” Montclair State is hosting four students and scholars from Syria, said Marina Cunningham, executive director of the school’s Global Education Initiative. The school has also brought academics from other countries in crisis in previous years through the IIE’s Scholar Rescue Fund, she said. “Our students are exposed to different international points of view,” Cunningham said. “It supports our philosophy that we have to help fellow scholars, especially those that cannot practice free speech.” Felician College, based in Lodi,

offered a full scholarship this year to a student from Aleppo, Syria. Officials there also say the school community learns and benefits from having foreign students. “We’re looking to expand our international student population here at Felician,” said Corrine Spring, the college’s director of international enrollment services. “Knowing we can help a student who is in need makes a lot of us appreciate the institution as a whole.” The student, fearing retribution against his family back home, did not want to be identified but said school became too dangerous because “no one knows what might happen while you are on the way.” He said there was stray gunfire and the potential for a battle to erupt at any time. He described his scholarship as a blessing from God. “I honestly still don’t believe what happened to me,” he said. “I am really lucky.” Fairleigh Dickinson in Teaneck is offering a partial scholarship for tuition worth $25,000 and a $10,000 housing grant, but has had no recipients yet, said Diana Cvitan, director of the Office of Global Learning. Demand has been high, Kaisth said; IIE got 5,300 applications for 150 spots when the program opened up in January. But in many cases, students can’t put any money toward their education at all. Top-off grants are available but limited, she said. IIE plans to expand its Emergency Student Fund and the Scholar Rescue Fund and is asking for more colleges and universities to get involved. The need is dire, Kaisth said.

MCCLATCHY TRIBUNE

WASHINGTON — France’s role in the unraveling of an international deal to curb Iran’s nuclear program brought angry reactions Sunday from Tehran, glowing praise from Iran’s detractors and a whirl of speculation about what the French motive might be. A marathon round of international talks in Geneva fell short of a widely anticipated deal early Sunday after French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius objected, saying the terms of a preliminary accord were too easy on Tehran. Many nations fear Iran has been secretly seeking a nuclear weapons capability, despite its claims to want nuclear power only for energy and medical purposes. Fabius broke an informal rule of the six-nation diplomatic group that has been negotiating with the Iranians by going public with his criticism of the preliminary deal, which was aimed at opening the way for comprehensive negotiations over the nuclear program. “One wants a deal ... but not a sucker’s deal,” Fabius said. When the negotiations ground to a temporary halt, Iran was quick to point a finger.

Iranian President Hassan believes multiple motives may Rouhani told the National be involved, including France’s Assembly that Tehran would desire to halt nuclear proliferanot be intimidated by any coun- tion but also interests in selling try’s “sanctions, threats, con- arms to Saudi Arabia and othtempt and discrimination,” er Arab nations in the Persian according to Iran’s student Gulf that fear Iran’s regional news service. “For us there power and would appreciate the are red lines that cannot be French stand. crossed.” Paris may also believe that it T he semihas an interest in strengthenofficial Fars ing its position news agency in the region, criticized the at a time when “dest r uct ive roles of France m a ny t here and Israel” for believe U. S. the failure of power is on the wane, Nadnegotiators to reach an interLAURENT FABIUS er said. FRENCH FOREIGN MINISTER im deal and ran “This could a caricature of be a way to F rance as a strengthen their ties genfrog firing a gun. “By shooterally,” he said. ing he feels he is important,” Nader said one downside is the commentary said. that France’s initiative could In contrast, Sen. John weaken the efforts of the sixMcCain, R-Ariz., tweeted that nation group that has been France “had the courage to pre- trying to work out a diplomatvent a bad nuclear agreement ic solution to the Iran nuclear issue. The six are Britain, with Iran. Vive la France!” The halt in talks set off a China, Germany and Russia, debate on whether France’s as well as the U.S. and France. The French stance weakintervention was motivated by commercial or geopolitical ens the unity of the group, interests in the Middle East. which has helped bring Iran Alireza Nader, a Middle East to the bargaining table, and specialist at Rand Corp., said he it strengthened the Iranian

“One wants a deal ... but not a sucker’s deal.”

FROM 1A

REVIEW tem and evaluate how it is working, Lanesskog said. He also said that each department will conduct internal reviews in addition to the new external review process. Based on the results of these two separate reviews, the department will adapt to the suggestions that were made and find ways to improve their programs. Ellinger said departments sometimes face a lack of additional funding when trying to make suggested reforms. As a result, the department must attempt to make changes without a budget increase. “The real fundamental question is: What are three or four things that this department should be looking at as strategic initiatives, without additional resources?” Ellinger said. “Everyone has great ideas if there were millions of dollars thrown at you, but that is not the situation here.” Ellinger attributes the lack of systematic reviews to the budget cuts that have affected the University over the past decade. “I think it is something that campuses have been thinking about for quite a while,” he said. “They might have decided that it might not be the right time, when we are going through budget cuts, to sort of put this extra burden on top. So I think now they think it is a good opportunity to do so.”

FROM 1A

PAPER er to prevent violence in thought, speech and action,” Mahan said. The University is the last stop on the Peace Paper Project’s tour of the United States. However, from November through March they plan to continue their work panty pulping abroad in the United Kingdom and in northern Spain. “It’s not just about making paper,” she said. “We don’t need paper. But we need vehicles of self-expression that can be new and healing and empowering, and that’s what paper is.”

Zila can be reached at zrenfro2@dailyillini.com.

FROM 1A

CEREMONY

CARMINE GALASSO MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

Joumana Jaber, an art teacher, pictured April 9, 2012, on the Montclair State University campus; her Syrian son (not pictured) is a recipient of the The Institute of International Educator Scholarship Rescue Fund. “It’s very terrible inside the country and outside the country,” she said. “They don’t have funds to continue studying or they’re in refugee camps. It’s terrible for a country because you’re going to lose a generation of students and leaders.” Jumana Jaber, an art and design teacher from Damascus, came to Montclair State in July as a visiting scholar, and her son received a scholarship to study computer science at the school — both through the IIE’s student and scholar funds. They had to leave, she said, as teachers and doctors were increasingly targeted. Her husband, also a professor, was picked up by police and released only after a student intervened on his behalf. Jaber said travel to the school

where she taught became impossible because checkpoint stops could be frequent and take hours. Meanwhile, money had devalued and electricity, heat and gas outages grew frequent, she said, while bombs flew overhead every day for two years. “I think it’s a good chance for me to go and start a new life,” Jaber said. “Maybe we will be safe, me and my husband and son.” Syria’s turmoil began in March 2011 with protests against the regime of President Bashar Assad, and the violence and destruction has only grown worse since then. About 100,000 people have been killed, and 2 million fled the country, according to the United Nations. An additional 4 million are internally displaced refugees.=

France’s motives for Iran nuclear program deal questioned BY PAUL RICHTER

3A

narrative that Iran has been willing to deal but that Israel, hawks in the U.S. Congress and now France may really prefer a military confrontation. Francois Heisbourg, a former French official in Paris who is chairman of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, saw different motives. He noted that France has long taken a hard line on Iran’s program, going back to the government of former Prime Minister Jacques Chirac. He said the French position may also reflect the fact that France “hates signing on the dotted line anything that appears to have been produced by Americans.” Heisbourg said that in domestic politics, “standing up to the Americans will be a winner for (Prime Minister Francois) Hollande’s government,” even though the Iran nuclear issue isn’t especially important to the French public. Yet Heisbourg and other observers noted that is it not clear to what extent the French objections actually upset Washington. Although the Obama administration clearly craves a deal with Iran, Secretary of State John F. Kerry went easy on France after the halt in

talks and made clear that the administration shares many of France’s concerns about Iran’s heavy-water reactor and medium-enriched uranium. Some analysts speculated that some in Washington may be pleased if France’s push leads to a tougher deal at the next round of negotiations, which are to start Nov. 20 in Geneva. A Western official who declined to be identified, citing diplomatic sensitivities, said that France was “only playing its traditional role within the group” and that the six nations were largely in agreement by the end of the negotiations Saturday night. In comments on “Meet the Press” on Sunday, Kerry again downplayed the idea that France had undermined the deal, saying that the United States too wanted more “clarity” about the terms of the deal and that the six powers remain united. He also defended the U.S. position in the talks: “We are not blind, and I don’t think we’re stupid,” he said. “I think we have a pretty strong sense of how to measure whether or not we are acting in the interests of our country and of the globe.”

behind. At the same time we’re all trying to figure out how to serve this nation as best as we can. We have so much honor and respect to show them that we thank them every day — not just Veterans Day — for what they did and what we’re planning to do.” Baxter recently found out that he would be a pilot after he graduates, a position he has always wanted. “It’s always been a childhood dream to fly planes,” he said. Joining the Navy was in Kelly Lorentson’s blood. Her father, who has watched her take part in the annual ceremony for the past three years, was also in the Navy, as was her grandfather and several of her uncles and cousins. Honoring her father, who served the Navy for 30 years — the maximum duration he could — and was sent to England following 9/11, was important to her. “It means a lot,” said Lorentson, a senior at the University. “My dad was here today, and he loves it. He went through ROTC and remembers being where I’m at. So it’s exciting for him, and it’s exciting for me too, being able to do that for him.” And while her father listened to guest speaker Allan Stratman’s voice echo off the banner-clad walls and the massive arch overhead, he felt proud that his daughter would keep the family tradition going. “For me, it’s tremendous pride seeing my daughter following in the Navy footsteps that I was in,” said Adrian Lorentson, Kelly’s father. “(My father) was also a Navy captain, retired. He went in during World War II, so it’s a Navy family now, and I’m very proud of that.” Adrian was one of the veterans who stood up as everyone else in attendance set off in applause. Still, he feels that serving in the Navy has done so much for him that when people thank him for what he has done, he is a bit offkilter. He appreciates everything the Navy offered him. “It was the best time,” he said. Though Adrian may be older than the students in the ROTC program and younger than many of the other veterans who might have served in Vietnam, he can still relate to all of them. Baxter said meeting a veteran for the first time feels more like meeting someone he’s already friends with — a feeling that will never go away, something military personnel can agree on. “There’s a camaraderie amongst all the services and there’s something you will never lose once you’re in the military. That camaraderie follows you for the rest of your life,” Adrian said. “There’s a special connection between you and another service member that nothing will ever take that away from you.”

Stanton can be reached at polansk1@dailyillini.com.


4A

OPINIONS

MONDAY 1RYHPEHU 7KH'DLO\,OOLQL 'DLO\,OOLQLFRP

%8,%2/ =3983 2%31- .%/3&7732

-

llinois will have same-sex marriage soon, but it came down to a close vote. For the bill to clear the House last week, where it was stalled on Valentine’s Day of this year, it needed 60 votes. It received 61. One of those votes belonged to the bill’s co-sponsor, Champaign’s Rep. Naomi Jakobsson, who had spent the previous week in Mattoon with her son, who was dying of Pick’s disease. When Jakobsson learned that Rep. Greg Harris, chief sponsor of the bill, would put the highly debated legislation to a vote, Jakobsson left her son’s side to ensure all Illinoisans could enjoy the right to marry. Her son died in the few hours when she was on her way back from Springfield. For that selfless sacrifice, we thank Naomi Jakobsson. Repeatedly, she expressed how much this marriage bill meant to her — she wouldn’t have left she son’s side had it not. Jakobsson and her family will become an important piece of the fight for equal rights for LGBT individuals in this state. Members of the gay and lesbian community should know what she did, and they owe her their utmost gratitude. This bill will bring so many people the happiness they have long been denied. It will bring existing families closer and forge new ones. It will give thousands of Illinoisans a right they deserve. But in light of this, we cannot and will not forget the sacrifice made. When we learned of Garret Jakobsson’s death, we were speechless. Even now, the right words to say thanks are hard to find. We offer the Jakobssons our condolences, and we hope they find solace as they helped countless Illinoisans find theirs in marriage.

THE DAILY ILLINI

EDITO RIAL U of I Foundation important arm in University funding The University of Illinois has to be creative in generating revenue, especially when the state contributes so little to it already. The University of Illinois Foundation, the fundraising arm of the University system, announced that it plans to more than double the donations it receives to $450 million over the next seven to 10 years. But we wondered just how much $450 million is each year. In 2013, that much money would account for 7.7 percent of the University of Illinois’ $5.4 billion operating budget. In 10 years, the $450 million will likely account for even less as the operating budget grows to over $6 billion. Relative to the operating budget, the UIF contributes little. But don’t let that percentage fool you: UIF does good work, and without it, the University would be in an even tighter pinch. The state doesn’t seem like it’s going to cough up anymore money for the University, so short of raising tuition, this is how the University can earn more money. That said, $450 million is nothing to scoff at. Look at what it can buy.

UIUC TUITION



CAMPUS

RANDOM







AT CHIPOTLE ON GREEN STREET

NEW ECE BUILDINGS

GRAINGER LIBRARIES

IN-STATE TUITION, ONE YEAR





OF STELLA ARTOIS

PERCENT OF THE YEAR’S SALARIES AT THE UNIVERSITY



HEAD FOOTBALL COACH TIM BECKMAN SALARIES

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION, ONE YEAR

STUDENTS’ IN-STATE TUITION, TOTAL EST. COST



OUT-OF-STATE TUITION, TOTAL EST. COST

AT STARBUCKS



OTHER SCHOOLS



FMPPMSR



AIMS TO EARN OVER SEVEN YEARS

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

FMPPMSR IOWA UNIVERSITY



AIMS TO EARN OVER EIGHT YEARS

FMPPMSR

HARVARD UNIVERSITY



AIMS TO EARN OVER FIVE YEARS

INCLUDING SAO TOME AND PRINCIPE; PALAU; SAINT PIERRE AND MIGUELON; COOK ISLANDS; ANGUILLA; FALKLAND ISLANDS; WALLIS AND FUTUNA; NAURU; MONTSERRAT; TUVALU; SAINT HELENA, ASCENSION, AND TRISTAN DA CUNHA; NIUE; TOKELAU

EASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY

COUNTRIES

STUDENTS’

GRANDE PUMPKIN SPICE LATTES

REALLY EXPENSIVE

ROYAL CARRIBBEAN’S OASIS OF THE SEAS CRUISE SHIP





13� MACBOOK PROS

JOHN HANCOCK TOWERS

STUDENTS’

 TWELVE-PACKS

HOPE DIAMONDS

STUDENTS’

CHICKEN BURRITO BOWLS

QMPPMSR EARNED IN ONE YEAR

Same-sex marriage opponents lack believable arguments BOSWELL HUTSON Opinions columnist

F

or once I’ve found myself more prideful of my politicians than I was the day before, so it begs the question: Why did it take so long? Well, earlier this week, it was announced that the Illinois House of Representatives and Senate finally passed bill SB 10, stating that same-sex marriage is to be legalized in Illinois (which Gov. Pat Quinn is expected to sign Tuesday at the University of Illinois at Chicago), making us the 15th state in the U.S. to have equal marriage rights. Don’t get me wrong, winning the political battle over same-sex marriage is immense-

ly important to me. As someone with progressive values, it shows that our country is slowly but surely advancing toward equal rights for all humans. I would much rather have the bill passed in 2013 than never have it passed at all. And I also understand that it has faced a pretty staunch political fight up until this point, but I don’t really understand why. If one person could articulate to me a legitimate reason why gays and lesbians shouldn’t have the right to be married, I would surely listen to what they had to say out of pure curiosity. The problem is, though, that none of them have remotely convinced me of the rationality of their opposition. The first, and most common, argument I hear against samesex marriage is the one that bases its claims in religion. I’m nor will I on religious texts and I won’t pretend to be one, but

those who argue this angle must remember that while many in the United States have religious values, the United States itself was intended to be a secular country. The separation of church and state has long been discussed by our Founding Fathers in reference to the First Amendment, and the fact that any given religion has a stance on homosexuality should have absolutely no bearing on what should be legal. Other, more logical, arguments against same-sex marriage exist but are still completely faulty. For example, many opponents of same-sex marriage claim that it will result in a slippery slope of marriage acceptance. These are the people that think if we allow same-sex marriage now, other stigmatized groups with nontraditional marriage beliefs will soon push for their respective marriage rights.

For example, same-sex marriage opponents use polygamy as an example to emphasize that if we legalize same-sex marriage, we will eventually allow individuals to have several husbands and wives, too. These opponents are scared about where to draw the line. To these people, I only have one response: Are you kidding me? Some people seriously think that once we allow samesex marriage, we’ll suddenly be opening the door for people to get married to multiple partners. This comparison is unfair considering that the goals of marriage equality are different for gays and polygamists: One focuses on the right to marry someone of the same sex, the latter usually focuses on marrying multiple people of the opposite sex. They just aren’t on the same playing field. One of the absolute worst

arguments I hear on the issue, however, is that marriage is defined as the union of a man and a woman, and solely between a man and a woman. Not only is this blatantly untrue (the Oxford English Dictionary recently amended the definition of marriage to include gay couples), but also riddled with fallacies. The definition of marriage has never been stagnant. As we have evolved as a society and as progressive values have won over the population, marriage, too, has evolved with us. Marriage, for example, used to be defined as the union between two people of the same race until the Supreme Court over-ruled it in Loving v. Virginia in 1967. The opposition to this ruling seems intolerant, much like those who oppose same-sex marriage seem now. Sometimes all it takes is a look back at history to gauge our own

values, and it’s pretty easy to tell who will be remembered as being on the wrong side of it. By denying people who are gay the right to get married, we are not only denying them a societal comfort, but also specific rights that would otherwise be guaranteed to heterosexual couples, whether it be hospital visitation rights or court testifying exemptions. To withhold these rights, especially when the arguments countering them are based in almost nothing, is an affront to humanity. Good for you, Illinois, for realizing a problem and correcting it, but why is it taking so long for those on the right side of the aisle to realize this? How it’s 2013 and some individuals are just not gaining their rights to marry, I just don’t get.

Boswell is a junior in LAS. He can be reached at hutson2@ dailyillini.com.

GUEST COLUMN

Students should consider reducing meat intake with ‘Meatless Mondays’

T

he movement toward more plant-based meals is taking root on college campuses across the country, with more than 200 universities leading the charge with “Meatless Monday� campaigns in their dining halls. Participating in Meatless Monday is a simple change that can have a profound and positive impact on our health, animals and the planet, and there has never been a more exciting time to expand your dining horizons. Whether you’re dining out or eating at home, there are so many cuisines to choose from — Indian, Ethiopian, Chinese, Japanese, Mexican and so much more — even veggie burgers and hot dogs! According to a

study conducted by Technomic, more than 20 percent of college students are reducing their meat consumption for delicious vegfriendly meals — and for good reasons. One of those reasons is concern with the humane treatment of animals. Nine billion chickens, pigs and other animals are raised for food each year, most of whom suffer in factory farms. Mother pigs in the pork industry are typically confined in tiny crates barely larger than their own bodies for virtually their entire lives. Unable to even turn around, these sensitive, intelligent animals — all of whom have their own personalities and preferences — experience tre-

mendous physical and psychological pain. Most egg-laying hens suffer a similar fate, as they’re crammed into tiny cages, each bird granted less space than the screen of an iPad on which to live for her entire life. By choosing meat-free options just one day a week, we can help prevent an enormous amount of animal suffering. Another reason more people are going meat-free? Human health and the health of the planet. A report issued by Environmental Working Group put it simply, “Producing all this meat and dairy requires large amounts of pesticides, chemi-

cal fertilizer, fuel, feed and water. It also generates greenhouse gases and large amounts of toxic manure and wastewater that pollute groundwater, rivers, streams and, ultimately, the ocean.� President Clinton, once known for his love of fast-food, has swapped the Big Macs, chicken nuggets and fried shrimp for veggie burgers, beans and fresh fruits and vegetables. After years of battling heart problems — even undergoing quadruple bypass surgery — Clinton took his doctor’s advice to reduce his meat consumption and increase his intake of plant-based foods. He reports that the results have been tremendous: losing

24 pounds, feeling more energetic and seeing a welcome drop in cholesterol levels. President Clinton isn’t the only one turning over a new leaf; from Usher to Oprah Winfrey to Ellen DeGeneres to Kristen Bell, people everywhere are eating less meat. Even Mike Tyson, once known for biting off a human ear, is now limiting his ear consumption to those of the corn variety. Increasing numbers of family farmers are also voicing their support for Meatless Monday as a means to achieve a more sustainable, community-based agricultural system before it’s too late. Our current rate of meat consumption is

simply unsustainable. By reducing the total number of animals raised for food, we place greater value on humane sustainable agriculture in which animal welfare is a priority. Thankfully, eating meatless doesn’t mean “less� at all. It means more choices, it means “better living� — for us and for animals — and it means a more sustainable future. So next Monday, think about going meatless — the options are endless. Bon appetit!

Kenny Torrella is the food policy coordinator for the Humane Society of the United States. He can be reached at ktorrella@humanesociety.org.


THE DAILY ILLINI | WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

FROM 6A

ART THEATER moviegoer, the theater’s 100th anniversary is an exciting event he is looking forward to attend. “I’ve never been to a movie theater quite as enriching as the Art Theater,” he said. “There are so many interesting artsy films shown here that I never would’ve even known existed. The theater has opened my eyes to new films and broadened my understanding of them.” Although the theater shows many art and foreign films now, this has not always been the case. Since its opening 100 years ago, the Art Theater has been through some major changes. Opened within a decade of the beginning of the movie industry, the Art Theater (then named the Park Theater) played silent Hollywood films. The theater continued to show popular Hollywood releases for several decades. It wasn’t until the 1950s — when the theater was taken over by a new owner — that it was renamed the Art Theater and became part of the new burgeoning art house movement, playing independent and foreign films. In 1971, the theater began showing only “adult” films as a way to differentiate itself from the larger theater chains that began to show art films as well. But its career as an “adult only” theater was short-lived; in 1987, after being purchased by

FROM 6A

VETERANS DAY imagine.” The University’s ROTC programs date back to 1916 when the National Defense Act required able-bodied men in college to perform in basic military training. In 1945, the Naval ROTC was established, which was followed by the Air Force ROTC in 1949. Jones, who comes from a military-based family, hopes to become the first military officer in his family. Jones stated his love for the military, but more importantly, his desire to lead that led him to Illinois’s Naval ROTC. Jones said that there is a relationship between the ROTC programs and student veterans on campus, but he feels it needs to be stronger. “The Veterans Day Ceremony is a stepping stone to that; this year we have really upped the ante,” Jones said in terms of marketing for the event. “There needs to be more communication and relations, but this is just the beginning of what needs to happen.”

Monday, November 11, 2013

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD a new owner, the theater began playing art films once more. Then, in September 2012, the business became a co-op. The decision was made to prevent a possible closing due to the movie industry switching to a digital cinema format. This required many theaters across the nation, including the Art Theater, to purchase digital projectors, which cost around $80,000. By becoming a co-op, the theater was able to raise the necessary funds to purchase a new projector and keep the theater running. “What the co-op does is formulate a vision of the organization based on what the co-op owners are looking for,” McCann said. “That’s preserving the classic moviegoing experience, building an interest in co-ops, being the center of a vibrant community and building awareness about art films. My job is to steward this organization, so that it can realize those dreams.” Today, the Art Theater Co-op aims to provide a unique moviegoing experience unlike any movie theater in the area. “I like to think of us as the hardest working movie theater in central Illinois. We’re always ... trying to offer things to different audiences and trying to show movies unavailable anywhere else,” McCann said. “The Art Theater is where you can come see a movie and leave a changed person because the

movie challenges you in some way.” Z Snyder, assistant manager at the theater added that while the Art Theater Co-op enriches the community, the guests are what make the theater a great business. “I really like the interaction with the guests,” she said. “If you remember the little details with them, they’re going to love it, and they’re going to be really appreciative, and that’s important. It is a community; the theater in itself is a community.” As for the Art Theater Co-op’s future, McCann said he hopes the theater expands its reach and influence. “I would love to see this business grow in different ways: to see our audience grow, to see the kinds of people that are coming in here grow,” he said. “I want to see a more actively engaged community of people who are interested in film in town, so taking the Art Theater’s end statements seriously, we want to be the middle of a vibrant community and build up an awareness of art house cinemas and what we work on.” McCann hopes Tuesday’s festivities will be helpful in creating an even stronger bond between the Champaign-Urbana community and the Art Theater Co-op for many centuries to come.

Throughout the entire month of November, the University’s Main Library will be hosting a veterans display collection that chronicles the University’s ties with the military. The exhibit displays a collection of artifacts, pictures and documents dating back to 1862, including a feature on when the Armory hosted the 33rd Division in 1941. According to the display, the University has had a 1,124 known casualties of students and alumni in World War I and II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. The University’s military history is commonly associated with its affiliation to World War II, according to Osborne. The University lost 850 students and alumni to the war, and with President Roosevelt’s signing of the GI Bill in 1944, the University welcomed over 11,000 veterans back to campus in 1945. Following the large increase of veterans coming to campus that year, former University professor Timothy Nugent established the Division of Disability Resources and Educational Services in 1948. The University, according to Osborne, is now a “world

leader in serving students with disabilities.” On Friday, officials of the Chez Family Foundation and of the University broke ground at 908 W. Nevada in Urbana for the Chez Family Foundation Center for Wounded Veterans in Higher Education, which is scheduled to open in the fall of 2015. University of I l li nois Department of Intercollegiate Athletics will be honoring veterans on Saturday at the football game against Ohio State University. Student veterans will be given free tickets to the game and invited onto the field during the game, Osborne said. “It is really humbling,” said Elizabeth Ambros, a student veteran, who served in the U.S. Navy from 2004 to 2010, and senior in Applied Health Sciences. “It tells the veterans, ‘We appreciate the time that you have taken off of life to go and serve.’ For us veterans, it wasn’t an easy thing. When they say it is a sacrifice, it is. ... It is nice to appreciate those who gave up a piece of their life to serve for other Americans.”

Elizabeth can be reached at edye2@dailyillini.com.

ACROSS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 Pat down, as pipe tobacco 13 14 15 5 Trade 9 Carpenter’s file 16 17 18 13 Grammy winner McLachlan 19 20 21 14 Heading on a list of errands 22 23 24 25 26 15 Salt lake state 16 1959 hit by the Drifters 27 28 29 30 31 19 Stock market index, with “the” 34 35 20Collaborative Web proj- 32 33 ect 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 21 Helpers 22 What children should 43 44 45 46 47 48 be, and not heard, they say 49 50 51 52 24Pudding or pie 27 1970 hit by Eric Clapton 53 54 55 56 32 Barbie and others 34180° from WNW 57 58 59 60 61 62 35 Close by 36 Letter after pi 63 64 65 66 37 Belly muscles, for short 40Magazine with an annual 67 68 69 “500” list 42 ___-la-la 70 71 72 43Forever and ever 45 “___ in apple” 47 Nutso 38==/(%<$0<-2+1621 49 1978 hit by Journey 53 Something to scribble on DOWN thor André ment 54“Hurry!,” on an order 1 California/Nevada 18 Fisherman’s tale 44 Dakar’s land 57 11- or 12-year-old 23 Org. for the Bears and 46 Pearly Gates sentinel border lake 60 Therefore 2 “Can anybody hear 48 Alias letters Bengals 62One may be under a 25 “But of course, 50 Anderson of “WKRP us?” blouse 3 Feb. follower amigo!” in Cincinnati” 63 What the artists of 16-, 4 “Close call!” 26 Garden of ___ 51 “That’s so funny I 27- and 49-Across are 5 Bram who created 28 Fed. air marshal’s org. forgot to laugh” doing (in reference to 29 Locale for an 1863 52 Rim Dracula the last words of their 6 “Alas!” 55 ___ football address hits)? 7 Billboards, e.g. 30 “B.C.” creator Johnny 56 Fail’s opposite 67 “___ and the King of 8 Certain lap dog, 31 A waiter carries 57 Bygone Kremlin Siam” informally plates on it resident 68 On the Adriatic, say 9 Gloat 32 Sketched 58 Cabernet, for one 69Brings in, as a salary 10 Slightly 33 Cry before “I know!” 59 Feminine suffix 70Piece of fly-casting 11 Kemo ___ (the Lone 38 Worms, to a fisher61 Follow, as orders equipment 64 Arrest Ranger) man 71 Roseanne, before and 12 ___ ed. (gym class) 39 Not at all nutso 65 Fed. property manafter Arnold 13 Norms: Abbr. 41 Network with an ager 72 Exercise that may 17 Nobel-winning au66 Philosopher ___-tzu “eye” for entertaininvolve sitting crosslegged The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

EDUMACATION

DOONESBURY

JOHNIVAN DARBY

GARRY TRUDEAU

Declan can be reached at dharty2@dailyillini.com.

DISH OF THE WEEK

BEARDO

DAN DOUGHERTY

6KDUH<RXU 7KRXJKWV

CLICK.

/HWWHUVWRWKH(GLWRU

ORDER.

SARAH PINA THE DAILY ILLINI

Antonio’s Pizza on Green Street features its pesto tortellini pizza as this week’s dish of the week.

Antonio’s Pizza reopens with return of pesto tortellini slice Pizzeria dishes out daily specials, non-standard pizzas BY STEPHANIE KIM STAFF WRITER

After closing in 2011, Antonio’s Pizza by the Slice made a triumphant return to its former Green Street location in October. Students can now enjoy the restaurant’s variety of dishes, specifically the pesto tortellini pizza. The store closed two years ago because it experienced management issues when they were opening restaurants at different locations in other cities, said Yazhi Fehri, store manager of Green Street’s Antonio’s Pizza. But since its return, the pesto tortellini pizza has been a customer favorite. The popular dish is a unique pizza concoction made with pesto sauce, mozzarella cheese and multi-colored tortellini. The mozzarella cheese marries well with the rich pesto sauce, while the tortellini adds a nice chewy surprise and colorful arrangement for the eyes — a recipe that James Krist, senior in Engineering, calls “perfect.” “The texture of the crunchy crust with the soft noodle and the warm, melty cheese is like

5A

no other food I have ever had before,” Krist said. “I remember having it as a freshman, and so when I visited Antonio’s for the first time since their reopening, that was the first slice I ordered. As I bit into the pizza ... I knew I was back at Antonio’s.” Pesto tortellini is just one of more than 50 menu items and various daily specials that feature fresh ingredients, homemade dough, various sauces and “not your every day toppings,” said Johnathon Ryder, Antonio’s employee. “Everywhere you go, all (the surrounding pizzerias) have red sauce — just standard pizzas,” Ryder said. “We have quesadilla pizza, and I don’t know any (other) store that has (that).” Ryder said that Antonio’s has a wide variety of dishes, which is appealing to customers. “As long as you have options, people will always want to come,” he said. This was true for Agustin Rodriguez, senior in LAS and second-time customer to Antonio’s. “I’m coming back,” Rodriguez said. “I’ve already recommended

this place to people. It’s a nice spot to come and grab a bite to eat before you get to your next class ... or (when you) have window gaps of time.” Because Antonio’s sells its pizza by the slice, customers have the option of taking their pizza to-go or staying at the restaurant to dine. This also allows customers to choose slices of different toppings within the five menu sections (daily specials, classics, pesto, chicken and veggie slices). The cost per slice is around $3. While costs vary in each section, a medium pizza (12inch) costs about $11 and a large (16-inch) is about $16. “Almost every day (customers) say they’re so happy we’re open and that it’s better than before,” Fehri said. “So Antonio’s is a familiar restaurant. Anyone is welcome, anytime.” Antonio’s is open from 11 a.m. to midnight Monday and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, and 11 a.m. to 3 a.m. Thursday to Saturday.

Stephanie can be reached at skim108@dailyillini.com.

E R A SH R YOU S GHT U THO

EAT.

/(77(56 727+( (',7256

Email: RSLQRQV#GDLO\LOOLQL FRP

FREAKY FAST

DELIVERY! ©2011 JIMMY JOHN’S FRANCHISE, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.


LIFE  CULTURE

Savor the slice Consisting of rich pesto sauce, mozzarella cheese and multi-colored tortellini, Antonioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pesto tortellini pizza has been a customer favorite since the restaurant returned to campus in October. Find out more on Page 5A.

6A | MONDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2013 | WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

University to celebrate veterans all month long Veterans will be honored Saturday at football game BY DECLAN HARTY STAFF WRITER

When the United States celebrated its first Veterans Day in 1938, the University had already established a deep tie to military service after having 189 students and alumni die during World War I. Now celebrating its 75th Veterans Day, the campus community plans to honor and celebrate those who have served the country. Nicholas Osborne has been the veterans coordinator of the Veterans Support Services since the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inception in 2010. He said the ChampaignUrbana area, as well as alumni and student veterans on campus, will continue its support of veterans on Monday and throughout the month of November. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Veterans) enrich our student body, and we want to show honor to that,â&#x20AC;? Osborne said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So I think that this is a great way for us to honor them, but to also honor the diverse range of students that we serve here at the University of Illinois.â&#x20AC;? Osborne also holds the position of interim director for the Center for Wounded Veterans in Higher Education. He served in the Coast Guard from 2002 to 2010 as a law enforcement and intelligence officer. According to Osborne, there are approximately 400 student veterans at the University. There will be numerous events held throughout November to honor student veterans, the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s veterans and the campusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rich ties with the U.S. military. On Sunday, the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Reserve Officersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Training Corps program honored veterans across the campus and community with a ceremony hosted at the Armoryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s indoor track. The Naval ROTC hosted the ceremony, but the Air Force and Army ROTC programs also were in attendance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This ceremony is to give back to them, all that they have sacrificed,â&#x20AC;? said True Jones, a midshipman second class in the Naval ROTC and junior in ACES. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is really to show them that we appreciate what they have given to us. ... That is kind of the whole point in putting it across to people. It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just a ceremony, where you come and sit down. It is a lot larger than we can even

BRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI

The Art Theater Co-op, located on Church Street in downtown Champaign, celebrates its centennial this week. It often plays contemporary films not shown at other local movie theaters.

Champaign Art Theater celebrates 100 years Anniversary commemorated with documentary BY ELIZABETH DYE STAFF WRITER

The Art Theater Co-op in downtown Champaign will have first opened its doors to the public exactly 100 years ago on Tuesday. For an entire century, the Art Theater Co-op has provided the Champaign-Urbana community with cinematic entertainment at its location at 126 W. Church St. To commemorate the milestone, the Art Theater Co-op will be holding a special celebration for its 100th anniversary, including the premiere of a documentary on the history of the Art Theater, the debut of a book about the theater, and a special performance by the Andrew Alden Ensemble. Austin McCann, the Art Theater Co-opâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general manager, said the

theater played â&#x20AC;&#x153;specially-selectedâ&#x20AC;? cult short films during the Art Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s late night cinema showings to lead up to the event. The fourday series, which ran last Thursday to Sunday, culminated with the screening of Tod Browningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cult classic horror film, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Freaks.â&#x20AC;? With festivities starting on Tuesday at 6 p.m., guests can visit the Art Theater Co-op to learn about its history and view the documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art Lives,â&#x20AC;? produced by Luke Boyce of the Emmy-award-winning Shatterglass Studios. The new book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art Theater: Playing Movies for 100 Years,â&#x20AC;? by Perry C. Morris, Joseph Muskin and Audrey Wells, will also be for sale. During the premieres on Tuesday, an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old Hollywoodâ&#x20AC;? costume contest will be taking place, where

the winner with the best costume will be awarded a copy of the newly released book. Food and drinks will be provided for all attendees. At 8 p.m., the Andrew Alden Ensemble, a chamber music group, will perform an original score to a program of silent films curated by McCann. The ensemble will also play their score to Carl Dreyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vampire horror film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vampyrâ&#x20AC;? on Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. Tickets for Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events are $15 for co-op owners and $18 for the general public. They can be purchased online at the Art Theater Co-opâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at arttheater.coop. For Brandon McKay, freshman in LAS and frequent Art Theater Co-op

SEE ART THEATER | 5A

SEE VETERANS DAY | 5A

YOU PLAY,YOU WIN

Gibson City

Saybrook

PICK 3 WIN 3

TICKET GIVEAWAY!

d Potomac Rantoul

Farmer City Mahomet De Land

Champaign

Monticello

Peoria Danville

Urbana

Ogden

Savoy Philo Tolono

vs. Jacksonville State 11/10

vs. Valaparaiso 11/13

to be entered to win tickets to the next 3 Fighting Illini home games:

Bradley vs. 11/17

Chicago State vs. 11/22

IPFW vs. 11/29

Send entries to promo@illinimedia.com

Stay updated on all things sports with The Daily Illini for more chances to win!

d

Champaign Urbana

Georgetown Sidal

Tuscola

Hammond

Fithian

Homer

Bement

vs. Alabama State 11/08

Chicago Rockford

Le Roy

Correctly pick the winners of the next 3 Fighting Illini home games:

Rankin

Paxton

Bourbon

Newman

Carbondale Arcola

6KRZFDVLQJWKHDUHDČ&#x2021;VEHVWORFDOPXVLF (YHU\6XQGD\DWSP


1B

MONDAY 1RYHPEHU 7KH'DLO\,OOLQL 'DLO\,OOLQLFRP

SPORTS Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball dominates in 2 opening games Illinois defeats Alabama St., Jacksonville St., rebounds need work BY SEAN HAMMOND AND JOHNATHAN HETTINGER SENIOR WRITER AND STAFF WRITER

PHOTO COURTESY BEN MIKESELL INDIANA DAILY STUDENT

Illinois' V'Angelo Bentley is tackled on a kickoff return during the game against Indiana on Saturday at Indiana's Memorial Stadium. Illinois lost the game 52-35, continuing its five-game losing streak.

Illinois prolongs losing streak with Indiana loss BY SEAN HAMMOND SENIOR WRITER

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Quarterbacks Nathan Scheelhaase and Nate Sudfeld aired it out all afternoon at Memorial Stadium in Bloomington, Ind., on Saturday, but it was a pass from Illinois punter Justin DuVernois that fi nally deflated the Illini. Trailing Indiana 42-35 with 11 minutes left in the game, Illinois attempted a fake punt on fourthand-10 from its own 37-yard line. DuVernoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; pass never even made it to its intended receiver, tight end Evan Wilson, falling to the turf before his feet. The Hoosiers went on to beat the Illini 52-35, dropping Illinois to 3-6, 0-5 in Big Ten play and extending its conference losing streak to 19 games. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Defensively we gave up too many big plays,â&#x20AC;? Illinois head coach Tim Beckman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It got down to a scoring battle and we fell short. When we have opportunities on offense, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to take advantage of those.â&#x20AC;?

Missed assignments and poor tackling were exposed by two high-powered offensive attacks. Both teams racked up more than 600 yards of total offense. Sudfeld threw for 267 yards and three touchdowns on 20-of-27 passing. His team edged out the Illini despite Scheelhaaseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 450 yards on 38-of-57 passing and two touchdowns. Scheelhaase also scored another touchdown on the ground. Senior receiver Steve Hull fi nished with 224 receiving yards and both touchdown grabs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Against a team like that, with the style and the rhythm that they like to play, we have to be on the attack and constantly moving the ball and putting points on the board so you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put yourself in a hole,â&#x20AC;? Scheelhaase said. It was a back-and-forth game the entire way, with neither team holding a lead of more than seven points until the fourth quarter. Running back Josh Ferguson opened the scoring for Illinois with a 21-yard touchdown and

Scheelhaase his first touchdown to Hull, from 60 yards out. Those scores kept Illinois close, and it trailed 21-14 at the half. The Illini came out firing on all cylinders in the second half. Scheelhaase capped off Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first drive of the third quarter with a 54-yard touchdown pass to Hull. Somehow Hull ended up behind the defense, 10 yards away from the nearest defender. The Illinois defense came up big on Indianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next possession. Linebacker Jonathan Brown intercepted Sudfeld and set up the Illini deep in Hoosiers territory. Scheelhaase scored five plays later on a 14-yard rush, giving the Illini their first lead at 28-21. The shootout didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t end there. Indiana drove 75 yards downfield and scored on a 41-yard pass from Sudfeld to Cody Latimer. Illinois would start its next drive backed up on its own 8-yard line because of a holding penalty on the kickoff. After a quick three-and-out, Indiana took pos-

session again and Sudfeld connected with Latimer on another long touchdown, this time from 50 yards out. Latimer fi nished with 11 catches for 189 yards and three scores. Another score for each team would bring the score to 42-35 before the ensuing fake punt. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was something that we worked on,â&#x20AC;? Beckman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If it would have worked weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d probably be smiling now. It was something that we saw was there. We just underthrew it.â&#x20AC;? Indiana running back Tevin Coleman ran for 219 yards and two long touchdowns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At some point youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be one-on-one, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to win those,â&#x20AC;? defensive coordinator Tim Banks said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We won our fair share tonight, we really did. When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing an offense of that caliber, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to win more than you lose.â&#x20AC;?

Sean can be reached at sphammo2@dailyillini.com and @sean_hammond.

Illini should give up hopes for bowl game ELIOT SILL Sports Editor

B

LOOMINGTON, Ind. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Another game, another chance gone awry, another tally on the longest conference losing streak in school history. Another dosage of questionable playcalling. Another chance to pan a river of failure for nuggets of success. Same Illini. Same result. Same response. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Proud of the way this team fought,â&#x20AC;? Beckman says, game after game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gonna come,â&#x20AC;? Beckman says, as â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;? continues to pass Illinois by. You can try resuscitation all you like, but a heart too weak wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t beat. And as far as bowl season goes, Illinois is as good as dead. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough for Illini fans as they watch Big Ten loss after Big Ten loss â&#x20AC;&#x201D; almost as tough as it is being an Illini defensive back â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for somewhere to get off the train, consider Bloomington, Ind., your stop.

The losses were getting worse and worse: A comeback effort falling just short against Washington, a rout by a good Nebraska team, a lesser rout by a better Wisconsin team, a greater rout by a not-as-good Michigan State team, a heartbreaker to an equal opponent in Penn State. Then you have Indiana: The rare Big Ten school with less fan support than Illinois, an identical record of 3-5, a similar all-pop-no-stop offensive team. Illinois was more desperate, and Indiana was better. For the second straight season, Illinois failed to halt a fourgame losing skid against the Hoosiers, and in both cases it was backbreaking. So you have to settle. You shift goals, you shift expectations, you shift your understanding of what this season is about and what it means. You would wish the seniors well, and the seniors played well. Scheelhaase got to throw the ball 57 times â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which sounds like a lot of fun â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and finished the game with 450 yards and two touchdowns. Both touchdowns found the hands of Steve Hull, another senior and converted safety, who left the defense at the right time and

hauled in nine catches for 224 yards and the pair of scores. On the defense, not everything was terrible. Senior Jonathan Brown nabbed an interception, and two tackles-for-loss, including one sack. In fact, the defense had three sacks, forced two turnovers and held Indiana to under 50 percent on third down. The Illini also had four plays in which they were burned for scores of 64, 41, 50 and 75 yards. And of the seven third downs successfully defensed by Illinois, three were merely precursors to Indiana fourth-down conversions. If you factor that in, Indianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conversion ratio jumps to seven of 11. The gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most pivotal moments came on a couple headscratching playcalls from the staff â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one to not go for it on fourth-and-3 from the 33-yard line on the opening drive, the other a decision to try a fake punt on fourth-and-10 in the fourth quarter. On the first drive, you punt the ball if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a real fieldposition battle, where pinning a team on the 10 instead of the 30 means starting your next drive on the 50 instead of your own 20. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t punt when your defense is primed to give up

what could have been a 1,000mile touchdown had the field been long enough. The coaches were making choices based off how good itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be nice for their team to be, and not the reality they were facing. Instead, the Illini net 13 yards on the punt and immediately let Indiana assume the role of aggressor. Then there was Justin Duvernoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; awesome fourth down pass. I wonder how Scheelhaase felt watching from the sidelines as that unfurled. Beckman made the point that had it worked, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be a great decision. True, but still not really a sound reason for doing something. Every day I choose not to try a backflip despite such logic. Another game, another loss. Another brick in the wall of disappointment that has been Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; performance in the Big Ten the last two-and-a-half years. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for Illinois to find a different wall to climb, because the loss at Indiana means a bowl game is simply out of reach.

Eliot is a senior in Media. He can be reached at sill2@ dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @EliotTweet.

Volleyball beats Michigan State for 1st sweep week BY NICHOLAS FORTIN ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

The Illinois volleyball team did this weekend what it has wanted to do all year. After winning against No. 17 Michigan on Wednesday, the Illini beat No. 13 Michigan State in four sets on Saturday for their third win in a row and the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first swept week of the conference season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought we just worked really hard and extended the amount of fight we had for one of the longest times that I have seen so far,â&#x20AC;? junior outside hitter Liz McMahon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the exception of the first part of the second set, we battled the whole time.â&#x20AC;? Illinois took control of the first set early and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t relinquish it. The Illini led throughout, eventu-

ally winning 25-19. Michigan State bounced back in the second set, jumping out to an early lead of its own and going on a nine-point run to make the score 11-2 before Illinois began to claw itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way back into the set. The Illini made a run, coming within three points of the Spartans at 17-14, but never got closer and eventually were put away in the set 25-21. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the middle of that set we talked about the fact that we did back off completely and let them come at us and then said we need to make this change where weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re attacking them and getting on them because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll back down, and they did,â&#x20AC;? sophomore outside hitter Jocelynn Birks said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We

SEE VOLLEYBALL | 3B

Illinois head coach John Groce has said it since the summer: For Illinois to do well, it needs to have a â&#x20AC;&#x153;by-committeeâ&#x20AC;? mind-set. The mind-set seemed to flourish this weekend, as all 11 Illini scored in each of Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; two wins to open the season. After falling behind 5-2 in the fi rst half on Friday, Illinois never trailed again the entire weekend, a grand total of 77 minutes and 5 seconds of playing time. Illinois won 80-63 Friday and 86-62 Sunday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought everybody made at least a play or two or more,â&#x20AC;? Groce said after Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s win. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to take that mind set of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;by-committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for this team ultimately to reach its potential this year.â&#x20AC;? On Sunday, fifth-year senior Joseph Bertrand accomplished something he hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t done in 83 previous games: He fi nished with a double-double. Bertrand had scored (he has a career-high of 25 points) and rebounded (career-high is 12 rebounds), but he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put it together until Sunday night in a victory over Jacksonville State. Bertrand led five Illini in double figures with 20 points and 10 rebounds. Juniors Rayvonte Rice and Tracy Abrams added 13, while junior Nnanna Egwu and freshman Jaylon Tate added 10. Illinois jumped out to a 12-1 lead, which it extended to a 40-27 halftime lead over the Gamecocks, thanks largely to 14 fi rst-half points from Bertrand, whom Groce was especially pleased with. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was terrific,â&#x20AC;? Groce said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I told him: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not taking you out until you tell me youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re tired,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; because I thought he was the one guy who was really locked in.â&#x20AC;? In the second half, Illinois did not commit a turnover and was 4-for-9 on 3-point shots, after going 0-for-4 in the fi rst half. The second half also saw the emergence of Abrams, who

scored a single point in the first 31 minutes, but added 12 in six minutes in the second half. During Abramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; absence from the game, freshman point guard Jaylon Tate stepped up, scoring eight points and dishing out six assists, but Groce pointed out that Tate fi nished with just one turnover. Although the victory was never in doubt, Groce was not pleased that Illinois was outrebounded 44-37 and outhustled on loose balls. D.J. Felder and Teraes Clemmons had 10 rebounds each for the Gamecocks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was unacceptable. The ball got in the paint too much,â&#x20AC;? Groce said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to scrap and claw and dig out more rebounds and loose balls, those 50-50 balls.â&#x20AC;? On Friday, it was the hometown kid who stole the show in the season-opening victory against Alabama State. Rice, a Champaign native, led Illinois with 22 points in an 80-63 win. Rice shot 6-of-12 for the game on top of 9-of-10 from the free-throw line in his return to Champaign after sitting out last season following his transfer from Drake. Egwu quietly put together the second double-double of his career, scoring 10 points and grabbing 10 rebounds, while Bertrand added 14. Illinois let Alabama State hang around for much of the fi rst half Friday, struggling early against the Hornetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 2-3 zone defense. The Illini surged late in the half after the Hornets pulled within six, at 31-25 with 4:12 remaining. Seven points from Rice and another bucket from Egwu extended the Illini lead to 40-26 at the break. Illinois would cruise to victory in the second half, leading by as much as 28. Jamel Waters led Alabama State with 27 points.

Sean and Johnathan can be reached at sports@ dailyillini.com. Follow them on Twitter @sean_hammond and @jhett93.

THE DAILY ILLINI

weekend

roundup

Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s note: The Daily Illini sports desk will publish a recap of this past weekend for Illinois sports here every Monday.

VOLLEYBALL

AT W, 3-1 HUFF HALL

MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BASKETBALL

AT W, 80-63 STATE FARM CENTER

SWIMMING & DIVING

AT W, 86-62 STATE FARM CENTER

WRESTLING

AT W, 186-114 ACTIVITIES & RECREATION CENTER POOL

BRIAN YU THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois' Jocelynn Birks spikes the ball at the game against Michigan State at Huff Hall on Saturday. Illinois won with a score of 3-1, bringing the Illini record to 12-12.

LORAS OPEN NTS, 9 TITLES DUBUQUE, IOWA

FOOTBALL

WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BASKETBALL

AT

AT

L, 52-35 BLOOMINGTON, IND.

L, 98-92 PEORIA


2B

Monday, November 11, 2013

THE DAILY ILLINI | WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

Special teams’ blunders fuel another Illini loss BY STEPHEN BOURBON STAFF WRITER

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — In a 52-35 loss to Indiana Saturday, the Illinois football team had multiple blunders on special teams that contributed to the Illini’s 19th consecutive Big Ten loss. On the opening drive against Indiana, the Illini had a chance to cash in on a productive drive and faced a fourth-and-3 from the Indiana 33-yard line. With the wind in their faces, the Illini chose not to try a field goal or

even try and gain a first down, but punted. Punter Justin DuVernois hit a low line drive that bounced away from the Illini coverage unit and rolled into the end zone for a touchback for a net of 13 yards on the punt. “I think any player that doesn’t want to be out there trying to convert probably shouldn’t be playing this game,” quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase said. “Obviously there’s an inner competitor, but you want to do what’s best for the team.”

Later in the game, facing a similar situation with a fourth-and-3 from the Indiana 40-yard line, the Illini elected to try their luck by going for it instead of punting. Backup quarterback Aaron Bailey kept the ball on a designed running play but couldn’t get past his own linemen for no gain and the Illini turned the ball over on downs. Illinois again went aggressive in its playcalling midway through the fourth quarter. Having surrendered 523 yards with

more than 11 minutes to play in the game, the Illini elected for a fake punt from its own 37-yard line. DuVernois faked a handoff going to the right and rolled out to his left. Tight end Evan Wilson was running a drag route in the same direction, but the punter’s pass didn’t reach its target, falling short. Even if Wilson had come up with the catch, he still needed significant yards after the catch in order to convert the fourth-and-10.

After the failed trickery, the Illini defense provided no relief, as Indiana running back Stephen Houston pounded the ball through the line on the second play to make the score 49-35. Even with the struggles of the punt unit, the normally reliable kickoff return squad was also ineffective. Despite V’Angelo Bentley returning from an ankle injury — his 30.8 yards per kick return ranks fourth in the country — the Illini averaged just 16 yards per return and three pen-

alties on returns consistently backed up the Illinois offense. “Crazy,” head coach Tim Beckman said of the return penalties. “You obviously don’t want your offense starting inside its own 20 regardless of who you’re playing against. You can’t make those kinds of penalties and put your offense in situations that are tough to get out of.”

Stephen can be reached at sbourbo2@dailyillini.com and @steve_bourbon.

Illini football reflects on 19-game Big Ten losing streak BY SEAN HAMMOND SENIOR WRITER

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — At the site of its last Big Ten conference win, it’s hard not to look at Indiana’s Memorial Stadium and think about Illinois football’s 19-game Big Ten losing streak, which the Hoosiers extended Saturday. Before the conference season began, the streak was an afterthought for the Illinois players and coaches. They didn’t mention it. They didn’t worry about it. It was a fresh season and a fresh start. Things have changed. The streak has gone from the elephant in the room to the monkey on Illinois’ back. The players do acknowledge it. They know it’s there. “It looms in the balance, for sure,” quarterback Nathan Scheel-

haase said. “But we don’t look at to come. We’re all going through it as what the streak is at or how it. I haven’t been through anylong it is in the past or how far thing like this in my life either. down the future. We look at that These players are very important game trying to be 1-0 at the end to me and they will always be very important to me.” of that game.” One streak neared its end in With undefeated Ohio State Bloomington, Ind., coming to Chamon Oct. 8, 2011, — paign next weekIllinois won the end, it’s likely the last of six straight streak will reach games — and 20. From there, another neared its Illinois has its best beginning. A lot chance to end it on has changed since NATHAN SCHEELHAASE the road at Purdue QUARTERBACK then: new coaches, on Nov. 23. new outlook. Last season But head coach it was Illinois’ Tim Beckman still hasn’t won a offense that struggled, this seaBig Ten game. son it’s the guys on the other side “I hate to see Nathan and the of the ball. The Illini have surseniors because I want them to rendered more than 470 yards win,” Beckman said. “It’s going of total offense in every Big Ten

“It looms in the balance, for sure.”

THE SCORE

ILLINOIS - INDIANA Scoring by quarter: 14 1st 14

35

0

2nd

7

14

3rd

14

7

4th

17

35

Final

52

52

NUMBERS TO KNOW

450 0-3 1262 31-7 42

Passing yards for Nathan Scheelhaase, a career high for the senior. He broke his previous career best of 416 yards set against Southern Illinois on Aug. 31 of this year.

The Illini finished the game 0-for-3 on fourth down conversions. The most notable of these was a fake punt on fourth and 10 that the Illini couldn’t execute from their own 37-yard line. Total yards for the game between Indiana and Illinois. Indiana tallied 650 while Illinois put up 612 yards in a game that was a full blown shootout from the opening drive. With eight minutes and 31 seconds remaining in the third quarter, the Illini took a 28-21 on a Nathan Scheelhaase 14-yard touchdown run. However, Indiana ended the game on a 31-7 run to bring the final margin to 52-35. Yards per carry for Indiana. Tevin Coleman had 215 yards rushing while Stephen Houston tallied 150. The duo also combined for four touchdowns.

QUOTE OF THE GAME

“It was something that we worked on. If it would have worked we’d probably be smiling now. It was something that we saw was there. We just underthrew it.” Tim Beckman ILLINOIS HEAD COACH (on the failed fake punt)

game this season, including 650 against Indiana. The defensive woes have frustrated everyone involved, but defensive coordinator Tim Banks thinks his players will learn a lot from the struggles of the last year and a half. “We’ve got some guys that are going to be better players for going through this,” Banks said. “Mason Monheim is a better player than he was last year. Our secondary will better players for what they’re going through this year. You grow with every experience that you have.” But for the Illini, these growing pains are getting old.

Sean can be reached at sphammo2@dailyillini.com and @sean_hammond.

SCHEDULE *Games in bold are at home* Michigan State Oct. 26 - L, 42-3

Southern Illinois Aug. 31 - W, 42-34 Cincinnati Sept. 7 - W, 45-17

Penn State Nov. 2 - L, 24-17

Washington (Soldier Field) Sept. 14 - L, 34-24

Indiana Nov. 9 - L, 52-35

Miami (Ohio) Sept. 28 - W, 50-14

Ohio State Nov. 16 - 11:00 a.m.

Nebraska Oct. 5 - L, 39-19

Purdue Nov. 23 - TBA

Wisconsin Oct. 19 - L, 56-32

Northwestern Nov. 30 - TBA

GAME TO FORGET Tim Banks

The much maligned defensive coordinator, also secondary coach, had another rough weekend as his unit surrendered 650 yards and 52 points. Either in the air or on the ground, Indiana moved the ball in a flash and it was those big plays that broke the Illini’s back. Indiana had four touchdowns of 40 yards or more - two long passes to a wide open Cody Latimer and two long runs from running back Tevin Coleman.

GAME TO REMEMBER Steve Hull

The senior had his best statistical game as a wide receiver, and one of the best games for his position in program history. Hull caught nine passes for 224 yards and two touchdowns (all career highs) and the 224 yards were second most in Illinois football history. Hull’s touchdowns of 60 and 54 yards kept the Illini in the game in the shootout loss.

TWEET OF THE GAME “I would trade all my personal stats from today in for a Win if I could. #stillfighting #wontgiveup.” Steve Hull @SteveHull5

PHOTO COURTESY OFBEN MIKESELL INDIANA DAILY STUDENT

Illinois’ Josh Ferguson (6) gets tackled during the game against Indiana on Saturday at Indiana’s Memorial Stadium. Illinois lost the game 52-35, continuing their five-game losing streak this season.

Steve Hull plays best game of offensive career despite loss most in school history and the first 200-plus receiving game for BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — A year an Illini player since A.J. Jenkins ago, Steve Hull was a safety that in 2011, who set the school record couldn’t stay on the field with vari- with 268 yards. ous injuries. For the senior Hull, however, Now, Hull has transformed into the way he’ll remember the game the Illinois football team’s deep- was by the score: 52-35 in favor of threat wide receiver after switch- the Hoosiers. After the game, Hull ing sides of the ball during spring tweeted his frustrations. practice. “I would trade all my personal Early in the season, it looked as stats from today in for a Win if I though the switch was more of an could. #stillfighting #wontgiveup.” In his last season with the Illini, impact on paper than on the field. Hull caught seven passes in the the team fell to 3-6, 0-5 in conferIllini’s first five games, and didn’t ence play. With Ohio State looming next on the schedule, a Buckeyes record a catch in two of them. Starting with a loss at home to team that hasn’t lost since Jan. 2, Wisconsin, Hull 2012, any hopes of finally made his a bowl game seem mark on the field slim. with a break“I’m frustrated right now,” Hull out game — six said. “This game catches for 105 yards. But again, hurts a lot because Hull was nicked at the end of the up with an injury day, our main against the Badgoal is to win the Big Ten. But now gers and sat out most of the followwe focus on going ing week against to a bowl game Michigan State. TIM BECKMAN and being bowl HEAD COACH As he’s done so eligible.” many times in the To become bowl eligible, Illipast, though, Hull bounced back from injury the nois must win its three remainfollowing week with another six- ing games, versus Ohio State, at Purdue and versus Northwestern. catch effort against Penn State. After losing fellow senior Ryan Saturday against Indiana, Hull took another leap. The senior Lankford to a season-ending shoulrecorded the best game of his der injury two weeks ago, the buroffensive career with new career den of production at wide receiver highs of nine catches, 224 yards falls to Hull and Spencer Harris. and two touchdowns. His two Although he’s been playing the touchdown catches of 60 and 54 position for less than a calendar yards lit up the scoreboard for year, Hull said he knows it’s his the Illini in the 52-35 loss, but the responsibility to put up numbers effort ultimately wasn’t enough to — a job that he’s fulfilled as Hull break a 19-game conference los- leads the team in yards and touching streak. downs over the past two contests. “Unbelievable,” head coach Tim “I feel like I did my job,” Hull Beckman said. “I think Steve made said. “I’m not one to toot my own some plays that were phenomenal horn and say I was doing great, but in my opinion. When we needed to it’s my job to perform.” make a play, Steve Hull was there Stephen can be reached at to help us make that play.” His 224 yards was the second- sbourbo2@dailyillini.com and BY STEPHEN BOURBON STAFF WRITER

“When we needed to make a play, Steve Hull was there to help us make that play.”

The Daily Illini The Illio Buzz WPGU


THE DAILY ILLINI | WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

FROM 1B

Monday, November 11, 2013

gained in its comeback in the second set to power through the final two sets and pick up the win. The Illini went on a 9-0 run in the third set before winning 25-17, and picked up right where they had left off in the fourth set eventually winning the set 25-19. With its first swept week of the year, Illinois moved back

VOLLEYBALL didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t end up winning because we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the points to string along or the time to get those points. I think we came back and that was a momentumcarrier into the third.â&#x20AC;? Illinois used the momentum

to .500 on the season at 12-12 (8-6 Big Ten). â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just feel like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been some time coming,â&#x20AC;? head coach Kevin Hambly said of the swept weekend. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had the opportunities to do it, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve finally just continued to execute and just fought for the whole match. Certainly we needed to get to .500, which we finally are at,

and now we need to get ahead of that. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping this is a sign of things to come from the group and that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to continue to compete the way weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve competed tonight because when we do that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re tough.â&#x20AC;?

Nicholas can be reached at fortin2@dailyillini.com and @IlliniSportsGuy.

MICHAEL WONSOVER

Volleyballâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4-game home stand comes at ideal time ARYN BRAUN Illini columnist

I

llinois volleyball is in the midst of a homestand. Four matches nestled nicely in a row, taking place at the one and only Huff Hall. Playing at home can do wonders for a team, and fans have a lot to do with it. When players arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t faced with opposing fans constantly berating and demoralizing them, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot easier to stay relaxed and focus on the task at hand, i.e. winning. Homefield advantage. We hear the phrase all the time. But what does it really mean? What makes playing at home advantageous? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a comfort level. Your locker room, your fans, your band, your pregame routine. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s familiar. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. When hypothesizing about which team will win a game, in any sport, where the game is played matters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, Illinois is playing Ohio State at State Farm Center? Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a chance!â&#x20AC;? How many times have we heard lines like this? Fans, especially, always feel better about going against top teams

if they can do so on their terms, in their town. I bet the Illinois volleyball team isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hating on the chance to play four games in a row at home. The first was a major victory. Illinois came back from being down two sets to zero to beat No. 17 Michigan. It was the big win they had been waiting for. This season the Illini have struggled when falling behind early, making this win over the Wolverines especially sweet. Not only did they beat a top program and a conference rival, they did it in a way that proved something to themselves. They fought, and came up victorious. How much of that win can be attributed to homecourt advantage? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impossible to tell, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hurt. When a team plays at home, the fans and coaches pick up on the momentum of the players. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s those moments when the entire arena fills with anticipation and there is a kind of pal-

pable excitement that can practically be felt rippling through the bleachers. The opposing team feels that too, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unsettling. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homefield advantage in a nutshell. In their second straight home matchup, the Illini beat No. 13 Michigan State 3-1 Saturday night to move into fourth place in the Big Ten standings. The Spartans had squashed Illinois 3-0 in their last meeting in early October. Not such a good weekend for the state of Michigan. The Illini are capitalizing on this unprecedented stretch of home games, and it comes at the perfect time. Big Ten play is more than halfway over, with just six matches remaining before the postseason. This far into the season, players are tired, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hurt, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for ways to gain the upper hand. This year, the schedule does that for Illinois. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not as though playing

Basketball columnist

T

he identity of the Illinois menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team has changed. No longer are the Illini the 3-point happy, offense-dependent team of a year ago. This Illinois team is defined by intensity and aggressiveness, as it showed in its first two games of the season against Alabama State and Jacksonville State. The word aggressive was repeated over and over again after Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 80-63 win over Alabama State on Friday and with good reason. Aggressiveness is the only reason the Illini won. The Illini canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shoot and they know it. After shooting 4-for-20 from downtown against Alabama State on Friday, the Illini attempted just three 3-pointers in the first half against Jacksonville State on Sunday. None went in. If Illinois is going to accomplish anything this year, the offense will have to play around the rim. Rayvonte Rice and Joseph Bertrand quickly got the message. Rice and Bertrand took turns as the leading scorers for the Illini in the first two games of the season. Rice scored 22 and 13, respectively, while Bertrand scored 14 and 20 points in the two games. Their combined field goal percentage in the two contests was 63 percent. The duo led an Illinois offense that was paint-oriented. Bertrand and Rice excelled at setting up their own drives with the dribble. They both used their strength and athleticism to finish at the rim, leading to their high field goal percentages. Nnanna Egwu gave the Illini an outlet when they struggled to get to the basket off the dribble. Egwuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rejuvenated post game extended from the exhibition games into Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first two contests. Egwuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s post

at home will make the Illini a better team. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible to be outplayed and overmatched at Huff Hall. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the emotional leverage; the psychological comfort Illinois gains just by walking out onto the court to a sea of orange and the sounds of the Marching Illini. This new propensity for performing well in front of a home crowd is a noticeable change from last season, when the Illini went 5-7 at Huff Hall. It was as though the team was so concerned with living up to expectations, it could never settle in and play its game. The Illini were nervous, afraid to let the Illinois faithful down. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team has matured. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re comfortable in their own skin. Home is no longer a scary place to play. Illinois will face Indiana and Purdue this week to finish off its home stint before heading back on the road. Two weeks of home games is a blessing. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a reprieve; a welcome rest from foreign locker rooms, opposing fans and Big Ten teams with their own homecourt advantage.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a comfort level. Your locker room, your fans, your band, your pregame routine. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s familiar. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s routine.

Aggressive play helps Illini to 2-0

Aryn is a senior in LAS. She can be reached at braun17@dailyilini.com. Follow her on Twitter @ArynBraun.

3B

fadeaway is unblockable; he connected on it four or five times in both games without a miss. The two biggest stats for Egwu this weekend were his seven blocks and two fouls. Egwu averaged more than three fouls a game last season, often having to sit out contests because of foul trouble. The Roy Hibbert-esque verticality is paying off for Egwu early on. When I talked to Bertrand before the season about the NCAAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s point of emphasis on hand-checks this season, he was unsure if the change would help or hurt the Illini. Early on, the Illini have benefitted from the extra whistles. Illinois followed up a 30 freethrow attempt game against Alabama State with 28 attempts on Sunday. The Illini almost had as many free attempts (19) as field goal attempts (24) in the first half against Jacksonville State. When Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shots arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t falling, which could happen frequently this season without many shooters around, free throws are an easy way to score. Of course thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still areas to work on, such as defensive rebounding (Illinois has allowed 35 offensive rebounds through two games) and forcing turnovers (Alabama State and Jacksonville State combined for 15 turnovers), but the aggressive mind set is there. Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; inability to the shoot the ball might not be a bad thing. It gives Illinois even more urgency to feed the ball into the paint and continue to be aggressive on both ends of the floor. Alabama State and Jacksonville State may not have given Illinois the best competition, but as Groce said after the first win, his players â&#x20AC;&#x153;had itâ&#x20AC;?. The effort was there, the spirit was there, and most importantly, Illinois was aggressive. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 2-0 because of it.

Michael is a senior in Media. He can be reached at wonsovr2@ dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @The_MDubb.

FOR RENT

Services

Employment

Business Services Child Care Cleaning Mind, Body & Spirit Tutoring Financial

Help Wanted Full Time 010 Part Time 020 Full/Part Time 030 Seasonal Jobs 035 Job Wanted 040 Business Oppurtunities 050

DAILY ILLINI CLASSIFIEDS

Merchandise Textbooks Clothing Computers Furniture Pets TV Garage Sales For Sale Miscellaneous

110 120 130 140 150 160

Rentals

Transportation

220 230 235 240 250 260 280 285 290

Houses (For Rent Condos/Duplexes Rooms Room & Board Roommate Wanted Office Space Parking/Storage For Rent Wanted To Rent

Apartments

Automobiles 310 Bicycles 320 Motorcycles/Scooters 330

Furnished/Unfurnished

Furnished Unfurnished Sublets Summer Only Off-Campus Other For Rent

410 420 430 440 450 460 500

510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590

Real Estate

Condos/Duplexes Houses (For Sale) Residential Property Open Houses

620 630 650 660

Things To Do Campus Events Community Events

Classes

Announcements

710 720 750

Lost & Found

810

Volunteer Opportunities 820

Miscellaneous

830

Adoption/Egg Donation 850

Shout Outs Shout Outs Greek Shout Outs

900 901

Rates Billed: 45¢/Word Minimum $2.00 Paid-In-Advance: 38¢/Word Deadline 2pm on the day before publication. Online Ads Classifieds automatically appear online at dailyillini.com

Place your ad by phone! Call 217.337.8337 Monday - Friday, 9am - 5:30pm

Important Information About Your Ad

Report errors immediately by calling 337-8337.We cannot be responsible for more than one dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incorrect insertion if you do not notify us of the error by 2 pm on the day of the first insertion. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher.The Daily Illini shall have the right to revise, reject or cancel, in whole or in part, any advertisement at any time. The Daily Illini shall not be liable for failure to print, publish or circulate all or any part of any issue in which an advertisement accepted by the publisher is contained. The Daily Illini extends credit to classified advertisers as a courtesy.We reserve the right to set credit limits, to require cash in advance, and/or to require a completed credit application. The Daily Illini screens classified advertising to avoid misleading or false messages. Please be cautious in answering ads, especially when you are asked to send money. If you have a question or concern about any advertisement which has appeared in our paper, we will be happy to discuss it with you. Please call 337-8337. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, and similar state and local laws which make it illegal for any person to cause to be published any advertisement relating to the transfer, sale, rental, or lease of any housing which expresses limitation, specifications or discrimination as to race, color, creed, class, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status, physical or mental handicap, personal appearance, sexual orientation, family responsibilities, political affiliation, prior arrest or conviction record, source of income, or the fact that such person is a student. Specification in employment classifications are made only where such factors are bonafide occupational qualifications necessary for employment.

220

BEST DEALS ON CAMPUS!

          

        

         

NOW RENTING FOR FALL 2014

1009 S First

1, 2, & 3 BR units, Spacious, Great Locations. MUST SEE! www.ppmrent.com 351-1800

                  ! 

        

RAMSHAWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FEATURED PROPERTY

3Br | 4Br | 5Br (217) 359-6400 www.ramshaw.com

Smith Apartments www.smithapartments-cu.com 217.384.1925

Efficiency ä&KXUFK&



1 Bedroom (&KDOPHUV& ($UPRU\&  ä&KXUFK& ä6WRXJKWRQ8 6/RFXVW& 66HFRQG&

rentals

410

     ! !   !!    !    !      

420

   

!-%)#"*,''+,%)#  

 ! ,**("/,)%-$! +.-  

 ,&%)# (* 000*(





($UPRU\&

  &('2,J-JJ)&





 





 















  

    







     





































 

 













 



 

 





 

















 



(QWHUWKHQXPEHUVLQWKHEODQNVSDFHVVRWKDW HDFKURZFROXPQDQG[VTXDUHFRQWDLQVRQO\RQH RIHDFKQXPEHU7KHUHLVRQO\RQHVROXWLRQ VROX WLRQLQ&ODVVLILHGVDQGRQOLQHDWZZZGDLO\LOOLQLFRP 





















 



































 

















  

     

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

  









 

P A S S



A R E N A



T R A Y



H A R T



P H Y S





















        

































L A O

G E T T Y S B U R G

S A B E







        



















    









        

E N N E

A K A

A T A D



     W I N E

R U B I T I N



T S A R

S A S N T E P E G T S E A R

A P D O S M Y A S E R I D N S E I N C B H E S A D R G O H E B A E R Y



O H O H

W O E I S M E



D R E W

S T O K E R



 





  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S T D S

M P A H R E G W I N D F T E L S A B S A E L I N O T E N G I N A A L B



 

 A R E W E A L O N E

 





















 









  



































































































(PDLORSLQLRQV#GDLO\LOOLQLFRP



 



T A H O E

 * &%& +(+!#!%%'("!% ''#!%),*((  ##+-(*. ##(!##!$)#*-     

6XGRNX 6.,// 

We're  Serious About Illini Sports





/HWWHUVWRWKH(GLWRU





Most apartments furnished parking & laundry available

6KDUH<RXU 7KRXJKWV

CONDOS/DUPLEXES 620

211 W Springfield Ave Champaign, IL 61820 (217) 352-1129 ¡ www.roysebrinkmeyer.com -XQ3DUW$6NLOO





3 Bedroom Apartments

      +$'"!(*%%)*$'"  !0  *((&!-*'$+# ),+    (& ) ,!*$ '%/ ...(&

  

   $%" "# # #" $ &%$%" "#$ # $"% % $ " ' %$$#    " #"!%"  

$3$570(176

"==:?:JA:D7



        



Furnished

  

"!  " %"##'#" '#""("("'$ &%%#$     $     

Bailey Apartments



APARTMENTS

/RRNLQJIRUDURRIRYHU\RXUKHDG" <RXFDQJHWWKDWDQ\ZKHUH

3URYLGLQJEHDXWLIXOKRPHVDQGVWHOODUVHUYLFH DW, microwave desk, central WRWKH&KDPSDLJQ8UEDQD6DYR\ FRPPXQLWLHVIRURYHU\HDUV a/c, balcony

344 - 3008

510



         

  

52<6( %5,1.0(<(5

2 Bedroom (&KDOPHUV& ($UPRU\& ($UPRU\& ä&KXUFK& ä6WRXJKWRQ8 6/RFXVW& ä&ODUN8 ä&ODUN8 ä&ODUN8

Apartment search

to Union, /RRNLQJIRUFRPIRUWDEOHOLYLQJDQG Grainger, TXDOLW\VHUYLFHDWDQDIIRUGDEOHSULFH" Siebel,  Comp. Sci. &RPHWR5R\VH %ULQNPH\HU$SDUWPHQWV 



Furnished/Unfurnished

House Hunting at its finest

HOUSES FOR RENT

1-3 blocks



APARTMENTS

     

          "$%& %$!& %'#%$ )!&#$&$ %)  &** !  !#&$% "# (! %%$%&") # %    %!"

440

    )  $%"

 %##! '%##!& (%"&$%'!"'& #'%' *'  "#"%&'" & $%'!"'&"("' ("%*"" ($&'%&#!*! "'& !#"'   



Furnished Urbana side



FOR RENT

430 SUBLETS

Unfurnished

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms



BOOKS

    $"-) '") %+"(!$%'""  "*, '$$+*""-*'$!(   &')#$)(()!$"((&&"!$( !( +( '+( ''-' '%#  &'(%$ !(!)+++'%') %#%'""

  %')!"(

   

    $  !%% %$  " ! !# !  !   !$!

www.BaileyApartments.com



   # !  ""!"  " "   " %%%!"$%"    

merchandise

              

430 APARTMENTS

Unfurnished



































  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      

   ',)('* 2 &!&*/,+"-* +"-&**0()'-""&  "&')%+"'&&+"%%& %&+ *,((')+)()*&+"& +!/,+"- +''+!)*"&*+(& %&"& &-")'&%&+ 

,+"* 2)',*"&')%+"'&0 +)&*)""& ')%++"& "&(,++"&  "+"& )+)"-"& '(0"& & +)&*%"++"& +/++& )(!"*  2 '&*)-*/,+"-*+"%0 )"& )*)!"& &)',+"&  '))*('&&)+"& $++)*& ',%&+*'$$+"& &&$01"&  "&')%+"'&"&"+"+"&  +$'%%,&"+"'&*  2"&+"&*()'**"'&$& +!&"$#&'.$ 0++&"&  ,+"'&$.')#*!'(*)-"."&  ()'**"'&$(,$"+"'&*  #"$$*,$"3+"'&* 2 %"&"*+)+"-)"+"& #"$$* (')+"& #"$$*!,$"&  ")'*'+3#"$$*) &"1+"'& "%& %&+)*&++"'& #"$$*)-$' "*+"*)$ '%%,&"+"'&  !"*('*"+"'&"*$'+"& ()"& 3$$$"&'"*'(($0($* %"$)*,%+' *'))$$ *!'%'%



                

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished



     

 '  !$$  !! ! "!! !"    ! !  '  " !! &! #    ' !(& % $ !  ' %!#$!! "!  ' ( "! "    !!    ! !

(   & &" "!

 

     %%#$  %&%"#$" %" " !"$$##$  !%#"  !"!"#     

150

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Full time

010 TUTORING

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

+HOSWRPDNHZHOONQRZQRIVXGRNXWRSLFDOFRP <RXOLNHWKLVZHEVLWH"7KHQUHFRPPHQGLWWR\RXUIULHQGV ,I\RXRZQ\RXUVHOIDZHEVLWHSODFHDOLQNWRVXGRNXWRSLFDOFRP ,I\RXSULQWRXWWKHVXGRNXVWKHQSULQWWKHPWZLFHDQGJLYHRQHWRRQHRI\RXUIULHQGV 7HOO\RXUDFTXDLQWDQFHVIULHQGVDQGWHDPPDWHVDERXWVXGRNXWRSLFDOFRP -XVWKHOSWRPDNHWKLVVLWHZHOONQRZQ

HELP WANTED

APARTMENTS

services

employment







 
















THE DAILY ILLINI | WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

# BDROOMS

Advantage Properties, C-U

MISC.

www.advproperties.com

# BDROOMS

217-344-0394

Roland Realty

FU RN / LA UNF U UN DR RN A/ Y I C NU NI PA T RK IN GO UT ILI NS TIE S I ITE NC L.

Monday, November 11, 2013

FU RN / LA UNF U UN DR RN A/ YI C NU NI PA T RK IN GO UT NS ILI TIE I S I TE NC L.

4B

MISC.

www.roland-realty.com

217-351-8900

1007 W. Clark, U.

1,2,3

F    

1BR & 2BR with Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D

501 S. Sixth

3,4

F    New building, spacious, luxury living, Engineering Quad

1003 W. Clark, U.

1

F    

NEWLY REMODELED - 1BR with Hi Speed Int, near Engr, W/D

905 S. First St

St.,1

F    On-site maintenance, access to pool

1005 W. Stoughton, U.

1,2

F    

1BR & 2BR 2BA w/Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D, sec Bldg

907 S. Third

2,4

F    Great location, secure, balcony

1002 W. Clark, U.

1,2

F    

NEWLY REMODELED 1BR & 2BR w/ Hi Speed Int, DW, W/D

404 E. Stoughton

2,3

F    Steps from Engineering School!

1007 W. Main, U.

1,2

F    

1BR & 2BR with Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D, sec bldg

903 S. First

1,2,3

F    On-site maintenance, free laundry room, pool access

1008 W. Main, U.

1,2

F    

1BR & 2BR with Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D, sec bldg

56-58 E. Daniel

2

F    Modern, affordable, complete utility package

908 W. Stoughton, U.

2

F    

2BR with Hi Speed Int, near Engr, W/D, sec building

304 S. Fifth

5+

F    

House near Engineering

1004 W. Main, U.

2

F    

2BR with High Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D

22 E. Chalmers

4

F    

Renovated House

1010 W. Main, U.

1,2

F    

1BR & 2BR 2BA w/ Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D, sec bldg

112 E. Green

2,4

F    Brand new building. TV in all bedrooms

1003 W. Main, U.

1,2

F    

Brand New Luxury Building w/Hi Speed Int, DW, W/D, sec bldg

307 E. Daniel

4

F    Huge bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, with large terrace. New!

Group Houses

2,3,4

F    

2, 3, & 4 bedroom houses fully furnished near Engr

203 N. Gregory, U.

1,2

F    

1BR & 2BR with Hi Speed Int, near ENGR, DW, W/D in-unit

204 N. Harvey, U.

1,2

F    

1BR & 2BR with Hi Speed Int, near ENGR, DW, W/D in-unit

306 N. Harvey, U.

2,3

F    

Luxury 2BR 2BA w/ Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D, sec bldg

1004 W. Stoughton

4

F    

Most units have 42â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; flat screen TV, Near Eng Campus

808 W. Clark, U.

1

F    

1BR with Hi Speed Int, near Engr, W/D

904 W. Stoughton

2,3

F

Covered parking, 2 units with W/D. Most w/ 42'' flact sc TV

906 W. Clark, U.

1

F    

NEWLY REMODELED - 1BR with Hi Speed Int, near Engr, W/D

1009 W. Main

2

F    

1 Block from Beckman Institute

1102 W. Stoughton

3

F    

Most units have 42" flat screen TV, 1 Block from Beckman

Bailey Apartments

www.baileyapartments.com

217-344-3008

Royse & Brinkmeyer Royse & Brinkmeyer

www.roysebrinkmeyer.com 1,2,3

Shlens Apartment

U    Fireplaces, garages, lofts www.shlensapts.com

Smith Apartment Rentals

217-352-1129

  

217-344-290

217-384-1925

1010 W. Springfield

3,4

F    

2 1/2 blocks to Quad

111 S. Lincoln

2

F    

Near Green and Lincoln

507 W. Church, C.

Eff.

F    

$375, includes water and one parking

911 W. Springfield

1

F    

Quiet building. Office location

58 E. Armory, C.

1

F    

$630, includes one parking

901 W. Springfield

1,2

F    

Large units

610 W. Stoughton, U.

1

F    

$520, includes water & one parking

1004 W. Springfield

1

F    

$525/month

1004 S. Locust, C.

1

F    

$675, parking $50

1106 S. Second, C.

1

F    

$525 & $575, includes water, parking $60-$70

1

B    

$500-$535, includes water and one parking

511 W. Church, C.

1

B    

$530-$575, includes water and one parking

58 E. Armory, C.

2

F    

$910, includes one parking

201 E Armory, C.

2

F    

$970, parking $70

On-site Laundry. Near campus. Some utilities paid

1004 S. Locust, C.

2

F    

$680-$890, parking $50

Hardwood floors. Large rooms

1009 W. Clark, U.

2

F    

$795, includes one parking

1010 W. Clark, U.

2

F    

$885, includes one parking

Burnham 310 Apartments 310 E. Springfield, C.

St.,1,2,3

Cline Student Housing 509 W. Nevada, U.

Ef., 1-6

Hunsinger Enterprises

www.burnham310.com

F     Spacious rooms, modern fitness center. Full service movie room 507 W. Church, C. 1004 Brighton Dr.

217-367-0956

F    Fall 2014. Hi-speed internet, 4 blocks to Quad. www.hunsingerapts.com

Hunsinger Apartments

Eff,1,2,3,4

F

Group Houses

4, 5+

F 

Klatt Properties

217-239-2310

  

www.klattproperties.com

217-337-1565

217-367-6626

www.smithapartments-cu.com

204 E. Clark, C.

St.,1,2,3

B    Laundry on-site. Includes internet & basic cable.

1012 W. Clark, U.

2

F    

$795, includes one parking

505 W. Springfield, C.

2

B    

Heat Included

511 W. Church, C.

2

B    

$705-$765, includes water and one parking

409 W. Elm, C.

2

B    

Most Utilities. Heat Incl. $750-800

201 E. Armory, C.

3

F    

$1335, parking $70

712 W. California, U.

5+

F    

Big campus house. $2750/mo

Tenant Union

407 W Elm, U

5+

F    Big campus house. $2100/mo

Lincolnshire Properties 201 S. Busey/714 W. Elm, U. 1,2,3

www.lincolnshireprop.com F    

Professional Property Management

217-398-1998

Modern, A/C, Dishwasher, Balconies. $950-$1425

www.ppmrent.com

217-351-1800

www.tenantunion.uiuc.edu

Tenant Union!

217-333-0112

Free apartment help! Issues with landlords! Lease reviews!

Tri County Management Group

www.tricountymg.com

906 S. Locust, C.

Eff.,4

F    

908 S. Locust, C.

1

F    Heat/water paid

705 S. First, C.

3,4

F    

217-367-2009

Quiet Location

1003 W. Stoughton, U.

2

F    

108 E. John, C.

1

B    Huge, hardwood floors, security doors

808 W. Illinois, U.

1,2,3

F    

Newer, W/D, D/W, open floor plan

410 W. California, U.

4

F    

305/307/311 W. Birch, C.

1

B    

Close to campus, 1 parking space included

603 W. Nevada, U.

2

U    Pet friendly! Heat, water, trash & parking included

906 S. Vine, U.

1,2

B    

Close to campus, remodeled, on-site laundry

206 S. Fourth, C.

3

F    

Pets welcome! Hardwood floors, dishwasher. House!

308 E. Iowa, U.

2

B    

Close to campus, 3 level floor plan

803 W. Stoughton, U.

2

U    

House! Pet friendly! Hardwood floors.

503 E. Springfield, C.

1,2

F    

Newer, W/D, D/W, walk-in closets, 2 full BA

906 W. Springfield, U.

1

F    Water & trash included! Pet friendly

610 W. Oregon, U.

2

B    

Spacious, W/D, off street parking included

109 S. Busey, U.

1

U    Parking $15/mo. Pet friendly. Water & trash included

802 W. Ohio/1009 Busey, U

2

U    

Duplex with Hardwood Floors, W/D, parking included

404 E. White, C.

3

F    Dishwasher, all utilities included. Pet friendly

502 E. Springfield, C.

3

F    

2 BA, W/D, newer, balcony/patio

714 S. Race, U.

1

U    

505 E. Stoughton, C.

3

F    

Newer, balcony/patio, 2 BA, W/D, D/W

603 W. Green, U.

2,3

U    Dishwasher! Pet friendly! Heat, water, trash & parking incl.

301 S. Fourth, C

2

F    

Newed, W/D, D/W, walk-in closets, 2 full BA

502 W. Green, U.

4

F    

Condo - pets allowed! Dishwasher

205 E. Green, C.

1

F    Large, great location, security doors

804 W. Springfield, U.

5+

F    

House, pet friendly, dishwasher

705 W. Main, U.

St.,1,2,3

F    Pet friendly! Most include all utilities!

Ramshaw Real Estate

Engineering campus, some remodeled, C/A

www.ramshaw.com

217- 359-6400

Weiner Companies, Ltd

Parking $40/mo

www.weinercompanies.com

217-384-8001

House! Hardwood floors! Pet friendly, dishwasher

Pet friendly! Parking & trash included

1009 S. First, C.

3,4,5

F    

Some remodeled units. Hardwood floors

703 W. Nevada, U.

1

U    Cats allowed. Water, trash & parking included

1105 W. Main, U.

3

F    

Near Siebel Center and Engineering

704 W. Nevada, U.

1,2

U    Water, trash & parking incl. Heat w/ most. Cats allowed

202 E. White, C.

3,4

F    

Fireplaces, Dishwasher, Balconies

700 W. Oregon, U.

3

U    

806 W. Stoughton, U.

4

F    

House! Free Parking!

604 W. Nevada, U.

St.,1

U    Cats allowed! Heat, water, trash & parking included

403 E. Elm, U.

1

U    

Trash & parking included. Pets allowed!

Rob Chambers

www.robsapartments.com

217-840-5134

Pet friendly! House! Hardwood floors

707 W. Elm, U.

2,3,4

F    

Balcony in the trees, free parking, fireplace, 1 & 2 baths

212 W. Illinois, U.

1

U    

Dishwasher, pet friendly! Hardwood floors

503 E. Clark, C.

Eff.

F    

Secure bldg. Free water

402 E. White, C.

4

F    

House! Pets allowed! Dishwasher!

101 W. Park, U.

1,2

U    

EZ bus to campus, free parking, fiber optics

506 E. White, C.

3

F    

Balcony, secure bldg. Free water & parking

K   (


The Daily Illini: Volume 143 Issue 44