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LOCAL KICKSTARTER RAISES OVER $5,000 TO CREATE CLAUDE MONET KIDS’ BOOK

THE

DAILY ILLINI Monday, June 16 - Sunday, June 22, 2014 Vol. 143 Issue 127 • FREE

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Dancing the night away Research Park hosts free outdoor concert

INSIDE

WEATHER

2

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POLICE

2

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OPINIONS

6

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SPORTS

8

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COMICS

10

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CLASSIFIEDS

11-12

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SUDOKU

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June 16-22, 2014

FIVE-DAY FORECAST

Monday

86Ëš/72Ëš Scattered T-Storms

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

2 Tuesday

89Ëš/72Ëš Isolated T-Storms

Wednesday

89Ëš/72Ëš Isolated T-Storms

Thursday

87Ëš/70Ëš Scattered T-Storms

Friday

85Ëš/67Ëš Scattered T-Storms

THE DAILY ILLINI ,.YLLU:[ *OHTWHPNU03 Â&#x2039;Â&#x2039; *VW`YPNO[Â? 0SSPUP4LKPH*V ;OL+HPS`0SSPUPPZ[OLPUKLWLUKLU[Z[\KLU[ UL^ZWHWLYH[[OL<UP]LYZP[`VM0SSPUVPZH[<YIHUH *OHTWHPNUHUKPZW\ISPZOLKI`[OL0SSPUP4LKPH *V;OL+HPS`0SSPUPKVLZUV[ULJLZZHYPS`YLWYLZLU[ PU^OVSLVYPUWHY[[OL]PL^ZVM[OL<UP]LYZP[` VM0SSPUVPZHKTPUPZ[YH[PVUMHJ\S[`VYZ[\KLU[Z(SS 0SSPUP4LKPH*VHUKVY+HPS`0SSPUPHY[PJSLZWOV[VZ HUKNYHWOPJZHYL[OLWYVWLY[`VM0SSPUP4LKPH*V HUKTH`UV[ILYLWYVK\JLKVYW\ISPZOLK^P[OV\[ ^YP[[LUWLYTPZZPVUMYVT[OLW\ISPZOLY ;OL+HPS`0SSPUPPZHTLTILYVM4J*SH[JO`;YPI\UL 0UMVYTH[PVU:LY]PJLZ4J*SH[JO`;YPI\ULPZ LU[P[SLK[V[OL\ZLMVYYLWYVK\J[PVUVMHSSSVJHS UL^ZWYPU[LKPU[OPZUL^ZWHWLY Periodical postage paid at Champaign, Ill., 61821. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and on Mondays during the summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-oftown and out-of-state rates available upon request.

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POLICE

CORRECTIONS

Champaign

When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see a mistake in the paper, please contact Interim Editorin-Chief Austin Keating at 337-8365.

Q Home invasion was reported in the 3800 block of Pebblebrook Lane on Thursday around 11 p.m. According to the report, the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residence was burglarized. Q Burglary was reported at Best Buy, 2117 N. Prospect Ave., on Friday around 12 a.m. According to the report, three unknown offenders broke three windows and stole a cell phone. Q Aggravated battery was reported in the 300 block of North Neil Street on Friday around 3:30 a.m. According to the report, two suspects reported being battered by unknown offenders. Q Burglary was reported at Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club, 915 W. Marketview Dr., on Friday around 11:30 a.m. According to the report, an unknown offender walked into the store and stole three bottles of liquor.

University Theft was reported at the University Main Library, 1408 W. Gregory Dr., Urbana, on Wednesday at 6 p.m. According to the report, a University student reported that someone had stolen his bicycle that had been locked to a rack at the library. The estimated value of the bike and lock is $140. Q Theft was reported at the University soccer fields near Stadium Drive and First Street in Champaign on Tuesday around 7:30 p.m. According to the report, an 18-yearold man reported that someone had stolen his unattended backpack, which contained a wallet and other items. The student said he immediately returned home to cancel his bank cards and discovered someone had already purchased merchandise with one of them. Q A 23-year-old Urbana man was arrested on the charges of theft and possession of burglary tools at 1 p.m. Monday outside Kenney Gymnasium, 1402 W. Springfield Ave., on Monday at 1 p.m. According to the report, someone called police after seeing the man use a tool to cut the lock from a bicycle that was secured to a rack. A subsequent search of the manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s backpack revealed a bolt cutter. Q

Urbana Q A lost license plate was reported in the 700 block of West Green Street on Saturday around 5 p.m. According to the report, the victim noticed his rear registration plate was missing from his car. It is unknown whether the plate was stolen or lost. Q Criminal damage to property was reported in the 500 block of West Green Street on Friday around 12 p.m. According to the report, victim accused listed offender of damaging her property after victim was issued a notice to appear for damaging offenderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s property. Victim stated the offender damaged her microscope while she was out of town.

Compiled by Tyler Davis

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ON THE COVER Audience members dance to Davina and the Vagabonds, who performed at OUTSIDE at the Research Park on Friday. COURTESY OF CLAIRE EVERETT

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Newsroom Corrections: If you think something has been incorrectly reported, please call Editor-in-Chief Austin Keating at (217) 337-8365. Online: If you have a question about DailyIllini. com or The Daily Illiniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social media outlets, please email our Web editor Karyna Rodriguez at online@dailyillini.com. On-air: If you have comments or questions about The Daily Illiniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s broadcasts on WPGU-FM 107.1, please email our managing editor, Tyler Davis, at onair@dailyillini.com. Employment: If you would like to work for the newspaperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial department, please fill out our form or email employment at dailyillini.com. News: If you have a news tip, please call Managing Editor Tyler Davis at (217) 337-8345 or email news@dailyillini.com. Calendar: If you want to submit events for publication in print and online, visit the217.com. Sports: If you want to contact the sports staff, please call Editor-in-Chief Austin Keating at (217) 337-8344 or email sports@dailyillini.com. Life & Culture: If you have a tip for a Life & Culture story, please call Managing Editor Tyler Davis at (217) 337-8343 or email features@dailyillini.com. Photo: If you have any questions about photographs or to suggest photo coverage of an event, please call Editor-in-Cvhief Austin Keating at (217) 337-8560 or email news@dailyillini.com. Letters to the editor: Letters are limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college. The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions. Email opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letter to the Editor.â&#x20AC;?

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

June 16-22, 2014

3

Monet and the Waterlily Friends

PORTRAIT BY EARN SAENMUK

Local Kickstarter campaign to create children’s book exceeds goal of $5,000, more books planned for the future BY EARN SAENMUK STAFF WRITER

When Judy Lee, a 28-year-old freelance graphic designer in Urbana, got a job offer to become a preschool art teacher, she didn’t know what to do. She was terrified — she wasn’t sure if she could actually work with children or not. She planned to reject the offer; however, all her friends encouraged her to take the job. “Every year I thought, ‘This is temporary,’ but all my friends kept telling me it’s going to be worth it,” Lee said. “That’s how I stayed for three years.” When she started, there was no teaching material or curriculum at all. She took advice from parents and other teachers and created her own materials on fine artists. She used puppets and pictures to tell the children stories about famous artists. Her students had fun and, after a while, started to recognize the work of famous artists in the world, which she feels is a great accomplishment. “I had a two-year-old bring in an art book and she couldn’t talk yet,” Lee said. “Her mom put a note that says, ‘Ella wants to show this to you.’” After visiting “The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter,” an exhibition at the New York Public Library, she was inspired to come up with an affordable book people and schools can use to learn about artists. She wanted to use this book to express her idea of art education for preschool students. She thinks art is very flexible, not restricted to just learning how to draw objects or learning the meaning of each color. She chose to profile Claude Monet, a French

impressionist painter, for her first book, “Monet and the Waterlily Friends.“ “Monet is my favorite,” Lee said. “I think I like him because he was so different, and he made this significant contribution to the visual art world.” The book is meant to be an art lesson guidebook for parents and teachers. It consists of three parts: a graphic novel without words, a short story for children to read with their parents or teacher and an activities section children can do along with the story. She started the project small. Publishing children’s books is very competitive, so she put the project on Kickstarter.com to garner recognition. The project has received positive feedback, and although her initial fundraising goal of $5,000 has been met, she’s still receiving more funds for her possible “stretch goals.” These additional goals will allow her to upgrade the book, its cover, create supplementary videos and begin work on other potential books in the series. She originally planned to market toward families with small children, but many of her friends were eager to help fund the book. “It’s amazing how many people have shown interest in the project,” Lee said. “Many of my friends have helped me reach the goal.” She thinks children should be allowed to think creatively and expressively as children can do amazing things with art. In art, she said, it is OK to be different. Children shouldn’t feel limited by their drawing abilities as there are many other tools and methods now available to express their ideas.

“After three years of teaching and talking to people, my conclusion was that creative thinking is the most important,” Lee said. “It’s not about the product, but it’s getting the kids to think flexibly.” Following this project’s completion, she plans to make books about other artists such as Vincent van Gogh, Frida Kahlo and Jackson Pollock. She also has plans for other media in addition to the books as well. The book is expected to be published in September.

Earn can be reached at saenmuk2 @dailyillini.com.


June 16-22, 2014

4

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Illini Union streams World Cup games University students gather in Illini Union Courtyard Cafe to watch the 2014 World Cup BY ABRAR AL-HEETI STAFF WRITER

Many World Cup enthusiasts gathered on Friday morning at the Illini Union Courtyard Cafe to share in the excitement of the games as they watched Mexico play Cameroon. The World Cup, an international soccer competition, started on Thursday and will end on July 13, and up until then, the Union will be screening each game via projector in the courtyard for students and community members. Angelina Jaimes is a summer intern who watched both the Brazil versus Croatia game as well as the Mexico versus Cameroon game at the Courtyard Cafe. “I come here to watch the games because of the environment — the students here cheering for their team,” Jaimes said. Kensuke Naito is a first year doctorate student who was attending his orientation. He decided to stop by the Courtyard Cafe to watch Friday morning’s game. “I want Mexico to win this game,” he

said. “And I think Brazil or Germany will win the whole thing.” Almost every seat in the cafe was occupied with viewers, and at Friday morning’s game, viewers in the courtyard largely rooted for Mexico. People cheered, groaned and watched anxiously together as the game unfolded. I n the C our t ya rd C a fe, f lags representing the playing teams will line the perimeter of the room for the duration of the World Cup. “There’s no team in particular I want to win this game,” said Michael Obiero Oyengo, graduate student. “I would like if an African team wins, or Germany.” Oyengo said he watched the first game from home, but “I was studying on campus, so I decided to come.” Attendees said they were likely to come back to the Union to watch more games throughout the tournament.

Abrar can be reached at aalheet2 @dailyillini.com.

PHOTO COURTESY OF KATRIEZ AGAMANOS

Viewers at the Courtyard Cafe watch as Mexico plays Cameroon during the World Cup. The Cafe screens each game in the cafe for the duration of the tournament.

Peace gardens planted to establish collaboration and unity between congregations BY ABRAR AL-HEETI STAFF WRITER

The First Mennonite Church and the Central Illinois Mosque and Islamic Center are planting for peace in their two peace gardens, a project with the goal of establishing collaboration and demonstrating unity between the two congregations. The first garden is located beside the First Mennonite Church at 902 W. Springfield Ave., while the second garden — a new addition this year — sits by the entrance of the mosque, located at 106 S. Lincoln Ave. These gardens are not the first time the church and mosque have reached out to one another in a collaborative effort, said Janet Guthrie, pastor at the First Mennonite Church. “We started (the gardens) back in 2010, although our work with the mosque goes back to when the building was constructed in 1985,” Guthrie said. “So as long as we have been neighbors with the mosque, the First Mennonite Church and the mosque have been doing some things like sharing parking and cooperating in various ways.” She said the peace gardens are another way to encourage cooperation between the groups and to celebrate their fellowship. “It was a way to also provide for a joint activity that would involve multiple generations,” she said. “It would be symbolically

very important, showing that we have a common goal of stewarding the earth and want to work together in that regard.” There are about 15 to 20 people actively involved in planting and maintaining the gardens. This year the garden is Mediterranean themed, so volunteers mostly plant greens in line with that, such as tomatoes, squash, peppers and basil.

“(The Peace Gardens) would be symbolically very important, showing we have a common goal of stewarding the earth and want to work together in that regard.” JANET GUTHRIE

PASTOR AT FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH

“People from both (the mosque) and Mennonite communities helped in land preparation, planting, and are currently helping with weeding and watering activities,” said Seyed Dastgheib, who is the head of the proj-

ect from the Central Illinois Mosque and Islamic Center. Beth Rempe leads the gardening efforts for the First Mennonite Church side of the project. She said setting up times for maintenance for the season is a “work in progress.” “We set up times for regular weeding and watering, but it’s hard to coordinate schedules,” she said. “I think there’s a lot of goodwill towards it, it’s just a matter of getting times when people can come and when we can all be together doing it as well, which is one of the aims of the garden.” Rempe said she’s thinking of having workdays once a month or so when a larger group of people can attend to “make it a more social event as well as a purely practical weeding session.” Most of the produce from the garden goes to the Center for Women in Transition. Guthrie said such outreach to the community, in addition to cooperation between the congregations, is a demonstration of how “this garden builds relationships and builds peace.” “We have the idea of having sort of a ‘try something new’ meal at the end of the year with some of the produce,” Rempe said. “We have the idea of inviting the youth from both congregations to participate in that.”

Abrar can be reached at aalheet2 @dailyillini.com.

Common Ground seeking lease for Champaign store DAILY ILLINI STAFF REPORT

Common Ground Food Co-op, 300 S. Broadway Ave. #166, Urbana, has announced that it is moving forward on lease negotiations for a second store to open by the summer of 2015 in Champaign. The exact location hasn’t been released, but according to a press release, the co-op hopes to have a lease and be able to announce the location to its 5,300 owners at their fall owners’ meeting Sept. 20. “I am excited to have found that CGFC is ready fiscally and internally to finally build the Champaign store that our owners have been asking for since we moved to Lincoln Square in 2008, and that the market studies show there is ample demand for the local farm foods and organic foods we bring to the community to support it,” said CGFC General Manager Jacqueline Hannah. The Champaign location will be similar in size to the Urbana location. According to the press release, it will have a full service deli, salad bar, large local and organic produce section, and community classroom; however, Hannah said she will be looking for other new features as well. “We definitely want to take our environmental stewardship to the next level with this new location and are actively researching what might be possible,” she said.


June 16-22, 2014

5

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

ARC offers workout classes throughout the summer Students can attend classes and workout at the gym with the purchase of a summer pass BY CHRISTINE OLIVO STAFF WRITER

Students staying on campus for the summer are able to maintain their summer bodies through a variety of group fitness classes offered at the Activities and Recreation Center. According to the ARC’s website, group fitness classes offer a way to keep students motivated and feeling healthy with instructors that are prepared to inspire and motivate. But beginning Monday, students who want to use the facilities at the ARC will need to buy a summer pass. According to the ARC’s customer service and website students will need to pay $85 to use the ARC unless enrolled in a summer class at the University. By purchasing the pass, students will able to use ARC facilities until Aug. 15. Students will also need to purchase a $30 unlimited pass to attend group fitness classes for the summer, or pay $7 per class attended. Although students will need to buy these extra passes, the $85 and $30 investments

are worth it, said Sheena Artajo, ARC customer service assistant and junior in FAA. “The ARC is a great place that provides tons of activities,” Artajo said. “The ARC also has great group fitness classes that give students a great way to workout.” Marquis Jackson, ARC customer service assistant and senior in LAS, agreed with Artajo. “The price of the pass is still relatively cheap compared to someone who isn’t affiliated with the University,” Jackson said. “Now students will have access to the ARC facilities that they would normally get in the school, but will have more time to use them now since they aren’t taking as many classes.” Lesa Scharnett, ARC professional group fitness instructor, said that this is the most important time for students to be using the ARC. “Your shorts are shorter, your sleeves are shorter and you’re showing more skin,” Scharnett said. “It’s all about self image and how you want people to perceive you.

Making sure you workout is also about self confidence.” Scharnett teaches multiple classes at the ARC including TurboKick, an upbeat, hiphop martial arts-based class; R.I.P.P.E.D., which stands for Resistance, Intervals, Power, Plyometrics, Endurance and Diet; Cardio Camp, an intense athletic training class that combines P90X and Insanity workouts; cycling; and BODYJAM, a highenergy dance and cardio workout. Scharnett said it is also important that students work on flexibility, which can be gained by taking pilates and yoga at the ARC. Artajo said she enjoys taking classes at the ARC such as Zumba and BODYJAM. “I love to dance, and these classes have actual dance moves,” Artajo said. “It’s a workout you wouldn’t expect and it’s a lot of fun. We have really great instructors that are really good at what they do.” Jackson said cycling and BODYPUMP classes are two of the most popular classes that students enjoy taking. “It’s a different kind of workout to do

with a group atmosphere,” Jackson said. “You’re not just doing it by yourself, it can be motivating to workout with a group of people, and the classes are just very fun.” Jackson also said the ARC is providing a Deep Water Exercise class for gym members that is only offered during the summer. The class takes place in both the indoor and outdoor pools. Students can also rent out multi-purpose rooms for free and create their own workout routines. Although Scharnett said it is important for students to take advantage of all the ARC facilities throughout the summer, it is also important for students to stay practical while working out. “When you’re trying to change or get in better shape, keep it realistic,” Scharnett said. “If your goals are too high, you might let yourself down. So just like we live one day at a time, keep working hard and take it one pound at a time.”

Christine can be reached at caolivo2@ dailyillini.com.


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OPINIONS QUICK

C O MME NTA RY Quick Commentary delivers bits of relevant and important issues on campus or elsewhere. We write it, rate it and stamp it. When something happens that we are not pleased with: DI Denied. When something happens that we like: Alma Approved.

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STANLEY CUP CHAMPIONSHIP While Chicagoans are still mourning the loss of the Blackhawks to the Los Angeles Kings, the playoffs marched on in anticipation of the 2014 Stanley Cup champions. In the end, the Kings won against the New York Rangers, earning the coveted hockey title. We say this is DI Denied on two fronts â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one because our favorite team lost the fight while the Kings moved on and ultimately won, and two because hockey season is over. However, we could slap an Alma Approved on the fact that the playoff beards are finally being shaved â&#x20AC;&#x201D; there is a fine line between sultry scruff and mangy mustaches.

A NOTEWORTHY WEDDING As part of a traditional ritual that is said to ensure rain and a good harvest, two frogs were wed in a ceremony in Nagpur, India last Thursday. And while seemingly strange to some of us here in the states, who are we to stop a little rain, and two frogs from an inevitably happy future together?

Study abroad: A chance for students to gain global consciousness BOSWELL HUTSON Opinions columnist

T

wo weeks ago, I returned to central Illinois from my nearly six month study abroad session at University College London. Towards the end of my tenure, I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to see my parents, reunite with my girlfriend and devour all of the delicious trans fats in the American snack foods Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come to adore. As the date of my departure from the United Kingdom loomed closer, however, I felt a sense of massive personal change. I suddenly realized how rare it was to get to study in a city like London and just as I was about to leave, I came to truly appreciate my time there. I remember reading a column in this very newspaper last year, highlighting how students should cherish their time at the University and that study abroad was essentially a waste of time because it took away from the great work going on right here in ChampaignUrbana. With all due respect to the author of that column, and the risk of sounding like an advertisement for the Study Abroad Office, spending an entire semester at UCL was simultaneously the best, most frightening, most fun, and craziest experience of my life, and I would never trade it for anything â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including one more semester in Champaign-Urbana. Even though there was minor culture shock at the beginning (did you know that â&#x20AC;&#x153;are you alright?â&#x20AC;? translates to â&#x20AC;&#x153;helloâ&#x20AC;? in British slang?), by the end, I was not only appreciative of my time there, but I also wished I

could stay in London longer. To give a little background, I grew up in Monticello, Illinois â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a small town just between Champaign and Decatur. Moving across an ocean to Western Europeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest city, away from my parents whom Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never lived more than 20 minutes from and away from my girlfriend, whom Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been with for over two years, was one of the most daunting feelings Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever experienced. Nothing can quite compare to the weight of the inevitable stop-watch that marked the time until my departure. It felt more like a permanent countdown which captivated every waking moment of the last days I spent surrounded by friends and family. The months before I left became markedly cherished, then slowly those months turned into days, hours, minutes and eventually seconds, until I was gone â&#x20AC;&#x201D; thousands of miles away, all by myself. The independence of being thrust into a foreign country by myself is something like an amplified version of the freedom-induced adrenaline rush a freshman gets during their first week of college. London is perhaps the most international city in the world, and while the University of Illinois provides a cultural experience, in my case, it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t nearly prepare me for the plethora of cultures, customs and languages I would experience in a completely new place. This immersion into something that is so far outside of the realm of comfort is what makes living, studying, or working abroad so important to understanding a higher sense of global consciousness. Not only do I now feel like I have a plethora of memories and experiences, but I also feel that those experiences are unique and international. Without a program like study abroad, a

small town kid from central Illinois might never get to see the Eiffel Tower at night or study at one of the best universities in the world. Because of that experience, I feel not only enlightened, but also like one of the luckiest people on the planet. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get me wrong, there are things I missed while I was in London, for example: Mountain Dew, a full-sized bed, my girlfriendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 21st birthday and our 2-year anniversary, my dadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surgery and subsequent recovery, and the publishing of my momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book. Though many of these things will never happen again, what is more important than these creature comforts is the notion of how this new experience forced me to adapt, expand my own horizons, and put myself into situations I never thought I would be in (both good and bad). I think I forgot to remind myself that everyone was still going to be there when I got back, and thus the fear of missing out on something was one of the largest hurdles of study abroad, but also one of the most empowering to overcome. To those questioning whether to study abroad, I strongly urge you to seriously consider it. Maybe you think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not for you, but if thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the case, I was in your boat. I can assure you that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a life experience that will change you for the better, just as it did for me. Who knows, maybe youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll end up skiing in Norway, interviewing the band Haim in Nottingham, or perhaps dancing on a bar in the Czech Republic just like I did. Better yet, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have an experience all your own, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what studying abroad is really all about.

Boswell is a senior in LAS. He can be reached at hutson2@dailyillini.com.

Readerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opinions: The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college. Mail: Opinions, The Daily Illini, 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letter to the Editor.â&#x20AC;?


SPORTS

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DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Runners participating in the Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon, Half Marathon and 10K start the race by heading north on First Street and passing under an American Flag on Saturday, April 26, 2014. A 5K race was held on Friday night.

Jen Rothâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s journey to becoming a marathoner After months of training, Roth runs in Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon with statisfaction

BY SEAN HAMMOND SPORTS EDITOR

Jen Roth begins to run. She heads west down Nevada Street from the two-story house where her husband Carl grew up and where they now live together with their 7-year-old daughter, Nora. It is a cloudy afternoon and Jen wears a turquoise windbreaker over a long-sleeved t-shirt and black leggings. She takes off at an easy pace. The Brooks Adrenaline GTS 13 shoes she got for a discount online barely make a sound on the brick street. At 5-foot-4, the 41-year-old doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the slimmest body. But she doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lack in determination. Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal: 18 miles, her longest run yet toward her goal of racing in the 26.2-mile Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon that was then five weeks off still. The windbreaker comes off after barely half a mile. Jen ties it around her waist alongside her new 20-ounce water bottle. Strapped to her left hand is her iPhone. She listens to podcasts, not music, and has a playlist more than three hours long, filled with â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Skeptics Guide to the Universe,â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Radiolabâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sawbones,â&#x20AC;? among others. She made the playlist this morning and was somewhat overwhelmed by how long it needed to be for her run. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not exactly the physical exertion,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the thought that this is going to take forever. It drives home how long Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to be out here.â&#x20AC;? Jenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s journey didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start on Nevada Street. It started two blocks east on Race Street when she took Nora, then 2, in a stroller to watch the marathon runners go by in 2009. Watching them, she made up her mind: She would run a half marathon the next year. She had been looking for something to keep her in shape. She had lost the baby weight fairly easily, but she hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been working out at all. She had achieved a black belt in taekwondo in 2006, but that passion had run its course and she needed a new exercise goal. Growing up near Springfield, Jen ran track in high school. The 3,200 meters â&#x20AC;&#x201D; two miles â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was her best events. She saw the marathon as something to be revered. It was the peak of athletic endurance. At

the University of Illinois studying biology in the mid-1990s, her distance running stopped and she hardly worked out at all. She met Carl and they married in 1998. Ever since college her weight had ballooned. She started taekwondo classes and dropped nearly 50 pounds. She kept at it, putting off pregnancy until she had earned her black belt. Then Nora became her life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never went back,â&#x20AC;? Jen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was hard to find time with an infant. With running, I can work it around other things I have to do, as opposed to having to be there at a specific time. I was getting pretty out of shape.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to say what Jen is chasing: a childhood dream, good health, personal satisfaction. She runs three hours every weekend chasing 26.2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; an arbitrary number steeped in Greek legend and Olympic lore. She doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do it to please anyone but herself. She wants to do it once, so she can forever say she did it, so she can call herself a marathoner. The route mapped into the RunMeter app on Jenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s phone is the exact route for the marathon. She has ran five half marathons

now, her first in 2010, and is familiar with the first half of the local course. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the second half, the part that circles through Champaign, that she has never ran and which she is running now. On First Street, having run about three miles, she heads north toward downtown Champaign. She cuts down Logan Street and has to stop at a couple of lights to wait for traffic. She imagines the street with a crowd of people cheering her on. The sidewalk is surprisingly empty for a Saturday afternoon. She cruises through downtown and heads west down Church Street. RunMeter tells her she is going faster than she anticipated. I need to slow down a bit, she tells herself. On a normal day Jen is up at a quarter to seven. She wakes Nora and gets her dressed, then showers while Nora eats breakfast. She, Carl or usually both of them will walk Nora the two blocks to school. Then itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s off to work and school â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jen works in communications for the department of animal sciences and Carl is working on his doctorate in computer

SEE MARATHON | PAGE 8


June 16-22, 2014

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FROM page 7

MARATHON science. Her training regimen has created stress — not only for her. Jen usually works until five, and then, most days, goes running. If Nora has soccer, Jen will pick her up after her run. Carl does most of the cooking. On weekends, she has had to set aside larger and larger chunks of time for her long runs. She started in December with a slow ninemile run. She has gradually upped that to today’s 18 miles. Her running eats into the time she could be cleaning the layer of dust on the shelves at home or cashing the check that’s been in her wallet for two weeks now. “I’m behind at work,” she says. “I’m behind on housework. My list of deferred things I want to do gets longer and longer.” Jen’s running through a residential neighborhood near Lincolnshire Fields Country Club. She’s still going strong until shortly after her ninth mile. Then her breathing gets heavy and she’s audibly gasping. Her shoes pound the pavement

harder. She feels as if she is trying to suck air into her lungs through a vacuum hose. She can’t quite get enough. Her pace slows. Her body is heavy: her arms, her legs, even her head. On Branch Road, a younger man in a gray sweatshirt passes her running the same direction. The man runs at a pretty fast clip. He gets smaller and smaller ahead of her. She watches him turn up Blackthorn Drive and knows he must be practicing the same route she is. Before long he is gone. Her first half marathon was hell. It was muggy from an early morning thunderstorm and Jen had to walk five of the 13.1 miles. She doesn’t remember her time other than that it was slow. She was going to give a full marathon a shot in October, but tendinitis limited her training time. She ran another half instead. The race was her best yet: 2 hours and 17 minutes. It’s an average time. Her goal for the full is 4:30. Again, an average time. But her time isn’t her main concern. She doesn’t care if she has to walk part of the race. She likes telling people she is running a marathon. She likes the new tone in her

leg muscles. She likes that 13.1 miles, which used to be her limit, seems like nothing now. Still, she doesn’t anticipate enjoying the last few miles on race day. The closest thing she can compare running a marathon to is pregnancy. It was scary at first, seemingly impossible, and now she just wants it to be done. “Of course, there’s a difference between it’s done and you have a baby, and it’s done and you have a ton of free time,” she said, laughing. As race day has neared, Jen has gotten worn out. Yet she’s in her best shape in years. “I’ve enjoyed getting to this point. Knowing I can set my mind to doing something hard and actually doing it is a big deal.” After 15 miles, Jen has caught her second wind. She feels light again. She passes the 16-mile marker and is now running the farthest she has ever run. Back on campus, she picks up the pace to catch the light at Peabody and Sixth. She runs through the South Quad and finally stops on Nevada, when RunMeter tells her she has reached 18 miles. She walks the rest of the way home, her breathing slowly calming.

Of today’s run, she said, “I’m pretty pleased about it.” After months of running through winter cold and spring rain, Jen finally came to the Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon. It was a sunny, 82-degree day. She ran the race in 5:10, 40 minutes slower than her goal. She had to walk portions of the course, but she completed all 26.2 miles. When she finished, she wanted nothing but to go to sleep. She was stiff everywhere, and the walk back to her car took so long she found it almost comical. But for Jen, it was worth the time and pain, the hour runs after work and the three-hour runs on her days off. She doesn’t think her first marathon will be her last. The end result was too satisfying: She is a marathoner. “I was a little down because I had to walk more than I’d hoped and because my time was so slow,” Jen says days after the race. “But that feeling didn’t last long. Mostly, I was just really, I don’t know, content. It just made me feel really at peace with myself.”

Sean can be reached at sphammo2@ dailyillini.com or @sean_hammond.

Baseball player retaliation shows over sensitivity Recent incidents of players reacting poorly to disagreements embarrass organizations, the game SEAN NEUMANN Staff writer

B

aseball has always been a game of respect, but player sensitivity is growing too wide. The line to cross when offending another player has quickly been pushed closer this season, most recently seen earlier this weekend when Baltimore’s Manny Machado caused the benches to clear when he “didn’t agree on the tag” that Oakland third baseman Josh Donaldson made, believing it was too hard. Or later in the series when the benches cleared again after Machado’s tried to launch a bat at Oakland A’s pitcher Fernando Abad after an inside pitch late in the eighth inning. But don’t blame Machado entirely for the heat on that one: Abad threw at him after Machado incidentally made contact with catcher Derek Norris on his back-swing. When the benches cleared in these situations, nothing happened — similar to most bench-clearing incidents. They’re merely to voice discontent and anger, but never fail in embarrassing the organizations and the game. Baseball players rarely let fists fly on the field and try to resolve issues through pitchers hitting batters.

RON JENKINS MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

The Baltimore Orioles’ Manny Machado reacts after striking out in the first inning against the Texas Rangers on Thursday, June 5, 2014, at Globe Life Park in Arlington, Texas. The Rangers won, 8-6. But when those pitchers are slinging fastballs in the high 90s at batters, there’s a bigger risk put into play above letting the other team know you’re upset. It’s quite obvious the danger is high for batters taking pitches in the body, but just in case anyone’s forgotten, meet Adam Greenberg. The promising Chicago Cubs prospect was hit in head by the first pitch he saw in the major leagues by Florida Marlins pitcher Valerio de los Santos. Greenberg suffered a concussion that saw him nearly carried off the field after his eyes rolled back into his

head and he collapsed to the dirt, clutching the back of his head. But let’s keep trying to recreate that moment for more players while trying to make a point. The way baseball players retaliate are increasingly dangerous, now with batters swinging bats out into the field, but it’s the over-sensitive reasoning at which these justices are handed out that’s getting ridiculous.

Sean is a senior in Media. He can be reached at spneuma2@dailyillini.com and @Neumannthehuman.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Men’s basketball team returns to practice Practice for the Illini team begins Monday ALEX ROUX Staff writer

T

he calendar reads the middle of June. For the Illinois men’s basketball team, that means it’s time to get back to work. Practice begins June 16 for John Groce’s squad at the Ubben practice facility, a venue that saw its basketball floors refurbished with the re-branded Illinois logos and word marks while the team was away. After open gym sessions concluded at the end of the academic school year in mid-May, the players had a rare extended time away from organized basketball. The team had a three-week break after finals, and players were able to go home and see their families before they were due back on campus June 6. Two new faces will arrive on campus: incoming freshmen Michael Finke and Leron Black. Finke, a 6-foot-10 forward from Champaign Centennial High School, averaged 19.6 points and 9.3 rebounds a game in his senior season. His father Jeff also played basketball for the Illini. Black is a 6-foot-7 forward out of White Station High School in Memphis, Tenn. He won the class AAA Mr. Basketball Award in the state of Tennessee following a senior season where he averaged 20 points and 12 rebounds a game. Black is Groce’s first Illini recruit to be ranked as one of the top 40 players in the country by rivals.com. Black is also fresh off USA basketball tryouts for the U18 squad in Colorado Springs. He was one of 24 athletes invited to the Olympic Training Center to try out, though he did not make the cut for the 12-man team. Future roommates Finke and Black will look to make an immediate impact on an Illini squad that has somewhat limited depth in the front court following the suspension and transfer of forward Darius Paul. The two freshmen won’t be the only unfamiliar Illini to take the floor next season. Guards Aaron Cosby and Ahmad Starks sat out last season after transferring from Seton Hall and Oregon State, respectively. They will both be participating in their second consecutive round of summer practice on the Illinois campus. After a season of watching from the bench, Cosby is eager to begin practice as an eligible member of the Illini. “It’s a great feeling,” Cosby said. “Now I feel like I’m back and part of the team.” For seniors Nnanna Egwu, Tracy Abrams, Rayvonte Rice and Starks, this will be the last summer offseason of their college careers. For Abrams and Egwu, the upcoming

June 16-22, 2014

9

season will be their fourth in an Illini uniform. It will also be their last chance to leave their mark on an Illini program that has seen numerous peaks and valleys during their time on campus. “This being my last year, I’m giving it all I got in practice, workouts, all that,” Egwu said. “Give it a hundred percent, because this University deserves that.” While this time of year is crucial for team and individual development, summer obligations aren’t limited to the practice floor for the Illini. The months of June and July also include the opportunity for players to interact with kids and fans at the annual Illinois basketball camps that are held on campus. The Illinois basketball program offers several different camps for kids, where Illini players and coaches work as camp counselors and instructors. The team had to be back more than a full week before June 16, the official first day of practice, so that they would be back in time to work the first basketball camps that began June 6. While the camps provide the chance for kids to play alongside their favorite Illini, the players are able to have some fun with the experience as well. “It’s just good to be with the kids a little bit and help them out,” Egwu said. “They bring a lot of excitement to the camp and I’m glad to be a part of it.” Each player is assigned a team of kids to coach throughout each camp, and sophomore forward Austin Colbert’s group of eight- to ten-year-olds won the five-onfive team championship at last week’s Day Camp. “I got a lot of fun out of teaching the kids certain moves and teaching the kids fundamentals,” Colbert said. “I had a great team. They really bought into the defense I taught them.” This summer might have even more in store for the Illini, beyond the camps and practice on the hardwood. Last summer Groce introduced a Navy SEAL summer training program, which included early morning training sessions with a company led by former Navy SEALs. The intention was to help a team of nine newcomers who were largely unfamiliar with each other become a more tight-knit group. Last September, Groce told The Daily Illini the summer experience brought the team “much closer” together. With only two newcomers this year, there may be less of a need to become acclimated to one another, but don’t be surprised if Groce puts his team through the program again. Players have heard whispers of more SEAL training this summer. “Rumor has it we are probably going to be doing it again,” Egwu said.

Alex is a junior in AHS. He can be reached at roux2@dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter at @aroux94.

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EDUMACATION

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HOROSCOPES BY NANCY BLACK MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

Today’s Birthday Simplify for elegance and ease this year. Travel delights, as finances and savings flourish (with care) until mid-July, when social interactions and communications take priority. Follow your true calling, as you pay the bills. Slow and steady wins. October eclipses usher in a new collaborative phase. Harmonize together. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) Today is a 7 -- Intuition leads to amazing discoveries. Discover a structural problem, and use trusted methods and experts to handle it. Handle responsibilities on time by padding the schedule for unexpected arrivals. A mentor has a plan.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) Today is a 7 -- Brief your team on a brilliant idea, and listen to what they come up with. Don’t make assumptions. Stay patient with a resister. Use your own good judgment regarding a controversy. It all works out.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) Today is a 7 -- Allow someone an insider

advantage or backstage pass. Follow advice from an experienced elder. Make a good impression without spending a lot. Use forgotten resources. Don’t gamble with the rent money.

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) Today is a 7 -- Friends help you discover a pleasant surprise. Don’t over-extend... weigh the pros and cons before paying. Measure well before committing. Jealousies could interrupt a collaboration if you let them. Count no chicken until hatched.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

as you navigate surprises. Keep building a strong foundation. Hide out, if necessary. Hold yourself to high standards. Stifle rebellious tendencies, for the moment.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) Today is an 8 -- Use your intuition to discover a weakness. Make repairs at home. Postpone a trip. Take on a new responsibility. Teach by example. Prioritize homework over socializing. Guard against over-indulging. It could lead to conflict.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)

Today is a 7 -- Money seems unstable, but put a little aside for something special anyway. Look back and discover the real story. Wait to see what develops.

Today is a 6 -- Make a date for something you don’t get to do often. Take it easy on yourself. Tempers could get short. Don’t make expensive promises. No need to confront authority.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)

Today is a 7 -- Listen to intuition and share the load. Send someone ahead. Take things slow, and clean up as you go. Explain your view to a skeptic. Save money and energy. Don’t be too critical.

Today is a 7 -- Redecorate without great expense. An awkward misunderstanding about priorities could carry a high price tag. Proceed with caution and communication. Hold your temper. It doesn’t matter who’s right or wrong. Love trumps money.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) Today is a 7 -- You can make your promises and deadlines. Upgrade workplace technology if needed. Support from your family helps. Set realistic goals. Use common sense in a clash with authority.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) Today is a 7 -- Keep your objective in mind

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) Today is a 7 -- Sate your curiosity by reading the background material. This provides insight for an amazing discovery. Do the work now and play later. Quiet focus can be productive. Clean, file and repair things.

dailyillini.comALL SUMMER LONG

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Secret stash Doorframe’s vertical part Water, in Latin Buenos ___ Dial button sharing the “0” Big oafs Samsung Galaxy or BlackBerry 1953 Leslie Caron musical Number after Big or top Two cents’ worth CBS police drama that debuted in 2003 Be hot under the collar Green ogre of film Carriage puller Where oysters and clams are served It’s beneficial Beneath “___ your head!” “That’s rich!” Devious trick When repeated, a Latin dance Turkish official Jimmy who works with Lois Lane Worker with an apron and a white hat Go carousing with a drinker, say Archaeologist’s find Trails “Sic ’em!” Makes a pick Book of the world Guy’s date It’s beneficial What an optimist always looks on ___ of Sandwich Comfort Witty Oscar Unit of force “___ the night before Christmas …” Does as told

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 18 24 25 27 29 30 32 33 34 35 36 38 42 47 49 51 53 55 56 57 58 59 61 62 66 67

Selects for a role ’Til Tuesday singer Mann Machine at a construction site “Tell Laura I Love ___” (1960 hit) Suffix with winning Chief Justice Roberts Individually Hostess’s handouts Fellow members of a congregation Never-before-seen Easily made profit Hybrid citrus fruit In its existing state Dockside platform Start of many band names Hurry, with “it” Melted cheese on toast Figure (out) Go in Tennis legend Arthur Backside Vengeful captain Long, involved story Abrupt left or right All over Kindergarten learning Statute Give a hard time Mascara target Something to stick in a milk shake Able to move well G.M. luxury car, informally Some German/Swiss artworks in MoMA Newspaper think piece ___ on words Bart’s intelligent sister Years on end Number of points scored by a safety Bro or sis

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HELP WANTED

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June 16-22, 2014

Armory House Properties 1,4

217-384-4499

F    Individual leases, leather furniture, balcony & dishwasher www.burnham310.com

1,2,3

217-239-2310

1

F    

www.campustownrentals.com

217-366-3500

3

F    Laundry on site. Sewer & trash included.

101 Green

4

F    Sewer & trash included.

207 Green

4

F    Sewer & trash included.

Faron Properties/MJ Partners

www.faronproperties.com

217-352-8540

713 S. Randolph

2, 3

B

 

Laundry center, seasonal pool, balcony, from $642

Small Buildings

1,2,3

U

 

Variety. Old town/downtown Champaign. Some utilities incl.

Hunsinger Enterprises, Inc

www.hunsingerapts.com

1,2,3,4

F    

Klatt Properties

217-337-1565

On-site laundry, some utilities paid, great locations

www.klattrentalproperties.com

217-367-6626

204 E. Clark, C.

St.,1,2,3

B  

Laundry on-site. Includes internet & basic cable.

505 W. Springfield, C.

2

B    

Heat Included

409 W. Elm, C.

2

B    

Most Utilities. Heat Incl. $750-800

Royse & Brinkmeyer

www.roysebrinkmeyer.com 1,2,3

217-352-1129

U    Fireplaces, lofts, garages

The Tower at Third 302 E. John

RN /U NF LA UR UN N DR A/ YI C NU NIT PA RK ING UT ON ILI S TIE S I ITE NC L.

Mon-Fri: 8-5:30 Sat: 8-5 Sun: Closed

On-site Laundry

101 Green

Royse & Brinkmeyer

Corner of W. Bradley & Country Fair, Champaign 217.352.9200 www.triple-tcarwashandlube.com

217-344-1927

Campustown Rentals

Hunsinger Apartments

MISC.

1/2 Price Car Wash with Oil Change

F    Spacious rooms, modern fitness center, full service, movie rm

Campo Rental Agency 508 W. Griggs

# BDROOMS

FU

MISC.

www.ahapartments.com

Burnham 310 310 E. Springfield

FU RN /U NF LA UR UN N DR A/ YI C NU NIT PA RK ING UT ON ILI SI TIE S I TE NC L.

# BDROOMS

2nd and Armory

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

12

www.tower3rd.com 2

217-367-0720

F    No Security Deposit

Tri County Management Group

www.tricountymg.com

217-367-2009

705 S. First, C.

3

F    

Remodeled units. Parking $40/mo

705 S. First, C.

4

F    

Remodeled units. Parking $40/mo

&RRO2II

Best Value Fall 2014 Prices from: 1 bedroom from $525 4 bedrooms from $1100 2 bedrooms from $785 6-10 bedroom houses 3 bedrooms from $975 from $275/bedroom

Klatt Properties 367-6626

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S THAT TIME AGAIN! SUMMER SAND VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT

Register a team of 6 - 10 friends to play sand volleyball! Starting July 2nd, play every Wednesday night from 6 - 9PM at the courts on 1st and Stadium Drive.

       

Publishing every Monday during the Summer!

Hurry! Registration ends June 27th at WPGU.com/volleyballsignup

WPGU

107.1

CHAMPAIGNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ALTERNATIVE

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