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Pull like the Egyptians: University students re-invent the pulley FEATURES, 6A

Everything Ebertfest Guide of reviews, articles, schedule INSIDE

Tuesday April 16, 2013

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Medical Amnesty policy stresses students’ safety Already-advised procedures solidified by approved vote BY DAN WELIN STAFF WRITER

The Urbana-Champaign Senate Committee on Student Discipline unanimously approved the Medical Amnesty and Good Samaritan procedures at its meeting Monday. The approved motion will become part of the sanctioning guidelines of the committee, which worked with the Office for Student Confl ict Resolution on the policy. This is the fi rst step in getting the legislation in the University’s Student Code. For nearly a year, the Illinois Student Senate lobbied for legislation to protect students seeking medical attention under the influence of a substance from disciplinary action. “The Illinois Student Senate initially proposed the creation of a Medical Amnesty and Good Samaritan policy last year, and I was very pleased to have been able to vote in favor of its fi nal adoption earlier today,” said Jim Maskeri, senator and senior in LAS. “The adoption of the Medical Amnesty and Good Samaritan policy by the Senate Committee on Student Discipline shows that our University wants to emphasize the importance of student safety.” Maskeri said the procedures are similar to those University Police are already practicing but will hold officers more accountable. University, Champaign and Urbana police do not currently ticket students who call 9-1-1 for substance use, whether they are of age. “The policy is very similar to what students were advised to do before, but its passing puts it down on black and white,” Maskeri said. Students who repeatedly violate the Student Code are not protected, nor is this a “blanket immunity for all possible violations,” according to the policy. “The adoption of this policy will hopefully make it easier for students to make the choice to seek help in emergency situations,” Maskeri said. The policy’s guidelines protect victims of crime, the person in need of medical attention, the caller and the organization. If an organization fails to call law enforcement in the case of an emergency, this will be considered an “aggravating circumstance” and will call for further disciplinary action. According to the document, this policy only applies to the University Conduct System, and students should expect local law enforcement “will be focused on providing aid and assistance rather than taking enforcement action.”

Dan can be reached at welin1@dailyillini.com.

DAVID L RYAN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Medical workers aid injured people at the 2013 Boston Marathon following an explosion in Boston on Monday. Two explosions shattered the euphoria of the Boston Marathon finish line, sending authorities out on the course to carry off the injured while the stragglers were rerouted away from the smoking site of the blasts.

Explosions at Boston Marathon

Bombing kills 3, injures over 130 in bloody, horrific assault BY JIMMY GOLEN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — Two bombs exploded in the crowded streets near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing at least three people and injuring more than 140 in a bloody scene of shattered glass and severed limbs that raised alarms that terrorists might have struck again in the U.S. A White House official speaking on condition of anonymity because the investigation was still unfolding said the attack was being treated as an act of terrorism. President Barack Obama vowed that those responsible will “feel the full weight of justice.” As many as two unexploded bombs were also found near the end of the 26.2-mile course as part of what

appeared to be a well-coordinated attack, but they were safely disarmed, according to a senior U.S. intelligence official, who also spoke on condition of anonymity because of the continuing investigation. The fiery twin blasts took place about 10 seconds and about 100 yards apart, knocking spectators and at least one runner off their feet, shattering windows and sending dense plumes of smoke rising over the street and through the fluttering national flags lining the route. Blood stained the pavement, and huge shards were missing from window panes as high as three stories. “They just started bringing people in with no limbs,” said runner Tim Davey of Richmond, Va. He said he and his wife, Lisa, tried to shield their children’s eyes from the gruesome scene inside a medical tent that had

Sarah Lovell, assistant professor in crop sciences, ran in the marathon but was headed back to her hotel at the time of the explosion. She said she watched from her hotel window as the Coast Guard and fire trucks arrived at the scene for increased security. “At first, it wasn’t at all clear if it was intentional, and nobody seemed to know the extent of the damage or injuries. It wasn’t until we were back at the hotel watching CNN that we realized the full story,” Lovell said. Additionally, 15 athletes in the Illini Wheelchair Athletics Program were in Boston at the time. All are safe and accounted for, according to a tweet from @IlliniWCA.

See BOSTON, Page 3A

New officials hired in light of Clery Act BY SARI LESK STAFF WRITER

The University Police Department is taking steps to ensure compliance with a federal mandate regarding the reporting of crime statistics. The mandate aims to ensure more transparency for prospective students. The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Campus Crime Statistics Act requires “all institutions of higher education ... that participate in the federal student fi nancial aid program to disclose information about crime on their campuses and in the surrounding communities,” according to the Division of Public Safety. The original form of the act was enacted in 1991. UIPD created a

IIFF sees submissions from inside, outside of Illinois

ZOE GRANT THE DAILY ILLINI

Tracy Mapaye, sophomore in LAS, performs the Tinikling, a national dance of the Philippines, at a tutorial organized by the Philippine Student Association and Asian American Association at the YMCA Lounge on Monday evening.

INSIDE

Thirteen people from the Champaign-Urbana area were registered for the Boston Marathon, which took place on April 15.

Mandate creates accountability

Teach me how to Tinikling

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Local Boston Marathon participants

The Illini Independent Film Festival received more than 40 submissions from schools across the state and across the country. Below are a select few of the schools: Q Illinois State University Q Eastern Illinois University Q Western Illinois University Q Northern Illinois University Q Southern Illinois University Q University of Southern California

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new position within its department, a compliance coordinator, to facilitate compliance with the policy. Jennifer Payan, who has worked in the Division of Public Safety for the past 20 years, has served in the position since March 4. “We have a responsibility to our community to report certain crimes and certain ongoing threats that occur within our geographical location,” she said. One of the requirements of the Clery Act is for the University to publish an annual security report that includes statistics about the 14 crimes defined by the act. The report includes crimes in the campus area investigated by UIPD, as well as the Champaign and Urbana police departments. The act also requires UIPD to issue alerts about Clery crimes that present a threat to campus communities, and to issue emergency notifications

2013 Crime, Illini Alerts data: Arson according to Crime Alert Feb. 7 around 9 p.m. Oak Street Library Facility, 809 S. Oak St. Robbery according to Crime Alert April 4 around 3:10 a.m. 100 S. Mathews Ave. between Green Street and Springfield Avenue Robbery according to Crime Alert April 6 around 2:40 a.m. 200 block of East Peabody Attempted sexual assault according to Illini Alert April 7 around 4:30 a.m. Allen Hall, 1005 W. Gregory Drive All-clear issued around 4:50 a.m.

See CLERY, Page 3A

Fest shows student films BY JACQUI OGRODNIK STAFF WRITER

The Illini Independent Film Festival will feature more than 40 student-made films from both the University and different colleges across the country. The IIFF is April 27 at the Armory, 505 E. Armory St., in room 101. It is the second annual festival organized and judged by the students of the Media and Cinema Studies 464 class, Film Festivals. The class is divided into different groups with specific jobs, such as

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partner relations, film screening and press relations. “In the class, we learn about the history of film festivals, and part of the class is putting together our own film festival,” said Elijah Schwadron, a member of the press relations group and freshman in Media. Last year, the festival was called “Movies to the MACS,” but the class decided to change the name to make the

See FILM FEST, Page 3A

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Police 2 A | Corrections 2 A | Horoscopes 2 A | Opinions 4 A | Crossword 5 A | Comics 5 A | Life & Culture 6 A | Spor ts 1 B | Classifieds 3 B - 4 B | Sudoku 4 B


2A

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

The Daily Illini 512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 217 • 337 • 8300 Copyright © 2013 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Darshan Patel 217 • 337-8365 editor@dailyillini.com Managing editors Maggie Huynh 217 • 337-8343 Ryan Weber 217 • 337-8353 reporting @dailyillini.com

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Scott Durand 217 • 337-8345 design@dailyillini.com Asst. design editor

Austin Baird

POLICE

Champaign Armed robbery was reported at Dos Reales, 1407 N. Prospect Ave., around 9 p.m. Friday. According to the report, the victim was robbed in the parking lot of the restaurant. Q A 26-year-old male was arrested on the charges of trespassing to land/real property and resisting/obstructing/disarming an officer at Red Lion, 211 E. Green St., around 12 a.m. Saturday. Q Criminal damage to property was reported in the 100 block of East Green Street around 3:30 p.m. Friday. According to the report, two victims had windshields broken. Q Criminal damage to property was reported in the 200 block of South Elm Street around 5:30 p.m. Friday. According to the report, an unknown offender damaged the victim’s vehicle and stole four auto parts. Q

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Asst. photo editor Hassan Khalid

Theft was reported in the 1600 block of North Lincoln Avenue around 2 p.m. Saturday.

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HOROSCOPES

Asst. news editors Tyler Davis Austin Keating Chrissy Pawlowski Daytime editor Hannah Prokop 217 • 337-8363 news@dailyillini.com Asst. daytime editor Danielle Brown Sports editor Eliot Sill 217 • 337-8561 sports@dailyillini.com Asst. sports editors Claire Lavezzorio Torrence Sorrell Jordan Wilson Features editor Alison Marcotte 217 • 337-8560 features@dailyillini. com Asst. features editors Sarah Soenke Emma Weissmann

Urbana Q

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BY NANCY BLACK

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Today’s Birthday

Asst. copy chief Audrey Majors Social media coordinator Karyna Rodriguez Advertising sales manager Nick Langlois ssm@illinimedia.com Classified sales director Deb Sosnowski Daily Illini/Buzz ad director Travis Truitt Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

Night system staff for today’s paper Night editor: Candice Norwood Photo night editor: Joseph Lee Copy editors: Lauren Cox, Sammie Kiesel, Sari

Lesk, Kaitlin Penn Designers: Taylor Carlson, Rui He, Ro Hassan Page transmission: Harry Durden

Periodical postage paid at Champaign, IL 61821. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday in summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, Kickstarter_U_Illinois.pdf out-of-town and out-of-state rates available upon request.

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

Personal growth colors this year, as you shed limitations and develop healthier, happier practices. Self and public image both get a boost, as communication buzz opens new doors and amplifies your message. After June, the pull to renew and beautify your home calls. Fill the space with love and laughter. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)

Today is an 8 — Stay close to home, and celebrate your friends and family. Others may come to you with problems. Simply listening can be a great help. Don’t tell everything you know.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)

Today is a 9 — What you learn now can help you immensely. Study intensely. Your partner has some constructive criticism; listen like each word is worth gold. Ponder the possibilities that arise.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)

Today is an 8 — Natural beauty catches your eye. Provide detailed information, and listen for what others can provide. Keep careful 4/2/13 Finish 5:08:11 PM already on your notes. what’s

TODAY ON DAILYILLINI.COM According to the report, the victim lost his wallet around the area of his apartment complex. The victim knows items were eventually stolen because his credit cards were used for fraudulent charges, which his bank is handling. The victim also reported his driver’s license as stolen. Q Fraud/deception was reported in the 900 block of West Oregon Street around 7:30 p.m. Saturday. According to the report, the victim received a check from an unknown offender. After he deposited the check into his account, he said he believes someone accessed his account and withdrew an unknown amount of money. Q Domestic dispute and resisting/obstructing/disarming an offi cer were reported in the 2500 block of Prairie Green Drive around 12:30 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, the victim and offender are in a dating relationship and had a verbal argument. When an officer arrived, the offender refused to give the officer identification and then tried to walk away from the officer. The offender

was also trespassing on the victim’s apartment.

lists. Take time out to get lost in a sunset.

your reserves. Don’t talk about money, or offer to pick up the bill. Do that after you nail your savings goal.

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)

Today is a 9 — Believing in yourself is part of the game. Go and accomplish the impossible. It’s worth trying. Your intuition lines up with your actions. You’re especially charming, too. Keep practicing.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

Today is an 8 — Complete projects now. Listen to advice from an authority figure. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Learn new tricks. Postpone a shopping trip. Finish up old business today and tomorrow. Provide prizes.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

Today is an 8 — Gather input from others. You’re learning quickly. Don’t shop for a few days, or get sucked into distracting discussions. Stay focused. Consider all options. Your status is rising. Love grows.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

Today is a 9 — Establish your message clearly, and maintain team communications. You’re entering a two-day responsibility phase. Use it to forge ahead. Work interferes with travel. Use your partner’s ideas. It’s okay to disrupt the routine.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)

Today is an 8 — Write down longrange goals. Strategize to increase

University Q A 21-year-old female was arrested on two outstanding warrants in the 1100 block of South Oak Street at 4:30 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, the suspect had outstanding warrants for failure to appear in court. One warrant, issued by the city of Champaign, was for possession of drug paraphernalia. The second warrant, issued by Champaign County, was for consumption of alcohol by a minor. An officer aware of one of the warrants recognized the suspect. Q A 29-year old male and a 39-year-old male were arrested on the charge of possession of cannabis in the 1000 block of West University Avenue at 3 a.m. Saturday. According to the report, the men were passengers in a vehicle that was pulled over for speeding.

Compiled by Sari Lesk

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)

Today is an 8 — Manage finances. A lack of funds threatens your plans. Be frugal, and keep quiet about money for now. Better cash flow lies ahead. Accept a gift. Intuition prompts an action.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)

Today is an 8 — Today and tomorrow are especially good for compromise, which is useful when controversy arises. Keep accounts separate. Don’t waste your words or money. You’re building security. They’re saying nice things about you.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)

Today is a 9 — There’s too much work coming in. Gather support from partners, and make your workplace more comfortable. Select what you want carefully. Spend some now to save more over time.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)

Today is a 9 — Your nerves will become less frazzled soon. Ignore a nasty tone. A goal gets achieved. Accept a loved one’s support and a compliment. You’re changing how you see yourself. Talk like you mean it.

Council to vote on city sewer project The Champaign City Council will vote on whether to accept a bid from Duce Construction Company for the city’s 2013 sewer rehabilitation project at its meeting Tuesday. The project is scheduled to be completed April 30, 2014. For more information check dailyillini. com.

The Daily Illini is online everywhere you are. Visit DailyIllini.com Follow us on Twitter @TheDailyIllini for today’s headlines and breaking news. Like us on Facebook for an interactive Daily Illini experience. CORRECTIONS

Subscribe In the April 15, 2013, edition of The Daily Illini, the editorial, to us “U-C on Senate committee should pass medical amnesty incorrectly YouTube forpolicy” video stated that the ISS proposed coverage and and theGood the Medical Amnesty Samaritan policy for the University. Daily Illini Vidcast. The Urbana-Champaign Senate Committee on Student Discipline proposed the policy. Also in the April 15 edition, the article, “Davis speaks to students on US-Israeli relations” incorrectly attributed Rep. Rodney Davis as a Democrat for the 13th District of Illinois. Rep. Rodney Davis is a Republication for the 13th District of Illinois. The Daily Illini regrets these errors. When the Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Darshan Patel at 217-3378365.

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BOSTON FROM PAGE 1A been set up to care for fatigued runners, but “they saw a lot.” “They just kept filling up with more and more casualties,” Lisa Davey said. “Most everybody was conscious. They were very dazed.” As the FBI took charge of the investigation, authorities shed no light on a motive or who may have carried out the bombings, and police said they had no suspects in custody. Officials in Washington said there was no immediate claim of responsibility. Police said three people were killed. An 8-year-old boy was among the dead, according to a person who talked to a friend of the family and spoke on condition of anonymity. Hospitals reported at least 144 people injured, at least 15 of them critically. The victims’ injuries included broken bones, shrapnel wounds and ruptured eardrums. At Massachusetts General Hospital, Alasdair Conn, chief of emergency services, said: “This is something I’ve never seen in my 25 years here ... this amount of carnage in the civilian population. This is what we expect from war.” Some 23,000 runners took part in the race, one of the world’s oldest and most prestigious marathons. One of Boston’s biggest annual events, the race winds up near Copley Square, not far from the landmark Prudential Center and the Boston Public Library. It is held on Patriots’ Day, which commemorates the first battles of the American Revolution, at Concord and Lexington in 1775. Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis asked people to stay indoors or go back to their hotel rooms and avoid crowds as bomb squads methodically checked parcels and bags left along the race route. He said investigators didn’t know whether the bombs were hidden in mailboxes or trash cans. He said authorities had received “no specific intelligence that anything was going to happen” at the race. The Federal Aviation Administration barred low-flying aircraft within 3.5 miles

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

of the site. “We still don’t know who did this or why,” Obama said at the White House, adding, “Make no mistake: We will get to the bottom of this.” With scant official information to guide them, members of Congress said there was little or no doubt it was an act of terrorism. “We just don’t know whether it’s foreign or domestic,” said Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security. A few miles away from the finish line and around the same time, a fire broke out at the John F. Kennedy Library. The police commissioner said that it may have been caused by an incendiary device but that it was not clear whether it was related to the bombings. The first explosion occurred on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the finish line, and some people initially thought it was a celebratory cannon blast. When the second bomb went off, spectators’ cheers turned to screams. As sirens blared, emergency workers and National Guardsmen who had been assigned to the race for crowd control began climbing over and tearing down temporary fences to get to the blast site. The bombings occurred about four hours into the race and two hours after the men’s winner crossed the finish line. By that point, more than 17,000 of the athletes had finished the marathon, but thousands more were still running. The attack may have been timed for maximum carnage: The four-hour mark is typically a crowded time near the finish line because of the slow-but-steady recreational runners completing the race and because of all the friends and relatives clustered around to cheer them on. Runners in the medical tent for treatment of dehydration or other race-related ills were pushed out to make room for victims of the bombing. A woman who was a few feet from the second bomb, Brighid Wall, 35, of Duxbury, said that when it exploded, runners and spectators froze, unsure of what to do. Her husband threw their children to the ground, lay on top of them and another man

JOHN TLUMACKI THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bill Iffrig, 78, lies on the ground as police officers react to a second explosion at the finish line of the Boston Marathon in Boston on Monday. Iffrig, of Lake Stevens, Wash., was running his third Boston Marathon and near the finish line when he was knocked down by one of two bomb blasts. lay on top of them and said, “Don’t get up, don’t get up.” After a minute or so without another explosion, Wall said, she and her family headed to a Starbucks and out the back door through an alley. Around them, the windows of the bars and restaurants were blown out. She said she saw six to eight people bleeding profusely, including one man who was kneeling, dazed, with blood trickling down his head. Another person was on the ground covered in blood and not moving. “My ears are zinging. Their ears are zinging,” Wall said. “It was so forceful. It

URBANA CITY COUNCIL

Urbana City Council votes to eliminate parking for bike paths BY CORINNE RUFF STAFF WRITER

The Urbana City Council voted to eliminate parking on Kinch Street from Washington Street to Florida Avenue in order to make room for a bike lane connected to the Bicycle Master Plan at its meeting Monday. This bike path is one of many to be constructed this summer through the $199,000 Safe Routes to School grant. While many residents have attended the meetings during the last three weeks to express their concerns of safety and convenience over the action, Jeff Yockey, neighborhood resident, spoke in favor of the bike lanes. “You won’t see it all at once, but as you do more of these improvements you will see more bikes,” he said. Dennis Roberts, Ward 5, said he appreciated hearing the concerns of the neighborhood and community. However after having reviewed the decision for three months in the Traffic Commission, he voted in favor of implementing the paths. “My observation is there is a lot of adequate driveway parking on the street,” he said. “This has not been an easy conversation, but the grid is served by connecting two elementary schools and allows students and adults alike to go north and south.” All of the residents of the street have driveways,

however any visiting guests will have to park in a lot at least a block a way. Heather Stevenson, Ward 6, voted no after reading concerned letters and speaking with residents in the area. “I have heard from several constituents in the area, and honestly there aren’t a lot of bikes,” she said. “I see more cars parked.” Eric Jakobsson, Ward 2, said the striped bike lanes will also help address issues of safety with speeding cars on the street. In the next few months the Traffic Commission will also look into implementing a stop sign on Michigan Avenue and Kinch Street. During the meeting, council also passed a Legacy Tree Program, a project proposed in 2011 to correlate with the city’s goals for environmental sustainability. The city has contracted Davey Tree Company to take inventory of all trees on city property, which will go into a database to be used for tree walks. The company also has plans to release a smartphone app that would allow residents to map the trees. Mike Brunk, city arborist, will admit trees into the program based on an assessment including a tree’s health, rarity and historic notability among other considerations.

Corinne can be reached at cruff2@dailyillini.com.

knocked us to the ground.” Competitors and race volunteers were crying as they fled the chaos. Authorities went onto the course to carry away the injured, while race stragglers were rerouted away from the smoking site. Roupen Bastajian, a state trooper from Smithfield, R.I., had just finished the race when he heard the blasts. “I started running toward the blast. And there were people all over the floor,” he said. “We started grabbing tourniquets and started tying legs. A lot of people amputated. ... At least 25 to 30 people have at least one leg missing, or an ankle missing, or

RAHMAT GUL THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Armed Afghan policemen destroy an opium poppy field in Noorgal, Kunar province, east of Kabul, Afghanistan on Saturday. Opium poppy cultivation has been increasing for the third year in a row and is heading for a record high, the U.N. said in a report released Monday.

Opium cultivation increasing in Afghanistan; prices unusually high THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KABUL, AFGHANISTAN — Opium poppy cultivation in Afghanistan has been increasing for a third year in a row and is heading for a record high, the U.N. said in a report released Monday. The boom in poppy cultivation is at its most pronounced in the Taliban’s heartland in the south, the report showed, especially in regions where troops of the U.S.-led coalition have been withdrawn or are in the process of departing. The report suggests that whatever international efforts have been made to wean local farmers off the crop, they are having little success. Increased production has been driven by unusually high opium prices, but more cultivation of Afghanistan’s premier cash crop is also an indication that Afghans are turning to illicit markets and crops as the real economy shrinks ahead of the expected withdrawal of foreign combat troops at the end of 2014. Afghanistan is the world’s largest producer of opium, the raw ingredient in heroin, and last year provided about 75 percent of the global crop — a figure that may jump to 90 percent this year because of increased cultivation.

Crop sales mostly fund local power brokers and criminal gangs in Afghanistan and to a lesser degree the Taliban, Western experts believe. This makes it difficult for the Afghan government to establish control in areas where the economy is driven by blackmarket opium sales, despite a small but effective counternarcotics force. “As we have predicted, opium will go up for a third year in a row,” said Jean-Luc Lemahieu, head of the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime in Afghanistan, which prepared the report along with the Afghan Counternarcotics Ministry. “We are looking at a record high cultivation.” The Afghanistan Opium Winter Risk Assessment 2013 issued by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime was conducted in two phases. One from December to January for central, eastern, southern and western Afghanistan, where opium was sown in the fall of 2012, and another in February and March that covered northern and northeastern Afghanistan, where opium is usually planted in the spring. The exact figure for 2013 is still unclear, but the U.N. said that indications are it will surpass the 154,000 hectares planted in 2012, and the 131,000 in 2011.

two legs missing.” The race honored the victims of the Newtown, Conn., shooting with a special mile marker in Monday’s race. Boston Athletic Association president Joann Flaminio previously said there was “special significance” to the fact that the race is 26.2 miles long and 26 people died at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

Associated Press writers Jay Lindsay, Steve LeBlanc, Bridget Murphy and Meghan Barr in Boston; Julie Pace, Lara Jakes and Eileen Sullivan in Washington; and Marilynn Marchione in Milwaukee contributed to this report.

FILM FEST

in years to come,” Richard Potter, professor of the class, said in an email. “Towards that end, I think the name, the publicity materials and the organizaFROM PAGE 1A tional structure of the event are solid components.” festival more professional and relatable, appealing to The films that have been submitted range from a wider audience throughout Illinois, Schwadron said. short comedies to feature length dramas. The ratThe goal of this year’s festival is to have an event ings for each film also vary, but any film that feathat is “put on by students, for students, to show- tures nudity or excessive violence were disqualified. case films by students,” said “We are very loose and Nathan Luft, a member of open with the requirements the press relations group and because we wanted to be as senior in LAS. open as possible to get as many submissions as possible,” Luft Schwadron said the IIFF is primarily a festival for said. “The only requirements young filmmakers who we had were that the film had simply enjoy and love film, to be between one to 120 minand wish to showcase their utes and had to be within comfilmmaking abilities to the mon bounds of decency.” public. After every film is present“We don’t have a film ed, the class will judge and vote on which films were the school in the University,” Luft said. “I think the fesbest. The film that achieves tival is an outlet for crefirst place will win $75, while second place will win $50. ative people to get their film shown and to have an Seven free tickets to The Art NATHAN LUFT, audience that is going to be Theater in downtown Chammember of the press relations group paign will be given to the best receptive to seeing it.” Luft said the goal of the film made by University stuclass is to have the festival dents, Schwadron said. establish a more permanent foundation for future The festival is sponsored by the College of Media, classes, unlike the first festival. The Art Theater and Indi Go Artist Co-Op. “They are consciously trying to establish an identity for the IIFF that future classes can build on Jacqui can be reached at ogrodni2@dailyillini.com.

“We don’t have a film school in the University. I think the festival is an outlet for creative people to get their film shown and to have an audience that is going to be receptive to seeing it.”

CLERY FROM PAGE 1A about significant emergency or dangerous situations. The University does so with Illini Alerts, which represent immediate threats, and Crime Alerts. Payan considers Crime Alerts to be timely warnings. They are more detailed than Illini Alerts, which must be released within 45 minutes of the crime occurring. The crimes reported in the annual security report and in Crime and Illini Alerts are confined to a specific area, which was reduced from its original boundaries in 2011. Another facet of the changes to compliance include training campus security authorities. They serve as contacts for students to report crimes. If CSAs

BY PATRICK QUINN

3A

hear about a crime, they are legally obligated to report it to the police department through the Clery reporting system. One of the departments trained for Clery compliance is the Division of Intercollegiate Athletics. Loren Israel, assistant athletic director of compliance for the DIA, coordinated with UIPD to train the legally required individuals, such as coaches, from his department on Clery compliance. Israel said the coaches and athletic directors are required by the Clery Act to be trained as CSAs, likely because of the relationship they have with students. He said abiding by the act demonstrates transparency on the part of the University. “This is a University where we’re trying to do the right thing,” he said. “We’re trying to protect our students.”

Israel worked with Sgt. Joan Fiesta and Lt. Tony Brown, of UIPD, on the training. Israel said he plans on hosting his department’s next training session some time next month. Fiesta said compliance with the act is beneficial to the police department in terms of recognizing trends in crimes that need to be addressed. She said it is also a source of information for people in the community. “It creates an accountability for us to be as transparent as possible so that people can make positive choices for their own safety,” Fiesta said. “If people understand the nature of crime in their area, they can utilize the resources that are available to them.”

Sari can be reached at lesk2@ dailyillini.com and @Sari_Lesk.

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4A Tuesday April 16, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

The Daily Illini

EDITORIAL CARTOON

Editorial

Open letter to Quentin Tarantino

DANE GEORGES THE DAILY ILLINI

New ISS president holds hope for positive change

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he Illinois Student Senate elected Damani Bolden, junior in ACES, to be its new student body president — and we are thrilled about his and the other senators’ transition. It’s time to turn a new leaf, to restart, rethink and re-evaluate. The executive board elections symbolize a new chapter for ISS and its commitment to continue representing the needs and perspectives of the student body. Although this editorial board has criticized ISS about a range of issues as we disagree with each other’s actions and perspectives on some campus issues, we can agree that both organizations make important contributions to the University. We both have a voice here. Sometimes our criticism can overshadow everything else ISS does, and it’s the good work the senate has done that we hope continues after the transition Wednesday. As far back as January 2012, former student body President David Pileski said the Student Code should guarantee medical amnesty for students. This would solidify an unwritten law ensuring amnesty for students who require medical attention because of alcohol or drugs. It would protect the caller and the victim, even if they are underage, so long as both appropriately cooperate with authorities. In early March, ISS passed a resolution in support of the Service Employees International Union Local 73 when food service and building service workers went on strike to secure fair contracts. After the March 24 snowstorm, several senators were upset with how the University handled class cancellations. Last week, ISS was scheduled to vote on a resolution that would grant the power to excuse students’ attendance in emergency situations, such as the previous snowstorm that was responsible for 531 incidents on Interstate 57, to the offices of the chancellor and the provost. Although the vote was turned over to the Committee on Campus Affairs, the senate has championed this bill for months. ISS has an obligation to speak loudly, but more importantly to be heard; its good work has been and should continue to be post-Wednesday evening. By supporting the students that are hesitant to seek necessary medical attention for them or others because they fear getting in trouble, ISS has stood up for them. By supporting the food service and building service workers despite the University’s apprehensiveness to negotiate, ISS has stood up for them. By supporting the students that trekked through dangerous driving conditions during the snowstorm because the University did not cancel classes until 1:25 a.m. the next morning, ISS has stood up for them. This is what we want to see from a student senate. Medical amnesty, SEIU and emergency situations — these are the types of topics that students want to see being addressed. Topics that are relevant to this campus, relevant to the community and, most importantly, that directly influence our experiences as students. ISS has proved that it is more than just representative of the student body, but of the employees and workers that contribute to the functioning and well-being of this University as well. We encourage ISS — the newly elected executive board and student body President Damani Bolden — to continue its efforts in representing the diverse range of individuals that are a part of this University — whether it is students, professors, service workers, researchers or administrators.

SARAH FISCHER Opinions columnist

D

Don’t fall prey to scam job opportunities ANDREW HORTON Opinions columnist

If

you are walking through the Union, and somebody you’ve never met before comes up and offers you a job, you should obviously be a little suspicious. However, there are several organizations that do exactly that, and many students fall victim to opportunities that are really not worth their time. These organizations include Vector Marketing as well as College Pro and College Works Painting. All three organizations prey on college students who are desperate for work by making promises that are misleading and unrealistic. I’ll begin with Vector Marketing, which I had a brief encounter with when I was in high school. My friend told me that he just got hired by the owner of a new business who was looking to expand. He asked if I was interested in a job, and I said yes, not having the presence of mind to ask what kind of job it was or who I’d be working for. A couple days later I got a call from Vector Marketing. They told me they wanted to set up an interview for a sales job that would pay $16 per appointment. When I tried to ask for more specific information about the position, the person on the phone answered every question in a very vague and indirect manner. After getting off the phone, I did research on the company and found that Vector was in the business of recruiting young people to sell high quality cutlery via in-home demonstrations. Its employees are required to attend an extensive, unpaid training session and are then forced to put down a payment in order to receive their sales kit. From there, the students are only paid for the

number of sales appointments they schedule. These appointments are extremely challenging to set up, as very few households are willing to let strangers into their homes to market knives costing hundreds of dollars. Realizing this, Vector encourages its young salesmen to start off by selling to family and friends who are often more sympathetic and willing to buy. This results in some sales initially, but after a while these personal connections run out and it becomes virtually impossible to make any significant money. The only real profits are realized by the upper level management that takes in the compiled revenues from hundreds of student salesmen.

These organizations have been around a long time using this revolving door approach, and it is time that students realize that their efforts could be better applied to other things. After learning all of this, I decided that this “job opportunity” had pyramid scheme written all over it. When Vector Marketing called back, eager to set up an interview, I told them that I was no longer interested. A short while later, my friend who had taken the job apologized to me, realizing he had made a mistake. College Pro and College Works Painting are similar to Vector, and have a particularly strong presence on campus. Their reps are everywhere, seeking out students at the

Union, on the Quad and even in classes when professors allow them to speak. These companies pride themselves on giving students an “internship” in entrepreneurship by providing them with the tools to run their own painting businesses. What these organizations don’t advertise is that they really provide lackluster training, and that their “interns” are forced to pay for many of their own work materials. Like Vector, they rely on sympathy sales from their many young employees instead of actually providing a business model for students to succeed. All of these companies have received such tremendous backlash that they have dedicated sections of their websites to debunking the notion that they are scams. Vector Marketing took it one step further creating a separte website. They often defend their actions by saying that students fail in their businesses because they were unwilling to put in the required time and effort. However, the reality is that the official business models of these companies are ludicrous, and their real objective is to prey on their new hires. While these tactics may not be technically illegal, they are definitely shady. These organizations have been around a long time using this revolving door approach, and it is time that students realize their efforts could be better applied to other things. Of course, you can argue that any opportunity can provide some level of meaningful experience. However, anyone seeking a job that actually pays a just wage for the amount of effort put in would be better off looking somewhere else for work. Even spending your summer unemployed is better than slaving over a hopeless job for an organization that is really just trying to exploit your efforts.

Andrew is a sophomore in Engineering. He can be reached at ajhorto2@dailyillini.com.

Modern campus may not be for the better TOMMY HEISER Opinions columnist

W

hen I first started coming down to campus to watch my brother play tennis, I was disappointed with the general quality of campustown. The buildings, roads, sidewalks and overall look made me feel removed from the college experience. Perhaps my attention to aesthetics was at fault. But campustown did have an allure to it that I couldn’t figure out. What it lacked in attractiveness it made up for with history and a sense of community. Since the past few years, the landscape of Green Street has not evolved much. The biggest change during my four years here was the fire between Sixth and Wright, something that was not planned, but nonetheless changed the landscape of the block. Green Street has always been a place associated with memories and history, at least during my time as a student. The current plans to revitalize campus do not seem to resonate with the students I have spoken to, especially because the new Green Street will be monopolized into an urban town center and lose its historical feel. Many students come to the University for the campustown feel. The housing development plans will most certainly take away from the campustown feeling these students seek. The allure of the local restaurants, shops and architecture of the buildings create the unique environment that students are proud to

call home. With the new campus revitalization effort, the community’s roots may be uplifted as we transition from a traditional campus into a more modern one. With these pieces completely removed, students will not be able to experience the true University history, the local attractions and the stories alumni tell to future and prospective students. For example, Follet’s Bookstore, a mainstay of Green Street since 1938, will be shutting its doors at the end of the semester. JSM Development purchased the property and is planning to add more food and apparel shops to the location. The proposed plans for Green Street could potentially change the demographic of students that choose to attend to the University. It has the potential to drive away students of a lower economic class who may not be able to afford the rents of new high-rise apartment complexes and trendy food joints. At the same time, international and more affluent students become the new target populations of campustown. By providing a quality education at a university conveniently located for many students around the Midwest, the University has been a top destination. Changing the landscape of campustown with expensive luxury apartments with high rents fits a different demographic than the one currently at the University. As a result, the commercialization may be a detriment for the students who are looking for a good education but can no longer afford to attend. Currently, there are four proposals for development on Green

Street in Champaign. Most of the proposals involve removing longstanding businesses and replacing them with mixed-use buildings, businesses on the first floor and apartments on the rest. In one plan, Garcia’s Pizza In A Pan and the old White Horse Inn would be replaced with a five-story, 52-unit apartment building on Second and Green streets. On the northwest corner of Fourth and Green streets, a 16-story apartment building with a three-level automated parking garage would replace what is now IHOP and Campus Liquor. Bankier Apartments is planning a 14-story apartment building on the southwest corner of Sixth and Green streets, which would replace Gameday Spirit, Hair Benders, Beri Frozen Yogurt and Roll Model. Some existing businesses are in negotiations to move into the new complex once finished. The biggest development is for Lot J near the northwest corner of Sixth and Green streets, which would include two 12-story buildings, one of which is planned to be a Marriot Town Place Suites designed for long-term stays. The University is pushing for a more diverse student body, which comes with increased numbers of out-of-state and international students. The change in demographic will provide the University with increased revenues and help support the campus economy. However, catering to a lower economic class, from the perspective of developers or the University, is not good for business.

Tommy is a senior in Business. He can be reached at heiser1@dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @tommyheiser.

ear Quentin Tarantino, First off, big fan. It’s probably a bad thing that I can slip quotes from “Pulp Fiction” into everyday conversation, but I’m going to call it a skill and leave it at that. I think you’ve mastered the art of dialogue, the give and take between characters as violence occurs all around them. It all seems perfectly normal and mundane. I have to ask, however: Why censor “Django Unchained,” just for the Chinese market? I realize its the largest film market after the United States, but are you so hard up for cash you’ll alter your work, subdue the violence, the gore, just to get the film shown? And not even to get it shown. Even after all that reediting, the Chinese censors still pulled the film on Friday, its opening day. You! You censored your own work! You who, in 2003, encouraged kids to sneak into “Kill Bill” as a challenge to the R-rating. You who, when asked about your excessive use of the n-word actually said the word, and added, “They think I should soften it, that I should lie, that I should massage. I would never do that when it comes to my characters.” You who, when asked in an NPR interview about the relationship between violence in your films to the real violence of the Sandy Hook massacre replied, in disgust and admitted annoyance, “They have nothing to do with each other. ... Yeah, I’m really annoyed. I think it’s disrespectful to their memory actually.” A myriad of rumors shot around the Internet trying to explain why the film got pulled: excessive violence, unspecified technical problems, Jamie Foxx’s penis. I can’t say with certainty why it won’t air on Chinese screens, and because you’ve neglected to comment on Django’s toning down for China, I can’t say what you actually altered. But considering “Django” was to be the first of your films cleared for distribution in China, it is no less violent or blood-soaked than your earlier films, and I don’t imagine Chinese censorship laws have lessened any. I’m concerned about your artistic integrity. Zhang Miao, director of the Chinese branch of Sony Pictures, stated, “What we call bloodshed and violence will not affect the basic quality of the film — such as turning the blood to a darker color, or lowering the height of the splatter.” He says that only you can make the adjustments. Which worries me. If you can make the adjustments, and you’re willing to make the adjustments, what does that say about the films you release in the United States, and other markets outside of China? Are those unnecessarily violent? I don’t think so. More importantly, I don’t think you think so. The violence broadcast in a film stamped with the Tarantino “genre” has purpose. Character makes story, Mr. Tarantino, and you — more than anyone — recognize that. Now-iconic players like Mr. Pink and Vincent Vega and Lieutenant Aldo Raine stick with us because we recognize their realities. The violence in your films is a character, too. It expresses the horrific chapters in history by separating film violence from real violence, a fact on which you commented: “There’s two types of violence in this film: There’s the brutal reality that slaves lived under for...245 years, and then there’s the violence of Django’s retribution. And that’s movie violence, and that’s fun and that’s cool.” Those distinctions are necessary, and to remove them from a film premiering in one country while lauding their purpose in another draws questions as to your motive — and your message. The violence in “Django” acts in a different way than most of your other films because of the subject with which it is associated. To discuss slavery, a man oppressed and able to rise from that oppression, and designate it from film violence very clearly, provides a commentary on both actions. It allows movie-goers to experience a part of the horrific reality of bondage — and then to experience the joy when such bondage gets thrown off. The audience knows what they get when going to a Tarantino film: a phenomenal soundtrack, a nonlinear narrative and an obscene level of violence. They rely on those cues to help them make sense of the film, not just to enjoy it, but to take on larger issues and work through them. There’s a sense of community and understanding in “Django,” of freedom and democracy, and downplaying those associations in China doesn’t make your film stronger or more accessible. It reduces to pulp.

Sarah is a senior in LAS. She can be reached at fische19@dailyillini.com.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

PULLEY FROM PAGE 6A the ancient Egyptian pulley would have lifted one of these stones up the pyramid every three minutes for about 30 years straight. This is how the entire pyramid structure would have been completed from 2649 to 2150 B.C., Blakely wrote on the site. Three posters are currently on display to the public on the

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

second floor of Spurlock Museum. They outline the goals and describe a general overview of the Egyptian Pulley. “(Working on the pulley) involves a lot of different aspects,� Jacobsma said. “It’s using things that you learned in multiple classes to create this project.� At the end of the day, the group’s overall objective is “testing the plausibility� of the pulley, Gaeta said. While it is difficult to know

for sure what the ancient Egyptians used to build the pyramids, Blakely and the group ultimately wanted to provide a possible answer to this age-old mystery. “This is a problem that has been looked at for hundreds of years and remains unsolved,� Gaeta said. “So it’s cool that we have an opportunity to take another look at it.�

Reema can be reached at abiakar2 @dailyillini.com.

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD 1

ACROSS

1 “Dragnet� force, in brief 5 Spirited steed 9 Bid 14 Calculus calculation 15 City with Aces Ballpark 16 Good news on Wall Street 17 Finishing up 20 ___ of time 21 “Miami Vice� informant 22 Baths 23 Affirmatives 25 Cleveland’s lake 27 “The way I see it,� briefly 30 Window-shopping locale 35 Avril follower 36 Go after 37 Hidden shooter 38 Shaw of the big band era 40 VCR button 42 President with a Nobel 43 45 47 48 50 51 52 54 57 59

BRIAN YU THE DAILY ILLINI

Caleb Gray, a senior in mechanical engineering, shows off the ancient Egyptian Pulley his group is constructing as a project. The group aims to recreate the method used by the ancient Egyptians to build the Great Pyramids.

Online campaign aims to help 8th-grader meet Justin Bieber BY BAILEY BRYANT STAFF WRITER

Between Murelle Plotner, eighth-grade student and St. Joseph, Ill. native, and her friends, Justin Bieber is a popular topic of conversation. They’ve swooned over the evolution of his hairstyles, the dreaminess of his voice and the prospect of attending one of his concerts. But over the past few months, those conversations have only existed through text messages, Facebook and Facetime while Murelle has been in St. Louis receiving treatment for myelodysplastic syndrome, a blood disease that’s often a precursor to leukemia. Instead of letting this virtual communication hinder their friendship with Murelle, Jenna Jenkins and Bailey George used it to their advantage. They decided that if anyone deserved to meet Bieber, it was her. That’s when the tweeting began. On March 25, the girls began tweeting at Bieber’s Twitter account with the hashtag, “#JustinMeetMurelle.� While the pop star didn’t respond, thousands of others did. Strangers — including Josh Paul, former bassist for the band Daughtry — quickly followed suit and tweeted at Bieber with the hashtag. Since then, supporters have printed t-shirts, organized fundraisers and shaved their heads in Murelle’s honor. Several Central Illinois news outlets, including WCIA and WICD, have picked up her story. A “Movin’ for Murelle� 1K run is scheduled for April 20 in her hometown of St. Joseph, Ill. But it wasn’t until Austin Leevy, an employee at This Is It Furniture in Champaign, decided to shave his head that Murelle’s

dream became a reality. Because Leevy didn’t know Murelle personally, his boss, Mike Namoff, owner of This Is It, was very interested in the situation. Namoff continued asking Leevy questions, and after learning that Murelle’s dream was to meet Bieber, he realized he could help. Namoff, who helps with auctions all over the country, heard about a “Justin Bieber package� that was being auctioned off at a silent auction at an architecture school in Philadelphia. After hearing Murelle’s story, he decided to purchase it. The package contained third row tickets to Justin Bieber’s July 9 concert at the United Center in Chicago, along with passes to meet the singer. He is currently raising money to pay for the package and the travel expenses, which in total is about $5,000. So far, Namoff said he has raised over $2,500 in physical donations, and he recently started a website so that people can also contribute funds online with their credit and debit cards. “The support has been pretty crazy,� Namoff said. “We’ve had little old ladies stopping into my store with $50 checks.� While some have donated hundreds of dollars, Namoff said he is appreciative of even the smallest contribution toward paying for the package. “I think people get intimidated to help, but all the $5, $10 and $20 add up,� Namoff said. “We’re not looking for people to give a thousand (dollars) or two, we’re looking at doing a community project.� Namoff added that even if he is unable to raise the money, he will make sure that Murelle will attend the concert, regardless.

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DOT. COMMON JOHNIVAN DARBY

Donations for Murelleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s medical costs and the Justin Bieber trip can be made here: http://www.giveforward. com/fundraiser/4l12/ murelleplotner justinmeetmurelle.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to make it happen,â&#x20AC;? he said. Murelleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father, Corey Plotner, said the prayers and support Murelle has received so far through the #JustinMeetMurelle campaign has overwhelmed their entire family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pretty quiet,â&#x20AC;? Corey said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get out and bolster too much, so to have all these people that we know, and even ... the people that we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know, doing everything they can to help is quite amazing.â&#x20AC;? John Eckert, freshman in LAS, is one of these supporters. At age 11, Eckert was diagnosed with lymphoma and underwent eight months of treatment. As a cancer survivor, Eckert said he can relate to Murelleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s situation and has the utmost respect for the supporters of the #JustinMeetMurelle movement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obviously something really special about this little girl that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s able to prompt this kind of support,â&#x20AC;? Eckert said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amazing.â&#x20AC;? On April 10, Murelle received even more good news. The bone marrow transplant she received was successful and the 13-yearold is now 100 percent cancer-free, according to her fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Twitter account.

Bailey can be reached at bebryan2@ dailyillini.com.

US Supreme Court faces dilemma on patenting strands of human DNA BY JESSE J. HOLLAND

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WA SHI NGTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Supreme Court seemed worried Monday about the idea of companies patenting human genes in a case that could profoundly reshape the multibillion-dollar biomedical industry and U.S. research in the fight against diseases like breast and ovarian cancer. Justices argued not only about snipping DNA strands but also about chewing the leaves of Amazonian jungle plants, the shaping of baseball bats and the ingredients of chocolate chip cookies as they tried to figure out whether companies can gain government protection â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and profits â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for their work with human genes. The ability to claim control of genetic information found inside every American could hang on the nine justicesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; decision later this summer, a ruling that could affect the intersection of science and the law for years to come. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The issue here is a very difficult one,â&#x20AC;? Justice Samuel Alito said. Abstract ideas, natural phenomena and laws of nature cannot be awarded patents, the legal protection that gives inventors the right to prevent others from making, using or selling a novel device, process or application. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has been awarding patents on human genes for almost

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30 years, but opponents of Myriad Genetics Inc.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s patents on two genes linked to an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer say such protection should not be given to something that can be found inside the human body. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Finding a new use for a product of nature, if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change the product of nature, is not patentable,â&#x20AC;? said lawyer Christopher Hansen, arguing against the patents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I find a new way of taking gold and making earrings out of it, that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t entitle me to a patent on gold. If I find a new way of using lead, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t entitle me to a patent on

lead.â&#x20AC;? Several organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union, the Association for Molecular Pathology, a number of doctors and researchers and some people at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, have challenged the patents. But Myriad argues â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and the patent office and a federal appeals court have agreed â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s genes can be patented because the DNA that Myriad isolated from the body has a â&#x20AC;&#x153;markedly different chemical structureâ&#x20AC;? from DNA within the body.

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An American flag flies in front of the Supreme Court in Washington on June 27. DNA may be the building blocks of life, but can something taken from it be the building blocks of a multimillion-dollar medical monopoly?

5A

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SOCIAL WORK

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Life Culture

#JustinMeetMurelle Thirteen-year-old Murelle Plotner, who recently received a bone marrow transplant, dreams of meeting Justin Bieber. Turn to 5A to read about how a social media campaign is helping make this dream a reality.

6A | Tuesday, April 16, 2013 | www.DailyIllini.com

RESURRECTING THE

EGYPTIAN PULLEY Student engineers re-create ancient Egyptian building technology using modern techniques

Its functionality is relatively straightforward: a rope fits into a groove in a smooth, cylindrical rock. Once magine if the ancient Egyptians had modern tech- the rope is pulled along the groove, the rock rolls in its nology. Using computer design software, they lubricated cradle as it lifts the excess weight. might plan out their pyramid elements and dimenThe Egyptian Pulley group is made up of Gabe Gaesions; then, they might use large excavator trucks ta, Neal Jacobsma, Caleb Gray and Yi-An Liou, all and massive hydraulic cranes to do the job. If this seniors in mechanical engineering. were the case, they might have fi nished the pyramids “It was something that was a little different than any of the other topics,” Jacobsma said. “We were just in a number of months, instead of about 30 years. While the ancient Egyptians kind of intrigued by the idea and wanted to see it out.” lacked the technology that is available today, they still had the The device is made up of two brainpower and manpower to cregranite parts, weighing over 400 ate some of the largest and most pounds. The stone cylinder is 12 familiar historical structures in inches in diameter by 12 inches the world. Still, it has always been in length, while the stone cradle a mystery as to how the pyramids is 14 inches long, 11 inches high and 18 inches wide. The stone were physically constructed. parts were sealed and lubricated A group of students in ME 470, with olive oil. All of these matea mechanical engineering senior design class, spent the spring rials would have been available semester creating a device that to ancient Egyptians at the time. could have helped the ancient “Our projects (in ME 470) require us to outline a plan of Egyptians haul tons of stone STEPHEN BLAKELY, blocks up to build the pyramids. action, including setting goals group sponsor, re-inventor of the Egyptian Pulley It is a simple pulley without an and objectives, and working and University alumnus, class of 1969 with our sponsor and mentors axle, which they call the Egyptian Pulley. or TAs,” Gaeta said. “Essential“Certainly a lot of people tried to solve this (ques- ly it’s just supposed to test and apply our engineering tion of the pyramids’ construction) for several years, knowledge to real life problems.” Other ME 470 projects have corporate sponsors, like so it kind of fascinated me,” said Stephen Blakely, the group’s sponsor and 1969 University graduate. “So I Bosch and John Deere, but the Egyptian Pulley group essentially invented, or re-invented, this Egyptian pul- has a private sponsor. Blakely produced the idea and ley, knowing ... that the Egyptians could have done it prototype and worked directly with the students to plan and build a working model. They set goals and because it was so rudimentary and simple.”

HOW IT WORKS

BY REEMA ABI-AKAR

I

STAFF WRITER

“I essentially invented, or re-invented, this Egyptian pulley, knowing ... that the Egyptians could have done it because it was so rudimentary and simple.”

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1

A rope fits into a groove in a smooth, cylindrical rock.

2

Once the rope is pulled along the groove, the rock rolls in its lubricated cradle.

3

The pulley lifts the stone block.

objectives, then began the design process. “We had to determine what kind of analysis we were going to have to do,” Gaeta said. “We had to identify that logistics were an important part because just because you have this technology, and it may work on a physical level, it doesn’t mean that logistically Egyptians would have been able to accomplish their construction requirements with it.” After they analyzed the dimensions, logistics and possible problems, the students had to obtain the physical parts and assemble them — all within their $1,000 budget. “It’s taken a while to actually get the parts ordered,” Gray said. “(The stone parts make up) almost half of our budget, between the material cost and the machining, so we needed to make sure that what we ordered was going to work.” The students have written their fi nal paper and will present their pulley in class on April 30. On Monday, they tested it out at Marcal Rope & Rigging in Alton, Ill. “(The tests) will at least demonstrate that it will stand up to the forces that would have been applied to this if it was pulling a 5,000-pound rock up a 52 degree incline,” Gray said. According to the website, www.egyptianpulley.com,

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See PULLEY, Page 5A

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1B Tuesday April 16, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Sports

Student becomes teacher Hockey coach Nick Fabbrini wraps up successful 1st season FALL

2004 Fabbrini comes to Illinois after exploring options on junior teams

SPRING

2005

Illini win ACHA national championship in Fabbrini’s first year as a player

SPRING

2008

Illinois wins another national championship, posting a historic 38-0-0 record in Fabbrini’s senior year.

FALL

2008

Fabbrini joins Chad Cassel on the coaching staff as an assistant coach

FALL

2010

Fabbrini goes back to his hometown Forrest Park to coach Fenwick High School’s JV team and assistant coach the varsity team.

FALL

2012

Fabbrini is hired at his alma mater as Illinois head coach after Cassel retires.

SPRING

2013

Illini lose in quarterfinals of ACHA tournament to end Fabbrini’s inaugural year.

BY STEPHEN BOURBON

N

STAFF WRITER

ick Fabbrini has probably burned a hole in Route 57 by now. For the last nine years, Fabbrini has been making the trip between Chicago and Champaign to follow where hockey is taking him. The current Illinois hockey head coach has a knack for returning to his alma maters and has experienced success so far at both the playing and coaching levels. He won the state championship as a player at Fenwick, two national championships as a player at Illinois and won the CSCHL conference championship in his first year coaching for Illinois last season. *** When Nick Fabbrini graduated high school, he didn’t have much of a plan. Back in the summer of 2004, Fabbrini was trying out for junior hockey teams after he deferred admission to Illinois. After Fabbrini, a forward from Fenwick High School in Oak Park, Ill., didn’t make either of the junior teams, he thought he was stuck. Two days after classes started in the fall of 2004, Fabbrini called the University to see if there was still an open spot for him at the school. “Apparently they never got my deferral letter, so they were wondering where I was,” he said. “They still had a spot for me and everything. It turned out really well for me.” It would get better. Fabbrini earned a spot on the club hockey team as a forward and the team won the ACHA national championship in his first season in Champaign. It was the first in program history. While at school, Fabbrini majored in accounting — his assessment, “It really sucked,” he said through a laugh — but focused on hockey, and the program kept winning. Fabbrini’s senior year was the best of any team in Illinois hockey history: a perfect 38-0-0 record and second national championship banner to hang in the Ice Arena. “It’s a special place to play,” Fabbrini said. “With all of the great support we get from our fans, the place really gets rocking when we have a full house.” When his four years of eligibility expired, Fabbrini decided to join the Illini coaching staff as an assistant in the fall of 2009 while he took classes to polish off his degree, despite not having aspirations to go into coaching at the time. After getting his first taste of coaching experience, however, Fabbrini returned to his hometown in and coached 13- and 14-year-olds for a year before accepting a position at Fenwick to coach the junior varsity team and become an assistant on the varsity staff. *** After coaching the Fenwick High School junior varsity team for just two years, Illinois hired Fabbrini in the spring of 2012 to replace Hall of Fame coach Chad Cassel. Fabbrini made bold predictions from the outset, saying that the team’s three season goals were to win the CSCHL regular season championship, the CSCHL tournament championship and the ACHA national championship. “For a first-year coach, those were pretty ambitious goals,” captain Austin Bostock said. “But with the guys we had, they were pretty realistic. ... We had the same goals going all the way back to June.” Those goals were especially ambitious after an extremely disappointing 2012 season when the Illini finished below .500 and lost in the first round of the national tournament. The preseason rankings reflected

these thoughts and had the Illini ranked 13th in the nation and fifth in the CSCHL. “I thought (the ranking) was way too low, it was a slap in the face,” Fabbrini said. “I took it more personally than some of the guys did.” The Illini would prove the national doubters wrong by blasting then-No. 2 Ohio 5-0 at the Big Pond in November. Illinois would tread water for the rest of the semester before ripping off seven consecutive wins right after the semester break in January. By sweeping Robert Morris in the last conference weekend of the season, the Illini completed one of the three goals established by their new head coach and captured the CSCHL regular season title. Illinois posted an 11-6 mark on the season against conference foes and ended with a 26-12-2 record for the season, a vast improvement from 16-17-1 in 2012. The other goals would be out of reach, though. Illinois was upset by Iowa State in the CSCHL Tournament and lost 3-1 to No. 2 Arizona State in the ACHA quarterfinals. “I want to say that it’s a good start, being for a first-year coach,” Bostock said. “But no one who is coming back is content. ... We’re going to have the same goals every year.” *** Being a club hockey coach isn’t the most glamorous job in the world. Although Fabbrini is able to stick around the game that he loves and give back to a program that gave him an opportunity, the perks of the job aren’t great. His coaching salary is paid by the club — by definition a registered student organizatioån — which although it doesn’t lose money, doesn’t have an excess of money. This past fall and winter, Fabbrini had to help teach ice skating classes at the Illinois Ice Arena to truly be a Campus Recreation employee and gain access to facilities such as the ARC. While the season is long by sports standards, starting in August and running through March, it still leaves five months of unemployment. To fill the time, Fabbrini has been aggressively recruiting for the team, a team that graduated just five seniors, but all of whom played meaningful shifts throughout the year. He’s worked out his familiar drive up and down Route 57 to see players in Chicago, then back down in Champaign for school visits and around to persuade high school players to don the orange and blue. When not out recruiting, Fabbrini is a substitute teacher in the Champaign area, teaching anywhere from kindergarten to 12th grade. The teaching gig is merely a temporary measure, as he’ll be back up in his hometown of Forest Park this summer to host ice time and run hockey camps while bouncing around living with his parents and former roommates in the Chicago area. Fabbrini is content for now at Illinois, although he said he would want to move up to an NCAA job if given the opportunity, depending on what happens with the program at Illinois. Taking a job in the NCAA would require a master’s degree, which presumably would be in coaching, a program that CSCHL rival Ohio

University offers. Fabbrini still doesn’t have an exact, clear plan to follow, which is nothing new for him. “The plan is to stay here for the next four or five years and see what happens here and go from there,” Fabbrini said. “I would hope building a good program here would open some doors for me. But right now, I’m more thinking about next year.”

Stephen can be reached at sbourbo2@dailyillini. com and @steve_ bourbon.

Banks unconcerned by Friday’s surrendered points

Young has potential for his best season under Cubit

BY CHAD THORNBURG

BY JAMAL COLLIER

STAFF WRITER

STAFF WRITER

Illinois gave up an alarming average of 32 points per game last season, surrendering more than 30 points in eight of 10 losses. And although last Friday’s spring game did nothing to quell those concerns, with the offenses putting up a combined 63 points in the blue squad’s 35-28 victory over the orange team, defensive coordinator Tim Banks isn’t concerned. “It’s spring. You’re playing with short depth and don’t have a lot of guys on either side of the ball,” Banks said. “As a defensive guy, we’d like to hold them to a goose egg every time, but the reality of it is we want to be able to win the game and put ourselves in position to do that.” Also, per Beckman’s spring game rules, the defense was limited to one outside blitz and one inside blitz and barred from blitzing any corners or safeties. While the point totals were discouraging, one positive sign for the Illini defense was the blue team’s five interceptions, including a 45-yard pick-six by Taylor Barton and a fourth-quarter pick by Mason Monheim to extinguish the orange team’s comeback hopes. “We want to try to turn the ball over four times a practice, and the guys are really taking that to heart,” Banks said. “They had a couple of opportunities that they were able to capitalize on, and for us to be a good defense you continue to improve and continue to make those types of plays.”

When the two first met, the first thing Illinois’ new offensive coordinator Bill Cubit said to Donovonn Young startled the Illini running back. “He asked me why am I not good,” Young remembered. Not good? But Young was Illinois’ leading rusher last season, gaining 598 yards on 4.4 yards per carry with three touchdowns. His 38 catches actually led the team. It was a seemingly bold and brash move for Cubit to challenge his starting running back, but Cubit’s an old-school coach, and it’s his style to be as straightforward with players as possible. He almost certainly knew about all of Young’s accolades, but he remembered coming into Memorial Stadium as the head coach of Western Michigan in 2011, when Young ran right past him and his defense. As a freshman, Young ended that game with a total of 100 yards on 12 carries and a touchdown. “You just want to challenge these kids,” Cubit said. “They’re here because they’re Big Ten football players, and I think sometimes if you want to play down to the level where you think you are or somebody told you you were, then that’s what you’re going to do. ... I think kids got to understand that there are people behind him, and I’m behind him.” Young has taken that as a

BRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Donovonn Young (5) celebrates with Ryan Lankford (12) after Lankford’s touchdown during the Orange and Blue Spring Game at Memorial Stadium on Friday. Illinois’ defense surrendered explosive offensive outputs to nearly every opponent last season, but Monheim shined as one the few bright spots in the otherwise dismal season. The freshman linebacker was called upon early and often, working his way into the starting lineup by Week Three and never relinquishing it. This season, Monheim and fellow sophomore Ohioan Mike Svetina will be even more important, particularly with senior linebacker and All-Big Ten honorable mention Jonathan Brown missing the spring after offseason shoulder surgery. With a host of veteran players moving on — starters Michael Buchanan, Terry Hawthorne, Glenn Foster, Justin Green, Akeem Spence, Supo Sanni, Jus-

tin Staples, Ashante Williams, Patrick Nixon-Youman and Steve Hull, who moved from safety to wide receiver — Monheim and Svetina are among the most experienced on the defense in just their second year. They are two of seven defensive players remaining who started any games last season. “He earned his stripes playing down in the Big House and Madison (Wisc.) and places like that,” Banks said of Monheim. “He understands that there’s still some things that he needs to improve on, but the thing I like about Mason is he’s out there trying to get better at it. So I think his future is bright.”

Chad can be reached at thornbu1@ dailyillini.com and @cthornburg10.

challenge and, at least for one night, did his best to prove Cubit wrong when he ran for 86 yards on 19 carries with three touchdowns during Friday’s Orange and Blue Spring Game. “I feel like I strive off stuff like that,” Young said. “When you doubt me, I feel like I come back stronger than before.” If Friday’s combined 87 passing attempts between the two teams is any indication, Illinois is going to throw the ball a lot this season; however, a lot of the early talk has been about how Young could be poised for his best season under Cubit. Young was never a huge fan of the spread offense and thought he could be better utilized in a different system. Last season was filled with uncreative handoffs to Young that forced him to sweep to the outside of the field, where he seemingly never gained any more than two yards and his runs usually resulted in negative yardage. The readoption run that made up for nearly all of Illinois’ rushing offense will be reduced, if not eliminated. Cubit plans to take advantage of Young’s ability as a north-south runner. Cubit has also spent time with Pro Football Hall of Fame running back Emmitt Smith, so Cubit wants to teach Young some of the things he’s learned from him. One thing head coach Tim Beckman always brings up when he raves about his new

“I feel like I strive off stuff like that. When you doubt me, I feel like I come back stronger than before.” DONOVONN YOUNG, Illini running back

offensive coordinator is how he is able to get the best out of his talent. “I think it’s friendly,” Beckman said. “When I say friendly, I mean player friendly. Our players understand what they’re responsible for doing.” Beckman said he was impressed as he stood behind the offenses Friday, especially on Young’s third touchdown run, a 3-yard run up the middle where Young was able to fight off a tackle from a linebacker. Beckman wants the Illini to be more physical next season, and after Young scored, Beckman pulled Young to the side to commend him. “He’s not anywhere near where he’s going to be in September,” Cubit said. “We’re going to get him better, even still, I think now he tastes it.”

Jamal can be reached at collie10@ dailyillini.com and @JamalCollier.


2B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

With bleak title hopes, Bulls must look to future MICHEAL WONSOVER Sports columnist

No,

the Chicago Bulls are not going to win a championship this

year. After consecutive years of claiming the best record in the league, the Bulls would be lucky if they reached the second round in the Eastern Conference. Losing Derrick Rose can do that to a team. Minus the 2010-11 MVP, Chicago is likely facing the Indiana Pacers in the fi rst round of the playoffs beginning this weekend. The Pacers are a far cry from the fi rst round matchups the Bulls have faced the past couple of seasons. Considering Chicago went 1-4 against the Philadelphia 76ers without Rose in the postseason last year, this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playoffs wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get any easier. Even if Chicago surpasses expectations and scraps its way past the fi rst round, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a matter of time before the Miami Heat would end the Bullsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bleak title hopes. Will next season be any better? The Bulls will most likely receive the 18th pick in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s draft after receiving the 29th and 30th picks the last two years, respectively. There is some value in the mid-to-late fi rst round, even if this field is considered one of the weakest since 2000. ESPNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chad Ford projects the Bulls to select Georgia shooting guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope. But with the emergence of Jimmy Butler, the Bulls may look for a backup big man to replace the departed Omer Asik. Expect Kansas center Jeff Withey and Louisville center Gorgui Dieng to be among the names Chicago considers come draft day. Withey and Dieng would step in right away as rookies and prevent Joakim Noah from playing 37.5 minutes per game again next season. The 18th or 19th selection in the draft isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the sexiest pick, but the Bulls have had a lot of late-draft success in recent seasons. Look no further than

forward Taj Gibson, whom the Bulls signed to a four-year deal worth $38 million last offseason, and Butler. This kind of production from Butler in particular is going to make the Bulls at least consider trading Luol Deng this summer. Although Deng is a back-toback All-Star and All-Defense performer, his $14.2 million on the books for next season is tough to swallow. Dengâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expiring contract will be a talking point of a Bulls front office with a $77 million payroll. Butler has proved he can handle a starting role and, as of late, has even outplayed Deng. Butler is also about five years younger and $13 million cheaper next season. As perfect as it sounds to unload Dengâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract and let Butler do his thing as a starter, the move would have plenty of risk. Butler has proved he could play in long stretches when Tom Thibodeau needs him to, but Deng leads the NBA in minutes per game for the second straight season this year. There is a reason Thibs canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sit Deng; he just means too much to the Bulls. Even stats donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do justice to Dengâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impact on the team. If Chicago balks at trading Deng, there are plenty of other ways to save money. Chicago fans have urged for Carlos Boozer to be released via the Amnesty clause. While Boozerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two years and $32 million remaining on his contract are rich, the bigger problem is that Gibson may be the more important player. When looking at the raw numbers, Boozer averages 16.1 points and 9.7 rebounds per game, compared with just 7.9 points and 5.4 rebounds per game for Gibson. But if you look at advanced metrics, Gibson is the superior all-around player. While Boozer is heralded as the better scorer, he and Gibson are tied in points per play offensively at 0.9. Even when looking at the post, where Boozer is considered one of the best in the league, Gibson ranks 18th in the NBA in points per play in the post, while Boozer ranks 67th. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not even close on defense, as Gibson ranks 60th in the league

in points per play allowed, compared with a 152nd overall ranking by Boozer. The Bulls are also outscored by 3.8 points per 100 possessions with Boozer on the court, whereas they outscore opponents by 5.2 points per 100 possessions with Gibson in the lineup, according to NBA. com. That 5.2 net rating is the best on the team. Gibson had a net rating of 15.1 last season, which was even greater than Roseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10.6. The Bulls could also release Richard Hamilton in addition to amnestying Boozer. Only about $1 million of his $5 million contract is guaranteed next season. Even with the newfound money, the Bulls may wait until 2014 to actually use it. Rose will return next season, but not the Rose we know and love. Expect Rose to need a couple of months or even longer to shake off the rust. Point guards Ricky Rubio and Iman Shumpert, who both tore their ACLs last season, had long recovery periods before returning to form. Rubioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s points per game has increased every month from December to March. Shumpertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s field goal percentage was only 33.8 in the fi rst half of the season and has jumped to 41.4 since the AllStar game. Since Rose missed even more time than those two, there may be an even longer adjustment period. With Nate Robinson likely leaving via free agency, the Bulls will suffer while Rose gets his legs under him. Taking into account the uncertainty of Rose and the high payroll, expect the Bulls to finish better next season, but not quite reach championship level. The summer of 2014 is when the Bulls will have more options to move into title contention. If Boozer is not amnestied this summer, he is as good as gone by 2014. With Dengâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract expiring as well as numerous others by then, only Rose, Noah, Gibson, Butler and Marquis Teague will remain on the roster from this season. The Bulls will also most likely have draft picks from this season and next on the payroll. This should give Chicago enough flexibility to once again pursue the members of Miamiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Three. LeBron James, Dwyane

JIM PRISCHING THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chicago Bullsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jimmy Butler dunks the ball against the New York Knicks during the basketball game on Thursday in Chicago. The Bulls won 118-111 in overtime. The Bulls donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have much hope this postseason. Wade and Chris Bosh all have early termination options for the 2014-15 season that will likely be exercised. LeBron is a long shot for the Bulls, considering his second option would likely be returning to Cleveland if he did leave Miami. Wade, on the other hand, is from Chicago and was close to signing with the Bulls in 2010. He will be 32 by then, but he is still among the leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best players. The Bulls would also have as good of a chance as any team to sign Bosh. Of Miamiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Three, he is the most likely to depart. Bosh ranks 10th in the league in PER among centers. Miami may have to let Bosh

leave with the increase in tax penalties in the new CBA. If none of the Big Three pan out, the Bulls can ditch free agency and look at the trade market. Minnesota Timberwolves forward Kevin Love, who hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been afraid to voice his concerns with the future of the organization, has a player option for the 2015-16 season. Knowing he may leave, Minnesota may be willing to depart with the All-Star forward just like Carmelo Anthony, Dwight Howard, Deron Williams and Chris Paul who were traded by their respective franchises. The Bulls could offer a trade including Gibson and the Charlotte Bobcats draft

pick that Chicago owns. The pick, which the Bulls received in the Tyrus Thomas trade, is protected until 2016. This pick will likely be in the top-10 with the Bobcats continuing to lose year after year. The Bulls can also offer European sensation Nikola Mirotic, who is unlikely to leave Real Madrid until 2014. Mirotic is the only two-time recipient of the Euroleagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rising Star Award. One star just isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough to win a championship in this era, even if heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a former MVP.

Michael can be reached at wonsovr2@dailyillini.com and on Twitter @m_dubb.

Parr earns Big Ten Player of Week after hitting cycle BY JAMAL COLLIER STAFF WRITER

Justin Parr thought he had a home run during the eighth inning Sunday, but when he realized it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going over the fence, he had to pick up the pace. Parr knew he was a triple away from the cycle, the first he could remember ever having in his career. He got to third base easily, a two-run, stand-up triple to emphatically complete one of the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most difficult accomplishments. He became the first Illini to hit for the cycle in four years. Parrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting some recognition for his accomplishments, as he was named Big Ten Player of the Week for the first time in his career. It comes after going 6-for-13 with five RBIs, five runs scored and an on-base percentage plus slugging of 1.456 as Illinois swept Purdue this past weekend. Add that with his performance in last Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game, and Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; standout center fielder has hit 8-for-17 slugged 1.000, scored seven runs, hit two home runs and

had six RBIs this past week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a well deserved award, he played so well this weekend,â&#x20AC;? head coach Dan Hartleb said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a number of times heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s played well and hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been recognized for it so its very nice that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s being honored this week.â&#x20AC;? This past week improves Parrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s average to .438 on the season, which leads the conference and is in the top-10 in the NCAA. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the first player in the Big Ten with 60 hits, which is also good for top10 in the nation. He leads the Illini with 36 RBIs. Parr was modest, quickly deflecting the attention to the way the entire team is hitting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; accounting for 40 runs this past weekend â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and shifting focus to Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game at Illinois State (18-15, 3-3 Ohio Valley Conference). â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know you enjoy it for about 10 seconds, and then you just got to lock in again,â&#x20AC;? Parr said. The Illini (22-10, 5-4 Big Ten) are 1-1 in midweek games this season, and Hartleb stresses how important not losing any more

games will be if Illinois wants to maintain a strong RPI. Parr will also put his career high 20-game hitting streak on the line Tuesday, which is nearing relevance in Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; baseball history. Parrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hitting streak is the second-longest active streak in the country and is now tied for the third-longest in school history. He is five games shy of the all-time Illinois record of 25, set by Ryan Snowden in 2007 and three games behind Tom Sinakâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 23-game hitting streak in 1994-95. During the first two games against Purdue, Parr didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a hit until his last at-bat and joked that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had people texting him asking why he keeps building the suspense. He wasted no time on Sunday, with a hit in the first inning before completing the cycle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cool opportunity, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not something I really hang my hat on,â&#x20AC;? Parr said.

Jamal can be reached at collie10@ dailyillini.com and @jamalcollier.

ZACH DALZELL THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Justin Parr hits the ball Sunday against Purdue at Illinois Field. Parr completed the cycle in the eighth inning.

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Mckinley Health Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Special Populationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Student Health Concerns Committee Presents

The 20 Annual th

Health Fair

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Wednesday April 17th 10AM - 3 PM Illini Union Rooms A, B, and C

ENTERTAINMENT

PARTICIPANTS

FREE SCREENINGS & SERVICES

Wal-Mart Inclusive Illinois Carle Clinic Christie Clinic Counseling Center Provena Covenant

Live DJ Door Prizes Dance Groups Fitness Demos Blood Pressure Cholesterol BMI Blood Sugar Manicures Massages Fitness Tests

Nutrition Education Sexual Health Stress Management Eye Clinic Skin Care Consulting Career Service Info Alcohol & Drug Info

GO FOR G O L D WITH GOOD HEALTH

McKinley Health Center Urbana Acupuncture Champaign Chiropractic Clinic Concept College of Cosmetology Planned Parenthood Center Abbott Diabetes Care

Sponsored By: Student Affairs Program Coordinating Council, McKinley Health Center, Office of Diversity, Equity, and Access, and paid for by the Student Cultural Program Fee and SORF

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

309 Green

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MISC.

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1

F    

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1

F    

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1

F    

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1

F    

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505 E. Stoughton, C.

3

F    

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203 N. Gregory, U.

1

F    

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808 W. Illinois, U.

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F    

2BR w/ Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D in-unit, sec bldg

610 W. Oregon, U.

2

B    

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1007 W. Main, U.

1

F    

1 BR W/ Hi Speed Int, near Engr, DW,WD, sec bldg

205 E. Green , C.

1

F    Large, Security Entrance

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2

F    

2BR with High Speed Int, near Engr, DW, W/D

108 E. John, C.

1

B    Huge, Hardwood Floors

1010 W. Main, U.

1

F    

1BR W/ Hi Speed Int, near Eng, DW,W/D, sec bldg

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2

F    

Engineering campus

Group Houses

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F    

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305/307/311 W. Birch, C.

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B    

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F    

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3

F    

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1,2

U    

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Roland Realty

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1

F    

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501 S. Sixth St

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309 E. Daniel

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F    

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5BR House, hardwood, free parking, close to County Market

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F    

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F    

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3

F    

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F    

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U    

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Tuesday, April 16, 2013

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010 APARTMENTS

420 APARTMENTS

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HELP WANTED

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FOR RENT

employment

 













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The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 139  

Tuesday, April 16, 2013