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Dow Chemical, Research Park form partnership

Vol. 142 Issue 87

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FREE

TUITION GOES UP BUT INCREASE IS

LOWEST IN

BY AUSTIN KEATING

18 YEARS

STAFF WRITER

Dow Chemical Company, an international corporation headquartered in Midland, Minn., announced a partnership with the University last week to build an “Innovation Center” in the University’s Research Park. Dow is a chemical corporation that creates agriculture, energy, infrastructure and consumer-related products. Research Park director Laura Frerichs said Dow will be able to benefit from this partnership because of the resources provided by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, or NCSA, on campus. Although the partnership was recently announced, the University has been working with Dow since last year. “They’ve done a number of things with our University, but this is the first time they’ve had a physical presence on our campus,” she said. “It’s the first of its type that they’ve done at any University.” Dow joins about 90 companies currently residing in the Research Park. Evan Burness, project manager for the Private Sector program at the NCSA, said the company chose the University over other universities’ research parks because of the campus’ reputation. “Part of the reason to have a space in the Research Park is so that they (companies) can have a permanent presence in the area to engage with faculty and students on campus,” Burness said. “They know that the University of Illinois is one of the absolute premier institutions in the country, if not the world, in terms of top domain science, computer science and engineering talent.” Part of Dow’s reasoning for joining the Research Park is to create “a recruiting pipeline” for students, Frerichs said. Sixteen computer science students from the University are already working part-time with the Innovation Center. “It benefits the company because they’re getting talent that’s not only well-trained in the fundamentals in their space but also in the practical applications themselves, and it benefits the students because it advances their career opportunities,” Burness said. He added that Dow may also benefit from the ability to advance their products with new data analytics and other types of computational projects through its relationship with NCSA. “A supercomputer looks today — and will look going forward — different than it has for a number of years, and Dow is interested in staying close to NCSA to help navigate those waters and understand them,” he said. “It becomes a notable competitive advantage for a company, and Dow is very keen on that.” Burness said most companies like Dow that partner with the NCSA seek help with researching projects, use the University’s supercomputers and maximize on the supercomputer expertise at the University. Roy Ladd, director of global information research at Dow, expressed enthusiasm for what the center would accomplish. “With access to a highly passionate student body and NCSA’s valuable resources, we are confident that we can develop innovative IT solutions that will help solve some of the most pressing challenges facing our customers and society today,” Ladd said in a press release. The permanent space for the new innovation center, 2021 S. First St., is still being prepared for use and will be finished early next week.

BY LAUREN ROHR

T

STAFF WRITER

he University board of trustees approved a 1.7 percent tuition hike for the 2013-14 academic year — the lowest percentage increase in 18 These in-state tuition rates will increase less than $200 on all three campuses, as announced at the board’s meeting in Chicago on Thursday. The $198 increase on the Urbana campus will set next year’s annual base tuition at $11,834 for the class of 2017. At the Chicago and Springfield campuses, tuition rose by $174 and $157.50 respectively. These rates are higher for out-of-state and international students and do not include the differing tuition rates for different colleges. At its January 2011 meeting, the board enacted a policy to ensure that tuition rates are adjusted for inflation and account for changes in state support. Next year’s tuition closely aligns with the Consumer Price Index, at 1.7 percent this year, as well as the Higher Education Price Index, which monitors costs for the nation’s colleges and universities. But Walter Knorr, chief fi nancial officer and comptroller, said the state owes the University $502 million in unpaid bills. The University’s annual state appropriation has also decreased by about 23 percent, or about $180 million, since fiscal year 2002. Christophe Pierre, vice president for academic affairs, said the limited support from the state was a key part of the conversation when University administrators began

In addition to tuition and student fees, the board of trustees also discussed the following: -Trustee Christopher Kennedy was reelected for a fifth term as chair of the board. He has served as chairman since he was appointed to the board in 2009. -Former U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald was welcomed to the board for a six-year term after being appointed by Gov. Pat Quinn last week. He is replacing former trustee Lawrence Oliver II. -Trustees re-elected Thomas R. Bearrows as University legal counsel, Susan M. Kies as secretary of the University and Walter K. Knorr as comptroller for one-year terms. Lester McKeever Jr. was re-elected to a twoyear term as treasurer. - The board named a new residence hall Maudelle Tanner Brown Bousfield Hall that will open next fall on the Urbana campus in honor of Bousfield, the first African-American woman to graduate from the University. -The board approved the project proposal for the new Center for Wounded Veterans in Higher Education on the Urbana campus. -Trustees approved an architectural consultant recommendation of LCM Architects for the reconstruction of the Natural History Building.

See TUITION, Page 3A

Tuition increases slow in recent years

$11,834

$11,636

$11,104

$10,386

$9,484

$9,242

$8,440

$7,708

$5,568

$5,302

$4,410

$3,724

At its Jan. 24 meeting, the University board of trustees voted to increase the base in-state tuition by $198, a 1.7 percent increase from the prior year. This is the smallest annual increase in dollars that the board has approved since 2000, when base tuition increased $178 from $3,546 to $3,724.

$7,042

January 25, 2013

$6,460

Friday

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 SHANNON LANCOR Managing Editor for Visuals

Source: University board of trustees agendas

Austin can be reached at akkeati2@dailyillini.com.

YMCA exhibit conveys views on the environment

Former ECE student charged with hacking professor’s account

BY JACQUELINE OGRODNIK STAFF WRITER

Local artists are using their work to convey their ideas of the environment at Art @ the Y’s exhibit “Artists on the Environment.” “Artists on the Environment” features three artists’ responses to the environment, which all share in the concern for preserving the earth and its resources. The exhibit opened Thursday and will remain open in the Murphy Gallery every weekday until Feb. 23. “I have been working with the concerns for the environment for a few years now,” said Viktoria Ford, exhibit curator and one of the artists. “It’s become very dear to my heart.” Molly Briggs is also showing her work in the exhibit and is an instructor at the School of Art and Design and a Ph.D student in Landscape Architecture. Briggs said her art shows the kinds of things people don’t notice until they open their eyes. “This means understanding that everything in the built environment is a form of communication,” Briggs said. “Also that the entire environment is ... ‘built’ where there’s nothing out there that’s not affected by us.” Briggs’ art encourages participation and

INSIDE

Police

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Horoscopes

BY CARINA LEE STAFF WRITER

Artist Glen C. Davies describes his style as psychological drama, or psychodrama, which is related to surrealism. They are meant to tell a story that warns the viewer about something — in this case, dangers to the environment. “They are cautionary tales that tell a story about things that concern me, such as envi-

Sung Dan Lee, senior in Engineering, had been expecting to take his Electrical and Computer Engineering 329 class exam Nov. 29 at 7 p.m. But when he received an unexpected email with the subject “ECE 329 Exam 3 Solutions for Sale,” he became suspicious. The email stated: “Sales stop at 17:57 CST, and all keys are distributed at 18:02 CST. You will be refunded if some white knight snitches to the damn professors...but we can all cooperate, amrite? ;-)” Police are charging Daniel Beckwitt, a former University student, with sending this illicit email and others in a string of hacks that became attributed to one “ECE Hacker.” University police officers arrested Beckwitt last Friday at his home in Urbana. He appeared in court Tuesday, where he was formally charged with five counts: property damage, two counts of computer fraud, tampering with documents and illegally possessing a firearm. His next court appearance is scheduled for Feb. 5.

See ART EXHIBIT, Page 3A

See HACKER, Page 3A

ZOE GRANT THE DAILY ILLINI

Viktoria Ford, artist and curator of “Artists on the Environment,” stands with her work at the YMCA during Thursday’s opening. The exhibit will run for the next five weeks. appreciation for what is both ordinary and extraordinary, Ford said. She focuses her art on engaging the viewer in a perceptive mode even after he or she leaves the gallery. Her paintings deal with the spaces where abstraction and realistic representation overlap. Most are landscape-style paintings that were painted with acrylic and tempera on canvas or panel.

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, January 25, 2013

The Daily Illini

POLICE

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!"A

Copyright © 2013 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Samantha Kiesel )(.›**.$/*-, editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor reporting Nathaniel Lash )(.›**.$/*+* mewriting@Daily Illini.com Managing editor online Hannah Meisel )(.›**.$/*,* meonline@DailyIllini. com Managing editor visuals Shannon Lancor )(.›**.$/*,* mevisuals@DailyIllini. com Website editor Danny Wicentowski Social media director Sony Kassam News editor Taylor Goldenstein )(.›**.$/*,) news@DailyIllini.com Daytime editor Maggie Huynh )(.›**.$/*,' news@DailyIllini.com Asst. news editors Safia Kazi Sari Lesk Rebecca Taylor Features editor Jordan Sward )(.›**.$/*-0 features@DailyIllini. com Asst. features editor Alison Marcotte Candice Norwood

Sports editor Jeff Kirshman )(.›**.$/*-* sports@DailyIllini.com Asst. sports editors Darshan Patel Max Tane Dan Welin Photo editor Daryl Quitalig )(.›**.$/*++ photo@DailyIllini.com Asst. photo editor Kelly Hickey Opinions editor Ryan Weber )(.›**.$/*-opinions@DailyIllini. com Design editors Bryan Lorenz Eunie Kim Michael Mioux )(.›**.$/*+, design@DailyIllini.com Copy chief Kevin Dollear copychief@DailyIllini. com Asst. copy chief Johnathan Hettinger Advertising sales manager Molly Lannon ssm@IlliniMedia.com Classified sales director Deb Sosnowski Daily Illini/Buzz ad director Travis Truitt Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

Night system staff for today’s paper Night editor: Samantha Kiesel Photo night editor: Brenton Tse Copy editors: Linday Rolf, Audrey Majors, Kirsten

Keller, Kirby Gamsby Designers: Danny Weilandt, Elise King

28-year-old male was arrested on the charge of criminal damage to property at Days Inn, 1019 W. Bloomington Road, around 2 a.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the offender damaged the victim's vehicle. !"Criminal damage to property was reported at Parkland Point Apartments, 2002 W. Bradley Ave., around 2 p.m. Monday. According to the report, an unknown suspect broke one window in an apartment. !"Theft over was reported in the 1800 block of Springer Drive around 11:30 a.m. Wednesday. According to the report, an unknown suspect removed copper lines from air conditioner compressors. One cop-

down. !"A domestic dispute was reported in the 200 block of Philo Road around 11:00 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the victim and offender were arguing, and the offender was taunting to the victim. No physical altercation occurred.

per alloy was reported stolen. !"A 62-year-old male was arrested on the charge of battery in the 600 block of South State Street around 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the suspect spat in the face of the victim. !"A 40-year-old male was arrested on the charge of battery in the 400 block of South State Street around 11:00 a.m. Wednesday.

University !""A

21-year-old male was arrested on the charge of retail theft at the Illini Union Bookstore, 809 S. Wright St., at 3 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, a store security officer told police he saw the offender place four books in a backpack and attempt to leave the store. The books are worth an estimated $50.

Urbana !"A domestic dispute was reported in the 1200 block of Lanore Drive around 7:00 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the offender and victim live together and are in a dating relationship. They got into a verbal dispute. The offender agreed to leave and calm

TODAY ON DAILYILLINI.COM

Men’s tennis hosts ITA Kick-Off tourney The No. 16 Illinois men’s tennis team will be hosting the ITA Kick-Off Weekend tournament against ranked opponents in Tennessee, North Carolina and Tulsa. For more, visit DailyIllini.com.

ISS column discusses engaging students The newly elected vice president external of the Illinois Student Senate Jenny Baldwin outlines her goals and duties for her term. She explains that she wants to take advantage of ISS’s social media to engage students more easily. To read her whole message visit DailyIllini.com.

Compiled by Rebecca Taylor

HOROSCOPES BY NANCY BLACK TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

Today’s Birthday Career keeps you busy into next summer, when priorities shift to your networks, groups and organizations. Partnerships and relationships grow and strengthen this year. Power and leverage come through teamwork. You’re gaining wisdom. Care for yourself lovingly, and take time to recharge. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)

Today is an 8 -- Set long-range goals or business plans. Look at the big picture, and watch for any conflict of interests. Choose conservative gains over risk.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)

Today is a 6 -- Don’t make hasty assumptions; consider long-term consequences. Study an ancient art. Tackle detailed chores and plans. Get practical, and worry about symbolism later.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) Today is an 8 -- Don’t offer

suggestions. Finish an old job, and avoid distractions. Postpone expansion and travel. A hero comes to your rescue. Discover romance today and tomorrow by listening for it.

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)

solutions.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)

Today is a 7 -- Weekend chores need attention. Arrange travel plans carefully. Expenses are high, so take care. There’s more work coming soon. An associate shares a dream. Take special time for yourself.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

Today is a 9 -- Avoid travel and other distractions. Handle important work, and then get into a relaxation phase. Take walks; share good food with dear people. Destress.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

Today is a 9 -- Make sure you know the rules. Stick close to home for a few days. Sort out your feelings. Avoid overindulgence, and focus on home improvement. Show respect with punctuality.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

Today is an 8 -- Proceed with caution (especially around sharp corners). Problems emerge, so get in communication. Costs are higher than expected. You have the patience required. Study for

Page transmission: Harry Durden

Today is a 7 -- Bring in the money. Don’t bet on a fantasy. Check for plan changes, and stay put. Use practical methods. There’s a test later.

The Daily Illini is online everywhere you are.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)

Today is a 9 -- A hunch could be quite profitable. Question odd facts. Avoid a public scene. Do the work yourself and save. You’re back in control, pretty much, and getting stronger.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)

Today is a 6 -- Finish up tasks and get lost in thought. Romance may have stressed your pocketbook, with higher costs than expected. Take a philosophical view.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)

Today is an 8 -- Relax with friends over the next day or two. Offer advice only upon request, and ease up on imaginative suggestions. Others seek your help. Consider consequences before speaking.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)

Today is an 8 -- Keep your eye on the ball (no spending distractions). There may be a temporary roadblock. The next two days are profitable. You may have to turn down work.

Periodical postage paid at Champaign, IL 61821. The Daily Illini is published Monday through Friday during University of Illinois fall and spring semesters, and Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday in summer. New Student Guide and Welcome Back Edition are published in August. First copy is free; each additional copy is 50 cents. Local, U.S. mail, out-of-town and out-of-state rates available upon request.

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, January 24, 2013

HACKER FROM PAGE 1A “I thought these incidents only happen in the movies and couldn’t believe that it could actually happen in one of my classes,” Lee said. “We were like ‘Maybe this guy was too scared to take the exam,’ and that was why he did such things.” Beckwitt was enrolled as a student in the electrical and computer engineering department last semester but did not register for classes this semester, according to University police Sgt. Tom Geis, head of the detectives of the University police. The property damage Beckwitt has been charged with is connected to two breaking-and-entering incidents at the Coordinated Science Laboratory where several i-card readers and locks were rendered inoperable with Super Glue and metal chips in November and December. The University Police Department teamed up with CITES to investigate the crime by using websites such

as reddit.com. Police found several postings on reddit.com from the username “ECEhacker.” During the investigation, three computer keyboards in Everitt Laboratory were discovered to be rigged to key loggers, devices that are physically connected to keyboards to capture the keystrokes of the user. “Whoever this ECE hacker was, the reason he was able to get access to people’s accounts and emails was because he was able to capture people’s username and passwords from the keyloggers that were installed in those equipments,” Geis said. Police found their first lead with a blog posting by a user named “Skunkworks,” who listed hacking into teaching assistants’ email accounts among his hobbies. Skunkworks also posted a photo two people, one of whom police identified as Beckwitt. Police obtained a search warrant to search Beckwitt’s home but are still in the process of obtaining a warrant to search his electronic devices, Geis said. Super Glue and packing material believed to be used for

ART EXHIBIT

TUITION

FROM PAGE 1A

FROM PAGE 1A

keyloggers were found while carrying out the warrant. “We still have loads of information to look over because not only we do search warrants on the resident, but from that, we got laptops, thumb drives, external hard drives and cell phones; now we have to go through and forensically search,” Geis said. “We are hoping to shed more light on this case as we trudge through the computer stuff ... but I think we have a pretty good idea that he is the guy.” The full extent of the hacking remains unknown, Geis said. Mike Corn, chief information officer for the University, said the investigation is going well. “Our people did all of the forensic examination of blogs, digital examinations of computers, and the police did an awful lot of work of reaching out to agencies and companies off campus,” Corn said. “We would talk to them, they would talk to us, and that led us to the suspect.”

ronmental issues and how the environment is being destroyed through our own negligence,” Davies said. The art is not only there for the viewer, however. Ford said she, as an artist, is also able to battle with her feelings related to the environment through making her artwork. She said through her artistic process, she is able to vent her frustrations. “If I tell you that the subsequent layers of fi lmy paint transport me to deeper reflections, you will understand what I have come to believe: art can heal,” Ford said. “The question is, can art heal the planet?”

Carina can be reached at lee713 @dailyillini.com.

Jacqueline can be reached at ogrodni2@dailyillini.com.

3A

discussing tuition rates last fall. But he added that keeping higher education affordable for students is also a top priority. “Certainly we want to recruit the highest quality class of students to the University, which argues for keeping tuition rate increases to a minimum,” Pierre said. “On the other hand, we also want to provide the students with a high-quality education, and that takes resources.” University officials said tuition increases have been declining in recent years. The University saw a 9.5 percent rise in tuition rates for the 2010-11 academic year, a 6.9 percent rise for 2011-12 and a 4.8 percent rise for 2012-13. All tuition rates are locked in for four years for incoming students under the state’s guaranteed tuition law. Pierre said this allows predictability of college education costs and also serves as an incentive for students to graduate in four years. The board also approved a 3 percent increase in undergraduate room and board costs on the Urbana campus. Students will pay $9,979 next year, a $291 increase, based on a standard double-occupancy room and 14-meal-per-week housing plan. Combining the costs of tuition, housing and student fees, incoming students will pay $25,167, increasing a total of 2.1 percent, or $519, from the 2012-13 academic year.

Lauren can be reached at rohr2@dailyillini.com

Rhode Island House passes gay marriage legislation BY DAVID KLEPPER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HUSSEIN TALLAL THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Egyptian protesters try to tear down a cement wall built to prevent them from reaching parliament and the Cabinet building near Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday. Egypt’s black-clad riot police fired tear gas in fierce dawn clashes with dozens of protesters. The violence which was soothed hours later in central Cairo comes on eve of the second anniversary of Egypt’s Jan. 25 uprising, which toppled longtime authoritarian president Hosni Mubarak in 2011.

Security fires tear gas at protesters celebrating 2011 Egyptian revolution BY MAGGIE MICHAEL THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAIRO — Egyptian security forces fi red tear gas and protesters hurled stones and Molotov cocktails in a daylong demonstration on Thursday, raising fears of a violent anniversary of the 2011 uprising that toppled long-time authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak. Youth activists and opposition groups have called for large rallies on the anniversary Friday in Cairo’s Tahrir Square and in front of the president palace in the upscale suburb, Heliopolis. The protests, which left dozens injured, began before dawn in central Cairo when protesters tried to tear down a cement wall built to prevent them from reaching the parliament and the Cabinet building. The street clashes continued after darkness fell on the Egyptian capital. Three weeks of mass protests that erupted on Jan. 25, 2011, eventually forced Mubarak out of office.

Since then, Egypt has undergone a tumultuous transition under the interim leadership of military generals until the election last June of Mohammed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood group. His first six months in office were marked by political tensions, street protests and an economic crunch that sapped his popularity. As the protests continued, Morsi visited the western city of Ismailia to inaugurate a maritime project, but he was received by activists who blocked a railway station, tore down the welcoming banners and issued a statement stating that they were opposed to inaugurating new projects while there’s corruption in the railway system. Later in the day, Morsi urged Egyptians to mark the anniversary peacefully. “I call upon Egyptians to celebrate the revolution ... with civilization and peacefully to preserve our nation, our institution, our souls, our streets and our sons,”

he told a gathering in a speech meant to mark the birthday of Muslim Prophet Muhammad. “We have to feel that we are all in one ship and we have to preserve its safety and respect the people and their free will which they express in their ballot boxes,” he added. But die-hard fans of Egypt’s most popular soccer team, Ahly, who took part in the clashes, warned in a statement: “The price of blood is blood.” It was a reference to the deaths of many of their friends last year in a violent rampage at a soccer game that left 74 dead. The soccer fans, known as Ultras, also called for mass protests on Jan. 26, the day a court is expected to rule on the fate of security officials being tried in connection with the deaths at the soccer game, one of the world’s bloodiest instances of violence at a sports event. On Tuesday, in an attempt to assuage anger, Morsi announced that the victims will be consid-

ered “martyrs.” That means their families will receive compensation like those killed in the uprising against Mubarak. That same day, Egypt’s prosecutor general, who was appointed by Morsi, asked the court to give the prosecution more time to introduce new fi ndings and new defendants before issuing its verdict. That was seen viewed as a move to postpone the verdict and avoid street violence by the soccer fans. On Wednesday, Ultras held a sit-in in front of Egypt’s stock market, briefly blocked a highway, and set up tents in Tahrir Square. The group has long been at odds with police, and it played a key role in antiMubarak uprising. The opposition has demanded a suspension or radical changes to be made to Egypt’s newly adopted constitution, which an Islamist-dominated constituent assembly drafted amid deep polarization and mass street protests.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — The Rhode Island House of Representatives on Thursday overwhelmingly passed legislation to allow gays and lesbians to marry in the only New England state where they can’t. The House voted 51-19 after an often emotional debate that touched on civil rights, religion and the nature of marriage. The bill now moves to the Senate, where both supporters and opponents of gay marriage say it is difficult to predict the bill’s fate. “This has been a long journey,” said House Speaker Gordon Fox, who is gay and supported samesex legislation when it was first introduced in 1997. “Today is a great day. Today ... we stand for equality, we stand for justice.” Thursday’s vote posed the most significant challenge yet for gay marriage in Rhode Island. While the five other New England states already allow gay couples to marry, attempts have fallen flat in this heavily Catholic state. “I wanted to be here to see it,” said 70-year-old Warwick resident Ken Fish, who is gay. Fish showed up at the Statehouse hours early to ensure he had a seat in the crowded viewing gallery. “Go back 10 years, even five years, and I wasn’t sure we’d ever get here. We’re not done yet, but this is a big one.” Nine states and the District of Columbia now allow gay and lesbian couples to marry. Gay marriage opponents vow to press their case in the Senate, where Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed, D-Newport, remains opposed to the legislation. Chris Plante, director of the state chapter of the National Institute for Marriage, said he believes state leaders who support gay marriage aren’t reflecting public sentiment. “Rhode Islanders care about marriage, and they don’t want to see it redefi ned,” he said. Some opponents have suggested placing gay marriage on the ballot as a referendum, but the

idea is a nonstarter with Fox and independent Gov. Lincoln Chafee, a gay marriage supporter. A handful of lawmakers rose during the debate to criticize gay marriage as a dangerous social experiment. Rep. Arthur Corvese, D-North Providence, warned lawmakers that samesex marriage was an “irrevocable societal game-changer” that would redefine “the fundamental building block of our community” and could lead to the legalization of polygamy or plural marriages. “Truth must not be sacrificed on the altar of political correctness,” he said. “Is this the vision you want for Rhode Island’s future? Is this the future you want for America?” Supporters in Rhode Island are hoping to build on national momentum after votes to approve gay marriage in Maine, Maryland and Washington. Meanwhile, in Minnesota, voters rejected a proposed state constitutional amendment that would have prohibited gay marriage, the fi rst time such a ballot question has failed in the United States. Lawmakers who argued in favor of allowing gays to marry warned their colleagues they could wind up on the wrong side of history if they cast a no vote. “Your grandchildren someday will ask you... ‘How did you vote on marriage equality?’” said Rep. John Edwards, D-Tiverton. “Hopefully you’ll be able to say the right thing.” Passage in the House was expected, as 42 of the 75 House members signed on as sponsors. Two years ago, Fox dropped gay marriage legislation after he concluded the bill would not pass the Senate. Instead, lawmakers passed civil unions for samesex couples. But there has been little interest in the state. In the year since civil unions were first offered, only 68 couples obtained civil union licenses. Last year, Chafee signed an executive order recognizing same-sex marriages performed in other states.

Trial of 5 men accused of rape, murder starts in India BY ASHOK SHARMA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW DELHI — The trial of five men charged with the gang rape and murder of a 23-year-old student on a New Delhi bus began in a closed courtroom Thursday with opening arguments by the prosecution lawyers in a special fast-track court set up just weeks ago to handle sexual assault cases. The brutal attack last month set off protests across India and opened a national debate about the epidemic of violence against women. A government committee established in the wake of the attack has called for a complete overhaul of the way the criminal justice system deals with rape, sexual assaults and crimes against women in general. The five men on trial — who face a maximum sentence of death by hanging if convicted — covered their faces with woolen caps as they walked into the courtroom Thursday surrounded by a phalanx of armed police. Two hours later, after proceedings were over, they were whisked away by the police. Details of the day’s proceedings were not available. The

courtroom was closed to the public and the media — a routine move in Indian rape cases — even though defense lawyers had argued that since the victim is dead, the proceedings should be opened. There was also a gag order on the lawyers to not reveal what happened inside the court. Judge Yogesh Khanna turned down requests by journalists Thursday that they be briefed on the day’s proceedings and said the gag order would remain. Since Friday is a public holiday in India, the next hearing in the case was set for Monday, when the defense will present its opening arguments. A sixth suspect in the case has claimed he is a juvenile and is expected to be tried in a juvenile court. On Thursday, a magistrate separately rejected a petition by Subramanian Swamy, a prominent politician, that no leniency be shown toward the accused who claims to be a juvenile because of the brutal nature of the crime, said Jagdish Shetty, an aide to Swamy. Magistrate Geetanjali Goel is expected to rule on the suspect’s age on Jan.28.

ALTAF QADRI THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Indian police officials ask activists, holding a mask of Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, to leave as they arrive to protest outside a district court where the accused in the gang rape and murder of a 23-year-old student are undergoing trial in New Delhi, India, on Thursday. The trial of the five men charged began in a closed courtroom Thursday with opening arguments by the prosecution lawyers in a special fast-track court set up just weeks ago to handle sexual assault cases.


4A Friday January 25, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

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Editorial

EDITORIAL CARTOON

University owes SEIU fair wages

JOHNIVAN DARBY THE DAILY ILLINI

Gun reform will not progress unless both sides of debate understand each other

“I

have a .380 auto at home. That’s a sexy gun. I wanted a body stopper, so I got a Smith & Wesson 1911 .45-caliber. I’m a pretty good shot. I can empty an entire clip into six inches. Consecutively. Head, throat, heart, gut. If you’re within 50 feet of me, I’m going to take you out.” For most of us, that is terrifying. Illinois has some of the toughest gun laws in the country. The ban on concealed carry was recently overturned, but you still can’t legally get a gun if you’ve been convicted of a felony or domestic violence, assault or battery or if you have a history of mental illness. We have a 72-hour waiting period for hand guns. Gun sellers must keep a record of the sale for 10 years. Compare this with Arizona, where the man quoted above was buying a SIG Sauer p226 9 mm, according to the September article “Guns ‘R Us” in GQ. Anyone over 21 who legally owns a gun can carry it almost anywhere without permit or license. You can buy an assault rifle at 18 and a pistol at 21. And these gun owners — conservative “gun nuts” — are scared of us. At first, the fear seems unimaginable, especially in a state where media and gun control legislation seem out to get gun owners. As scared as some of us are of gun owners, gun owners are scared of those who want to take their Glocks away. This mutual fear needs to stop. “Do not patronize the passionate supporters of your opponents by looking down your nose at them,” former President Bill Clinton said Saturday. He’s right. If we want meaningful gun control, both sides need to cooperate. We need to understand each other’s positions. Most of the students at this University grew up in a liberal Midwestern state with a gunfree culture. Most members of the media do not own guns, nor do they understand them on a social, cultural or even technical level. Without knowledge of gun culture, we only see its flaws. This leads to gun owners fearing that the scary “liberals” in the east want to take their guns away. We don’t. We want to take guns out of the hands of criminals and people who will walk into a school or movie theater or grocery store and open fire. Until both sides can realize this, no meaningful reform will be passed. Gun owners don’t want the events of Newtown, Aurora or Tucson to repeat, and neither do we. However, politicians, lawmakers and much of the media won’t understand that unless they try to. Understanding diversity simply requires a willingness to learn, to seek answers and to realize that you can see eye to eye on something, even if each side comes from some place different. To anti-gun crusaders, we ask: Do you own a gun? Do you know someone who owns a gun? Do you understand why someone would want a gun? We ask because until these questions can be answered yes, reform will be stagnant and mass shootings will continue. So go outside, find some gun owners and have a meaningful conversations. Don’t worry, they’re more scared of you than you are of them.

KIRSTEN KELLER Opinions columnist

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Get over your weight room phobia, take a trip to the ‘man cave’ MELANIE STONE Opinions columnist

It’s

noon on a Monday, and I’m perched on a faded blue bench in the lower level at the ARC. Grunts and groans echo through the area, interspersed with the ringing sound of dumbbells clanging, weight stacks smashing and Nikes squeaking. There are few places more intimidating than this one. Men dominate the floor, sporting cut-off tees and grimaces. On this particular day, I’m in the minority group, and I make zero effort to blend in: My fuchsia headband and striped Lululemon workout top stand out among the sea of black and gray. I pick up my 10-pound dumbbells and gear up for my first set of bench presses. And somewhere between my second and third rep, I hear something. It’s quiet, understated, yet distinct. “Heh, heh.” A snicker. My cheeks burn. I close my eyes and imagine what that sweaty offender was thinking: “Ten pounds, ha-haha. She belongs upstairs, on the ellipticals, with the rest of her kind. This is the man cave. Hear us roar.” Days later, I found myself back in the lower level, stationed at the base of the stairs with a notebook in one hand and pen in the other. My view was impeccable — biceps flexing and back muscles clenching — but I wasn’t there for sightseeing. I was determined to figure out what guys really thought about girls in the weight room. Hayden Johnson, senior in Aviation, told me how surprising it is to see women down in the lower level. “Most girls take it as more of a guy thing,” he said, shrugging. “If there’s 100 guys down here, then there might be five girls.” A hundred to five? Seriously? I asked Ryan Nemethy, junior in LAS, if he’s ever heard negative comments from guys about female presence in the area — something along the lines of: “She shouldn’t be down here. She needs to go find a treadmill.”

THOUGHTS Email: opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.

of my biggest pet peeves is when I hear a woman complain, ‘Oh, I don’t want to do weights, I don’t want to look bulky,’” she said. According to Cirrincione, beastly muscles require an immense amount of heavy lifting and a strict diet. “I squat, deadlift, do chest presses, rows, lunges, bicep curls, shoulder presses — you name it — and I will try to fit it into a cycle. And not a single person would call me ‘bulky,’” she said. Cirrincione had me convinced that ladies need to lift. But how can we do that without feeling awkward or out of place? An easy way to get educated on the how-to’s of the weight room is setting up an appointment with a trainer, such as Cirrincione at Campus Recreation. They are equipped with the tools and knowledge to change the way we feel about our bodies. But there is one thing that a personal trainer can’t give us: confidence. If we want to feel comfortable in the man cave, then we’ve got to realize that we belong down there. Some guys might not like it — but most do. The last person I interviewed at the ARC was Jarrell Boykin, junior in ACES. He told me how much he appreciates girls venturing down to the lower level. In fact, Boykin thinks it’s downright great. “Girls who work out are pretty cute,” he said with a cheeky grin. A sculpted body is certainly cute, but confidence is even cuter. By breaking the barrier and braving the lower level of the ARC, we are on our way to more than just muscles and tone. We find a spirit of courage, of assurance, of belonging. Then, and only then, we can boldly go where few of us have gone before: downstairs.

But there is one thing that a personal trainer can’t give us: confidence. If we want to feel comfortable in the man cave, then we’ve got to realize that we belong down there.

Melanie is a sophomore in Media. She can be reached at mastone3@dailyillini.com and @mellystone.

Letter to the Editor Doping is taking an illegitimate shortcut

SHARE YOUR

I knew no boy would admit his sexism to me, but some, I figured, might tell me what others say. “Yeah, except when they say it, there’s more swears and macho stuff mixed in,” he said. A handful of those I talked to said women in the weight area serve as a distraction, and — if they don’t follow gym etiquette — an annoyance. But to my surprise, the vast majority of guys really don’t mind girls working out in the man cave, commending those of us brave enough to walk down those stairs and into the sweat pit. And then there were people like Andy Munger, sophomore in Business: “Girls are my supreme motivator.” Right. Well. One of my random male interviewees just happened to be the president of Illini Bodybuilding Club. Sergio Luna, junior in AHS, said: “Women have this perception that lifting is bad. Me? I prefer a girl with lean muscle, as opposed to someone who looks soft and fragile.” Luna isn’t the only one who looks for a toned woman. Out of the 33 boys I talked to, 23 of them prefer strong over skinny. For us females, this should be encouraging news, given the benefits of strength training. According to an article from Bodybuilding.com, weight lifting boosts metabolism, sheds body fat, increases muscle definition and improves functional strength. Rose Cirrincione, junior in AHS, is a National Academy of Sports Medicine-certified personal trainer who works for Campus Recreation. “Basically, I live in the basement of the ARC,” she said. “I went on the upper level of the gym three times last semester, and it was only to use the track.” This girl knows her stuff. For Cirrincione, weight training is crucial to a healthy lifestyle and fit physique. “One

Sarah Fischer’s opinion piece in the Jan. 22, 2013 edition of The Daily Illini on doping in sports, specifically cycling, demonstrates a misunderstanding of the subject. Sport is, fundamentally, a test of the limits of human potential; it calls into question what is possible. We cheer for the incredible run, jump or ride not because these things are inhuman, but because they are entirely, intensely human. Athletes dope for a variety of reasons, but they are all taking an illegitimate shortcut. They

are cheating. In doing so, they replace the humanity of sport with the deceit of a needle. They maintain the veneer of excellence while betraying the ideals of faster, higher and braver. They violate the trust fans place in them. Lance Armstrong is a household name because when presented the choice to pursue clean sport or take the needle, he decided to cheat, apparently without remorse or regret. He, and others like him, didn’t dope to please adoring fans but for personal gain. He’s a cheater, a liar and in Oprah’s words, a “bully.” These are not traits I would attribute to a hero or role model. Other cyclists chose

strength when faced with the same options, even though it meant worse placings or losing their jobs altogether. These are the heroes, the people whose lives can serve as a model for others. I have heard repeatedly that we should stop holding our athletes to higher standards than we hold ourselves, and I don’t understand this sentiment at all. We hold athletes to the highest standard precisely because they represent the best of us. Sport is a celebration of human strength, not weakness, and weakness is exactly the nature of a doped athlete. ALEX VOITIK, junior in LAS

uilding service worker Jesse Butler was featured in The Daily Illini three months ago for his outstanding service in Nugent Hall. In my time living in Nugent, I have appreciated Jesse’s hard work and his friendly demeanor, as he is always willing to stop and chat with anyone around the residence hall. But yesterday and today, he, along with other members of the Services Employees International Union, will vote whether to hold a strike. The SEIU has been negotiating a new contract with the University since June, to no avail. Soon, Jesse and hundreds of other University employees could temporarily disappear. Food and building service workers make up the University’s portion of the SEIU Local 73. These groups include those who prepare food at University housing, those who clean and maintain the residence halls, those who clean and do regular maintenance in academic buildings, those who deliver campus mail, the maids at the Illini Union hotel and countless more. Among many parts of the contract, they are negotiating for fair raises that are adjusted for inflation and additional costs, like health care premiums. The timeline of these negotiations is strikingly similar to those of the Graduate Employees’ Organization, which started last April. The GEO’s contract was settled a week into December, just before a strike that would have halted many undergraduate classes a week before finals. While the negotiations between the SEIU and the University have taken too long, I hope that a contract can be settled before a strike would happen. What would a food and building service strike mean? It would mean that all food and building service workers, except those that have recently been hired, would not come to work. Hair piling up in your residence hall shower? Unless you do it, no one will be there to remove it. Looking forward to a good meal of burgers and fries at Ikenberry? Sorry, only cold cuts for a while. Eagerly awaiting that care package from grandma? It won’t be delivered. And for those students in Nugent, along with all other residence halls, our Jesse Butlers won’t be there to greet us hello throughout the day. Perhaps I’m being melodramatic. A strike won’t last forever. However, the University likes to push the limits when it comes to deadlines for negotiations. The GEO negotiated with the University for eight months before they voted on a strike authorization. Only then did the University buckle down and truly negotiate. Negotiations with the SEIU have persisted for seven months, and the threat of a strike looms near. Instead of having to anticipate how to continue operations without a staff, the University needs to realize a strike can and probably will happen, should negotiations not be worked out in the next few days. But even more importantly, the University needs to recognize that these workers are essential — they are valued. After all, they are the ones who keep the day-to-day operations of this University running smoothly. History professor Megan McLaughlin wrote in to The Daily Illini on Wednesday, voicing her contempt for the University’s treatment of the building and service workers. “I therefore call on you (University administrators) to take action on behalf of our lowest-paid and most vulnerable colleagues in the academic enterprise — and yes, they are our colleagues, for without their essential physical work, no intellectual work would be possible on this campus,” she wrote. “I call on you, first of all, to negotiate in good faith with the (SEIU), the building and food service workers’ union, in simple accordance with the law.” Above all, these workers want and deserve decent wages, ones that increase from year to year so that they don’t end up losing money, should wages not rise to compensate for inflation. It’s not an outrageous demand. In fact, it’s a demand that makes complete sense and is puzzling as to why the SEIU has to fight for this aspect of its contract in the first place. Let’s show those workers represented by the SEIU that we care; they do not receive daily recognition for their work, but should they strike, everyone would notice and miss the work that is not being done. University administrators: Now is the last chance to negotiate, and it is clear what the right thing to do is.

Kirsten is a sophomore in Media. She can be reached at kekellr2@dailyillini.com.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Destiny’s Child and JT making a strong comeback HALEY JONES Staff writer

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verybody loves a good comeback story. It is why we all rooted for Michael Phelps to be as talented in the 2012 Olympics as he was four years ago. No one wants to watch her childhood heroes fall. In 2007, many onlookers watched in horrified disbelief as Britney Spears crumbled under the pressure when only a few years earlier we were singing “Oops, I Did It Again” at the top of our lungs. Gone are the days of “Bye, Bye, Bye,” but some of our heroes are back, and I could not be more excited. Both Destiny’s Child and Justin Timberlake have released a new single and plan to have a new album out by the end of the year. They are survivors, they’re not going to give up, they are going to make it and once again, they are going to bring sexy back. The last time we had heard from Destiny’s Child and Justin Timberlake was 2004 and 2006, respectively. Sadly, Destiny’s Child will only be releasing one new song on their album Love Songs. Timberlake has been posting photos of himself in the studio recording his new album that does not yet have a release date. Destiny’s Child’s song is called “Nuclear” and is an R&B love ballad. It has a different feeling than what we remember of the old Destiny’s Child — those empowering songs such as “Survivor” and “Say My Name.” This song is more reminiscent of “Cater 2 U” with its soothing effect, and it tell the story of a love that is so strong and powerful that it is nuclear. There aren’t any hard-hit-

5A

Friday, January 25, 2013

ERIC JAMISON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

This Oct. 25, 2004, file photo shows members of Destiny’s Child, from left, Beyonce Knowles, Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams at the Radio Music Awards in Las Vegas. The trio announced Thursday that they will release a new track called “Nuclear” when performing at the XLVII Super Bowl. ting notes, but it is still enjoyable. Personally, I was hoping for a more of a climactic, face-melting song from the trio, but the song fits nicely with the album. While Destiny’s Child’s single has received mixed reviews, Justin Timberlake’s “Suit and Tie” has nearly everyone begging for more. “Suit and Tie” has already made a record for the most played song in its first week, beating out Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way.” Timberlake’s single has touches of the past in it, unlike his last album that sounded very futuristic. It begins with about a 40-second interlude that is mainly there just to pump you up for what is to come. When the music drops after the intro, it goes into a smooth number that you can’t help but move to. A superstar team contributed to making the song. Not only is it produced by Timbaland, Jay-

Z is featured in a verse, and of course, Timberlake leads the song with his angelic voice. Suit and Tie is practically the theme song for the “How I Met Your Mother” character Barney Stinson. The lyrics talk about wooing the honeys while being dressed to the nines. Jay-Z’s verse is filled with romance when he raps, “Tell your mother that I love her cause I love you. Tell your father we go farther as a couple. They ain’t lose a daughter, got a son. I show you how to do this, hun!” Both songs are sure to get old fans all excited and pumped to see the artists back in action. Destiny’s Child will be performing at the Super Bowl and Timberlake fans will just have to be a little more patient while they wait for the release of another single or album.

Haley is a sophomore in media and can be reached at hrjones2@dailyillini.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD 1

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  1 The 500s, in the Dewey Decimal Classification: Abbr.   4 Bars 10 Secretary of war under Theodore Roosevelt 14 Not be underdressed? 16 Polish border river 17 Winner of nine 2011 Tonys 19 Payoffs 20 Figure in a celebrated 2004 breakup 21 Off 22 Stravinsky’s “Le ___ du Printemps” 24 Corrodes 26 Minimally 28 Specialized in fiction, say 29 Title girl in a John Cougar #1 hit 30 Female Arabic name meaning “peace” 32 “___ Fitz,” old comic strip started by Mort Walker 35 Director Thomas H. ___ of the silent era 36 Ring with a face attached? 37 Crossjack, e.g. 38 ___-specific 39 One-___ 40 “Twin Peaks” actor Jack 41 Some hotels, for short 42 Hans Christian ___, pioneer of electromagnetism 44 Everything 48 Program blocker 49 Antique dealer’s transaction 50 Guadeloupe, par exemple 52 Suffix with method 54 American diner favorite 57 61-Across affliction 58 Fad of 2010-11 59 “Bonanza” brother 60 “Who ___?” 61 See 57-Across

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DOWN   1 Some officers: Abbr.   2 Working like Kelly Ripa and Michael Strahan, say   3 F. Scott Fitzgerald short story, with “The”   4 Music genre   5 Beats decisively, in slang   6 Bit of filming   7 Two-___   8 Certain e-mail attachment   9 “Whenever” 10 R-rated or higher, say 11 Frequenter of Web forums: Abbr. 12 False personality

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“Romance de Barrio,” e.g. X-rated By land ___ Singer Corinne Bailey ___ Gridiron star 1998 hit that begins “___, I do believe I failed you” “You shouldn’t have done that” Word often uttered with a salute Legendary creature similar to the Sphinx Certain irrigated cropland Go downhill fast? Bridge need

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Fresh fish dish Play ___ in Atomic energy org. Marshy tracts Crabtree & ___, retailer of body products Lay waste to Up on Annual athletes’ awards Long bout “___ and the Real Girl” (2007 Ryan Gosling film) ___-majesté Sea goddess who saved Odysseus U.S. dance grp.

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

MARCO AND MARTY

DOONESBURY

BILLY FORE

GARRY TRUDEAU

Streaming at your fingertips BY ADLAI STEVENSON STAFF WRITER

Anyone today who hasn’t heard of Netflix might just live in a cave. As of 2011, the website is the largest source of online traffic in North America, with 33 percent of bandwidth share, according to networking company Sandvine. Ironically enough, users have a cave of their own — their homes — that serve as the most popular access point and area of use for the movie website. So long as erosion doesn’t knock out the modem signal, coursework can wait. Initially a DVD-by-mail service, Netflix introduced the “Watch Instantly” feature in early 2008, which allows subscribers to stream movies directly to their computer or other digital devices. Streaming took off for the company at a much higher rate than the DVD rentals, and Netflix decided to split the rental and streaming services in 2011 just after a hefty price increase. The result was a disaster. Over 800,000 members cancelled their Netflix subscription with flocks of complaints against the change, citing video quality issues and faulty displays with the streaming feature. In addition to customer frustration, the library of movies for streaming was only a fraction compared to the ones available on DVD or Blu-Ray. Nasdaq reported a 75 percent loss of revenue by the end of 2011. Since then, Netflix has gone back to offering both streaming and renting movies under one account, although for separate prices. The number of movies available to stream has increased over time on top of changes to incorrect aspect ratios and shabby prints that initially plagued streaming. Several devices, such as video game consoles and smart phones, grants users access to their account. The use of these devices has expanded users viewing options of movies. Netflix may have started its recovery. Against many expectations, the company posted a surprising fourth-quarter profit after a surge in streaming customers that led to $8 million. Although issues still may exist for select

users and Netflix’s recent business has yet to really turn heads, a future may be on the horizon that satisfies both ends. In the meantime, students who do stream Netflix can treat themselves to nearly unnoticed choices that have a unique hook. Several gritty B-flicks show a strong influence to Quentin Tarantino’s “Django Unchained” and three documentaries nominated for the Oscars next month are only a click away. If the Art Theater or That’s Rentertainment are too far of a trek, Friday night can still be movie night.

Navajo Joe An American Indian played by a young Burt Reynolds, of all people, hunts an outlaw’s gang after they brutally massacred Joe’s tribe. Sound familiar? Tarantino has openly referred to Spaghetti Western maestro Sergio Leone, director of “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” and “Once Upon a Time in the West,” as his biggest influence, but “Navajo Joe” director Sergio Corbucci may show a bigger imprint. Great vengeance is struck down upon the outlaws with great anger and lots o’ blood in its quick, clumsy 92 minutes.

The Mercenary Corbucci shines through Tarantino again. In the film, a hired gunman decides to help a rebel and his revolutionaries during the Mexican Revolution, but his motives are far from noble. The team-up is much like the partnership between slave Django and bounty hunter Dr. Schultz in “Unchained,” and students can get a better sense of who played the curious Italian who lost to DiCaprio’s character in Mandingo gambling. The actor, Franco Nero, stars as the hired gun and played the original “Django” in the 1966 feature as well.

Drum Sharing “Unchained’s” small patience for sensitivity, a daring slave in the antebellum South

fights his way through pit brawls that catch the attention of his loathsome masters. And with the master’s girl, in more ways than one! Much of “Drum’s” settings and plot share parallels with events that unfold in “Unchained,” and DiCaprio’s Calvin Candie owes much to Warren Beatty’s performance as the villain slave owner.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea’s top governing body warned Thursday that the regime will conduct its third nuclear test in defiance of U.N. punishment, and made clear that its long-range rockets are designed to carry satellites and warheads aimed at striking the United States. The National Defense Commission, headed by the country’s young leader, Kim Jong Un, denounced Tuesday’s U.N. Security Council resolution condemning

North Korea’s long-range rocket launch in December as a banned missile activity and expanding sanctions against the regime. The commission reaffirmed in its declaration that the launch was a peaceful bid to send a satellite into space, but also clearly indicated the country’s rocket launches have a military purpose: to strike and attack the United States. While experts say North Korea doesn’t have the capability to hit the U.S. with its missiles, recent tests and rhetoric indicate the country is feverishly working

DAN DOUGHERTY

The Invisible War This investigative documentary explores the conflict of rape in the U.S. military, considered the nation’s best-kept secret crisis by several of the film’s subjects. Its most startling fact: female soldiers are more likely to face assault from an ally than be killed in action. Director Kirby Dick received his second Oscar nomination for “The Invisible War” after 2005’s “Twist of Faith.”

How to Survive a Plague Archive footage reveals the gay community’s reaction to the AIDS epidemic that led to the ACT UP and TAG advocacy efforts to spread awareness of the disease and find a cure. Interviews collected decades after the movements highlight several important perspectives of the time period, particularly the pain and anger of the activists. The Art Theater in downtown Champaign is scheduled to show “How to Survive a Plague” on Feb. 8 as well.

5 Broken Cameras In response to Israel building a large barrier in the West Bank that separated them from their crops, villagers protested with the support of several international peace activists. Filmmakers Emad Burnat and Guy Davidi documented the protests for over four years, revealing the resulting violence in his village and constant family struggles. Much more is at stake for Burnat and his family than the risk of broken technology.

Adlai is a freshman in Media and can be reached at aesteve2@dailyillini.com.

North Korea warns of 3rd nuclear test BY HYUNG-JIN KIM

BEARDO

toward that goal. The commission pledged to keep launching satellites and rockets and to conduct a nuclear test as part of a “new phase” of combat with the United States, which it blames for leading the U.N. bid to punish Pyongyang. It said a nuclear test was part of “upcoming” action but did not say exactly when or where it would take place.

Associated Press writers Jean H. Lee and Sam Kim in Seoul and Matthew Pennington in Washington contributed to this report.

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, January 25, 2013

Q&A WITH CURTIS PETTYJOHN

Alumnus in stage version of ‘I Love Lucy’ Pettyjohn discusses play, gives advice to aspiring actors BY LYANNE ALFARO STAFF WRITER

Based on the revered 1950s CBS sitcom, “I Love Lucy Live on Stage” made its way to Broadway in Chicago last fall. After several weeks in hiatus, the musical stage show returned to the Water Tower Place in December 2012. The musical’s extension will last until March 3. Fresh faces are featured in the play, including Illinois alum Curtis Pettyjohn as landlord Fred Mertz. Pettyjohn shared details with The Daily Illini about his audition, character and hopes for Broadway in Chicago’s production.

Daily Illini: How did you become involved with “I Love Lucy” on Broadway in Chicago? Curtis Pettyjohn: I have a mutual friend

who is in the production, and he used to live in Chicago, but I also knew him when I was much younger in Springfield, where I grew up. He now lives in Los Angeles, which is where “I Love Lucy” first was produced. He called a mutual friend of ours here in Chicago

and said that he was coming into town to do “I Love Lucy” live. Our friend said, “I know who would make a great Fred Mertz.” ... She said, “Curtis Pettyjohn.” What happened was we used an iPhone and videoed my audition on an iPhone, compressed it in an email and sent it to L.A. ... Days later, the director called again and said, “We want you to prepare these musical numbers from the show.” Once again, I used the iPhone and email. From that, I was cast. It’s amazing how the technology has changed things for everybody.

DI: What were rehearsals like? CP: The rehearsal period actually

went for a month, which is long for some shows. It was incredibly thorough. In the show itself — the audience, it becomes a studio audience. There is a host, which is sort of the warm-up act. There are live television commercials that are performed by singers and dancers for products sold at that time like Pearl Cream and Alka-Seltzer. There is a parade of hit songs from 1952 that are performed as a part of the show. There are two episodes that are acted as though they’re being filmed. So the audience becomes a huge part of the whole experience. It’s not just about sitting quietly and watching. The audience is very involved. In the middle of the show,

there is even an “I Love Lucy” trivia contest.

DI: How have the crowds reacted to the performances? CP: “I Love Lucy,” from the time they

showed the first episodes, has never been off television, ever. So you have whole generations of people who have seen episodes of “I Love Lucy.” A lot of times, we have as many as three generations of a family coming together to see the show and the people who grew up in that period, the fact that they are hearing commercials that they have not heard in a really long time, many of them are singing along. Kids love it, which is surprising that the material holds up. I have not done a show where people laugh so much from the beginning to the end. So, that part of it is pretty joyous.

DI: How do you transform into Fred Mertz? CP: First of all, vocally there is a

change. Obviously, we have used the episodes to understand better what (the character’s) movement looks like, how they carry themselves and mannerisms. There is an aging in (my character’s) body, and I have to bring my own energy down in a way that is a little bit older and stiffer. Watching (original portrayer) William Frawley ... he was a master, just watching him

work, he understood so well how to set up a line, how to set up a joke. The costumes obviously help a great deal and the costumes are pretty amazing for this show. For the other characters, there are an unbelievable number of wigs and hairstyles from the 1950s, but luckily, Fred was almost bald, and I am, so I don’t have to deal with any of that. Then, there’s makeup and some of that I am still utilizing from skills that I learned at the Krannert Center when I was a theater major there ... slightly altering the face so I look a little bit more like Fred Mertz.

DI: How did you become interested in theater? CP: I started doing community theater

at the age of 15 in Springfield. Once I started doing that, I didn’t really want to do anything else. My focus was strong on performance. My family always stressed academics, so I had to stay on the Dean’s List most of the time, which meant that I had to study a lot as well as rehearse a lot. I have over the years, been many things. I am still a therapeutic body worker. I work a lot with people who are in chronic pain. Over the years, I at one point was the assistant producer for Chicago Shakespeare, which is a big company now but was very much a beginning company at the time. I’ve worked

on historic preservation issues. I have worked in community redevelopment. My career is not quite what people would think as a typical acting career, but I always continued to do television commercials, no matter where I was living, and I’ve lived in a number of different places.

DI: What advice can you provide for aspiring actors in the Illini community? CP: First of all, know that it is a diffi-

cult business to make a living in. Secondly, know that you are really going to have to work very hard to learn all that you possibly can. A smart actor and an informed actor, I think is 10 times more interesting (than one that is not). The more you read, the more you know about the world around you. The more you bring that into your performance. It makes for a much more interesting and exciting person on stage and in film. Other advice — it’s a tough business sometimes, but if it’s something you love doing, pursue it. There are many ways to do what you love. Sometimes that might not mean being the star somewhere — it might be working in a different theater, it might be teaching. Wherever you find your joy is where you need to head.

Lyanne can be reached at alfaro2@dailyillini.com.

Ground zero skyscraper filled with memories from workers, mourners THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — On most construction projects, workers are discouraged from signing or otherwise scrawling on the iron and concrete. At the skyscraper rising at ground zero, though, they’re being invited to leave messages for the ages. “Freedom Forever. WTC 9/11” is scrawled on a beam near the top of the gleaming, 104-story One World Trade Center. “Change is from within” is on a beam on the roof. Another reads: “God Bless the workers & inhabitants of this bldg.” One of the last pieces of steel hoisted up last year sits near a precarious edge. The message on it reads: “We remember. We rebuild. We come back stronger!” It is signed by a visitor to the site last year — President Barack Obama. The words on beams, walls and stairwells of the skyscraper that replaces the twin towers lost on Sept. 11, 2001, form the graffiti of defiance and rebirth, what ironworker supervisor Kevin Murphy calls “things from the

heart.” They’re remembrances of the 2,700 people who died, and testaments to the hope that rose from a shattered morning. “This is not just any construction site, this is a special place for these guys,” said Murphy of the 1,000 men and women who work in the building at any given time, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. “Everyone here wants to be here, they want to put this building up,” Murphy says. “They’re part of the redemption.” On a frigid, windy winter day, with the 9/11 memorial fountain straight below and the Statue of Liberty in the distance, Murphy supervised a crew of men guiding the first piece of the steel spire that will top out the building at a dizzying 1,776 feet — the tallest in the Western Hemisphere. In the rooftop iron scaffolding for the spire, 105 floors up, a beam pays homage to Lillian Frederick, a 46-year-old administrative assistant who died on the 105th floor of the south tower, pierced by a terrorist-hijacked airliner. A popular Spanish phrase is penned next to two names on one concrete pillar: “Te Amo Tres

Metros Sobre el Cielo,” meaning, “I love you three steps above heaven.” Some beams are almost completely covered in a spaghettilike jumble of doodled hearts and flowers, loopy cursives and blaring capitals. Many want to simply mark their presence: “Henry Wynn/Plumbers Local #1/Sheepshead Bay/Never Forget!” Families of victims invited to go up left names and comments too, as did firefighters and police officers who were first responders. “R.I.P. Fanny Espinoza, 9-1101” reads a typical remembrance signed by several family members of a Cantor-Fitzgerald employee. Former Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff wrote: “With you in spirit — those who perished, those who fought, those who build.” Time and daily routines have softened the communal grief as the workers carry on, trading jokes and gruff male banter. Some ends up in whimsical graffiti marking World Cup soccer matches, New York Giants Super Bowl victories and other lessweighty matters that have gone

AP FILE PHOTO

Barack Obama’s message and signature, is on a steel beam at One World Trade Center in New York. The president’s words will join those of many construction workers at the site who left personal messages on the beams, when they will be sealed behind the facade of the buildings as they progress toward their 2014 completion date. Some remembrances for first responders, such as “R.I.P. Fanny Espinoza, 9-11-01,” are signed by several family members. on since construction began six years ago. One crudely drawn map of the neighborhood down below shows the location of a popular strip club. People on the ground below will

never see the spontaneous private thoughts high in the Manhattan sky. The graffiti will disappear as the raw basic structure is covered with drywall, ceiling panels and paint for tenants moving into

the 3 million square feet of office space by 2014. Knowing this, workers and visitors often take photographs of special bits of graffiti, so the words will live on.

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1B Friday January 25, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Sports

Sold-out Assembly Hall welcomes Michigan Illinois hopes to re-establish home dominance with win BY THOMAS BRUCH STAFF WRITER

There was an aura about the place, the giant orb blooming above the flat Champaign cornfields. Opposing teams did not

win at Assembly Hall. This much was rooted in fact — over a span of seven seasons, from 1999 to 2006, Illinois lost only four games at home. The winning sheen of the

Hall has faded recently. In the years after that 2005-06 season, including this year, Illinois lost 27 games at Assembly Hall and attendance figures dropped. But No. 2 Michigan comes to Champaign on Sunday boasting a national player of the year candidate in Trey Burke, and Assembly Hall will be packed to capacity for its fourth sellout of the year. It will serve as the biggest home game in John Groce’s

fledgling coaching career at Illinois. A potent and diverse attack of guards and wings propel Michigan’s offense, which ranks ninth in the nation in points per game and fourth in the nation in field goal percentage. Two freshmen wings, Nik Stauskas and Glen Robinson III, average 12.6 and 12.1 points per game, respectively, while Burke can affect the game in rapid spurts through

transition scoring or facilitating. Burke’s 18 points per game is tied for second in the Big Ten with Brandon Paul, while his 7.2 assists lead the conference. Will the home crowd be enough to sway the result in the favor of an unranked Illini team? The players will ultimately decide, but the different factions of the Assembly Hall

No. 2 Michigan

See MEN’S BASKETBALL, Page 3B

The Wolverines will be eyeing a No. 1 ranking after Duke lost Wednesday.

at (17-1, 4-1 Big Ten)

Illinois

(15-5, 2-4)

Sunday, 5 p.m. Assembly Hall

Don’t expect the good guys to be perfect, even in sports

MORGAN JOHNSON 7.7 RPG 6’5” Iowa center

EMILY BAYCI Sports columnist

I

KARISMA PENN 10.3 RPG 6’2”

ADRIENNE GODBOLD 7.3 RPG 5’11”

HUSTLE OVER HEIGHT Penn, GodBold show there is more to rebounding than size

BY JOHNATHAN HETTINGER

K

STAFF WRITER

arisma Penn usually isn’t the tallest player on the basketball court. She isn’t usually the fastest or the largest. Despite all this, every time someone misses a shot, Penn thinks she is going to grab the rebound. And, more often than any other player in the Big Ten, Penn succeeds in doing so. The senior forward leads the conference with 10.3 boards per game. “You don’t have to be the biggest person,” Penn said. “Most nights, I’m nowhere near the biggest post or person on the floor, and I play the 5 (center). It’s definitely all about effort and mentality. I always think I’m going to get the rebound.” Despite Penn’s conference-leading efforts, the Illinois women’s basketball team has the worst rebounding margin in the Big Ten. On average, the Illini grab 37.9 rebounds to their opponent’s 41.4. The Illini are one of three Big Ten teams that grab fewer rebounds than their opponent. Because of a lack of frontcourt depth on his roster, Illinois head coach Matt Bollant starts a four-guard lineup. This quicker lineup is more likely to force turnovers, which it does at a conference-

high clip of 23.7 per game. But the lineup athleticism. Quickness is more imporalso means that Bollant’s squad has the tant. For good offensive rebounding, you shortest frontcourt in the Big Ten. The have to have quickness. There are a lot Illini tout Penn, who at of 6-6 kids who don’t get 6-foot-2 is the only 6-foota lot of rebounds because er in the starting lineup. they’re not quick.” Senior Adrienne GodEvery other team in the Big Ten flaunts a player Bold is one of Illinois’ as tall as Penn, in addiquickest players, and she tion to at least one other has emerged as a second rebounding threat since starter who is 6-foot-1 or returning from academtaller. But height doesn’t ic ineligibility. In sevalways make teams great en games, she has been at rebounding. the team’s second-leadNor thwester n, for ing rebounder, averaging example, starts the tall7.3 boards per game. Last season, GodBold, who is est frontcourt in the Big 5-foot-11, averaged 4.2 Ten with Dannielle Diamant — one of the conferper game. ence’s two 6-foot-5 cen“I’m more aggressive ters — and two 6-foot-2 on the boards, and I’ve forwards. Despite this been more aggressive MATT BOLLANT, size advantage, Northall around. We’ve been head coach getting outrebounded in western ranks ninth in the Big Ten in rebounding most of the games,” Godmargin by grabbing 0.2 more rebounds Bold said. “Me and Karisma wanted to per game than its opponents. The Wild- step up and change that as of late. We’ve cats rank last in offensive rebounding. been working hard in practice and coach “I think (height) has some role, along with length,” Bollant said. “But it’s more See REBOUNDS, Page 3B

“Quickness is more important. For good offensive rebounding, you have to have quickness. There are a lot of 6-6 kids who don’t get a lot of rebounds because they’re not quick.”

PHOTOS BY JONATHAN DAVIS THE DAILY ILLINI AND ADAM WESLEY THE DAILY IOWAN

feel like I’ve had my heart broken a lot lately. No, it’s not by boys — I just break hearts in that department. It’s by athletes. I become inspired by heartwarming stories only to witness controversy ruin their names forever. You think I would have learned something from my dad, the biggest sporting fan I know, who barely has any faith anymore. He’s a diehard Cubs fan with depressingly realistic expectations that he’ll never live to see a Cubs World Series. “They’ll always break your heart,” he says to me over and over again. Of course, even he was surprised and confused by the recent dramas involving Lance Armstrong and Manti Te’o. Who wouldn’t be? But my dad is wise, and he knows better than to set unrealistically high expectations for athletes. I’ve fallen victim to this problem plenty of times. I build athletes up in my head as perfect people. I think they can do no wrong, and their high level of play goes hand in hand with an amazing personality. Then I actually talk to the athlete or see them outside of the field and realize they often fall short of the ideal person I imagined. Everyone should slow down a bit and stop building these athletes up to mythical proportions of unsinkable superstars like they are some form of Greek god or legend. Then when they make mistakes, fans are crushed because they can no longer trust their models for inspiration. The point is, we give these athletes more credit then they deserve, which simply sets them up for failure. Sporting drama has been at a low recently. We had legendary coach Joe Paterno end his career in shame. The New Orleans Saints bounty scandal left the entire team in disarray. Then even in the midst of Olympic frenzy, there were badminton players disqualified for throwing matches. We’re so quick to hate on these athletes and teams when they make mistakes. But we also build them up at rapid-fire speed. Remember Linsanity and how Jeremy Lin was famous overnight? How about the great Tebow-mania of 2012? These athletes skyrocketed to hero status when we barely even knew their stories. Everyone loves a good underdog story, but if we can’t fall in love with every hero, then it just hurts more if something goes wrong. Something most people love about sports is the reality behind the situations. There’s the ability to relate to stars enduring trials and tribulations, the feeling of unpredictability during a live sporting event and the indescribable thrill of witnessing a grand slam or a buzzer-beater. But something to remember in reality is that the good guy isn’t always perfect, and that in the end, everything doesn’t tie together perfectly. They’re ordinary people making ordinary (and not-so-ordinary) mistakes. We need to be more selective about whom we choose as a hero. Make a personal investment in the athletes you dedicate your fandom to and don’t just give your faith to everyone. Yes, it’s hard to determine what an athlete is like when postgame press conferences are littered with coach speak and sheltered answers or when all you see is his natural talent on the field. It’s too often that we take that stellar talent and pair it together with an amazing person, a do-gooder with no faults. We watched Michael Jordan play basketball and thought he could conquer the world. We looked at Armstrong and everything he went through and thought there was no way he could do wrong. We looked on in awe as Sammy Sosa and Mark McGwire nailed home run after home run and viewed them as perfect people. Then when these athletes mess up and make mistakes, we gossip and judge them and analyze the situation. It’s not any better than trashy celebrity magazines that publish pictures of people without makeup or air the stories about an affair. Obviously some situations are going to surprise everyone. Armstrong played America with his heartwarming story of being a cancer survivor and still winning seven Tours de France. We wanted to believe him when he said he didn’t dope because why wouldn’t we? And I don’t think the world will ever truly understand Te’o’s story. My dad would probably say something like, “The best way to avoid heartbreak is just expect the worst.” But as an eternal optimist, I disagree with that. Make sure you choose your heroes wisely, just like you would any other significant member in your life. Then, hopefully, you’ll experience more joy than disappointment.

Emily is graduate student. She can be reached at bayci1@ dailyillini.com. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyBayci.


2B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, January 25, 2013

Illini ready to compete for first time in Metroplex Men’s gymnastics to face Sooners BY GINA MUELLER STAFF WRITER

This weekend marks the first time the No. 6 Illinois men’s gymnastics team will face No. 4 Oklahoma since it edged out the Sooners to earn the 2012 NCAA Championship title. “We are really interested to see where they are at,” junior Chad Mason said. “We’ve been looking at their scores online every week after they are posted up, but we want to see where they are at in person.” The Illini will travel to Fort Worth, Texas, to compete in the Metroplex Challenge for the first time. Illinois has yet to have a meet at home this season and will not host its home opener until Feb. 16. However, long bus rides and flights don’t seem to have an effect on the Illini. “For us the most important thing is to be comfortable on a plane or on a bus,” junior Jordan Valdez said. “As long as you always move around, there really aren’t too many problems. Then once you get to wherever you’re staying, stretch out a little bit and get ready to train. I’d say the traveling doesn’t take too much of a toll on us.” Illinois will compete against some of the top talent in the country at the Metroplex Challenge. Among them will be Oklahoma, No. 5 Ohio State, No. 8 Iowa, Texas A&M and Texas. This is the first year the Metroplex Challenge is hosting an NCAA session for both men and women. Usually, the USAG boys and girls levels 2-10 are the only teams that compete. “It’s the same kind of elevated setup that’s used at that USA National Championships,” Illinois head coach Justin Spring said. “It’s a small venue with a great collection of teams. It’s going to be a good match.” Struggling with injuries in the preseason, the Illini roster is now nearing full health. Though the gymnasts might be cleared to perform, they have gone weeks without training. The repercussions from the injuries are still causing problems in the starting lineups. “We are in the middle of season, and we are still doing the problem solving and the tweaking and the changing,” Spring said. “It’s a new routine every other practice and we are fine-tuning amidst a competition every weekend. ... A lot of the guys have stepped up and helped some of the injured guys reformat their routines.” With close to a month left before the new five-up, five-count format goes into effect, consistency has been an ongoing goal during practice. The most important thing for the Illini is to practice as many routines as possible at the highest level. “We did some pretty high numbers,” Spring said. “It’s a constant balance for managing lighter numbers for some of the injured guys and pushing the other ones that have been healthy to do more numbers to build the consistency. Practice is still kind of irregular in that not everyone is quite on the same schedule.” On Thursday night, Spring said he had still not finalized the lineups for the competition on Friday. One thing he did know was that senior Yoshi Mori, who led the team last weekend, would not be competing in the all-around due to his back injury, though he is still slotted for competition. While adversity is still clearly present, having a large crowd will keep the Illini’s energy high. “Having a larger crowd makes keeping the energy high much easier on the team,” Valdez said. “When it comes to guys having to do three or four events, they aren’t dying trying to cheer everyone on and then get ready to do a set. I think the crowd will help keep the energy high in itself.”

Gina can be reached at muelle30@ dailyillini.com and @muelle30.

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Elizabeth McNabb competes her balance beam routine at Huff Hall on Dec. 9. McNabb said winning the Victory Plank will motivate the team to defeat Michigan State.

Illini will try to bring home Victory Plank BY NICHOLAS FORTIN STAFF WRITER

When the Illinois women’s gymnastics team takes the floor at 4 p.m. Saturday at Huff Hall, it will compete for more than just a win against Michigan State. While hoisting the Victory Plank — the only rivalry trophy head coach Kim Landrus said the Illini will compete for this season — is still a major goal for this weekend’s competition, the significance of honoring those lost to breast cancer through their annual Pink Meet is bigger to the Illini then what’s in their trophy case. “The meet is for breast cancer awareness,” Landrus said. “And it’s very near to our heart. We lost one in our Illini family over the summer, so this meet is a chance to recognize all those who have battled through breast cancer and those who we have lost.”

Illinois will compete in a sea of pink, To take home the Plank for a third time as everyone attending the meet is encour- in four years, Illinois will take on one aged to wear pink in support. of its biggest rivals this weekend. The Up for grabs this Spartans, like the Illini, weekend is the Victogot off to a slow start ry Plank, a rivalry trothis season with three phy that was shared straight losses to Michigan, Western Michilast year, when Illigan and Nebraska. nois and Michigan State tied. Before last Michigan State The Illini stumbled Illinois season, the trophy had (0-2. 0-1 Big Ten) in their first meet as (1-3, 0-1) been won outright by well, a quad meet in Saturday, 4 p.m. the Illini in each of its which they finished Huff Hall first two years of its third with a score of existence. 193.750, but performed The Illini look to claim “We always have the better in their loss to the Victory Plank for the motivation to go out Michigan, where they third time in four seasons. there and win,” junior scored 195.100 and had all-arounder Elizabeth improved performancMcNabb said. “But the Plank is really es on both bars and beam. great because it’s an added challenge “The team is looking really good,” for the meet and another thing to look Landrus said. “We have taken what we forward to.” learned at our meet at Michigan and

at

come in here and continued to work on all the little things like the handstands, the sticking, the amplitude and the execution to continue to improve upon what we did last week and the week before that.” Illinois will be looking to hit a teamhigh score for the season, around 196 points, against Michigan State, said senior Alina Weinstein, who added that her personal goal for the meet is to hit on all four of her events and help contribute to the teams goal. “We have to continue consistency on all the events,” Landrus said. “Last week at Michigan, we improved on three out of our four events, but I think we can go out there and hit 24-for-24 and be aggressive in our gymnastics and really attack our routines. And if we do that, we’ll be very happy.”

Nicholas can be reached at goldwyn2@ dailyillini.com and @IlliniSportsGuy.

Illinois hockey hosts SIUE in ‘Paint the Pond Pink’ fundraiser play in the defensive zone. After struggling in that facet for much of the seaThe Illinois hockey team has learned son, Illinois has allowed just three goals its lesson. Or so it says. in the past three games. The Illini (17-8-2) have made a habit “We clearly have the talent advanthis season of overlooking opponents, but tage,” forward Nick Stuercke said. “It’s both players and coaches say that those all about coming to play, though.” The highlight of the weekend series thoughts are gone with just four games left until the CSCHL League Tourna- will be Saturday night, when the Illini ment. This weekend brings Division II’s are hosting the second annual “Paint the Southern Illinois (Edwardsville) to the Pond Pink” event. The event supports the Big Pond for a pair of games. American Breast Cancer Foundation as “We’re not really in well as the Caitlin Bull a position to take anyFoundation. one lightly,” head coach Not only is the crowd Nick Fabbrini said. going to be pink, but “We’ve already lost to Illinois will as well. The Illini custom-made a Division II team this pink jerseys to wear year.” Southern Illinois Illinois Saturday night and The defeat Fabbrini (Edwardsville) (17-8-2) referred to was Illinois’ then will auction them (17-8-1) season-opening loss to off after the game. Friday 7:30 p.m. Division II Michigan The Caitlin Bull Illinois Ice Arena State, a 5-4 loss in a Foundation was creshootout. ated after Caitlin Bull On Saturday, the Illini Coming off of a died following a twowill host their annual sweep at home of No. year battle with can“Paint the Pond Pink” fundraiser. 13 Iowa State, the Illicer in 2009 at the age ni have won three of 20. Her foundation straight games. While it might not seem supports treatment for those with canlike much, Illinois went through a stretch cer in the Chicago area and proceeds earlier this season in which the team split from an auction of the pink jerseys will five straight weekend series. The main be donated to the foundation. difference has been the Illini’s improved Fabbrini knew Bull’s father, the ownBY STEPHEN BOURBON STAFF WRITER

at

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

The Illinois hockey team is hosting “Paint the Pond Pink” this Saturday. The team will be the team wearing pink Illini jerseys, pictured, that will later be auctioned. Illinois kicks off the weekend against Southern Illinois-Edwardsville at 7:30 p.m. on Friday. er of Gunzo’s Hockey Headquarters, a place where Fabbrini had worked when he was 17. “He wanted to create a way to honor (Bull’s memory),” Fabbrini said. “I think it’s a great way for us to give back.” The team also made pink Illinois hockey T-shirts for sale and those proceeds will all benefit the American Breast Cancer Foundation. While last year’s event was a success — raising over $5,000 — the team says this year will be even better. “We’re hoping to raise more money

than (last year),” Stuercke said. “This year should run more smoothly, we actually know what we’re doing.” As for the games themselves, the Illini have a bit of familiarity with the Cougars. In last year’s games, the Illini dominated the first game 10-2 but had trouble earning the same result in the finale, winning by just a 2-0 margin. This year, the players are hoping for a more consistent effort on and off the ice.

Stephen can be reached at sbourbo2@ dailyillini.com and @steve_bourbon.

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, January 25, 2013

3B

MEN’S BASKETBALL

the help of marketing personnel, it follows a loose script that determines when to play certain FROM PAGE 1B videos and promotions on the home experience want to leave scoreboard. an imprint on the visiting Wol“You want to let it come naturally and follow the fl ow of verines, too. Populating the bleachers and the game,” said Andrew Young, floor seats surrounding the court director of video services. will be the Orange Krush, sport- “You don’t want to overtake the ing ties over their orange attire crowd.” to promote the Coaches vs. CanYoung said a series of “call-tocer “Illini Tie Together” event. action” videos are used when the The Krush plans game becomes to drum up the tense in the fi nal anticipation minutes of the before the game second half. If by performing such a situation the Krush Walk occurs Sunday, from i n sid e when Illinois Memorial Stacomes out of a timeout needing dium to their a stop on defense, spots at Assembly Hall. the go-to video is “You line up always the rautwo-by-two and cous “Stand Up everyone crossand Shout.” MCKENNON BIERS, es the street all “That’s the Illini Pride vice president together moving one the crowd toward Assembly r e s p o nd s to Hall,” Illini Pride Vice President every time,” Young said. McKennon Biers said. “Seeing With Michigan eyeing the the sea of orange is defi nitely No. 1 ranking after Duke’s loss cool to watch and be a part of.” Wednesday, the Wolverines will Aiding the Krush will be bring a special effort to Chamblown up faces of famous per- paign. Illinois will counter with sonalities, like former Illini Ste- the energy of a home crowd phen Bardo and comedian Nick behind the team, hoping to Offerman, which has become restore the Hall’s formidability. an essential feature of college Though Biers was a high basketball student sections. school senior, he remembers the Biers preliminarily said notori- loudest he’s ever heard Assemous referee Jim Burr would get bly Hall – the upset of Michithe oversized face treatment for gan State in February 2010, Sunday’s game, but rules state when ESPN’s College Gamethat an official’s likeness can- day stopped in Champaign. D.J. not be reformatted or used as a Richardson was a freshman at giant face. For now, the blown- the time, but he punctuated the up faces for Sunday are to be upset with a fastbreak dunk that determined. elicited a mighty roar from the But the Orange Krush will crowd. compose of only a small seg“You could hear the top of the ment of the sold-out crowd Sun- crowd,” Richardson recalled. day. Heightening the rest of the “It was the craziest feeling I’ve ticketholders’ excitement will ever felt. Every time I watch fall on the shoulders of the Illi- that play, I get chills. When it nois athletic department’s mar- gets crazy like that, it’s going to make us play even harder. I keting and video teams. The video department uses think that will help us if we’re the days preceding a game to up.” compile a highlight reel of the basketball team’s previous Thomas can be reached at bruch2@ games this season. Then, with dailyillini.com and @ThomasBruch.

“You line up two-by-two and everyone crosses the street all together moving toward Assembly Hall.”

REBOUNDS FROM PAGE 1B has been on us on boxing out, leaving the zone and making sure we get our rebounds.” Since GodBold has returned, Illinois has gone 4-3. In their four wins, the Illini have outrebounded opponents 159-150. In three losses, opponents have outrebounded the Illini 137-85. Illinois is 6-0 when outrebounding opponents this season and 4-8 when losing or tying the battle on the boards. Coaches have tried to increase rebounding production despite a small lineup by giving point guard Alexis Smith the title of “halfback.” Smith’s role is to crash the offensive boards. Coaches have also emphasized rebounding in practice. “We’ve been doing a ton more rebounding drills — that was our biggest adjustment in practice,” freshman forward McKenzie Piper said. “We have to rebound after everything. No matter what drill we’re going through, it’s always rebounding.” In addition to increased rebounding in practice, Penn

has been able to use her expertise to help her teammates. “She helps everybody with everyone’s position,” Piper said. “She’s a great leader. She tells people what to do and how to do it. If it’s wrong, she’ll help them. She’s always there to help people. She has a really good insight of the game.” Bollant said one thing is more important than both height and quickness. “It’s more heart and passion. Just wanting the ball and pursuing the ball all the time. It’s what really makes a difference.” Bollant has noticed that characteristic in Penn, who he calls one of the best rebounders he’s ever coached. “She just has a nose for the ball and a great feel for where it’s going,” he said. “There are a lot of 6-2 kids who don’t get the rebounds she gets. I think her feel for where the ball is going and just being in the right spot at the right time (sets her apart). “Every time the ball goes up in the air, I think she is going to get it.”

Johnathan can be reached at hetting2@ dailyillini.com and @jhett93.

PAUL BATTAGLIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michigan guard Trey Burke, right, drives against Minnesota guard Julian Welch during Michigan’s win at Minnesota in Minneapolis on Jan. 17. Burke wore the No. 12 because of an issue with his No. 3 jersey. He has been a difference-maker for the Wolverines this season.

Play by Michigan point guard Burke brings Wolverines to another level DANIEL MILLER-MCLEMORE Basketball columnist

B

asketball is often described as a game of inches. Saturday night’s matchup between Illinois and No. 2 Michigan will be a game of feet. Six feet to be exact, or the 72 inches that make up Wolverine point guard Trey Burke’s diminutive stature. On the surface, both are similarly built teams. Both John Groce and John Beilein employ perimeter-based attacks. Each team’s top-four scorers are guards or wing players, and neither team regularly feeds the ball to the post. As a result, the Wolverines and Illini are first and second in the Big Ten in 3’s made per game, respectively, although Illinois has steadily trended downward in that category in the last month and a half. The difference is Burke. The sophomore is the best player in

the country at the most important position in college basketball, and that fact makes itself apparent in the Wolverines’ play. Burke is tied for second in the conference in scoring with Brandon Paul and is first in assists. His 7.2 dimes per game eclipses the next best assist man, Ohio State’s Aaron Craft, by 2.5 per game. But the numbers don’t tell the whole story. It’s the way Burke controls tempo and pace like he’s holding his fi ngers to the fluxing pulse of the game that is extraordinary. Not to mention his shot-making ability late in possessions and in games, an added bonus that makes Beilein’s job significantly easier. “Having a point guard that can make plays during that time is really essential because if you’re trying to pass the ball around and run a play at shot clock time, you can do it,” Beilein said at Big Ten Media Day in October. Penn State head coach Pat Chambers has also benefited

from excellent point guard play in Tim Frazier, one of the conference’s best before a ruptured Achilles tendon suffered in November sidelined him for the rest of the season. “We’re an extension of one another,” Chambers said of Frazier before the season. “And to not have someone like that at the point, you can really struggle in this type of league where they’ve got so many talented guards.” Those struggles have manifested themselves on Illinois, a team whose offense has frequently broken down against the Big Ten’s top-notch defenses. Tracy Abrams and Paul share point guard duties, and while both are good players in their own right, neither has displayed anything close to the game-managing ability of Burke. Abrams, a sophomore like Burke, has shown vast improvement since his freshman season but is still too inconsistent game-to-game, with fl ashes of brilliance (27

points, eight rebounds, five assists and only one turnover, against Auburn) accompanied regularly by disappearing acts (against Wisconsin and Northwestern). Paul, meanwhile, is still an actor playing a part, a terrific scorer often forced into the role of primary ballhandler for a team lacking at that position. The result, not surprisingly, is a sputtering offense that is constantly out of sync, doesn’t move the ball well (just 50 assists to 76 turnovers during six conference games) and often fails to create open shots. The Illini got off the mat Tuesday against Nebraska, scoring more than 70 points for the first time since beating Ohio State three weeks ago. But Michigan is whole different animal, in large part because of the small point guard spearheading the offense.

Daniel is a senior in Media. He can be reached at millerm1@dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @danielmillermc.

Seniors to be ‘stone-cold killers’ at final home meet BY J.J. WILSON STAFF WRITER

DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Illinois’ Sarah Coady swims in the 400 yard IM event during the swim meet at the ARC on Jan. 23, 2010. Coady placed second with a time of 4:40.56. This weekend will be Coady and Illinois’ other seniors’ last home meet.

Illinois swimming and diving will be celebrating its seniors in its fi nal home meet against Nebraska on Saturday morning, but the team is treating it like any other meet. “It’s always an emotional day,” head coach Sue Novitsky said. “But as soon as that national anthem is over, they have to become a stone-cold killer, get up on the block and get ready to go.” Senior Sarah Coady agreed with Novitsky, saying the seniors will have to focus on the task at hand. “Last year at the Big Tens, we beat (Nebraska) by one point, so it’s a pretty big rivalry between us,” Coady said. “It should come down to be pretty close.” After the Illini went 1-1 last weekend, Novitsky spoke with the team about the lack of pool energy and what a difference

acting like a team can have. posed to swim,” sophomore Cal“They’re stronger as a team lan McDermott said. Despite the team’s 2-3 record of ‘we’ than a team of ‘me,’ and a lot of them were acting like a (1-2 Big Ten), Novitsky said this team of ‘me,’” meet isn’t just about winning. Novitsky said. “It was a little The Illini will harder tha n be using this they wanted it final head-toto be, but that’s head matchup competition for more than Nebraska Illinois and you’ve got (6-1, 0-0) (2-3, 1-2 Big Ten) just salvaging to be ready to their record. step up and go.” “It’s our last Saturday, 11 a.m. Novitsky t i me here,” ARC Pool said the team is sen ior Da rworking to pol- Illinois head coach Sue Novitsky ragh McDerhas stressed energy in practice ish and sharpmott said. “It’s leading up to senior day. en detail work really excitin the pool, adding, but we still ing that she is still looking to have a couple more meets and make those details automatic. a lot bigger meets this season “It’s all about fi nishing our to look forward to, so we’ve got races and remembering that to use this as practice to keep we’ve been practicing and train- preparing.” ing all year for these kind of meets so that we’re prepared J.J. can be reached at jjwilso2@ for the events that we’re sup- dailyillini.com.

at

Men’s track and field to hit road for 1st time at Indiana Relays BY DAN ESCALONA STAFF WRITER

After winning the Illini Classic, the Illinois men’s track and field team will be on the road for the fi rst time this season at the Indiana University Relays in Bloomington, Ind. “This a big meet for us. This is around the time in the season when the competition is really going to ratchet up, so this is the time for us to begin to take every meet seriously,” head coach Mike Turk

said. “The next few meets will be key as prepare for the Big Tens and hope to qualify a few guys to the NCAAs.” This weekend, two key athletes will be returning from injuries in major events for the Illini. Sophomore Davis Fraker will return to the shot put lineup for the first time this season, and Vanier Joseph, an Eastern Michigan transfer, will also make this return to the 60-meter hurdles after nursing a hamstring injury.

“I haven’t been able to compete over the last week, so it will be good to get back out on the track,” Joseph said. “I have had a very good week of training, so I am excited for the weekend.” Along with benefi ting from the return of two key competitors, Illinois is hoping to see a rebound performance from its sprinters, who were disqualifed at the Illini Classic because of false starts. Brandon Stryganek was

unable to race after a false start in the 60-meter dash, and Stephon Pamilton was disqualified prior to the 4x400-meter relay. To minimize the number of false starts, Turk and the coaching staff have placed a greater emphasis on race fundamentals, such as getting out of the starting blocks more effectively. Turk is also hoping to see continued growth from the shot put squad. A week after he fi nished

runner-up in the event fi nal, sophomore Brandon Noe will compete Saturday hoping to win the title in the shot put. Fraker’s return will be beneficial for Noe, who says they share a great deal of chemistry. “Davis and I always train and practice together, so it will be a huge confi dence boost for me to have him back competing alongside me,” Noe said. Turk also expects to see another successful

performance from the 200-meter squad, following Stryganek’s dominant win and Julian Smith’s second-place fi nish last week. “I’m not afraid to say it, but our 200-meter squad might be one of the best in school history,” Turk said. “I’m looking forward to Brandon and Julian putting in another solid effort this weekend.”

Dan can be reached at descalo2@dailyillini.com.

“I haven’t been able to compete over the last week, so it will be good to get back out on the track.” VANIER JOSEPH, transfer hurdler


4B

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211 W. SPRINGFIELD AVENUE | CHAMPAIGN, IL 61820

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Luxury Locations 1-2 bedrooms, beautifully appointed, fireplaces, balconies, & garages $725-$895

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The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 87