Page 1

Gymnastics with grace

Letter to the editor: A call to improve the conditions of all of UI’s employees OPINIONS, 4A

Senior Yoshi Mori leads Illini team post-injury SPORTS, 1B

Wednesday January 23, 2013

The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

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Vol. 142 Issue 85

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ILLINOIS STUDENT SENATE

ISS tables ‘Fighting Illini Forever’ resolution “It’s part of our heritage. ... I think it’s important to preserve our history in this way if we can.” BROCK GEBHARDT, ISS president

BY TYLER DAVIS STAFF WRITER

The Illinois Student Senate’s committee on campus affairs discussed a proposed resolution ensuring that the University will be forever known as the Fighting Illini at its meeting Tuesday but tabled the issue until its next meeting on Jan. 29. Review of the legislation was postponed to give committee members time to conduct more research on the subject and make changes to the language of the resolution.

The resolution, sponsored by student body President Brock Gebhardt , was introduced via press release Jan. 14. Gebhardt said the purpose of the legislation is to quell students’ fears that with the potential change of a campus symbol, there may be a move away from the name Fighting Illini. “It’s part of our heritage, it was not sanctioned by the NCAA in any way whatsoever, so I don’t think this is a hugely debatable issue, and I think it’s important to preserve our history in this way if we can,” Gebhardt said.

According to University of Illinois Archives, the earliest recorded usage of the term “Illini” appears in a January 1874 edition of the University’s weekly student newspaper, the predecessor of the modern The Daily Illini, when it changed its name from “The Student” to “The Illini.” The name Fighting Illini was given to the University’s football team in honor of drafted Illinoisans in World War I. The senate is working with registered student organization Campus Spirit Revival to adopt a new symbol

for the University. Gebhardt is not concerned that retaining the name “the Fighting Illini” will hinder this selection process. He said the concern regarding how a new campus symbol and Fighting Illini would mesh will be addressed by the resolution in its amended form next week. “I’d rather work on my own and with other senators who are interested to really put a lot into it to make sure that

Shooting at Lone Star College in Houston

See LEGISLATION, Page 3A

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Board of trustees to decide on fees, tuition BY LAUREN ROHR STAFF WRITER

»

» » » » » »

More inside: To find out more about the shooting in Houston, in which three people were injured, turn to Page 3A.

HOUSTON CHRONICLE, BRETT COOMER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ana Leal, left, embraces Lone Star College student Sabrina Cuellar after she was evacuated and picked up by her mother, Maria Cuellar, right, from the campus following a shooting at the school Tuesday in Houston.

Child care » » » » » » » facility launches fundraiser

Rezoning ordinance voted down in wake of community concerns BY EMMA WEISSMANN STAFF WRITER

STAFF WRITER

INSIDE

See BOT, Page 3A

URBANA CITY COUNCIL

BY MADDIE REHAYEM

Six local restaurants have teamed up with Crisis Nursery to support dine&donate, a new fundraising program for the nonprofit. The Crisis Nursery, a child care facility in Urbana for families going through temporary crises, is expanding its services and in need of more staff. The nursery previously only took infants through children up to age 5, but they now accept 6-year-olds as well. They will also be doing more outreach to the local Latino community. The restaurants — D.P. Dough, The Great Impasta, Kofusion, Village Inn Pizza, Butcher Boy Burgers and Java Connection — have agreed to donate ranging portions of their profits to the fundraiser for one business day each month to help the nursery as it expands, according to a press release. The program will begin Jan. 30 at D.P. Dough. “Like Crisis Nursery, these local restaurant owners depend on community members for support,” said Stephanie Record, executive director of Crisis Nursery, in a press release. “In addi-

The University’s board of trustees will approve next year’s tuition and fee increases at its regular meeting Thursday in Chicago. “If the recommendation is for a tuition increase, I expect it would be a modest rate given the Board’s policy to try to keep tuition increases no greater than the cost of living index,” said University spokesman Tom Hardy in an email. While the tuition recommendation of the academic and student affairs committee, which is scheduled to meet Wednesday at 8:30 a.m., have not been made public, recommendations for cost recovery programs have been released. Cost recovery programs are academic programs covered entirely by tuition and fees.

SADIE TEPER THE DAILY ILLINI

Steve Fiala, owner of D.P. Dough, stands next to calzones at D.P. Dough on Green Street on Tuesday. D.P. Dough agreed to donate some of its profits to the Crisis Nursery as part of the dine&donate program. tion to helping the Nursery fulfill our mission, we’re confident this partnership will bring restaurants increased business and positive feedback.” D.P. Dough owner Steve Fiala said he will donate 20 percent of his restaurant’s gross sales to the program and hopes to break even after his donation to the nursery. “When they asked if I wanted to help pilot this program, it sounded like a no-brainer,” he said. “They are a great organization, and they can use all the help they can get.” Fiala said he hopes the program will bring new customers to the restaurant and make his current

customers happy as they will be participating in giving to a good cause. Kristen Bosch, the nursery’s development and marketing director, said restaurants seem to be excited about participating, and one restaurant, Kofusion, approached her about being part of the program after hearing about it. “They called us and said that they wanted to be involved and they wanted to be associated and they wanted to give back to a good cause,” Bosch said. “It was really meaningful to us that they saw how meaningful that this could be

for their business as well as giving back to a local charity.” She added that the Crisis Nursery has worked with restaurants similarly in the past requiring flyers or verbal mention of the promotion, but dine&donate doesn’t require anything extra of the customer. This way, the donations “come back to Crisis Nursery with no strings attached,” Bosch said. “It’s an easy way to try something new and also know that their money’s going somewhere that can really use it,” Fiala said.

Maddie can be reached at rehayem2@ dailyillini.com.

Urbana resident Viola Bias has watched as all but one of her neighbors chose to move from the area, selling their properties to a local developer. But after years of battling cancer, Bias was fi nally feeling well enough to voice her opposition to an ordinance that would place her home in a commercial business area at Tuesday’s Urbana City Council meeting. Council members unanimously agreed. Bias has been a resident of West Hill Street for 20 years. She has been approached multiple times by developer Howard Wakeland, the owner of nine of the 11 single-family properties on Lincoln Avenue just north of University Avenue that surround Bias. Wakeland wants to rezone the area, including Bias’ home, and develop it commercially. “I have a right to live peacefully and in serenity,” Bias said. “I’ve been living in this house for 20 years. This is my home. ... (The council is) supposed to be for the people, not one person.” The Urbana City Council voted 6-0 to defeat this ordinance at Tuesday’s meeting.

The action came after Bias, along with several community members, expressed their concern before the council’s discussion. The Urbana Plan Commission had unanimously recommended approval of the ordinance Dec. 20 with a 5-0 vote, saying the development was in line with the city’s comprehensive plan. Tuesday’s meeting was not the fi rst time Wakeland faced backlash to the idea of rezoning the neighborhood. The fi rst time he petitioned for a similar rezoning was May 2008, but he withdrew his application after a public hearing. Alderman Dennis Roberts, Ward 5, presented the motion to defeat the ordinance. He noted several disadvantages to rezoning the area, among them addressing community concerns and discussing the positioning of the properties not owned by Wakeland. “Because of the position of the two lots not in Mr. Wakeland’s ownership, I don’t see how any Lincoln Avenue-facing business can be built,” Roberts said. “Mixing the neighborhood (to be residential and

See REZONING, Page 3A

Police 2A | Corrections 2A | Horoscopes 2A | Opinions 4A | Letters 4A | Crossword 5A | Comics 5A | Health & Living 6A | Sports 1B | Classifieds 4B | Sudoku 4B


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

The Daily Illini 512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 217›337›8300

Champaign Criminal damage to property was reported at the Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority house, 904 S. Third St., around 7:30 a.m. Friday. According to the report, an unknown suspect threw a brick through the window of the residence. ! Residential burglary was reported in the 1100 block of North Sixth Street around 11:30 a.m. Sunday. According to the report, one microwave and one television were reported stolen. ! Domestic battery was reported in the 1600 block of Cruising Lane around 10:30 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, the !

Copyright © 2013 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Samantha Kiesel )(.›**.$/*-, editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor reporting Nathaniel Lash )(.›**.$/*+* mewriting@Daily Illini.com Managing editor online Hannah Meisel )(.›**.$/*,* meonline@DailyIllini. com Managing editor visuals Shannon Lancor )(.›**.$/*,* mevisuals@DailyIllini. com Website editor Danny Wicentowski Social media director Sony Kassam News editor Taylor Goldenstein )(.›**.$/*,) news@DailyIllini.com Daytime editor Maggie Huynh )(.›**.$/*,' news@DailyIllini.com Asst. news editors Safia Kazi Sari Lesk Rebecca Taylor Features editor Jordan Sward )(.›**.$/*-0 features@DailyIllini. com Asst. features editor Alison Marcotte Candice Norwood

POLICE

Sports editor Jeff Kirshman )(.›**.$/*-* sports@DailyIllini.com Asst. sports editors Darshan Patel Max Tane Dan Welin Photo editor Daryl Quitalig )(.›**.$/*++ photo@DailyIllini.com Asst. photo editor Kelly Hickey Opinions editor Ryan Weber )(.›**.$/*-opinions@DailyIllini. com Design editors Bryan Lorenz Eunie Kim Michael Mioux )(.›**.$/*+, design@DailyIllini.com Copy chief Kevin Dollear copychief@DailyIllini. com Asst. copy chief Johnathan Hettinger Advertising sales manager Molly Lannon ssm@IlliniMedia.com Classified sales director Deb Sosnowski Daily Illini/Buzz ad director Travis Truitt Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

Night editor: Eliot Sill Photo night editor: Rochelle Wilson Copy editors: Chad Thornburg, Virginia Murray,

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Urbana Residential burglary was reported in the 100 block of Glover Avenue just before midnight Sunday. According to the report, an unknown offender entered the victim’s apartment and stole several items including two firearms and ammunition. ! Theft was reported in the !

TODAY ON DAILYILLINI.COM

1300 block of East Michigan Avenue around 2 p.m. Monday. According to the report, an unknown offender stole a bed Senior Yoshi Mori, all-arounder frame stored in the victim’s backyard. Neither the offender for the men’s gymnastics team, attended practice Tuesday nor the bed frame was located.

IOTW goes viral

University ! A 19-year-old female was arrested on the charges of driving with a suspended license and operating an uninsured vehicle near Third and Daniel Streets at 11 p.m. Monday. According to the report, the suspect was initially pulled over after a patrol officer saw her going the wrong way on a one-way street.

Compiled by Klaudia Dukala

WPGU 107.1 !"#$%#&'()*+#,-./(#-&0.

HOROSCOPES BY NANCY BLACK TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

Today’s Birthday

Your first half of 2013 supplies fertile ground for creativity. Ideas abound, and fun exploration crews tempt. What would you love to see realized? Set intentions. Your career heats up after June, with expanded income and influence. Come to terms with the past ... divine forgiveness provides freedom. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) Night system staff for today’s paper

victim reported that she was choked by the offender. ! Aggravated battery was reported in the 1700 block of West Clark Street around 3:30 a.m. Sunday. According to the report, two victims were stabbed during a fight. The offenders were not located.

Today is a 7 -- Communication is key; luckily it comes easily right now. Don’t sell yourself short, as there’s far more to you than you give yourself credit for. Travel virtually.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)

want, making certain that’s really where you want to be. A temporary rush of overwhelm brings out your creativity. Outwit the competition.

judgement. Let people know what you need, emotionally or financially. It’s a good time to ask for money. Send out bills.

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)

Today is a 5 -- There’s no need to fight, as you both see the path to follow. You’re learning quickly. A traveler from distant lands inspires. Continue to invest in family.

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

Today is a 9 -- Your optimism is attractive; keep it up. Embrace the contributions that your friends are to you and your quality of life. Return the favor. You get more by giving. There’s good news from far away.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

Today is a 6 -- Consult an expert, then trust your intuition to solve the puzzle. Say more about what you need, and what you need to hear. Support your team.

Today is a 6 -- You’re especially creative with your money-making capabilities. Others are impressed. Find a way to increase your savings. Pinch yourself to see if you’re dreaming.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)

Today is a 9 -- Go for what you

Today is an 8 -- Start by realizing how much you have to learn. You can maximize your career, and your welfare. Keep most of what you know secret, for now. Today is a 6 -- Stick to your good

Today is an 8 -- When in doubt, count your blessings, again. Don’t be afraid to ask for what you want, and find support around you, near and far. Express your love in words and pictures.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)

Today is an 8 -- Quick thinking wins, but you’re going to need the stamina. Get plenty of rest and eat healthy. Exercise also helps get your ideas flowing. Get help building your dream.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)

Today is an 8 -- Your creative juices are flowing. There may be a tendency to want to stop the flood. Let yourself run with the ideas instead. Make a long-distance call for additional benefits.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)

Today is a 9 -- Talk about dreams for the future and then get into !!!!! action. Spreading the word helps find supporters. Keep an important appointment. Love finds a way.

EVERY THURSDAY INSIDE OF THE DAILY ILLINI!

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following an X-ray screening of his back, which has given him trouble lately. “If you let it get to you, it’s all down hill,” Mori said. “You just gotta keep up with your rehab, keep icing. Focus on the main goal, I guess.” Mori overcame the back troubles to place third at the Windy City Invitational. Go to DailyIllini.com for the full story.

The Daily Illini is online everywhere you are. Visit DailyIllini.com Follow us on Twitter @TheDailyIllini for today’s headlines and breaking news. Like us on Facebook for an interactive Daily Illini experience. Subscribe to us on YouTube for video coverage and the Daily Illini Vidcast. CORRECTIONS When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Samantha Kiesel at 3378365.

HOW TO CONTACT US The Daily Illini is located at 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. Our office hours are 9a.m. to 5:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

General contacts: Main number...........(217) 337-8300 Advertising .............. (217) 337-8382 Classified ...................(217) 337-8337 Newsroom................(217) 337-8350 Newsroom fax: ........ (217) 337-8328 Production................(217) 337-8320

Newsroom Corrections: If you think something is incorrectly reported, please call Editor in Chief Samantha Kiesel at 337-8365. News: If you have a news tip, please contact Daytime editor Maggie Huynh at 337-8350 or News Editor Taylor Goldenstein at 337-8352 or e-mail news@DailyIllini.com. Press releases: Please send press releases to news@DailyIllini.com Photo: For questions about photographs or to suggest photo coverage of an event, please contact Photo Editor Daryl Quitalig at 337-8344 or e-mail photo@ DailyIllini.com. Sports: To contact the sports staff, please call Sports Editor Jeff Kirshman at 337-8363 or e-mail sports@dailyillini.com. Calendar: Please submit events for publication in print and online at the217.com/calendar. Employment: If you would like to work in the newspaper’s editorial department, please contact Managing Editor Reporting Nathaniel Lash at 337-8343 or email mewriting@DailyIllini.com. Letters to the editor: Contributions may be sent to: Opinions, The Daily Illini, 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820 or e-mailed to opinions@ DailyIllini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” Letters are limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. UI students must include their year in school and college. The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit or reject any contributions. Daily Illini On-air: If you have comments or questions about our broadcasts on WPGU-FM 107.1, please call 337-8381 or e-mail meonair@DailyIllini.com. DailyIllini.com: Contact Managing Editor Online Hannah Meisel at 337-8353 or meonline@DailyIllini. com for questions or comments about our Web site.

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Placing an ad: If you would like to place an ad, please contact our advertising department. ! Classified ads: (217) 337-8337 or e-mail diclassifieds@illinimedia. com. ! Display ads: (217) 337-8382 or e-mail diadsales@illinimedia.com. Employment: If you are interested in working for the Advertising Department, please call (217) 3378382 and ask to speak to Molly Lannon, advertising sales manager.

UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? UI alum couple waiting to adopt!

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Perilous, freezing weather hits the Midwest At least 3 dead due to exposure BY TODD RICHMOND THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MADISON, Wis. — Homeless people scrambled to fi nd shelter, schools closed down and plumbers wrestled with frozen pipes Tuesday as the Upper Midwest endured a third straight day of bitter cold temperatures. Waves of frigid Arctic air began sweeping south from Canada on Saturday night, locking the Midwest in a deep freeze that has left a section of the country well-acquainted with winter’s pains reeling. Authorities suspect exposure has played a role in at least three deaths so far. “I am wearing a Snuggie under a top and another jacket over that,” said Faye Whitbeck, president of the chamber of commerce in International Falls, Minn., a town near the Canadian border where the temperature was minus 30 on Tuesday morning. The anticipated high was a balmy 8 below. “I pulled out a coat that went right to my ankles this morning and I wore two scarves.” The coldest location in the lower 48 states Monday was Embarrass, Minn., at 36 below. On Sunday it was Babbitt, Minn., at 29 below, according to the National Weather Service. The bitter conditions were expected to persist into the weekend in the Midwest through the eastern half of the U.S., said Shawn DeVinny, a National Weather Service meteorologist in suburban Minneapolis. Ariana Laffey, a 30-year-old homeless woman, kept warm

3A

Former Gov. Ryan to be released Jan. 30 BY SOPHIA TAREEN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JOHN HAR THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

University of Wisconsin-Madison student Marisa Weich contends with sub-zero wind chill temperatures while making her way to class on the campus Tuesday. with a blanket, three pairs of pants and six shirts as she sat on a milk crate begging near Chicago’s Willis Tower Tuesday morning. She said she and her husband spent the night under a bridge, bundled up under a halfdozen blankets. “We’re just trying to make enough to get a warm room to sleep in tonight,” Laffey said. But in Sioux Falls, S.D., where winter temperatures are normally well below freezing, some homeless shelters had open beds. Shelter managers suspect people who needed a place to stay were already using the services before the temperatures reached more extreme lows. The fi rst cold snap of the season was in early December. Overnight temperatures dropped to 9 below with the wind chill. In Vermillion, S.D., a water pipe break forced the evacuation of a dormitory at the University of South Dakota, with nearly 500 students offered hotel rooms. In Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, residents woke to a wind chill that made it feel like 35 below. The temperature in Madison, Wis., was a whopping 1 degree above just before midday Tuesday. For northern Illinois, it was the fi rst time in almost two years that temperatures had dipped below zero. The temperature in Detroit was a toasty 7 degrees with a 10 below wind chill around midday. City officials said they planned to extend hours at its two warming centers. A warming center run by St. Peter and Paul Jesuit

Church downtown that usually home in Des Plaines, Ill. And in sees 50 to 60 people on a typical Green Bay, Wis., a 38-year-old winter day had taken in about 90 man was found dead outside his people Tuesday morning. home Monday morning. AuthorPolice in Milwaukee, where ities in both cases said the victhe temperature was just 2 tims died of hypothermia and degrees at noon, checked under cold exposure, with alcohol a freeway overpasses to fi nd the possible contributing factor. homeless and urge them to fi nd A 77-year-old Illinois woman a shelter. The United Way of also was found dead near her car Greater Milwaukee has donat- in southwestern Wisconsin on ed $50,000 to two Saturday night. homeless shelters The plunging so they can open temperatures overflow centers. made life plen“We’re incredty miserable for ibly relieved,” plumbers. sa id Donna Workers in Rongholt-Migan, Madison had to executive direcrepair at least tor of the Cathefour water main dral Center, a breaks since SunMilwaukee shelday afternoon. DONNA RONGHOLTMIGAN, ter that received Jim Gilchrist, a $25,000. “I was Cathedral Center excutive director third-generation walking my dog plumber in the last night and I couldn’t feel my Chicago suburb of Oak Park, legs just after walking around said he received about five or the block.” six calls Tuesday from people Schools across the region with frozen water pipes in their either started late or didn’t open homes. Few pipes had actually at all. Districts in Duluth, Minn., burst — yet. and Ashland, Bayfield, Hurley, “We’ll probably get those calls Washburn and Superior in far later, as pipes begin thawing” northern Wisconsin closed amid and develop a split, Gilchrist warnings that the wicked wind said. “Today they just know they chills could freeze exposed flesh don’t have water; tomorrow they within a minute. will have water spraying.” “It’s brutal,” Courtney Thrall, At least two fi res in southa 21-year-old University of Wis- ern Wisconsin were blamed on consin-Madison student, said as property owners using heaters she waited for her bus, her fur- or other means to thaw frozen trimmed parka hood pulled over pipes. In one case, a dairy barn her head. was destroyed, and in the other, On Sunday, a 70-year-old man a mobile home was lost. No one was found frozen in his unheated was hurt.

“I was walking my dog last night and I couldn’t feel my legs just after walking around the block.”

CHICAGO — Imprisoned former Illinois Gov. George Ryan, who has served six years at a federal prison for wide-ranging corruption charges, is scheduled to be released to a Chicago halfway house by the end of January, his attorney said Tuesday. Ryan is set to leave the federal facility in Terre Haute, Ind., on Jan. 30 as part of a work release program, said one of his attorneys, Albert Alschuler. That’s about five months ahead of his official release date, though it’s common for inmates to be eligible for work release early. In a twist illustrating perhaps the worst of Illinois politics, Ryan will overlap at the federal prison for several days with convicted former power broker William Cellini. The longtime Springfi eld businessman, who knows Ryan well, reported to the Indiana prison Tuesday. Jurors in 2011 convicted Cellini of trying to extort the producer of the fi lm “Million Dollar Baby” for a $1.5 million political contribution intended for thenGov. Rod Blagojevich’s campaign. Blagojevich is serving a prison term in a Colorado prison for multiple corruption counts. Ryan, 78, was convicted of racketeering, conspiracy, tax fraud and making false statements to the FBI. The Republican was accused of steering state contracts and leases to insiders as secretary of state and then as governor, receiving vacations and gifts in return. He also was accused of stopping an investigation into secretary of state employees accepting bribes for truck driver’s licenses. Nothing in prison rules that would bar Ryan and Cellini from seeing each other while incarcerated, and it’s likely they will cross paths, Bureau of Prisons spokesman Chris Burke said. “Hard to be involved in Republican politics and not know Bill Cellini,” said Ryan’s former chief of staff, Scott Fawell, who also spent time in prison for corruption. “He raised money for us ... They were friends.” The prison time has been particularly difficult for Ryan on a personal level, attorneys say. His wife of 55 years died in 2011, while he was incarcerated. Prison officials allowed Ryan to

leave prison to visit her several times during her fight with cancer, but he was not allowed to go to the funeral. Ryan has also suffered from health problems of his own, including kidney disease and infected teeth. At the same time, several appeals seeking his release from prison were denied. “He’s had a long hard time,” Alschuler said. “He’s had some health problems. He’s lost his wife ... He’s out of money, he lost his state pension.” Although his attorneys have mentioned several times over the past year the possibility of work release as early as January, they didn’t say what Ryan will be doing at the halfway house or what type of job he may get. Ryan attorney Jim Thompson, also a former Illinois governor, has previously mentioned a Salvation Army halfway house in Chicago’s West Loop neighborhood. He didn’t immediately return messages Tuesday. Salvation Army officials declined to comment on their community corrections program, referring all questions to the Bureau of Prisons. For decades, the Salvation Army has run a community program where inmates live for a short time, take classes to learn basic skills and receive counseling, among other things. Fawell, who was also convicted in the corruption investigation, spent time after his prison term at that same halfway house mentioned by Thompson. “It’s like a really bad dorm room,” Fawell said. For one, inmates at a halfway house get to wear their own clothes, work a job and can be eligible to be in their own homes within weeks, though they still have to keep close contact with prison offi cials. At the same time, inmates of all walks of life are put in the same place. “You could be sitting at a table with someone who just did 40 years,” Fawell said. “The clientele is a little different than he’s used to.” Before the corruption allegations emerged, Ryan was best known nationally for emptying Illinois’ death row in 2003, which re-ignited a national debate on the death penalty and led to the end of capital punishment in Illinois in 2011.

Three wounded in shooting on Texas community college campus BY JUAN A. LOZANO AND MICHAEL GRACZYK THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOUSTON — A shooting at a Texas community college wounded three people Tuesday and sent some students fleeing for safety while others with medical training helped tend the wounded. Harris County Sheriff’s Maj. Armando Tello said authorities had detained a person of interest. Authorities also thought there could be a second shooter, according to a law enforcement official in Washington who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the ongoing case. Students said they were studying or waiting for classes to start when they heard gunshots about 12:30 p.m. on the Lone Star College System campus about 20 miles north of downtown Houston. Some barricaded themselves in the room they were in, while others fled to nearby buildings. Mark Zaragosa said he had just come out of an EMT class when he saw two people who were injured and stopped to help them. Officers had not yet arrived, he said. “The two people that I took care of had just minor injuries,” Zaragosa told KHOU. “One gentleman had a gunshot to the knee and the (other) actually had an entry wound to the lower buttocks area.” The college’s official Twitter feed said the shooting was between two people. Tello said three people were injured, but he did not provide any details about them, such as

BOT FROM PAGE 1A The executive MBA program is the only program that will not face an increase. The master of science programs in finance may increase by $1,900, in technology management by $1,100, in policy economics by $1,120 and in accountancy by $2,500. Earlier this month, the board’s audit, budget, finance and facilities committee reviewed recommendations for student and housing fees. If approved at Thursday’s meeting, mandatory student fees may increase by 1 percent, or $30, which will bring the total annual bill to $2,916. Students could also see a $291 increase in room

whether they were students or included the person who was arrested. Mark Smith, spokesman for the Harris County Emergency Corps, said three people were taken to two hospitals. He said at least two had gunshot wounds, and one appeared to have heart problems related to the shooting. He said one was in critical condition. Smith said previously that four people had been taken to hospitals. Reginald Neal told KPRC-TV that his nephew, Jody Neal, 24, was one of the wounded taken to Harris Health Ben Taub Hospital Emergency Center. “All I know he got shot three times. That’s all I know,” Reginald Neal said. “He got shot in one of his arms, in the stomach and the leg.” The shooting comes one month after a gunman attacked an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., killing 20 children and heightening security concerns at campuses across the country. In Texas, several school districts have either implemented or are considering a plan to allow faculty to carry guns on campus. Guns are not allowed on college campuses, but the Texas Legislature this year may debate a bill that would allow them. At least 10 police cars clustered on the campus’ west side soon after the shooting. Emergency personnel tended to people on stretchers and loaded them into ambulances, while officers led students from the buildings where they sought shelter.

A woman, right, embraces a Lone Star College student after he was evacuated from the campus after a shooting at the north Harris County school Tuesday in Houston. The shooting wounded three people Tuesday and sent students fleeing for safety as officials placed the campus on lockdown, officials said.

and board fees, bringing the total to $9,979 — a 3 percent increase from the current academic year. The board will also vote to approve the project recommendations for a wounded veterans’ center on the Urbana campus, the architectural consultant recommendations for the reconstruction of the Natural History Building and the naming of a new residence hall in the Ikenberry Commons after the fi rst African-American woman to graduate from the University. The board will also meet Wednesday at 10 a.m. for its annual retreat in Chicago. Hardy said the retreat will focus around the topic of technologyenhanced teaching and learning, an “increasingly important

aspect of higher education.” National experts in the field and faculty members from each cam- FROM PAGE 1A pus, including Doug Beck, physics professor on the Urbana campus, it’s both substantive and wellwho will lead a panel discussion burnished for the senate floor,” on the topic. he said. Retreat participants, includThe resolution was tabled in ing board members, Universi- part in order to make it more ty officers, members of the Uni- presentable to the senate and to versity Senates Conference and avoid what senator Christopher deans and administrators from Dayton , senior in LAS, referred each campus, will then break into to as a “maelstrom.” discussion groups. The board will “No matter what we put into reconvene afterward to review this (resolution), this will probeach group’s report. ably be a heated debate,” DayThe retreat will be webcast live ton said. at www.uis.edu/technology/uisShao Guo, vice presidentlive.html. internal, said the most essential part of this process is student Lauren can be reached at rohr2@ input. Without enough student input, he said one of the things dailyillini.com.

HOUSTON CHRONICLE, BRETT COOMER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LEGISLATION

that may be amended is the “forever” part. “The forever part is one of the questionable parts of the resolution. You’re not only dealing with this year, but you’re talking about until essentially the end of this University if you want to take this resolution seriously,” he said. Nick Larson, senator and senior in LAS, is in favor of the resolution with more research. “It’s important that we get this out to everyone possible, so it can literally be ingrained in everybody’s memory that this is going to stay forever; we’re not going to change this,” Larson said.

REZONING

Tyler can be reached at tadavis2@ dailyillini.com.

Emma can be reached at wessmnn2@ dailyillini.com.

FROM PAGE 1A commercial) usually results in hardship to the owners that are still single-family residents. ... I don’t think we have a way to understand the importance this has on individuals and family members.” Alderman Robert Lewis, Ward 3, agreed with Roberts and said it is important that “the concerns of the people prevail.” “It’s important to take in the concerns with the people invested in the area,” Lewis said. “I think they have a lot of stock.”


4A Wednesday January 23, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

Pursuing passion is worth the hardships, failures that may follow

EDITORIAL CARTOON

Volunteerism should focus on learning, not helping

VERONICA PHAM THE DAILY ILLINI

ADAM HUSKA Opinions columnist

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TA’LES LOVE Opinions columnist

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olumnists should not only think as journalists and storytellers. They should strive to shed light and unique perspectives on different issues that they are passionate about. With this in mind, I spent our rare three-day weekend digging into the depths of my soul in an effort to find what I’m truly passionate about. After praying about it, I realized the answer was right in front of me all along. I was reminded that I generally enjoy writing. That is my passion. However, writing hasn’t always been easy for me. It’s something that I have struggled with, especially as of late. It’s sometimes difficult to present my ideas in a clear and concise manner, and I always fear that I’m not explaining myself well enough or that my thoughts don’t make sense. My struggles have caused some major headaches, and at times I wanted to quit writing columns altogether. Writing has been a pastime of mine since I was a little girl. It has allowed me to be honest and freely express myself. It has allowed me to stay organized, focused and close to God. By writing in a journal daily, I have been able to learn and reflect on life’s challenges. It’s sort of like therapy. When writing freely, it’s almost second nature. Column writing, on the other hand, has not treated me so nicely. Finding relevant, substantial and interesting topics is challenging. Because I have a variety of different interests, my topic choices tend to be all over the place. I sometimes realize that I am not as passionate about an issue as I thought, making it all the more difficult. Most of the time, I struggle with what I want to say. Other times, I feel like I don’t have anything to say at all. This was even the case this week as I continuously struggled with finding my voice. The subject of my column changed four to five times in one hour, I kid you not. No matter how many drafts I wrote or tears I shed, I could not construct a coherent piece. And when the light bulb did flicker, I was so upset that I could not organize my thoughts. And while giving up seemed to be on the horizon, I knew I would eventually have to push myself through it because quitting is not something I do. That’s when it dawned on me — I just needed to write what I was feeling. This week was one of the most difficult weeks I’ve experienced during my time as a columnist, and believe me, I’ve gone through some meltdowns. I can blame my pursuit for perfection. My family always says that I am my own worst critic. However, my biggest fear is making a complete fool of myself. Even though my readers may not always agree with my point of view, I always want to make sure that I’m presenting a thorough and well-supported opinion. The purposes of my columns are to create and spark conversation while bringing attention to important issues. My mother says, “When we set out to accomplish the things we love to do, they will not be easy. And if they were easy, everyone would do it.” So if you find yourself at the point of frustration and tears, like me, take a step back and refocus. Sometimes you have to take a break from what you’re doing to formulate a game plan on how to do it. It’s also important to keep faith and trust in your own abilities. Anything worth having is worth working for, and there will definitely be roadblocks along the way. The point is to keep working at it, not just because you want success but because you love it. When you continuously work at something you love, success and improvement will naturally follow. After everything I go through with my columns it is a rewarding feeling to know that I made it through the process and that my voice is being heard. I encourage everyone to keep working at things they love. Each step you take is a step in the right direction, even if you stumble along the way. Use the love for your passion as motivation and encourage yourself frequently. It’s our passions that make life worthwhile, not our failures. If you go after what you love, you will have life.

Ta’les is a senior in Media. She can be reached at tllove2@dailyillini.com.

Printed guns push freedom too far BRIAN SIEGEL Opinions columnist

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ody Wilson is considered by some to be the most dangerous man in the world. He is not a terrorist, not a murderer and not a dictator. He is just a young man who found a way to permanently impede gun restrictions. Wilson developed computer code for 3-D printable gun parts and can even make an entire gun out of plastic. All someone would need is an Internet connection and a 3-D printer. This past Thursday on Glenn Beck’s new libertarianbranded show “The Blaze” (libertarian-branded is an insult to libertarians, but Glenn Beck criticism will have to wait for another time), Wilson told Beck how he had made and fired rounds from each of the pieces displayed on the show, all of which were made from his computer program. His group, Defense Distributed, launched the Wiki Weapons Project, which made this program available. And Wilson seemed smug and pleased that these guns are now exponentially available. Quite frankly, at first I didn’t know what to make of it. His complete dismissal of almost all government dips into anarchism that I just can’t get behind. While I can appreciate his “F the government, I want my own freedom” mentality, there is no way this could be beneficial. A culture where anyone

can have a gun at the click of a button is not one I want to live in. This act bypasses background checks, does away with magazine restrictions and does away with registered serial numbers. Which leads me to my point: We’re doomed. It can go one of two ways from here. The first being that hardened criminals and terrorists can now more easily get their hands on weapons — and much more quickly. All they need is an Internet connection. This essentially would do away with President Obama’s new magazine restrictions. Of course, the government has stepped in to regulate how Wilson goes about his business, and he has tailored his guns computer code to their restrictions. But what happens when someone isn’t as compliant as Wilson? If an Anonymous-like group with purely evil motives got its hands on this code and circumvented the restrictions, then it would have nearly unlimited access to most guns. It could result in another tragedy, but one that would be exponentially harder to trace. The second scenario might seem a little less dystopian, but I would argue it has much greater detriment to society in the long run. Because the government wants to have its hands on just about everything, it will eventually step in — and has already begun to step in — to regulate the process of printing guns online. Now don’t get me wrong, I’m all for the regulations here because I think background checks and serial numbers are not

just necessary but vital. Crimes would have unregistered weapons, leading to more unsolved cases. The government will eventually do what it always does and overregulate. The Internet will be scrutinized; anything judged by the government as even remotely threatening will be taken down for “public safety” or “national security.” I have no doubt that the government will again use the terms “public safety” and “national security” loosely when regulating products like these weapons. As P.J. O’Rourke of the Cato Institute says, “Giving power and money to the government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys.” The Internet is basically man’s last truly free frontier, though it is regulated to some extent, and I don’t want to see it fall prey to the same police state ideology we tend to see on Capitol Hill. As if it wasn’t tricky enough already, the gun issue just got a lot trickier, my friends. Probably the one piece of sensationalism that came out of Glenn Beck’s mouth that I agree with was, “Is this guy a hero or a villain?” I love the call for freedom and “F you” mentality he has toward the government, but this idea of 3-D printed guns without regulation seems borderline insane. And while I am a man who supports liberty in its purest form, I cannot support a country where anyone can run around with a gun, especially one they printed.

Brian is a junior in Media. He can be reached siegel9@dailyillini.com.

An Open Letter An open letter to President Easter and Chancellor Wise: There was a time, not so very long ago, when universities actively defended academic values; when they fought, as institutions, for integrity in the search for truth (however truth was conceived); for openness in the creation and transmission of ideas; and for that basic human decency that is the legacy of both religious and humanistic intellectual traditions. All of these values are now embattled in our universities. My concern in this letter, however, is with the last and the most important — with human decency, with the simple yet profound idea that one should treat others as one would like to be treated. The question I would like to put both of you is this: Is the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign behaving with basic decency toward all of its employees? Is the institution for which you are responsible treating our building and food service workers as you yourselves would like to be treated if you were in their position? These are the men and women who clean offices, labs and classrooms and care for the grounds and animals on campus. These are the people who feed our students. Their physical labor is essential

for your administrative labor and for my intellectual labor. And yet far too many of them now belong to the “working poor.” No matter how hard they work or how eager they are to take on more work, their pay remains so low or their hours so limited that they cannot earn enough to support themselves and their families. It is a truly shameful fact that some University employees — even some of those with years of experience and loyalty to our university — must rely on food pantries to feed themselves and their children and must take refuge with relatives to avoid homelessness. I’m sure if they had any other choice, they would be taking other jobs. However, there are very few jobs to be had in this area. Having no other choice, our building and food service workers hang on to jobs at the University, even as the University, which should be a bastion of basic human decency, depresses their wages, cuts their hours, and, most recently, attempts to undermine their union by illegally retaliating against its most active members. Of course the University has its own financial problems. But somehow it can find the money for “more important” people’s pay raises, for all sorts of “initiatives” that pad administrative resumes, and for lit-

tle “perks” ranging from country club memberships to catered lunches for those who already have far too much. It would not actually take that much money out of the University budget to bring our building and food service workers up to a living wage. I therefore call on you to take action on behalf of our lowest-paid and most vulnerable colleagues in the academic enterprise — and yes, they are our colleagues, for without their essential physical work, no intellectual work would be possible on this campus. I call on you, first of all, to negotiate in good faith with Service Employees International Union, the building and food service workers’ union, in simple accordance with the law. I also call on you to freeze new administrative hires, to stop funding some of the sillier initiatives, to give up your country club memberships, and, yes, maybe even pay for lunch out of your own pocket until the poorest members of what Chancellor Wise has taken to calling the “Illinois family” are treated like real family members, with some basic decency, with some respect for their human dignity. Sincerely, MEGAN MCLAUGHLIN, professor of history, gender and women’s studies and medieval studies

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THOUGHTS Email: opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.

he major misconception we have is that as Americans, we are the bearer and managers of abundant resources, and it is therefore our responsibility to reach out to help those “in need” or “less fortunate.” The helping mentality is degrading, especially when it consists of donating money over the phone or because your favorite celebrity is endorsing it. There were numerous things that came to mind the day before I left home for a land that history textbooks and unauthentic movies had represented. I was apprehensive, objective, willful. There’s something about Africa that always felt distant to me. Yes, there’s the obvious hemispheric change, but there was always something emotionally distant about the continent to me. Africa had always been a stigmatization of widespread poverty, an uncontrollable HIV/ AIDS epidemic and a jigsaw of distinct, fundamentally different African countries. Like the same way with approaching anything new or different, I started optimistic because I didn’t want to be pessimistic, but I was well aware of everything I didn’t know as well. Although I felt confident in leaving for South Africa with just 8 weeks of instruction on the country’s culture and history, I also knew that there was a difference between learning about culture and being cultured, and between learning about history and being a part of history. The problem is this false and ignorant representation of unfamiliar territory. The problem is how my Westernized thinking interferes with my ability to fairly represent things that are foreign to me. This opportunity to visit South Africa wasn’t necessarily about experiencing something life changing or even participating in something special. It was just as much a trip to test my tolerance and nonpartisanship, as it was to test my will to learn and grow. South Africa is thriving, despite ending apartheid, the country’s legal segregation of blacks and whites, only 20 years ago in 1994. South Africa is thriving, despite the 10 percent of the country’s population affected by HIV or AIDS. However, one can thrive and still need a boost. The focus of volunteerism should change from helping to learning. We should stop the campaigning for an end to African hunger and poverty and, instead, learn about the social conditions that create widespread hunger and poverty. We blurred the line between helping and learning so much that we often fail to realize that simply taking the time to learn can be help in itself. Unlike in the U.S., the term “colored” is not used derogatorily in South Africa, and instead refers to a mixed racial group. When the black and colored communities were forced into townships, they rose to the challenge to succeed, despite limited mobility and resources. They set up salons, markets, appliance repair shops and clinics — services that we would see in any American town or community. And that was exactly the point: to work with what they do have and make it resemble that of any other community. The government’s helping hands didn’t pass these out; it was entirely in the fists of dedicated, progressive and motivated people. They don’t need the help we think we’re providing, let alone for the satisfaction we think we’ll gain by doing so. Help isn’t just a by-product of conflict; it occurs whether we want, need or ask for it. Help can arise out of benefits, promotion or change — there are more facets to help than we give it credit for. What they need are people who are open to learn about problems that are very much unique to their country. They need people who are open to doing things their way first, before we deem our methods superior. Underdeveloped and developing countries aren’t in need of American pity or sympathy. Aid without purpose is the problem. Part of the beauty in South Africa’s path to independence and freedom for all people was that it was the people’s effort. The majority of South Africa’s population was viciously oppressed at one point in history, and that oppression’s end wasn’t the result of intense governmental pressure. It was the result of Africans empowering Africans. Not with money, not with help, but by learning despite the pressures of conformity. By spreading awareness despite the threat of incarceration and silence. I can tell you that the dignity and spirits of the people I encountered in the townships of South Africa surpassed those of the wealthy and fortunate American. We construe our definitions of “neediness” and “fortunateness” to circumscribe ideas of social class and monetary wealth when in reality, it isn’t money that South Africans need; it’s resources such as modern health care technology and a diversified education system that reaches out to all of South African’s ethnic groups and 11 official languages. In reality, it isn’t money that empowers South Africans, it’s purpose. Instead of helping those “in need” or those who are “less fortunate,” we should be learning about those who are “in need” and “less fortunate.”

Adam is a junior in ACES. He can be reached at huska1@dailyillini.com.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Overcome, prevent hangovers BECKY ZILIS Staff writer

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he deathly combination of head pounding, stomach churning and fuzzy memories from the previous night has caused many to pledge a life away from Green Street after dark. Unfortunately, the base of the Red Lion DJ booth and the golden stairway to Brothers keeps students coming back. While some of my friends pop out of bed, chug a Gatorade and skip to class after a night on the town, I shove last night’s Beef Stand leftovers onto my breakfast plate and hope the grease will ease my headache. Over time, I’ve learned a few tricks of the trade to keep hangovers at bay. Studies have shown that many foods can help prevent and cure hangovers, meaning Tuesday nights at Legends will no longer keep us from our Wednesday 8 a.m. Though a breakfast of asparagus sprouts may not seem appetizing to McDonald’s breakfast lovers like myself, it can help to

alleviate a hangover. According to a study in the Journal of Food Science, asparagus contains amino acids that protect the liver against toxins like alcohol. But don’t fret, my fellow McDonald’s fans, because other foods with amino acids include eggs, meat and poultry, so your favorite breakfast might actually do the trick. Alcohol and an empty stomach don’t mix. Stock up with a big dinner before going out and get your friends together for a protein-rich breakfast when you wake up. Next: hope the food overpowers the alcohol toxins so you start to feel better. There are also a few things you can do while drinking to lessen the morning pain. Tobacco has been found to worsen hangovers, adding to the list of reasons to keep away from cigarettes. The “why” is still unclear, but according to the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, nicotine and alcohol are connected to the brain in similar ways. This can possibly explain why heavy drinking combined with tobacco intake can make for an especially awful hangover. There are also scientific rea-

sons why whiskey drinkers feel the effects of a hangover more strongly than those who choose clear alcohols like vodka. A study titled Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research conducted by Jonathan Howland suggests that hard alcohol with a darker hue can create a stronger hangover. Brown liquids like bourbon and whiskey contain higher amounts of congeners, which are created during the fermentation process and worsen the chance of a hangover. Drinking vodka, rum or gin can be better for your liver and your morning after. Sometimes popping a few Tylenol and a glass of water might seem like enough to tough out a rough morning, but the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs explains that hangovers affect your attention and reaction time. While college is undeniably fun, overindulging can keep us from being our best the next day. By changing diet and alcohol choices, students can increase their productivity and maybe survive to see another night out.

Becky can be reached at zilis1@dailyillini.com.

Juice your fruits and vegetables Add juicing to your diet for a fun, efficient way to a healthy lifestyle

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JORDAN SWARD

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The crossword solution is in the Classified section.

Features editor

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BILLY FORE

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an avid watcher of food documentaries on Netflix, I was fi rst introduced to the concept of juicing by the fi lm “Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead.” In a nutshell, a man named Joe Cross who was 100 pounds overweight and suffering from an autoimmune disease, chronicles his journey to good health by eating nothing but fresh fruit and vegetable juice for 60 days. Although I absolutely was not interested in a 60-day liquid diet, the concept intrigued me. Some sources claim juicing fruits and vegetables is healthier than eating them because the nutrients are more easily absorbed and juice is easily digested. Even if this isn’t true, the bottom line is, it can be hard to get in the recommended nine servings of vegetables and fruit each day. Especially if you’re not a huge veggie fan, juicing is a fun — and often tasty — alternative. So after setting my sights on trying my hand at juicing, I ran into only one problem: I didn’t own a juicer. In the grand scheme of appliances, juicers don’t exactly break the bank. They start at around $40, but on a college budget, my bank would have broke. To my good fortune, a Breville juicer was delivered to my doorstep Monday that I had not ordered. I was hoping it was either by magic or a secret admirer at fi rst but was thrilled to fi nd that the secret admirer was my generous mom. Armed and ready, I drove straight to Meijer’s produce section. There I realized juicing’s second setback: the cost of large quantities of ingredients. I would suggest sticking with inexpensive ingredients such as apples, celery, cucumbers and carrots as fi llers. Then splurge on a few extra flavorful ingredients like kale or ginger. Once in possession of my supplies, I made a carrot, apple, cucumber and ginger recipe. While I am a fan of the taste of most raw fruits and veggies, I was still afraid of the dark orange concoction. To my delight — and I even tested it with my more skeptical roommate — it tasted surprisingly, very good. If you’re a fan of ginger, add some ginger root to your juice. You won’t regret it. As an added bonus, ginger has been proved to combat nausea and vomiting. Next time you’re heading out, juice a ginger drink for the morning. The next juice I made was strictly vegetables with added spices for flavor and hot sauce for a kick. This one came out with a green hue, and tasted more like a garden. Note to self: Don’t get carried away on the green leaves. If you give juicing a try, keep in mind that fresh juice should be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to four days to avoid bacteria growth.

DEAF TECHNOLOGY FROM PAGE 6A

GARRY TRUDEAU

Green veggie juice: 2 large carrots 2 celery stalks 2 tomatoes 2 kale leafs

handful spinach onion powder cayenne pepper hot sauce

BEARDO

DAN DOUGHERTY

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY KELLY HICKEY THE DAILY ILLINI

While I still have experimenting to do with an endless possibility of juice recipes, I’m excited to add fresh juice into my diet. The juicer can even be used for fresh orange or grapefruit juice or a bloody mary mix. For now, I plan on drinking juice for a snack or substituting one meal a day for fresh juice. I have found most juices are surprisingly satiating and easy to take to class in a portable cup. As for Joe Cross’s 60-day diet plan, I have yet to actually try a juice cleanse. While drinking only juice for a few days can cleanse toxins from your body, extended juice fasts can be dangerous. Besides that, I think I would simply miss chewing too much. All in all, my surprise juicer delivery could very well be the start to a healthier lifestyle. Especially if you struggle with fresh fruits and vegetables, I would suggest juicing as a fun and efficient way to get them in.

Jordan is a senior in Media and can be reached at sward13@dailyillini.com.

in the deaf community. “Almost at a fundamental value, a cochlear implant kind of says deaf is not good, so you can see how it’s kind of a challenge to a cultural value,” Dye said. “They see it as an invasion surgery for a non-life-threatening condition, because from their perspective, you can live a full, fulfilling life as a deaf person, so there’s no need for the surgery.” Deaf people don’t always see the implant as necessarily the problem but more so as the negative attitudes toward deafness that tend to go along with the cochlear implant. By and large, technology has served as an amazing communication tool for the deaf community while also providing some challenges to their cultural values. Economic improvements, migrations into the suburbs and better accessibility to the hearing world has caused some deaf communities to disperse, Dye said, although video telecommunication and the use of the Internet has allowed deaf people from across the country and around the world to connect. Looking ahead, Weiss would like to see improvements in television captioning services, video quality and connection speeds, as well as an increase in ASL interpreters, specifically in University programs in Champaign. Although most of the current technological advancements used by the deaf were created by the

hearing world, the deaf community might start to direct their technological tools on their own as higher numbers of the deaf enter high education. “I think what you’ll see is rather than deaf people piggy-backing on technologies developed by the hearing world, they’re going to have their own computer scientists, their own engineers, their own entrepreneurs, who are going to develop the technologies and the tools that deaf people want, as deaf people,” Dye said. This type of progress will continue to develop through the cultivation in deaf schools and communities found throughout the country, a network of people that are now better connected than ever before. The Illinois Association of the Deaf, an organization that communicates through email, AIM chat and videophones, helps share deaf culture through many social events hosted in the Champaign-Urbana area through its Illini Chapter. The IAD will also have its 2013 conference in Champaign on June 20-22 to host a variety of social gatherings and workshops, including those on technology. “Deaf advocates look forward to an even brighter future of improving communication barriers to ensure access for deaf and hard of hearing people and full participation in all aspects of life,” Botz said.

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Illinois Student Senate Come to the Illinois Student Senate’s weekly meeting at 7:00 p.m. in the Pine Lounge at the Illini Union. We will be discussing student policy and Campus Spirit Revival will be giving a presentation. Free iClicker Rental this Wednesday in the Illini Union from 11-3.

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Communication accessibility isn’t the only important aspect of these advances, Weiss explained. Technology is also helping to change the reputation of the deaf and hard of hearing to the hearing world. “Our language is different than English, and hearing people can’t always understand it. (Now) people are realizing, ‘Wow, deaf people really can communicate,’” Weiss said. “We were very dependent on hearing people to make phone calls for us. Now deaf folks are very independent, and technology has certainly been a part of that.” Deaf culture has also been challenged by technology, however. According to Gallaudet University, a deaf university in Washington, D.C., 13 percent of the U.S. population is deaf or hard of hearing. Of those 38 million people, 10 percent are considered to be the core component of deaf culture: people born into deaf families or are actively involved in the deaf community or both. This core group identifies themselves as deaf — not in terms of a disability but as a minority group. So when cochlear implants — a surgically implanted electronic device that can help provide a sense of sound — were introduced in the late 20th century, they caused a lot of controversy

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Not getting all your fruits and veggies? Turn to Page 5A to learn how columnist Jordan Sward creates nutrient-filled snacks on the go.

6A | Wednesday, January 23, 2013 | www.DailyIllini.com

BY KELLY CHUIPEK STAFF WRITER

Being bilingual may delay Alzheimer’s, increase cognition and expand your horizons eyond a means of communication, the ability to speak multiple languages includes a wide variety of benefits — many unknown to those who even possess the capability to converse with people all over the world. For some students on campus, bilingualism has been a lifelong skill, leading to the pursuit of future language acquisition and aiding in everyday life. Further, recent studies have shown that bilinguals have many cognitive advantages. For example, studies show that bilingualism may aid in delaying the onset of Alzheimer’s. “Handling two languages in your head is like cognitive gymnastics,” said Silvina Montrul, professor in the department of Spanish, Italian and Portuguese. “So as I am speaking English to you, I have to suppress my Spanish, for example.” Beyond the cognitive and metalinguistic advantages, Montrul said learning a second language can have a large impact on a person’s life, opening doors for those desire a unique perspective. “Today we live in a global world,” she said. “Knowledge of something more than us is really important.” For Sasha Kupershmidt, freshman in LAS, being bilingual is a quality she has possessed since preschool. With her first language of Russian, which she learned with her parents at home, Kuperschmidt learned English when she starting attending school. For the past five years, Kuperschmidt has been studying and practicing French with plans to immerse herself

in Parisian life to fully master the language. With three languages under her belt, Kuperschmidt has seen this skill repeatedly work in her favor. “Russian has helped me because I obviously wouldn’t be able to communicate with my family,” she said. “I have also been to Russia and Ukraine, where my family is from, over past summers, so communicating with all of the people there and knowing a whole new culture that takes up almost two continents is fascinating.” Aside from communication with family, Kuperschmidt hopes to use her language skills to further her career aspirations of working as a dentist. While Kupershmidt might have been bilingual at an early age, that does not mean it doesn’t have its challenges. “Most people say that it’s easier to learn another language once you already know one, but what I have learned is that it is easier to learn a second language after you have learned one by the book,” she said. Kupershmidt learned Russian from listening to her parents at home, but she doesn’t have textbook grammar knowledge. “I know it because I hear it and it sounds right,” she said. “Had I learned Russian by the textbook, then I definitely would have known what it means to conjugate a verb or that adjectives go before nouns or something.” Kuperschmidt has learned a great deal of patience in maintaining and learning a new language, forcing herself to practice among family members and using flash-

cards to expand her knowledge of the French language. This perseverance has paid off for her so far. “Learning a language takes diligence and patience and a lot of practice,” she said. “So I think that it has taught me that you have to be very diligent about learning it — and I have taken that to other parts of my schooling and my life.” Peter Alemis, sophomore in LAS, has a similar background to Kuperschmidt. Alemis’ first language is Greek after learning to speak it at home and in Greek school. He is fluent in English, Greek and Spanish and considers himself conversational in Italian. Alemis studied Spanish for five years and spent a summer in Madrid, which helped him further understand the language. He learned Italian in school and credits his ability to learn diverse languages with his background. “Italian and Spanish were easier to pick up because I know Greek,” he said. “Learning Greek helped me learn Spanish easier because I had the accent and it’s easier to pick up similar words in the language.” Alemis’ ability to master multiple languages has benefitted him in more ways than one — including improving his knowledge of the world. “One thing that stood out to me is that I have met friends all over the world so I feel more global, and it’s cool knowing language so that I can communicate with other people in their own languages,” he said. “It has expanded my knowledge of the world and other cultures.”

Montrul said that being bilingual is particularly beneficial when started at a young age. In addition to teaching on campus, Montrul has dedicated part of her time to founding the University Language Academy for Children at the University of Illinois, which focuses on providing after school opportunities for children to learn Spanish. The program highlights the benefits of early second language education, including cognitive, academic, social and cultural advantages to children. Much of Montrul’s research on campus focuses on second language acquisition of adults who started in high school, as many students on campus have attempted. While adults have the ability to study more because their cognitive capacity is higher, the result is not always as successful as if the learning were to start earlier. “As a child, you are making slower progress, but you are also setting the roots for what will happen in the future,” she said. Language acquisition in children also enhances cognitive development, especially when they are in a situation where they are adding a second language to their knowledge. If a child understands two languages and tries to learn a third language, it becomes much easier. Whether students grew up bilingual, took language class in high school or have yet to make it through Rosetta Stone tapes, the benefits of learning multiple languages can last a lifetime.

Kelly can be reached at features@dailyillini.com.

Advances in technology help deaf, hearing worlds communicate BY SARAH SOENKE STAFF WRITER

New popular technological advancements, such as the recent release of the iPhone 5, can cause excitement for different reasons. For the hearing world, it’s for the improvements and new gadgets that will entertain and increase convenience. For those deaf or hard of hearing, however, it can serve as a tool to communicate in ways never before possible. Take the succession of networks that have been released for cellphones. The switch from 3G to 4G was praised for its increased speed and improved clarity.

For the deaf though, it was seen as the introduction to being able to call another person for the first time. Matthew Dye, assistant professor in Speech and Hearing Science, teaches a class on United States deaf culture. He explained how the introduction of video telecommunication had a major impact on the deaf community. “3G really struggled to support sign language communication. You really couldn’t video chat with a high enough quality — it would get blurry, you wouldn’t have the resolution you’d need,” he said. “(Now with 4G) it can be captured, trans-

ported and displayed in real time on another device. Fundamentally, that was transformational.” The deaf community uses a variety of technologies with improved accessibility, said Angela Botz, president of the Illinois Association of the Deaf. Generally, these technologies can be grouped into three categories: hearing technology, alerting devices and communication supports. These encompass many video- and text-based communication systems, such as real-time captioning, email, instant and text messaging systems and a wide range of relay ser-

vices that provide access to telephone networks. All of these technological improvements are unitized to make communicating with both the deaf world and the hearing world more accessible. Susan Weiss, an American Sign Language instructor at the University, has been deaf since birth. For her, video telecommunication and video relay service, a type of video interpreting service, have been the most influential technological changes so far. Through VRS, a deaf person can communicate to a hearing person via a live interpreter; as the deaf person

signs to the interpreter through video, the interpreter translates for the hearing person by telephone and vice versa. “That technology has just been amazing. It’s something I use everyday, it’s very beneficial,” Weiss said through an interpreter via VRS. “In the olden days, we didn’t have to do that. I actually had to physically drive to a person’s home and if I found out they weren’t home, I’d leave them a note, you know, and drive back. ... Then the person comes over and misses me.”

See DEAF TECHNOLOGY, Page 5A

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1B Wednesday January 23, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Sports

Illini men’s basketball ends skid at Nebraska

Illini

OF THE WEEK

BY ERIC OLSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LINCOLN, Neb. — D.J. Richardson scored a career-high 30 points, Brandon Paul added 14 and Illinois ended a three-game losing streak with a 71-51 victory over Nebraska on Tuesday night. Illinois (15-5, 2-4 Big Ten) held Nebraska without a field goal for the last 8:51 of the fi rst half and led 35-23 at the break. The Huskers got no closer than six points the rest of the way. Dylan Talley had 16 points and Brandon Ubel added 10 for the Cornhuskers (10-10, 1-6). John Groce, in his fi rst year at Illinois, recorded his 100th win in five seasons as a head coach. The Illini shot 45 percent and committed 14 turnovers, but they had more offensive rebounds (12) than Nebraska had total rebounds (10) in the fi rst half and fi nished with a 40-28 advantage on the boards. Nebraska was 2 of 14 on 3s and shot 32 percent for the game. Andre Almeida scored to trim Illinois’ lead to six points with 13 minutes left, but Paul converted a three-point play and made two more free throws to make it 49-38. Two Richardson free throws upped the Illini lead to 11 points before Talley’s 3 and David Rivers’ layin cut it to 51-44 and forced Groce to call timeout. The game got away from Nebraska at that point. Almeida was whistled for fouling Paul after the timeout, prompting howls from the crowd, and Paul made the free throws. Richardson followed with a 3-pointer, and while Nebraska was huddled in a timeout, the Huskers were assessed a bench technical. Richardson made the free throws to make it 58-44 with 7:26 left. The 6-foot-11 Nnanna Egwu blocked two of Ubel’s shots and had 10 rebounds to go with eight points. Joseph Bertrand had a career-high five steals for the Illini. Freshman Shavon Shields, who scored a careerbest 29 points on 10-of-11 shooting against Penn State, committed his fourth foul 2 minutes into the second half and didn’t score until he made a free throw with 11:16 left. Shields, who had averaged 13 points and 6.8 rebounds his previous five games, missed both his field goals and had two points in 21 minutes before fouling out with 5:13 to play. Illinois endured one of its most embarrassing defeats in its previous visit to Lincoln. The

See MBBALL, Page 2B

PORTRAIT OF YOSHI MORI BY BRENTON TSE

Yoshi Mori

Senior gymnast returns from injury to lead team to second-place finish at Windy City Invitational BY GINA MUELLER STAFF WRITER

Editor’s note: The Daily Illini sports desk sits down Sunday nights and decides which Illinois athlete or coach is our Illini of the Week. Student-athletes and coaches are evaluated by individual performance and contribution to team success. It’s ironic that Yoshi Mori chose to be a gymnast. Gymnastics can be a very individualistic sport, and Mori hates competing for himself and by himself. He was put in this exact situation when competing at the 2012 Visa Championships. Though Olympic Trial spots were limited, C.J. Maestas, Paul Ruggeri, Mori and former Illini volunteer assistant coach David Sender still showed support for one another. Being a part of such an individualistic competition this summer helped

prepare the senior for his final season at Illinois. “Me and Yoshi share that love of being a part of a family,” Maestas said. “It was a different atmosphere at Visas. He’s more comfortable competing for us than he is competing for himself.” Mori was not selected to attend the Olympic Trials but wasn’t discouraged from trying to represent the U.S. in another way. He is hoping to make the national team this year and continue his gymnastics career in the elite field after he leaves Illinois. “He was able to get to Visas and be on cusp of making Olympic Trials and realizing that he’s not that far out of the top-tier group. And despite never having made a national team, he can,” Illinois head coach Justin Spring said. “These nitpicking injuries have been very untimely, so that hasn’t been to his advan-

tage. But even with that, he still has a great opportunity to go and make the national team for the first time.” One of Mori’s specialty events is the pommel horse. This event has been said to be one of the most, or the most, difficult in men’s gymnastics. To be successful, a gymnast needs to present a combination of strength, precision and grace. Most gymnasts are intimidated by the event, but Mori is just the opposite. “I’d say it’s one of my favorite events because it’s the least scary,” he said. “You aren’t flipping up in the air or doing any crazy stuff. For the rest of the events, I need adrenaline and I need to get pumped up, but for pommel horse, I have to make sure my heart rate is a little lower.” Mori not only has the strength and precision needed to earn a high score, but he also captivates the judges with his grace. Maestas

»

More online: Go online to see

Yoshi Mori talk about his place on the team and what the future holds at www.DailyIllini.com. refers to Mori’s style as “elegant and Japanese” to complement his heritage. Aside from hard work, Mori’s body type factors into his success. “It’s genetics,” Spring said. “You play to your strengths, and his strengths play out very well on pommel horse. The horse is a swinging event, and he’s very good at it and very comfortable at it. He feels at home and trains hard. That’s a recipe for greatness.” This season, Illinois has had to deal with adversity. The Illini are missing two leaders — Paul Ruggeri graduated and Maestas is out for the year because of a tricep injury. After

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See IOTW, Page 2B

Illini racking up fouls, forced turnovers with aggressive ‘D’ BY JOHNATHAN HETTINGER STAFF WRITER

Adrienne GodBold has been available to play to the final buzzer just once this season. Karisma Penn and Ivory Crawford have been forced to end the game on the bench five times in 18 games. The trio of GodBold, Penn and Crawford accounts for 72 percent of Illinois’ scoring, 59 percent of the team’s rebounding, 72 percent of its steals and 85 percent of its blocks, but Illinois’ three greatest contributors are often not available in the closing minutes of games due to foul trouble. The Illinois women’s basketball team has had its players foul out more times (21) than any other team in the country this season. Disqualifications have played a key role in each of Illinois’ four most recent losses, all of which have been decided by four points or less. In each of the losses, the Illini were missing at least two current starters when time expired. In a 69-68 loss to Illinois State on Dec. 21, Crawford fouled out and GodBold was academically ineligible. Penn and GodBold fouled out in a 67-66 overtime loss to Purdue and a 79-75 loss to Michigan State. Point guard Alexis Smith, Penn and GodBold fouled out in Sunday’s 62-58 loss to Northwestern. GodBold, Penn and Crawford have accounted for 16 disqualifications. The three top scorers alone have fouled out more times than any team in the country other than the Ohio Valley’s Jacksonville State.

Smith has accounted for two more disqualifications, and frontcourt reserves Kersten Magrum, McKenzie Piper and Nia Oden have each fouled out once this season. Illinois head coach Matt Bollant said his aggressive style of play is likely to accumulate more fouls. His teams have a history of accumulating a lot of fouls. Last season, his Green Bay squad finished 290th out of 336 teams with 18.3 fouls per game, but the Lady Phoenix only had 10 players foul out in 33 games. He said since players were more familiar with his system and knew when to decrease aggression, they fouled out less often. Illinois has also had a history of fouling in recent years. Last season, the Illini averaged 17.8 fouls per game, and recorded 13 disqualifications in 30 games. The combination of Bollant’s coaching style and his roster’s aggressive tendencies have led to an average of 19.4 fouls per game, ranking 320th out of 343 teams nationally. The aggression has also helped the team force 23.7 turnovers per game, the most in the Big Ten and fifth-best in the nation. “We are getting in foul trouble, but we are being more aggressive and forcing a lot more turnovers,” Bollant said. “That being said, I think it’s possible to force turnovers without fouling people or else we wouldn’t play this system.” Bollant said he is fine with fouls coming from aggression, but too many fouls have

See WBBALL, Page 2B

Senior Adrienne GodBold has fouled out in six of her seven games. Foul trouble has limited her to 32.3 minutes per game, fourth on the team, despite being the team’s top scorer (19.0 points per game), secondleading rebounder (7.3 rebounds per game), and top perimeter defender. The trio of GodBold, Penn and Crawford accounts for 72 percent of Illinois’ scoring, 59 percent of the team’s rebounding, 72 percent of its steals and 85 percent of its blocks. Illinois’ three greatest contributors have combined to foul out 16 times this season, more than any other team in the country, other than Jacksonville State.

BRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI

Adrienne GodBold forces her way into the paint during Illinois’ loss to Northwestern at Assembly Hall on Sunday.

The Illinois women’s basketball team is 0-4 in games decided by four points or less this season. In each of the losses, Illinois was without at least two of its current starters. Here is a breakdown of the close losses: Dec. 21 — Illinois State, 69-68. Sophomore Ivory Crawford fouled out. Senior Adrienne GodBold was ineligible. Jan. 2 — Purdue, 67-66 (overtime). The Illini were forced to play overtime without seniors Karisma Penn and GodBold. Jan. 13 — Michigan State 79-75. The Illini were forced to finish the game without Penn and GodBold. Jan. 20 — Northwestern, 62-58. Point guard Alexis Smith, Penn and GodBold all fouled out. Northwestern ended the game on a 6-0 run after the three players fouled out.

Defending NCAA Champion Pieters will turn professional after junior season BY CLAIRE LAVEZZORIO STAFF WRITER

CHONG JIANG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Thomas Pieters tees off during a practice at the Stone Creek Golf Club in Urbana on April 18. Pieters announced he will turn professional after this season.

With many Illini from the past becoming professionals, such as Steve Stricker, Luke Guthrie and Scott Langley, the Illinois men’s golf team was bound to have another player take the leap from college to the pros. Belgian native Thomas Pieters is the latest addition to that list. Following the 2013 spring season, the reigning NCAA champion will leave the program with intentions to become a professional golfer, the program announced Tuesday. “I knew that I was going to one day become professional when I was around 8 to 10 years old,” Pieters said. “I just kept winning junior titles, so at that point I just knew.” During Pieters’ junior career, he placed top 10 in many prestigious tournaments, winning several titles. He has placed ninth at the European Individual Championship in Spain and has won titles in 2009 at the Ternesse Junior Open and the International Junior Open, where he fired a career-low 67 in the second round,

Entering Illinois having experienced success, it didn’t take much time for Pieters to stand out among competitive collegiate golfers. His 2012 season exemplifies his preparedness to compete at the professional level. Pieters was Illinois’ top finisher in seven of 12 events in 2012 and was named a firstteam All-American as well as first-team AllBig Ten. He finished the season placing in the top 11 at 10 events and boasted his first career title at the Jack Nicklaus Invitational in Dublin, Ohio, in October. Last season, he totaled 16 rounds under par, four of which he set career-bests at 6-under-par. Pieters earned two Big Ten Golfer of the Week honors on his way to winning the 2012 NCAA Championship as an individual. Pieters said he could not be more excited to begin his professional career. After the season, he will leave school to begin his new path. “Maybe in 10 years or so I’ll finish my degree, but for now, golf is my life,” Pieters said with a laugh.

But he said he is still nervous about what’s to come. “I like being very organized,” he said, “playing in both Europe and America without having my coach there full-time and having to do everything for myself is scary. Hopefully, I will have a good agent to plan my tournaments and travels.” Pieters did acknowledge that he has a lot to fall back on while beginning his new career. “I’ve learned a lot about work ethic and time management. Coach (Mike) Small has always pushed me to work so hard, and it’s something that I’ll always remember no matter if I play on the PGA Tour, the European Tour or the Web.com Tour,” he said. Because the direction of his future is uncertain, Pieters said his plan now is to focus on the season ahead. That point of his journey begins Jan. 26, when the Illinois men’s golf team opens its spring campaign Jan. 26 against Illinois State at the Tinervin Cup in Florida.

Claire can be reached at lavezzo2@dailyillini.com.

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2B

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

The big 10 of the

Big Ten reigns in turnover efficiency their production in the absence of preseason First-Team All-Big Ten selection Tim Frazier, signaling a potentially brighter future when Frazier returns from injury next year. Junior guard Jermaine Marshall exploded for 29 points and 10 rebounds in a loss to Michigan State last week.

BY ETHAN ASOFSKY AND THOMAS BRUCH SENIOR WRITER AND STAFF WRITER

Editor’s note: Big 10 of the Big Ten is a collection of tidbits from around the conference. This weekly feature provides a recap from the previous slate of games and also serves as a preview to the upcoming basketball week.

Michigan State scuffle

Evanston is not home After a road win at Illinois on Thursday, Northwestern head coach Bill Carmody said that he might put his team in a hotel off campus the night before its home matchup on Sunday against Indiana. Carmody’s team has struggled at Welsh-Ryan Arena all season.

Coach Miles out here tweetin’ Illinois fans got their first introduction to new Nebraska head coach Tim Miles on Tuesday night. Miles, an enthusiastic coach who turned Colorado State into an NCAA tournament team at his previous job, uniquely connects with Huskers fans by tweeting out adjustments his team needs to make at halftime.

Penn State police investigated a minor dust-up between two Michigan State players — Adreian Payne and Branden Dawson — at a Penn State hotel the morning before the Spartans’ game against the Nittany Lions. Michigan State head coach Tom Izzo suspended both players for the first half of the game. The brief suspension did not deter Payne much, who finished with 20 points.

Izzo reaches another milestone With his team’s win over Penn State on Jan. 16, Michigan State head coach Tom Izzo won his 200th Big Ten game, a milestone only six coaches have recorded in history. Illinois great Lou Henson is one of those six. MARK DAVIS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ohio State lost a close one to Michigan State on Saturday, but Deshaun Thomas is not to blame. Thomas scored half of his team’s 56 points and made more field goals and 3-pointers than the rest of his teammates combined. Thomas leads the Big Ten in scoring at 20.8 points per game.

The Big Ten has five of the top 17 teams in turnover efficiency in the nation, the best of any conference. Wisconsin ranks fourth in college basketball, giving up just 9.1 turnovers a game. Ohio State, Nebraska, Michigan and Northwestern also cracked the list.

Home court advantage

Not much ink will be devoted to the Nittany Lions basketball team this season, especially after their 0-6 start in the Big Ten, but unheralded players have stepped up

After Wisconsin’s 70-66 loss to Iowa on Saturday, no team in the Big Ten remains untainted, confirming most analysts suspicions that the conference is as deep as

come from mental mistakes and frustration. GodBold has fouled out in six of her seven games. Foul trouble has limited her to 32.3 minutes per game, fourth on the team, despite being the team’s top scorer, second-leading rebounder and top perimeter defender. Mental lapses many times lead to GodBold’s fouls. “Be smart. That’s something I need to do as a starter,” GodBold said. “I tend to be overly aggressive most of the time. That’s how I get my fouls, fouling in the backcourt and making not-smart decisions.” GodBold isn’t the only player making questionable decisions on fouls. Crawford and Smith have both been guilty of perimeter fouls as well. “We should be more aware and conscious of what’s going on as a team (on the defensive end),” GodBold said. “Talking to each other ahead of time is something we don’t do very often on fouls, but it’s something

Michigan’s Tim Hardaway, Jr. was named Big Ten Player of the Week after dropping 21 efficiently scored points in Michigan’s 83-75 road win against Minnesota. The junior got 87.5 percent of his shots to fall from the field in Michigan’s first road win over a top-10 team since 1996.

Best ballhandlers

Depth proven

FROM PAGE 1B

Hardaway Jr.’s week acknowledged

Deshaun “Offense” Thomas

Penn State stand-ins

WBBALL

its ever been.

we’re going to work on.” The Illini accumulate less fouls in their Buzz defense, so Bollant often switches to that when players accumulate a large number of fouls in man-to-man coverage. He said that he has played Buzz more than he likely would have if he had more depth. Bollant also has let his players continue to play with two fouls in the first half because of a lack of depth. Many coaches deem this approach too risky because they want their players to be available in the closing minutes of the game; players many times end up recording three first-half fouls, limiting the players in the second half. Illinois’ loss to Northwestern was the latest example of foul trouble putting an Illinois lead in jeopardy. With 2:00 left and Illinois leading 58-56, GodBold recorded her fifth foul, joining Smith and Penn on the bench. After the foul, the Wildcats went on a 6-0 run to finish with a 62-58 victory.

Johnathan can be reached at hetting2@dailyillini. com and @jhett93.

Visiting teams hold a .500 record (16-16) in conference play this season.

Ethan and Thomas can be reached at sports@dailyillini.com.

IOTW FROM PAGE 1B Maestas’ injury, the injuries mounted. As a senior, Mori was the first one the team looked to for a leader. “Obviously, we have had some injuries that have set us back as a team, but that doesn’t matter to Yoshi.“ Maestas said. “I know when he raises his hand, it’s complete trust and confidence that he’s going to go out there and do his job. Especially now, when it was him, Paul and I last year who were the three big hitters. This year, it was just me and him, and now I’m out. It’s more to his plate, but you could throw anything his way.” Though Illinois has lost Maestas for the season, Mori felt as if he was going to be a leader no matter what the circumstances arose this season. As an upperclassman, he said he wants to train his younger teammates to keep the program’s success

Nebraska head coach Tim Miles argues a call with an official in Lincoln, Neb.

MBBALL FROM PAGE 1B Illini were outscored 36-4 over portions of the fi rst and second halves Feb. 18 on their way to an 80-57 loss to a poor Nebraska team that ended up fi ring its coach, Doc Sadler, after the season. The performance prompted some Illinois players to weep alive. “I do feel like I have more of a leadership role, especially this year being a senior and doing the allaround,” Mori said. “I got to make sure that I especially keep the freshmen motivated, share the experiences I have had and hope they do well.” Unlike Maestas, Mori is more of a quiet, reserved gymnast. But that doesn’t mean his leadership goes unnoticed. Last season, he finished sixth in the all-around and fifth on the pommel horse at the 2012 NCAA Championships. Spring said his performances have the ability to change the entire team atmosphere. “Especially in competitions, there are momentum shifts left and right and hit routines are big,” Spring said. “Yoshi is kind of a silent competitor in the meet until he gets out on the equipment and then he lets his gymnastics do the talking.” This season, Mori has suffered from collarbone, sternum and back

on the bench and in the locker room. The loss also sealed the fi ring of head coach Bruce Weber last year. Illinois continued to struggle with its 3-point shooting, making 7 of 22. The Illini averaged a nationleading 10.8 threes a game in December but have made just 15 of 80 in their previous four games.

injuries. Last weekend, he competed for the first time this season desppite still suffering from pain in his back. Mori has also never competed with the all-around format in practice before, but Spring said the Windy City Invitational was more of a trial run. With a small amount of practice, Mori placed third in the all-around and first on the pommel horse. His performance foreshadows what is yet to come. “It says he is incredibly talented,” Spring said. “To be great on something, like his pommel horse, the work has got to be there. We’ve got to get a lot more work in the allaround, and he could be a lot higher than third in the all-around, even in the country. He can compete, but the hard work has to come behind the scenes to get on the top of the podium, which is where he could be.”

Gina can be reached at muelle30@dailyillini.com and @muelle30.

Illinois hockey utilizes system of colorful jerseys to organize lineup BY STEPHEN BOURBON STAFF WRITER

Hockey is a unique sport. Contrary to its popular counterparts, football or soccer, hockey doesn’t wait for players to be substituted in and out. Player changes are done on the fly, once a minute for every minute of the game. With four lines of offense and up to three pairings of defensemen, the Illinois hockey team has a lot of players shuttling in and out of the game. Trying to break up the players during practice causes the team to stash away traditional Illini colors in favor of a more diverse pallet. At each practice, players will sport one of eight colors, based on their position and line. Goaltenders wear white, defensemen wear black and injured players don red uniforms. Each line of forwards wears a different color: gray, light blue, yellow, orange or green, depending on how lines are broken up that weekend. “I think it’s really common,” forward Austin Bostock said of the rainbow of jerseys. “It really helps in practice when we’re doing forechecking drills and zone drills.” Also, the chaos of trying to orchestrate substitutions is quelled with the colors. In the midst of play, head coach Nick Fabbrini can simply call out a color and three forwards will be ready to come in at a moment’s notice. While it’s convenient not

only to differentiate players in drills and games, breaking up the lines helps Fabbrini game plan. Because the team only dresses four lines a game, players on the green line normally are scratched from the lineup on game day. “We take extra players because obviously everyone doesn’t play,” forward Mario Pacheco said. “If you had a bad week of practice or aren’t playing well, then you might get scratched.” The gray line, centered by freshman John Olen, is the Illini’s premier scoring line, with Olen and forward Scott Barrera as the team’s top-two point scorers. The light blue line, centered by Matt Welch with Bostock and Matt Crook, is a fast and physical line with the ability to fly around at both ends on the ice. The yellow line is known for being a stingy defensive unit that is mostly tasked with matching up against the other team’s top scoring line. Eddie Quagliata centers the line, along with Nick Stuercke and Daniel Kerr, as of late. Orange is led by Pacheco at center and features Jon Langan and Jacob Matysiak on the wings. Pacheco described the group as a “tempo line” that comes in and is reliable to play a good shift in situations after a power play or at the beginning of a period. The main competition among players is to stay off the green line and on the ice, but there is also friendly competition among

PORTRAIT BY JOSEPH LEE THE DAILY ILLINI

At each Illini practice, the players will sport any one of eight colors, based on their position and line. Goaltenders wear white, defensemen wear black and injured players don red uniforms. Each line of forwards wears a different color: gray, light blue, yellow, orange or green, depending on how the lines are broken up for that weekend’s games. . lines in practice. “It can be frustrating when you aren’t clicking as a line,” Pacheco said. “If we’re getting dominated out there in a minigame, and my line is losing to another line, it’s frustrating.” There isn’t the blind ambition of a set depth chart like other sports. No line is necessarily better than others, but playing time depends on the situation. The whole team knows there are shifts to be won with good play in practice. Particularly, the “special teams” of hockey, which consist of power-play and penalty-killing shifts, allow lines to be sculpted and altered to

create the best combination. With the exception of those situations, the linesmen are able to work together in practice and games, building chemistry with each other on the ice. “You get pretty bonded with your line because they’re always on your team,” Pacheco said. “We’re great buddies off the ice.” With a three-game winning streak intact and the conference and national tournaments looming, Bostock doesn’t foresee too many more changes to the lines — a practice that was common in the beginning stages of the year.

“I don’t think there will be too much more switching,” Bostock said. “It’s up to Fabbrini and (assistant coach) Dan Rooney as we go forward.” The Illini are winding down the season and enjoying the constant of having the same lines. Bostock said even the little things are important to keep the same in the future. “I think it would cause a bit of commotion in the locker room if Barrera and those guys were wearing orange, and we were wearing green.”

Stephen can be reached at sbourbo2@ dailyillini.com and @steve_bourbon.

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013

3B

We still don’t know all the answers about Te’o’s girlfriend hoax JACK CASSIDY Sports columnist

P

RYAN JONES THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

In a photo provided by ESPN, Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te'o pauses during an interview with ESPN on Friday, in Bradenton, Fla. ESPN says Te'o maintains he was never involved in creating the dead girlfriend hoax.

ut yourself in this scenario. Your boss calls you into his office early one morning. The drive to work was pleasant enough to have you in a chipper mood despite it being a Monday morning. The sky was clear, the sun was warm and the breeze was cool and crisp, so you decide to put your car windows down. Your coffee was delicious. And at first glance, with the sunlight pouring in the office windows, your co-workers carry your same mood. You poke your head into your boss’ office with a smile and say, “Good morning.” He only looks at you, then at the chair across from him, then back down at the desk. His face tells the story. You sit down without a word, waiting for whatever bad news awaits you, for whatever is about to ruin your mood. But he is not mad at you. In fact, he is not angry at all. After some mumbling and broken sentences, he finally conveys what exactly is bothering him. His best friend is ill at a hospital two hours away and is not expected to make it through the day. You’ve never had a relationship or any sort of meaningful interaction with your boss. You never even knew he had friends. But he is a major presence at work and you respect his accomplishments, so in this moment, you feel for him. In a voice you imagine to be holding back tears, he explains why he specifically brought you into his office. You are in charge of the office’s top project at the moment, and he was wondering how the job was progressing. He must have mentioned his dying friend simply because he needed to share that information with someone, anyone, to unbottle the grief building inside him. At

least, that’s what you presume. The project is going smoothly, so you tell him so. Then you give your condolences, exchange goodbyes and head back to work. Your good mood is gone, replaced by motivation. The project that your boss expressed a clear interest in now becomes more important. And each time you pass your boss’ office and see him working hard through what must be overwhelming despair, you feel that much more motivated. If he can do it, you can do it. You work with the corporate equivalent of an Olympian’s final stretch adrenaline rush, and the project turns out masterful. Your stock has improved in the eyes of your boss, and his stock has improved in the eyes of his superiors. Given the circumstances, you know you’ve done well. Three months later, you find out your boss’ best friend did not die. He was never in the hospital. He was never sick. He may not even be a real person. How do you feel? Suddenly, you start asking the question you should have asked that morning in his office. Why wouldn’t he travel two hours to see his friend in his final moments? Why was he at work? They are easy questions to ask now, but at the time, you don’t question grief. More so, you didn’t truly know your boss outside of work, yet he was confiding the death of a friend with you. Why, if not for inspiration? Now, keep yourself in the same scenario, but instead of your boss’s friend dying, it is the friend of a seldom seen coworker. Or instead of death, your boss’ house is being foreclosed. Or his car has been vandalized. How do you feel now? Did those

occurrences affect your work? This is the Manti Te’o story. In both the case of Te’o and the fictional boss, the answers to the above questions are unclear, but it has something to do with his team and its success. And it certainly has something to do with his leadership position. Te’o wasn’t simply a Notre Dame co-worker. He was the boss. Of the biggest and most desperate fanbase in college football. Reestablishing itself as a national power. During its best season in decades. And the story wasn’t overcoming injury, rebounding from a bad season or anything sports related like that. It was about death. That “hoax” pulled off the ultimate formula for inspiration. If even one component changes, the story’s effect lessens. Sports have become so much of a legend that if the narrative isn’t an epic tale, it isn’t worth telling. When the story comes together — Jesse Owens, Jackie Robinson, the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team, postKatrina New Orleans Saints, etc. — the payoff for fans is tremendous, so in some ways this trend is good. But in many other ways, needing Disney-like inspiration for sports to be validated ruins the game. This is the Information Age. Is a real sport still real if it’s told through false storylines? Is the employee’s work legitimate, regardless of quality, if it is the product of manipulation? Perhaps we needed to be inspired by nonexistent inspiration to understand the question. We still don’t know the answers.

Perhaps we needed to be inspired by nonexistent inspiration to understand the question. We still don’t know the answers.

Jack is a senior in LAS. He can be reached at cassidy8@dailyillini.com. Follow him on Twitter @JCassidy10.

Ohio State holds on to defeat Iowa, gains all-time series lead BY RUSTY MILLER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Deshaun Thomas, who missed part of the second half with a cut above his eye, scored 16 points and No. 14 Ohio State built a big lead and then held on to beat Iowa 72-63 on Tuesday night. Thomas, the Big Ten’s leading scorer at 21 points per game, sat out about three minutes while an open cut over his right eye was bandaged. The Buckeyes (14-4, 4-2 Big Ten) led by 24 points with under 13 minutes left but watched as Iowa cut the lead to four with 1:30 remaining. Aaron White, an Ohio native playing his first college game in his home state, had 13 points for Iowa (13-6, 2-4).

Aaron Craft and Lenzelle Smith Jr. both had 12 points and Evan Ravenel added 11 for Ohio State. The Buckeyes used a 10-0 run bridging halftime to build a 24-point lead. Iowa rallied to draw within five points on White’s bank shot with 2:30 left. Ohio State missed a shot but rebounded it before Craft was called for an offensive foul. White then was fouled and hit the second of two to cut the lead to 63-59 with 1:30 remaining. Craft added a foul shot with 1:02 left and, after forcing a turnover, Thomas made two more with 52.9 seconds remaining. Roy Devyn Marble, who had a miserable shooting night for the

Kansas defeats KSU 59-55 in battle of ex-Illinois coaches

Hawkeyes, then missed two free throws before Craft made two more to push the lead to 68-59 with 40 seconds left. The victory broke a stalemate in the series, which began in 1915. Each team had won 75 meetings coming in. Ohio State has won eight straight against Iowa and 10 of the last 11. The Hawkeyes haven’t won in Columbus since 2004. The Hawkeyes’ four Big Ten losses have come to teams ranked in the top 15 — No. 2 Michigan, No. 7 Indiana, No. 13 Michigan State and the 14thranked Buckeyes. Those teams came into the week with an overall combined record of 62-10 and 16-5 in the conference.

GENE J. PUSKAR THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A sign of support is displayed near the site where a bronze statue of former Penn State head coach Joe Paterno once stood outside Beaver Stadium in State College, Pa., Tuesday. Supporters of Paterno are marking the 1-year anniversary of his death with a candlelight vigil Tuesday night.

Paterno remembered on anniversary of his passing BY GENARO C. ARMAS

BY DAVE SKRETTA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MANHATTAN, Kan. — Travis Releford scored 12 points and No. 3 Kansas held off No. 11 Kansas State down the stretch for a 59-55 victory Tuesday night that gave the Jayhawks sole possession of first place in the Big 12. Ben McLemore and Jeff Withey added 11 points each for the Jayhawks (17-1, 5-0), who pushed their nation-leading winning streak to 16 games — matching the third-longest under coach Bill Self — and ended the Wildcats’ 12-game home winning streak. Shane Southwell, who scored a career-high 19 points, got Kansas State (15-3, 4-1) within 56-53 with a scooping layup with 38.2 seconds left. But after Naadir Tharpe made two foul shots to restore a five-point lead, the Wildcats’ Rodney McGruder misfired from beyond the arc at the other end. McLemore was fouled and missed his free throw, and McGruder made two to get Kansas State within 58-55 with five seconds left. But Elijah Johnson’s free throw put the game away. McGruder finished with 13 points and Angel Rodriguez had 12, all in the first half, as the Wildcats lost for the 45th time in 48 games against their bitter in-state rival. Kansas State had its own eight-game winning streak snapped. The atmosphere was amped long before the opening tip. Students on their first day back from winter break lined up for several hundred yards in freezing temperatures, and then flooded seats on one

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — Flowers and mementos left by supporters adorned Joe Paterno’s gravesite Tuesday, a year after the longtime Penn State coach’s death, while at the spot where a bronze statue of him used to stand, a makeshift sign of cardboard CHARLIE RIEDEL THE ASSOCIATED PRESS flapped in a cold wind. Kansas center Jeff Withey gets past Kansas State guard “Joseph Paterno. Always Shane Southwell to put up a shot Tuesday in Manhattan, remembered. Always a legend,” Kan. Kansas defeated Kansas State 59-55 on the backs of read the sign outside Beaver Stadium and attached to a tree with Withey and Ben McLemore’s 11 points. white wire. side of the building more than two hours before The Hall of Fame coach died of the game started. lung cancer Jan. 22, 2012, at age The Jayhawks, undaunted by the pulsating 85. Besides the bouquets and signs, crowd, methodically built a 16-8 lead midway supporters also planned to mark through the first half. Kansas took advantage of the anniversary of his death with some balky outside shooting by the Wildcats, and a candlelight vigil at a downtown routinely beat them off the dribble at the other State College mural that includes end for easy baskets around the rim. a depiction of Paterno. McLemore picked up his second foul of the half He died more than two months with 9:22 left, though, and Kansas State went on after being fired in the frana run with the Jayhawks’ leading scorer on the tic days following the arrest of bench. Martavious Irving started the 11-2 spurt former assistant coach Jerry with a scooping layup and Southwell ended it with Sandusky on child molestation a 3-pointer from the wing that gave Kansas State charges in November 2011. His a 19-18 lead and forced Self to call a timeout. legacy remains a sensitive topic It served to settle down the senior-laden for groups of alumni, former playJayhawks. ers and local residents. A family spokesman has said Perry Ellis scored a couple of baskets around a shot clock-beating jumper by Tharpe to help the Paternos would not take part Kansas retake the lead, and Kevin Young’s put- in public gatherings Tuesday. A year ago, the campus was back off his own miss made it 31-27 at halftime.

flooded with mourners. Commemorations were much smaller on a frigid Tuesday with temperatures in the teens. Supporters like Dan Hamm, a freshman from Williamsport, have said Paterno’s 46-year career as a whole should be taken into consideration, including the longtime coach’s focus on academics. “We wanted to pay our respects. We wanted to celebrate who he was as a person,” Hamm said after visiting Paterno’s grave at a State College cemetery on a blustery afternoon. Then, nodding his head in the direction of Paterno’s adorned gravesite, Hamm said, “You can see here that Joe Paterno was Penn State, and Penn State will always be Joe Paterno.” Former FBI director Louis Freeh released findings July 12 in the school’s internal investigation of the scandal. Paterno’s reputation was tarnished after Freeh accused the coach and three former school administrators of covering up allegations against Sandusky. The retired defensive coordinator has been sentenced to at least 30 years in prison after being convicted of 45 criminal counts. Prosecutors said allegations occurred off and on campus, including the

football facility. On July 22, Penn State removed Paterno’s statue, which had been a gathering point for mourners last January. The next day, the NCAA reacted with uncharacteristic swiftness in levying strict sanctions including a four-year bowl ban, strict scholarship cuts and a $60 million fine. Paterno was also stripped of 111 victories, meaning he no longer held the major college record of 409 career wins. Paterno’s family and the three administrators have vehemently denied Freeh’s allegations, along with denying suspicions they took part in a cover-up. Also, Paterno’s family has been planning what a spokesman has called a comprehensive response to Freeh’s findings. But on Tuesday, the family was expected to remain in privacy. A delivery man dropped off flowers at the Paternos’ modest ranch home in the afternoon, walking past a sign staked to the snow-covered lawn. The sign read in part, “Thank you Joe! Thank you Sue!”, referring to Paterno’s widow. “RIP JoePa ... 409 forever.” Another sign posted near Paterno’s grave read “Joe Paterno. Penn State’s Spirit in the Sky.”


4B

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217-742-6130

505 W. University Ave., Champaign

B L O T T O

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PARKING / STORAGE 570 "#$%&'$!(!)*++$! ! ,-.!(!/.#-+! ! 01-!(!23$#+'! ! 435!(!6&.$! ! 7-.!(!8'3*5! ! 90:;<<:;==,9! ! >>>?@.@A*&A+*-#+1?%&@!

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$890 $950 $685 - $745 $1000+ $660 - $870 $775 $865 $775 Most apt. furnished, parking available, laundry available

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Luxury 1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Loft Apartments with Private Baths

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306 N. Lincoln, U.

Budget Minded 1-2 bedrooms, five great locations, air-conditioning, & off-street parking $425-$660

530

ROOMMATE WANTED 550

211 W. SPRINGFIELD AVENUE | CHAMPAIGN, IL 61820

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Office: 911 W. Springfield, Urbana IL

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020

Part time

420 APARTMENTS

Furnished

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HELP WANTED

420 APARTMENTS

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Full time

420 APARTMENTS

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HELP WANTED

APARTMENTS

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The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 85  

Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013

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