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The Daily Illini

Friday January 18, 2013

www.DailyIllini.com

The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

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Vol. 142 Issue 82

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Pension debt rising as Legislature inaction continues BY CHRISSY PAWLOWSKI STAFF WRITER

By the time the Illinois General Assembly is scheduled to take the next step on pension reform Jan. 30, the pension debt will have increased by $376.2 million since lawmakers ended their session on Jan. 8 without voting on a plan to fi x the pension system. That debt continues to grow at a rate of $17.1 million each day,

accruing unfunded liabilities through the interest on the state’s pension debt, according to Gov. Pat Quinn’s office. This adds to the $96 billion in unfunded pension liabilities, currently the highest in the nation, according to the Pew Center for the States. House Bill 98, the refi led pension reform bill that was submitted in the eleventh hour of the previ-

ous term, can’t move forward until the House Rules Committee holds a hearing at the end of the month. Quinn hoped a decision on pension reform would be reached before the Democratic supermajority was sworn in Jan. 9, but the previous assembly adjourned its session before a floor vote took place. House Bill 98 co-sponsor David Harris, R-Arlington Heights, said he was disap-

pointed that the bill was not put to a vote before the assembly’s adjournment. “There was a disagreement ... between the House and the Senate on the best approach to take, and given the very short period of time that we had to work with, we weren’t able to hammer out a negotiated agreement,” Harris said.

See PENSION, Page 3A

“As elected leaders, we have a responsibility to put politics aside and enact a solution that prevents skyrocketing pension costs from squeezing out core services like education, public safety and health care.” PAT QUINN, Illinois governor

Mixed reactions for gun control

You’re getting very sleepy

Proposed law draws criticism, support from local officials DAILY ILLINI STAFF REPORT

BRIAN YU THE DAILY ILLINI

Craig Langworthy, freshman in DGS, squeezes his hands together during an audience participation segment during the Illini Union Board’s Hypnotist Show on Thursday night. Steve Marino, renowned hypnotist, visited the Courtyard Cafe and held a show as part of the Illini Union’s Welcome Back Week.

See GUN CONTROL, Page 3A

Little Rock Nine member to lead MLK celebration Committee hopes to create ‘call to action’ within community BY EMMA WEISSMANN STAFF WRITER

The citizens of Champaign County and members of the University community are invited to come together and honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the 12th annual county wide celebration of the civil rights

leader’s life and legacy Friday afternoon. “Having the Courage to Overcome the Mountain,” planned by a committee of representatives from the University, Parkland College, Urbana, Champaign and Champaign County, will be held from 4-5 p.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn, 1501 S. Neil St., Champaign. Champaign City Council member Will Kyles, District 1, said he hopes the celebration will lead to a “call for action” within the community. “Inequality still exists, and ‘Overcoming the Mountain’ may not necessarily

“I want a student to feel like they’re more than somebody who pays tribute to our businesses...there’s a lot of opportunities for collaboration.”

be a racial issue, but maybe something in our own life,” Kyles said. “I hope people will have a call to action to do something positive.” He said he also hopes members of the University attend in order to “bridge the gap” between the University community and the public community in the Champaign County, and encourage students to stay in the community after they graduate. “It’s an opportunity to breach two worlds,” Kyles said. “I want a student to

pound targeted an enzyme in the bug, helping those infected to fight it off with their immune systems. “The compound inhibits an enzyme that staph requires to divide,” said Oldfield. “You basically stop them from making the cell wall so they can’t grow and your immune system, if you’re not suppressed, can kill them.” The California team is headed by Andrew McCammon, professor of pharmacology and chemistry and biochemistry. When his team first started out, they singled out an enzyme called FPPS as a possible way to disrupt the bacteria’s cell wall. Oldfield’s team was put in charge of testing various compounds on the enzyme. However, when University graduate student Wei Zhu carried out these tests, he found the compounds were not potent enough. “I first tested FPPS, but it didn’t

STAFF WRITER

A University-led team has discovered a compound that could stem the tide of deadly infections from a drug-resistant bacteria. Although the research has only been with mice recovering from Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, team leader and chemistry professor Eric Oldfield said he eventually wants to get drugs using the compound the team discovered to doctors and patients. This particular strain of Staph infection was responsible for an estimated 18,650 deaths in the United States during 2005 and claimed more lives than HIV/ AIDS, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Oldfield teamed up with a University of California, San Diego group to find a compound aimed at reducing that number. The com-

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See MLK, Page 3A

work very well, so I chose to test a different enzyme, which is UPPS, and it worked,” he said. After going through several compounds, Zhu eventually found the compound that ended up inhibiting UPPS a thousand times better than the leading methods to shut down the enzyme FPPS, according to Oldfield. Victor Nizet from San Diego was given the compound developed by his team to test it on mice, Oldfield said. Nizet carried out two tests with 10 mice infected with MRSA in each. “If they were treated after infection with our compounds, in two sets of experiments, all 20 infected mice that were treated with this compound survived,” Oldfield said.

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Q: What do you think of Obama’s gun control proposals? COMPILED BY CARINA LEE STAFF WRITER

“I think it’s important that we take some action. Especially considering how many large mass shootings there have been recently and then besides those, there have been a lot that people haven’t even heard of, smaller-scale shootings.” MAYANK JAIN, freshman in Engineering

“I truly feel that the gun control bill as it is presented now is overkill. When someone drinks and drives and kills someone, we don’t suddenly pull all the liquor from the shelves and stop people from driving.” ED MCCARTHY, senior in ACES

PHOTO COURTESY OF L. BRIAN STAUFFER, UIUC.

Austin can be reached at akkeati2@ dailyillini.com.

Opinions

YOUR VOICE

WILL KYLES,

UI researchers discover compound to combat Staph BY AUSTIN KEATING

President Barack Obama is receiving mixed reactions for the set of gun control proposals he unveiled Wednesday. Written in the wake of December’s Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, Obama’s proposals include a ban on assault weapons, universal background checks and increased access and coverage for mental health care services, according to a press release from The White House. Champaign County Democrats chair Alvin Klein said the move for tougher gun laws is not a matter of limiting the Second Amendment right to bear arms but a matter of protecting the public from gun violence. “Guns are certainly dangerous,” Klein said. “This legislation will do a lot to help us restrict the use of certain weapons. The reason the per-

The drug-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus under a microscope. A University-led team has discovered a compound that combats the bacteria.

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, January 18, 2013

The Daily Illini

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512 E. Green St. Champaign, IL 61820 217›337›8300

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Residential burglary was reported in the 100 block of East Daniel Street around 3 p.m. Monday. According to the report, an unknown offender burglarized the victim’s house and stole three televisions. ! A 23-year-old male was arrested on multiple charges in the 1500 block of Holly Hill Drive around noon Tuesday. According to the report, the suspect was arrested on the charges of possession of a controlled substance with intent, unlawful possession of a weapon by a felon and armed violence. A search warrant was executed, and police officers found firearms and controlled substances during the search.

Domestic battery and domestic dispute were reported in the 1700 block of East Florida Avenue around noon Wednesday. According to the report, the victim began an argument with her ex-boyfriend that became physical. Hours after the argument, the victim saw her ex-boyfriend with another woman and called police to report the battery. The ex-boyfriend left before officers arrived and was not located. ! An animal complaint was reported in the 1600 block of Trails Drive around 9 a.m. Tuesday. According to the report, a resident contacted animal control regarding a possible animal cruelty situation. Police could not confirm any animal cruelty behaviors.

A 21-year-old was arrested on the charge of driving under the influence of alcohol near the intersection of John and Sixth Streets around 2 a.m. Thursday. According to the report, the suspect was initially pulled over for driving the wrong way on a one-way street. ! Theft was reported at the Illini Union, 1401 W. Green St., around 3 p.m. Tuesday. According to the report, a University student reported that an unknown offender stole her phone while she was studying. The student said she placed her phone on top of a backpack that she placed nearby.

add some water and sunshine, and let them flower. Your curiosity is your ally, and so are your friends. Continue to increase awareness of personal values.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)

!

Copyright Š 2013 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student news agency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. The Daily Illini is a member of The Associated Press. The Associated Press is entitled to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper. Editor-in-chief Samantha Kiesel )(.›**.$/*-, editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor reporting Nathaniel Lash )(.›**.$/*+* mewriting@Daily Illini.com Managing editor online Hannah Meisel )(.›**.$/*,* meonline@DailyIllini. com Managing editor visuals Shannon Lancor )(.›**.$/*,* mevisuals@DailyIllini. com Website editor Danny Wicentowski Social media director Sony Kassam News editor Taylor Goldenstein )(.›**.$/*,) news@DailyIllini.com Daytime editor Maggie Huynh )(.›**.$/*,' news@DailyIllini.com Asst. news editors Safia Kazi Sari Lesk Rebecca Taylor Features editor Jordan Sward )(.›**.$/*-0 features@DailyIllini. com Asst. features editor Alison Marcotte Candice Norwood

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Sports editor Jeff Kirshman )(.›**.$/*-* sports@DailyIllini.com Asst. sports editors Darshan Patel Max Tane Dan Welin Photo editor Daryl Quitalig )(.›**.$/*++ photo@DailyIllini.com Asst. photo editor Kelly Hickey Opinions editor Ryan Weber )(.›**.$/*-opinions@DailyIllini. com Design editors Bryan Lorenz Eunie Kim Michael Mioux )(.›**.$/*+, design@DailyIllini.com Copy chief Kevin Dollear copychief@DailyIllini. com Asst. copy chief Johnathan Hettinger Advertising sales manager Molly Lannon ssm@IlliniMedia.com Classified sales director Deb Sosnowski Daily Illini/Buzz ad director Travis Truitt Production director Kit Donahue Publisher Lilyan J Levant

Night editor: Samantha Kiesel Photo night editor: Rochelle Wilson Copy editors: Audrey Majors, Thomas Thoren,

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Today’s Birthday Career achievement sparks action for the first half of 2013. Summer brings a slower pace and romantic flavor, with interesting new characters. Family and home changes color the autumn, with remodeling, relocation or care for a loved one possible. To thrive, grow wellness practices that enliven. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19)

Today is a 9 -- Something new is coming your way. Increase your personal responsibility and ride it out. A partner revitalizes your spirit. Give yourself permission to excel. List goals.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)

Today is a 6 -- Things are working out for the better, even if they don’t quite seem so yet. Do what you know will please a loved one and yourself. You don’t have to do everything.

Night system staff for today’s paper

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GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)

Today is a 9 -- Organize your ideas,

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)

Today is an 8 -- Update your resume with your latest accomplishments. Listen to other’s advice. Your efforts pay off. Continue to decrease doubt. All of a sudden, it all makes sense!

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

Today is an 8 -- Put your heart into it and embark into a writing project. Publish your best book. But don’t spend more than you get. The important stuff is all hidden. Randomness brings joy now.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)

Today is a 5 -- Immerse yourself in a team project. You provide a balanced approach on what is needed. The boss is in a talkative mood. Listen. Remember to get out for some exercise.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

Today is a 9 -- There’s still plenty to be done, but you can take a breather to acknowledge the team, rest, and to receive wellearned compliments. Then ramp up participation.

TODAY ON DAILYILLINI.COM

Swimming heads to doubleheader After a training trip to Largo, Fla., the Illinois swimming and diving team is heading into a doubleheader weekend against Iowa State and Iowa. It’s been over a month since Illinois’ painful defeat to Illinois State, which was first loss against the Redbirds in over a decade, but head coach Sue Novitsky said her team is ready to get back to competing.

The Daily Illini is online everywhere you are.

Today is a 7 -- Handle obligations and increase efficiency this week to clear your plate. A journey with friends would be excellent. Listen to your subconscious. Change the scenery for inspiration.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)

Today is an 8 -- Don’t get too wrapped up in your worries today. Choose romance over money. Write a love letter. Encourage creativity in others and enjoy the results. Your understanding is expanding.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)

Today is a 9 -- Cut clutter to clear space for creative thinking. Invest in your dreams to really make them come true. Delays and detours are part of the process.

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)

Today is a 7 -- The communication key can open doors that until now were locked. Use the power of words to discover a whole new world. It’s an excellent moment to express love.

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)

Today is a 6 -- You have a tough job. You can do it, so relax. Grow your area of influence over the coming days. Friends help you advance. Repay a favor.

Kirby Gamsby Designers: Elise King, Shannon Lancor

Visit DailyIllini.com Follow us on Twitter @TheDailyIllini for today’s headlines and breaking news. Like us on Facebook for an interactive Daily Illini experience. Subscribe to us on YouTube for video coverage and the Daily Illini Vidcast.

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ILLINI HOCKEY VS. IOWA STATE

UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? UI alum couple waiting to adopt!

CORRECTIONS When The Daily Illini makes a mistake, we will correct it in this place. The Daily Illini strives for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Samantha Kiesel at 3378365.

HOW TO CONTACT US The Daily Illini is located at 512 E. Green St., Champaign, IL 61820. Our office hours are 9a.m. to 5:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

GUN CONTROL FROM PAGE 1A son should own (a gun) is to protect themselves.” National Rifl e Association members believe that such a general ban will not solve society’s gun-related issues. “(Lawmakers) continue to attempt very broad-based gun bans. We saw how much opposition there was in the lame-duck session,” NRA Illinois lobbyist Todd Vandermyde told The Associated Press. “They’ve failed in the past, and I don’t see any more support this time.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

“I think there are definitely not enough regulations. I think people who sell guns are just about the money; they don’t really think about who they are selling it to, and I don’t think mental illness is enough of an issue to them.” ELIZABETH KAPLAN junior in LAS

“I think it’s a bit ridiculous. I feel like if this bill gets passed then obviously it detriments our constitutional rights. ... The fact that it’s within the Constitution: freedom to bear arms and they are trying to limit that. That’s not very American.” ROBERT BAGINSKI, sophomore in LAS

PENSION FROM PAGE 1A Quinn expressed his concern for the growing pension crisis in a news release Jan. 4. “Every day that urgently needed action on pension reform is delayed, the problem gets worse,” Quinn said. “As elected leaders, we have a responsibility to put politics aside and enact a solution that prevents skyrocketing pension costs from squeezing out core services like education, public safety and health care.” Harris said he hopes the bill will receive a committee hearing and be discussed by the General Assembly. “I hope (the bill) can be used as a platform on which to build a reform plan that can pass both the House and the Senate,” he said.

Chrissy can be reached at capawlo2@ dailyillini.com.

MLK

Friday, January 18, 2013

Sergeant may undergo sanity review Army says review needed for mental health defense, but defense disagrees BY GENE JOHNSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — An Army staff sergeant accused of massacring Afghan civilians must undergo an official sanity review before a mental health defense can be presented, the military judge overseeing the case said Thursday. Staff Sgt. Robert Bales deferred entering a plea Thursday at Joint Base Lewis-McChord to 16 counts of premeditated murder and other charges related to a nighttime attack on two villages last March. The Army is seeking the death penalty. But the judge, Col. Jeffery Nance, took up arguments over whether Bales can present a mental health defense or testimony from mental health experts, given that he has not yet participated in a “sanity board” review. The judge ordered that to take place, but made no decisions about the conditions for the review or what information from it would be turned over to prosecutors — something prosecutors and defense attorneys have been arguing about. Such reviews are conducted by neutral doctors tasked with discerning a defendant’s mental state at the time of the crime and whether he’s competent to stand trial. Bales was serving his fourth deployment, and his lawyers said he may have suffered from a traumatic brain injury. His mental health has been expected to be a key part of the case. “An accused simply cannot be allowed to claim a lack of mental responsibility through the introduction of expert testimony from his own doctors, while at the same time leaving the government with no ability to overcome its burden of proof because

its doctors have been precluded from conducting any examination of the very matters in dispute,” prosecutor Maj. Robert Stelle wrote in a Jan. 3 motion obtained by The Associated Press. Bales’ attorneys have said a traumatic brain injury may have been sustained when he was knocked out by an improvised bomb explosion during one of his tours in Iraq. One of those attorneys, John Henry Browne, said Thursday that the defense has obtained medical records from Madigan Army Medical Center in Washington state indicating Bales had suffered from TBI and PTSD, but he described those records as incomplete. The attorneys have thus far refused to let him take part in the sanity board because the Army would not let him have a lawyer present for the examination, would not record the examination and would not appoint a neuropsychologist expert in traumatic brain injuries to the board. “These are not independent doctors; they’re doctors who work for the Army, and the Army is trying to kill my client,” Browne said after the hearing. “If there’s a tape recording, you know what people say.” However, Browne also said Bales might participate — as long as only certain information about the results are forwarded to prosecutors. Prosecutors should promptly receive fi ndings about his current competence, but nothing about his mental state at the time of the attack, they said. To allow the sanity board to share the basic results of the examination — the “short form,” with answers about his mental health diagnosis and mental state at time of the attack — would be to provide prosecutors with information based on compelled statements from the defendant. That could violate his right against self-incrimination under the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution, defense

co-counsel Emma Scanlan told the judge. The Army isn’t entitled to such information unless the defense makes an issue of Bales’ mental health at trial, which they haven’t yet done, she said. “There is no authority for the bizarre proposition that the accused has to submit to a compelled mental health examination before he gives notice of a mental defense,” she wrote in a motion fi led Tuesday. The judge said he would rule later on the conditions of the sanity review and when the prosecutors could have access to the results. Prosecutors said Bales, a father of two from Lake Tapps, Wash., had been drinking before he slipped away from his remote outpost in southern Afghanistan to attack the villages. Soldiers testified at a pretrial hearing in November that Bales returned to the base alone, soaked in blood, after the shootings. Bales’ lawyers have criticized the base at Camp Belambay where Bales was stationed, saying that Special Forces members there gave him banned substances including alcohol, Valium and steroids. They insist that by seeking the death penalty the Army is ignoring its own responsibility for sending him to war. Prosecutors also argued Thursday for setting the trial quickly — for June 10 — because many witnesses remain in a volatile part of Afghanistan. Two possible witnesses have already been killed in separate and unrelated attacks, they noted, and as American troops withdraw, access to those witnesses is only going to get tougher and more dangerous. “Simply stated, with each day that passes, the government’s right to a fair trial is further jeopardized,” they wrote in court fi lings. Browne said the prosecutors neglected to mention one thing about the two witnesses who were killed: They were on a list of insurgents, and were actually killed by U.S. forces.

AP FILE PHOTO

Staff Sgt. Robert Bales could face the death penalty if convicted in the March 11 massacre of 16 Afghan civilians. He faces premeditated murder and other charges in the attack on two villages in southern Afghanistan. Scanlan said setting a trial this year is unrealistic, given how much time the defense team needs to review more than 30,000 pages of discovery materials, and fi nd and interview witnesses — not to mention getting their own client to open up. The defense has suggested a May 2014 trial date. “Without adequate time to develop the relationship of trust

required for effective representation in a capital case, counsel may never learn or be able to present the most crucial facts about the accused, facts without which any possible understanding of his actions is impossible,” she wrote. The judge did not set a trial date, but did indicate that June was too soon.

New Boeing 787s grounded until battery is fixed BY JOSHUA FREED THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boeing said 787s will keep rolling off the assembly line while it works to get the planes grounded by regulators back flying again. Boeing’s newest, fl ashiest jet was grounded worldwide on Thursday after one plane suffered a battery fi re and another had an emergency landing because pilots detected a burning smell. The two incidents prompted airlines and regulators around the world to ground

the planes until a fi x for the battery problem is found that satisfies the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration. It’s not clear how long the investigation — or the fi x — will take, but it won’t be cheap for Boeing. Meanwhile, airlines that had sought the prestige of flying the world’s most sophisticated plane are instead stuck with one they can’t use. Poland’s airline LOT said Thursday it may seek compensation from Boeing Co. for the grounding of its two 787 Dreamliner planes.

The airline suffered the highest-profi le embarrassment of any of Boeing’s customers on Wednesday night, when it was showing off new service between Warsaw and Chicago. The plane’s captain learned of the FAA grounding order while the fl ight was on its way from Warsaw to Chicago. The airline had to cancel the return trip — and a ceremony at O’Hare that was to include airline officials and Mayor Rahm Emanuel. Passengers who were eager to ride the airline’s fi rst fl ight back to War-

saw ended up looking for a hotel room instead. Boeing currently builds fi ve 787s every month. It hasn’t delivered any since Jan. 3, before the fi rst fi re. Boeing Co. spokeswoman Lori Gunter said no deliveries were scheduled during that time. She declined to talk about planned deliveries. All Nippon Airways said its 18th 787 is due at the end of this month, but it won’t take delivery until the 787 fl ights resume.

Terrorism charges dismissed against Fla. imam

FROM PAGE 1A

BY CURT ANDERSON

feel like they’re more than somebody who pays tribute to our businesses ... there’s a lot of opportunities for collaboration.” Ernest Green, one of the “Little Rock Nine” — the black students who were first to attend Little Rock Central High School in 1957 after the landmark Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education — will be the keynote speaker for the event. He, along with the other eight of the Little Rock Nine, was a recipient of the 1999 U.S. Congressional Gold Medal and the first African-American graduate of Little Rock Central High School in 1958. Jason Hood, community relations specialist for the City of Champaign, said the event’s committee sought a keynote speaker with a “compelling story of encouragement.” “(A visitor) can expect to learn more about the iconic role Ernest Green played in the desegregation of schools, the experience of growing up in the Jim Crow era, the lessons he has learned and insights on overcoming adversities,” he said. There will also be a musical performance by Mo’ Betta Music, a multi-genre music initiative through the Bruce D. Nesbitt African American Cultural Center at the University, and entertainment from vocalist Barrington Coleman, an associate professor of music at the University. Otis Noble III, senior campus and community affairs specialist in the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access, is one of the University representatives on the planning committee. Like Kyles, he said he believes it is important that students know they are a “vital part of this conversation” and hopes there will be a large student presence at the event. “A lot of this progression that we’re talking about in remembering Dr. King is about the future,” Noble said. “Students here are a part of that leading group that’s really going to be able to change the community and the area that we live in.”

MIAMI — Citing a lack of evidence, a federal judge on Thursday dismissed terrorism support and conspiracy charges against the younger of two Muslim clerics accused of funneling thousands of dollars to the Pakistani Taliban. U.S. District Judge Robert Scola ruled that “no rational trier of fact” could convict 26-year-old Izhar Khan, who is imam at a mosque in suburban Margate north of Fort Lauderdale. Trial is continuing against his father, 77-year-old Hafi z Khan. Scola said the evidence against the older Khan is much stronger. “This court will not allow the sins of the father to be visited upon the son,” Scola wrote in a seven-page order. Federal prosecutors earlier dropped charges against another of Hafi z Khan’s sons who also had minimal involvement. Izhar Khan’s attorney, Joseph Rosenbaum, said a judge’s dismissal of charges is rare, particularly in a case linked to international terrorism. “It shows that the justice system does work despite going against the federal government,” Rosenbaum said. “I’ve always believed Izhar was innocent. The judge really paid attention and the evidence was not there.” Izhar Khan, who has been jailed in since his May 2011 arrest, was immediately freed after the judge’s decision. “I’m happy with the justice system, to say the least, and I think justice was served,” he told reporters outside Miami’s downtown federal court complex. Hafi z Khan, imam at a downtown Miami mosque, still faces four terrorism support-related charges that each carry maximum 15-year prison sentenc-

Emma can be reached at wessmnn2@ dailyillini.com.

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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this photo made available by law firm of Joseph Rosenbaum, P.A, attorney Joseph Rosenbaum, left, and his client Izhar Khan stand outside the federal courthouse in Miami on Thursday. A federal judge has dismissed terrorism support and conspiracy charges against Khan, who was accused with his father of funneling cash to the Pakistani Taliban. Trial for Khan’s father, 77-year-old Hafiz Khan, is continuing in federal court.

es. Prosecutors said Hafi z Khan orchestrated the sending of at least $50,000 to the Pakistani Taliban between 2008 and 2010, money that was allegedly used to help mujahedeen fighters attack Pakistani and U.S. targets. In his order, Scola noted that the older Khan was recorded by the FBI talking “openly and brazenly” about raising money to help overthrow the Pakistani government so that strict Islamic law could be imposed. The recordings showed Hafi z Khan praised suicide bomb attacks in Pakistan and the attempt in May 2010 by Faisal Shahzad to detonate a bomb in New York’s Times Square. “He actually did send money to friends and family in Pakistan knowing that the money was going to be directed to support the Pakistani Taliban,” Scola wrote of the elder Khan. Izhar Khan, by contrast, barely appeared on the FBI recordings and never discussed violence. He was involved in two transactions to Pakistan totaling about $1,100 at a time when many Pakistanis living in the U.S. were sending money to family members dealing with Taliban violence in that country’s Swat Valley. The biggest transaction involved Izhar Khan’s sister, Amina Khan, who has also been indicted in the U.S. case but remains in Pakistan. Scola noted that there is “ample evidence” she is a Taliban supporter but none that Izhar knew a $900 wire transfer sent to her would be used to support the Islamic fundamentalist group or violence. The prosecution rested its case before Scola’s dismissal of charges against the younger Khan, and Hafi z Khan’s defense began presenting its evidence. After Thursday the trial is off until next Tuesday.

“I’m happy with the justice system, to say the least, and I think justice was served.” IZHAR KHAN, imam who was accused of funneling cash to Pakistani Taliban


4A Friday January 18, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Opinions

The Daily Illini

Editorial

EDITORIAL CARTOON

JOHNIVAN DARVY THE DAILY ILLINI

Never take your friends for granted

Gun violence, mental illness are separate issues

L

ast week, the Champaign Parent Teacher’s Association held a mental health forum in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Conn., in which 20 children and six adults were killed. The goal of the forum was to provide information about local mental health services that could possibly prevent similar tragedies from happening. It’s no secret that there has been an increase in these mass shootings in the past few years. The shootings at Fort Hood, the Colorado movie theater and the Sikh temple in Wisconsin are just a few of the examples of recent mass shootings, but the stories that followed all of these have something in common: mental health. After news of the Sandy Hook shooting broke out, most people in America were left with the questions of how someone could carry out this massacre. What kind of person could walk into an elementary school and shoot down 20 innocent first-graders? Though many possible motives floated around, there was the common assumption that mental illness was the cause for all of this. Following the shooting, there was word that Adam Lanza had some type of mental illness and that his mother was planning to commit him to a psychiatric facility. Though we might never know if Lanza’s mother had planned to commit him, people will associate mental illness with the shooter. Most of us consider ourselves “normal” in some respect, and because we are mentally sane, we would never carry out such a massacre. Classing tragedies like this on a generality like mental illness is unfair to those who do have one, especially if we don’t know for a fact that mental illness is really what caused the shooting. By labeling these shooters as “mentally ill” without such firm verification, a damaging stereotype becomes real: Anyone with a mental illness could snap at a moment’s notice and ruthlessly kill. Mental illness takes hold of society and public opinion as it has in the last month only following shootings like this. Illness is paired with the images of assault weapons and faces of innocent victims, but mental illness and gun violence are two separate issues. President Barack Obama announced plans for tougher gun control on Wednesday, and it included improving mental health services. At last, the government is making a bigger push for mental health treatment, but it’s blurring the distinction between being mentally ill and being a mass murderer. Now, it seems as if the only reason mental health services have a spotlight trained on them is that the public doesn’t feel safe anymore with what some would consider to be the mentally ill unrestrained. This should not be the case. These services exist to improve day-to-day lives, not to reduce any ounce of violence they have building inside of them. While the federal government and local organizations like the Champaign schools PTA are now making efforts to focus on mental health, we need to keep sight of the real utility of mental health services. Improvement and availability of mental health services should come from wanting to improve the quality of life for the mentally ill, not to solve the problem of mass murders. Mental health services are meant to bolster the lives of those who require their services, not to imprison the next mass murderer in a mental institution.

SHARE YOUR

THOUGHTS Email: opinions@dailyillini. com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.

MELANIE STONE Opinions columnist

I

What should be remembered KIRSTEN KELLER Opinions columnist

It

took me about two weeks to buy Time magazine’s 2012 year-in-review issue. For days I stood in bookstores and grocery store lines reading parts of it. The only thing keeping me from claiming its glossy pages as my own was the $12.99 price tag. But eventually, I caved, to which my friend asked, “You spent a Target gift card on that?” Why did I feel the need to purchase the issue? Well, first of all, I’m a news junkie. But more specifically, I’m amazed by how much happens in the world in the course of a year and how much we easily forget. After reading the magazine, I thought about how the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting was not included. The shooting, which happened Dec. 14, occurred shortly after Time’s publication date. The shooting’s absence struck me as amazing, in that so much news can happen in a short period of time. Though the Sandy Hook shooting is not memorialized in the pages of Time’s year in review, I would hope that it is not forgotten event. But we don’t know if this event will ingrain itself in our minds more than other news — ingrained enough to cause us to take action. In the couple of weeks following the shooting, news organizations released tidal waves of information about the tragedy. Touching stories from across the country about people sending gifts to the Sandy Hook victims’ families. Fierce debate about gun control in the country. Less, but no less sig-

nificant, debate about our culture of violence and the mental effect it has on children. About a month later, talk of the shooting has exponentially decreased. This is to be expected. But time is a funny thing. As time passes, the impact of big events, horrific events, can appear to decrease. And when that happens, steps are not taken to change things. How horrifying of an event has to happen to spur real change? Looking through the Time magazine, I made mental notes of which events of the year stood out for me. Of those I chose: Former assistant coach of the Penn State football team, Jerry Sandusky, was found guilty of 45 of 48 sexual abuse charges on June 22. Taliban shooting Pakistani Malala Yousafzai in the head on Oct. 9 because of her outspokenness on female education. The violence that erupted in the wake of the “Innocence of Muslims” video, which depicted the Prophet Muhammad in a degrading manner and led to the killing four Americans in Benghazi, Libya, by protesters on the 11th anniversary of Sept. 11 attacks. Of those that had faded out of my memory: 32 passengers died when the ship Costa Concordia sunk off the northwest coast of Italy on Jan. 13, and the captain abandoned ship before all the passengers had left it. The arrest of three women of the political activist group and band Pussy Riot in Moscow after they performed a “punk prayer” in a church, criticizing Russian President Vladimir Putin, on Feb. 21. Many of the elements of newsworthiness would explain what we remember and what we don’t. There’s proximity, where we may remember more clearly events

that occur closer to us. There’s conflict, where confrontations and tension draw human attention. There’s also a certain amount of oddity, or shock value, that grabs hold of the minds of the public. Things we do not expect, things that we would not dream of, retain a spot in our minds. For so many members of the coaching staff at Penn State to ignore Sandusky’s abuses is a travesty. For the Taliban to choose a 14-year-old as its target is inhumane and unbelievable. For protestors to take their rage out on Americans in the U.S. consulate in Libya is alarming and concerning. But while these events may stick out more than others, it is important to pay attention to those lesser-remembered events. The sinking of the Costa Concordia hopefully taught captains to stay on course and not cut too close to land, which caused the ship’s demise. It also hopefully readjusted the moral compasses in ship captains, making them care about the safety of their passengers more than their own. The protest by Pussy Riot shows the dissatisfaction with Vladimir Putin and makes us think about freedom of speech around the world. Time’s year in review alerted me of the importance of paying attention to all types of news because each event affects someone. We have to see past the sensational, flip past the front page and read the stories inside the paper to understand what is going on in the world. While some events are covered more, there is a need to remember and learn from others as well.

Kirsten is a sophomore in Media. She can be reached at kekellr2@dailyillini.com.

Nominate your favorite teachers Editor’s note: The views expressed in the weekly columns are the views of the authors and not the organization as a whole.

As

explained in one of the announcements made by Illinois Student Senate Chairman Jim Maskeri last night, the deadline for the Teaching Excellence Awards is drawing near. For the past few years, ISS has, through the Committee of Academic Affairs, sponsored an event known as the Teaching Excellence Awards. These are awarded to outstanding faculty instructors and teaching assistants. The teachers are awarded with a plaque and a ban-

quet in their honor, and their names will also be placed on the list of past winners in the ISS Complex. This event exemplifies the optimal relationship between the students, teaching assistants and faculty. By expressing gratitude and awarding those teachers who deserve it, students become closer to their instructors. Community then prospers, as life-long friendships are created, yielding teamwork and ultimately increased productivity and happiness in the University. I’m sure many, including myself, would give thanks to Maskeri and the Committee on

Academic Affairs for spearheading and sponsoring this event for the past two years. Each year, improvements are made in the process and the celebration for the instructors who deserve it. To all students who appreciate one of your instructors, please let your voices be heard this year on determining which teachers receive this prestigious honor. The deadline for submissions by students for teachers is Jan. 27. Students can nominate an instructor at illinois.edu/fb/ sec/5096495. SHAO GUO, vice president-internal and historian of ISS

Letter to the Editor Tragedies must be accepted as a price for our freedom There is a thought experiment that David Foster Wallace proposed in a November 2007 Atlantic article entitled “Just Asking” that struck me as I reflected on the horror at Sandy Hook. It goes something (exactly) like this: “What if we chose to accept the fact that every few years, despite all reasonable precautions, some hundreds or thousands of us may die in the sort of ghastly terrorist attack that a democratic republic cannot 100-percent protect itself from without subverting the very principles that make it worth protecting?”

DFW was of course writing in reference to the terror attacks of 9/11, but it seems to have some application in the aftermath of the shootings in Newtown, Conn. The weapon that was used to commit the shootings wasn’t illegally acquired nor were those used at Columbine. The terror would not have been averted by tighter gun laws. What else can be done? Invest more in mental health care? Sure, but it won’t catch everyone. What was so shocking and continues to terrify so many in the wake of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School is that when the parent’s young child asks, “Will I be safe at school?”

they can no longer assume with 100 percent certainty that they will. This is the reality of living in a democratic republic where angry, intelligent and determined people will, from time to time, inflict massive harm on our society. We should go to lengths to defend ourselves from them, but part of being an adult is realizing how childish it is to believe that we can be 100 percent safe from any harm without the sacrifice of enormous wealth or the subversion of freedoms. It is time to ask ourselves just how much this fear should be allowed to dominate public discourse. ERIC BRICKMAN, 2010 graduate of LAS

remember the first time I experienced the concept of intentionality. It was August 2011, and my best friend Courtney and I were at the Ice Arena for Illini Life’s annual broomball event. We didn’t know anyone; we were curious freshmen desperately searching for community. We met Heather over a bowl of pretzels. She was a senior at the time, effervescent and endlessly passionate about I-Life. Three minutes into our conversation, Heather started asking us all about our hometown, our families and our faith journeys. And the crazy thing was, Heather cared about what we told her. Her gray-blue eyes were brimming with interest as she nodded along, listening to us share a slice of our lives. I’ve since realized how rare it is to find intentionality like that. In simplest terms, the word “intentional” means doing something on purpose, with thought or planning or design. In our self-obsessed culture, most people don’t function that way, especially in friendships. Instead, we prefer to glorify ourselves, seeking recognition and praise. But being intentional requires humility. An intentional friend is someone who asks the hard questions. Follows up. Cares deeply. Stays accountable. Months ago, that wasn’t me. I was completely wrapped up in myself, hardly cultivating my relationships — relationships that I took for granted. I put relatively no effort into checking up on and treasuring my friends, and when someone tried to talk to me, I seldom revealed my flaws. It was as if I had been wearing a mask, unable to reveal my true self for fear of rejection. I could barely be vulnerable with my very best friends, the ones I’ve known for years. Then, when it came to my new relationships on campus, I held back. My mask stayed on, and I stuffed the real Melanie far, far down, until I completely lost sight of her. I spent most of the past fall semester at home (stay tuned for more on that) and found myself evaluating the type of friend I was. How could I put others first? How could I get to know new people on a more intimate level instead of hiding in the shallow stages of relationships? How could I really, truly be a friend? When I first came home in September, I was overcome by the love and undying support from the people in my life. There were snail-mail letters, there were texts, there were emails, there were phone calls. Even from afar, my friends were insanely intentional with me. They reassured me and encouraged me, building me back up. And slowly, I started reciprocating. The idea of intentionality has become huge for me. After everything that happened last semester, I’ve realized just how blessed I am to have these people in my life. What’s more, I am now wholeheartedly seeking intentionality in those friendships and any new ones that will inevitably come my way. I want to challenge this campus to deepen our friendships. I believe that this life we have been given is short, and while we’re here, we need to invest in our friends’ lives. We should be talking about stuff that matters and asking the questions that no one wants to ask: How are you, really? What have you been struggling with? What are you worried about? How can I be there for you? There are certainly times when I love random conversations, dripping with sarcasm and full of laughter. But, more than that, I love going beyond the surface and learning more about people. This campus is full of unique personalities: 43,000 students, 3,000 faculty members, 3,700 professional staffers and 4,000 support staffers. Those are some overwhelming statistics, numbers that remind me of the potential friendships we miss out on when we focus too much on ourselves. Imagine the effects of intentionality on this campus — if we let our guards down and asked someone about his or her life. We all have a story. We all have anxieties and thoughts and hopes and dreams. Why don’t we start sharing?

Melanie is a sophomore in Media. She can be reached at opinions@dailyillini.com.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, January 18, 2013

Illinois state senator faces felony gun charge THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A judge in Chicago has scheduled a March 12 trial date for an Illinois state senator accused of trying to board a flight with a gun and ammunition, but a police officerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s testimony about having trouble finding the small gun in a garment bag may help establish the politician had forgotten the gun was there. During a hearing Thursday, Judge Ann Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell found probable cause to continue the case against Donne Trotter. He faces a felony gun charge after being stopped by security last year at Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hare International Airport. Trotterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney, Thomas Durkin, said after the hearing that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d hoped the judge would dismiss the case but said he believes prosecutors wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able to prove that Trotter knew

the gun was in the bag when he headed to the airport. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very confident going forward. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll just take it to the next step,â&#x20AC;? Durkin said. Trotter didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speak to reporters. Trotter, 62, had been considered a front-runner to replace former U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. in Congress, but he withdrew from the 2nd Congressional District race last month, saying he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want the gun charge to detract from the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important issues. Trotter was arrested Dec. 5 when security screeners at Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hare International Airport found an unloaded .25-caliber Beretta handgun in his bag. Trotter had planned to board a flight for Washington. The Chicago Democrat told air-

port security he uses the handgun for his job with a security company and had forgotten it was in his bag, according to a police report. Chicago Police Officer Vince Bielicki testified Thursday that airport security called him after an outline of a gun was seen in a screened bag. Bielicki told the judge he initially couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t locate the weapon in the bag but eventually found it in an outer zipped pocket. Bielicki said Trotter cooperated with authorities at the airport. After the hearing, Durkin told reporters the officerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s testimony helps his client. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The most telling fact was the police officer said when he went to look for it he couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even find it,â&#x20AC;? Durkin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even find it the first time he looked for it.â&#x20AC;?

UN investigates Iranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible test of atomic weapon triggers BY ALI AKBAR DAREINI THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TEHRAN, Iran â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Senior investigators from the U.N. nuclear watchdog ended two days of intensive talks with Iranian officials on Thursday over allegations the Islamic Republic may have carried out tests on triggers for atomic weapons. The semiofficial Fars news agency said the two sides agreed to hold another round of negotiations on Feb. 12. Fars and other Iranian media did not say if any progress was made, but a senior diplomat from an International Atomic Energy Agency member state in Vienna said shortly before talks ended that they were â&#x20AC;&#x153;not going well.â&#x20AC;? He demanded anonymity because he was not authorized to divulge confidential information. U.N. team leader Herman Nackaerts had hoped the IAEA would be able to â&#x20AC;&#x153;finalize the structured approachâ&#x20AC;? that would outline what the agency can and cannot do in its investigation. The IAEA wants to revisit Parchin, a military site southeast of Tehran, to probe allegations that Iran may have tested components needed to develop a nuclear weapon. Tehran has steadfastly denied any such activity. Iran says the agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suspicions are based on forged intelligence provided by the CIA, the Israeli Mossad, Britainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MI-6 and other intelligence agencies, materials it has not been allowed to see. Iranians say they have bitter memories of allowing IAEA inspections and replying to a long list of queries over its nuclear program over the past decade. Tehran has allowed IAEA inspectors twice into Parchin, but now it says new agency investigations must be governed by an agreement that lays out the scope of such a probe.

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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD 1

ACROSS

 1 She often wears hand-medowns   4 2010 best seller by Michael Lewis 15 Homewrecker? 16 Fever that reached America in the mid-1960s 17 Org. fighting decay 18 Nominee who was the subject of a 2006 filibuster attempt 19 Major Eur. oil exporter 21 Matter found in briefs? 22 Digital evidence? 23 Toss down tequila, e.g. 25 Comedian/rapper Williams 26 One may service an organ 27 Relative of John Bull 31 Carousal 32 Not clear, in a way 33 Special handling 34 They indicate shyness 35 Bazooka Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s company 36 Stiff 37 Sleepy co-worker? 38 Rascal, in slang 39 Shooter favored by Henri Cartier-Bresson 40 Large hunter with a shaggy gray coat 42 Percolate 43 Adept arguer: Abbr. 44 Virtuous behaviors, in Hinduism 45 End 48 Due tripled 49 Contemporary of O. Henry 50 Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OrĂŠal spokeswoman of the 2000s 53 Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a sign 54 Wake up and smell the coffee 55 Political adviser Nofziger 56 Sea novel by James Fenimore Cooper 57 Lottery letters

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go ___!â&#x20AC;? DOWN â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nutsâ&#x20AC;? director, 1987  1 Take no preventive action Ute Peakâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s county   2 Amenity in some Cries on a ride 30-Down Bed rock?   3 Transported by a big Publisher with a name borzoi logo   4 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sullivan & Sonâ&#x20AC;? airer 27 Worked on a field   5 Unrestrained 28 Chains of chains,   6 ___ House (Los often Angeles landmark of 29 2001 Best New Artist modern architecture) Grammy winner   7 Energy qtys. 30 They stand out in the   8 TrinitĂŠ, e.g. neighborhood   9 Flexible injury 32 Fella soothers 35 Took up the slack? 10 One way to dress 36 Equals 11 Cubic crystals with 38 Became peeved perfect cleavage 39 Low location? The crossword solution is in the Classified section. 12 13 14 20 24 25

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Whom a hack watches out for Follower of Ali Dict. info Magicianlike Cole Porterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, Did You ___?â&#x20AC;? Police supply Unbanded? Fish with poisonous roe Scottish port

BILLY FORE

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DAN DOUGHERTY

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei listens to a speaker during a meeting in his tour in northeastern Iran on Oct. 14. A religious decree issued by Iranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supreme leader banning nuclear weapons is binding for the Iranian government, the Foreign Ministry said Tuesday that suggesting that the edict should end the debate over whether Tehran is pursuing atomic arms. Iran says it cannot allow its security to be compromised by allowing the IAEA access to nonnuclear facilities simply on the basis of suspicions raised by for-

eign intelligence agencies Tehran considers enemies.

George Jahn in Vienna contributed to this report.

St. Louis school shooting suspect had active warrant BY JIM SALTER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. LOUIS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A student accused of shooting an administrator at his St. Louis business school had a history of violence and a parole violation that should have landed him in jail, but didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. People in the law enforcement said Thursday that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not surprising that Sean Johnson remained at large nearly eight months after a warrant was issued for his arrest. They say the system is flooded with so many arrest warrants that police canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keep up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You walk up and down the street in downtown St. Louis and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to pass a bunch of people who have an active warrant,â&#x20AC;? said David Klinger, a criminologist at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not at all surprised that someone who had an active warrant was out there in the community.â&#x20AC;? Johnson, 34, is charged with first-degree assault, armed criminal action and two firearms violations in Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attack at Stevens Institute of Business & Arts. Authorities said Johnson, an on-again-off-again student at the school, got into an argument with financial aid director Greg Elsenrath in Elsenrathâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fourth-floor office and shot him once in the chest. Johnson then shot himself in the side, while the more than three dozen students, faculty and staff in the building scrambled to safety. Both men remained hospitalized Thursday. The school said Elsenrath, 45, was expected to make a full recovery. Details of Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s condition havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been released. Johnson was wanted for allegedly violating the terms of his parole in a 2009 attack on a cab driver in St. Louis County. The driver, 53-year-old Belete Mekuria, told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that Johnson smelled of alcohol after he was picked up at Lambert Airport, so Mekuria asked for $60 up front. Johnson paid, but later reached into a shoe and pulled out a box cutter. Mekuria said he caught Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hand and pinned him down as the cab hit a median barrier on Interstate 70. The men were still scuffling when police arrived. Johnson pleaded guilty to reduced charges of unlawful use of a weapon and second-degree assault. At a hearing in 2011 he was placed on probation for five years and ordered to take medication for an unspecified mental illness. His attorney, Eric

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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

This photo provided by The St. Louis Circuit Attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office shows Sean Johnson, 34, who was charged Wednesday for allegedly shooting a St. Louis school administrator. Barnhart, declined to discuss the mental health issue. But he said Johnson was a productive member of society only when he was on his medication. A judge ruled on May 21 that Johnson violated his probation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; court records donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t indicate why. An arrest warrant was issued three days later, but Johnson was never taken into custody. St. Louis police didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t respond to several messages requesting an interview. St. Louis County courts administrator Paul Fox said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not unusual for fugitives to go for months or longer without being apprehended. Police â&#x20AC;&#x153;simply donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the manpower to go out and track down everybody,â&#x20AC;? Fox said. Every warrant is entered into a statewide database known as MULES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Missouri Uniform Law Enforcement System â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which is administered by the Missouri State Highway Patrol. Statistics provided by the Patrol to The Associated Press indicate itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting harder to capture fugitives. In 2011, 235,322 warrants were issued statewide and 156,881 fugitives were apprehended. Last year, the number of warrants rose to 251,657, but the number captured dropped to 130,368.

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Friday, January 18, 2013

‘The Hobbit’ garners mixed reviews for many reasons Drawn-out plot drags as high frame rate removes viewers from Middle Earth BY ADLAI STEVENSON STAFF WRITER

Nine years after “Return of the King” concluded the successful “The Lord of the Rings” movie franchise, filmmaker Peter Jackson has returned to Middle Earth once again for an adaptation of “The Hobbit,” author J.R.R. Tolkien’s induction to his popular fantasy series. Jackson received commercial and critical recognition for the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy, but has come under criticism for his approach toward adapting “The Hobbit” and the film’s use of high frame rate digital projection. “All good stories deserve embellishment.” So says Gandalf the Grey to a reluctant Bilbo Baggins before the story’s prominent hobbit begins his hero’s journey, but it may as well have come out of Jackson’s mouth given the circumstances of his adaptation. Jackson has not only formatted the 270-page book for a lengthy feature, but into a trilogy of its own to match the “Lord of the Rings” films. The recent first release in the trilogy, subtitled “An Unexpected Journey,” roughly covers the first third of the book in nearly three hours. The film and book introduce hobbit Bilbo Baggins, who audiences know as the elderly uncle of Frodo from the other “The Lord of the Rings” movies. Here, played by British actor Martin Freeman, he is 60 years younger and travels with a band of dwarves across Middle Earth to help reclaim their lost fortunes from the dragon Smaug. “An Unexpected Journey” details Bilbo’s introduction to the dwarf clan and the group’s beginning trek across Middle Earth toward the dwarves’ homeland. Trolls, goblins and orcs soon follow. And if Gandalf’s line does not serve as a central thesis to Jackson’s new movie, it is at least a line of defense. Many popular film critics have disapproved

of the planned trilogy, stating that the strategy makes “An Unexpected Journey” feel bloated and plodding for the original story’s swiftness. Those criticisms aren’t entirely undue, considering the small stakes of the clan’s road trip and a plot that develops leisurely. What comes of the almost three hour film, if relatively fun and engaging, doesn’t amount to much. Their trip toward Smaug? Well ... they’re getting there. Previous film adaptations of “The Hobbit,” including the 1977 animated musical, and even a conspicuous Russian feature made during the Soviet Union’s rule, all clock in under 80 minutes. But those movies were much more lenient with Tolkien’s book, and were made under different circumstances than Jackson’s trilogy. “An Unexpected Journey” follows the original story with greater fidelity and includes additions as well. Two extensive prologues introduce Bilbo as the protagonist and the dwarves’ history in Middle Earth. Several characters only briefly mentioned by Tolkien are given crucial roles in the first film. The new movie also ties in “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy, presenting familiar faces and ominous signs of impending darkness in Middle Earth that further bond the trilogies. Both of these factors were absent from Tolkien’s “The Hobbit” and could cause viewers to compare this new film to the previous trilogy. Viewers should judge “An Unexpected Journey” on its own merits, although Jackson may have dug himself a hole with the extended connections and similarities. But “An Unexpected Journey” has received much more of critical skepticism from its use of a high frame rate, a new method of film production and projection.

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This publicity file photo released by Warner Bros. shows the character Gollum voiced by Andy Serkis in a scene from the fantasy adventure “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey.” The film garnered controversy over the 48 frames and the drawn-out plot. “The high frame rate format displays movies at 48 frames per second, twice the normal frame rate of a standard movie,” said Ross Anglin, general manager of Landmark Theatres in Los Angeles, Calif. “The idea behind it is that the new format gives a closer display to how the human eye perceives images and motion compared to past frame rates.” The standard frame rate usually displays an object or person as somewhat blurry when in motion, but high frame rates eliminate this blur with the greater number of frames, in addition to a supposedly brighter and crisper appearance. Anglin said that it is purported to give a life-like, high-quality image in comparison to a grainy film look, but it largely depends on someone’s preferences. Many evaluations of it are disconcerting among critics and audiences. Comments from popular publications and forums describe the movie’s presenta-

tion as distracting and more similar to live television, a soap opera or a video game cutscene than another movie. For some, adjusting to the new display may lead to missing important plot points in the first hour of “An Unexpected Journey.” Viewers might consider the new format bad and associate it with lower-grade media because they are used to watching movies at 24 frames per second and other video formats at different frame rates. That leaves Jackson with the challenge of presenting his hobbit trilogy in unique ways compared to standard films, and it’s hard to say that he took initiative. Many cuts between shots or scenes appear stiff, even the movements of characters on-screen can appear awkward or jittery. Furthermore, high frame rate doesn’t seem right for Middle Earth. The ultracrisp, digitized images hardly go hand in hand with the medieval sentiment

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of Middle Earth, which can add to the strange, alienating experiences that audiences have expressed. And it doesn’t help when you can much more easily make out the plastic of a dwarf’s fake nose. The textures in Jackson’s storytelling are certainly off, or at least diverging. Controversies aside, high frame rate is here to stay with the remaining “Hobbit” movies and James Cameron’s upcoming sequels to “Avatar.” “An Unexpected Journey” will likely earn more than $1 billion worldwide before its theatrical release ends, according to BoxOfficeMojo. The next entry in Jackson’s “Hobbit” trilogy, “The Desolation of Smaug,” arrives in December, swiftly followed by the third film, “There and Back Again,” in summer 2014.

Adlai can be reached at aesteve2@ dailyillini.com.

Religious Services

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Mon­Fri 9:30 ­ 5pm  & Sat. 10 ­ 2pm  January 22 ­ February 2

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Sports

1B Friday January 18, 2013 The Daily Illini www.DailyIllini.com

Illini embarrassed by Wildcats Men’s basketball loses 3rd straight by double digits BY ETHAN ASOFSKY SENIOR WRITER

There’s really no explanation for it. The Illinois men’s basketball team that fought to the end against Gonzaga on the road and stymied Ohio State just a few weeks ago is diminished. The toughness and togetherness first-year head coach John Groce likes to wave in front of the media’s face as his team’s calling card has been reduced to meaningless diction. Perhaps the most astonishing part of the

Illini’s fall from grace has been how quickly they’ve forgotten their identity. To put it bluntly, the Illini completed their regression into last year’s team on Thursday night, when Northwestern (11-7, 2-3 Big Ten) traveled South down I-57 to win for its second straight time at Assembly Hall, 66-51. Bruce Weber is nodding his head somewhere, and feelings are boiling over in Champaign after the Illini’s latest loss dropped their conference record to 1-4 and all but certainly will knock them out of the polls. Those frustrations were vented most directly at the officials, whom Groce hounded for much of the game before picking up the first technical foul of his Illini career.

“I don’t want to talk about it or get into it,” Groce said. “If I did, my wife would probably have less money for shopping.” After such a promising start to the season in which the Illini (14-5, 1-4) emerged from a tough nonconference schedule with one loss, the wheels have fallen off and games are actually starting to look and feel like Weber is back at the helm. On Saturday, Illinois was blown out by Wisconsin at the Kohl Center in a similar fashion to last season’s March 4 embarrassment. On Thursday, Northwestern ran out to a 36-21 halftime lead and fended off any kind of run the

See MEN’S BASKETBALL, Page 3B

BRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Tracy Abrams loses control of the ball during the Illini’s loss to Northwestern at Assembly Hall on Thursday.

FRESHMAN MAKING EARLY IMPACT BY GINA MUELLER STAFF WRITER

The Illinois men’s gymnastics program unknowingly began recruiting freshman Joey Peters since he was a young boy. Former Illini Adam Pummer, who competed alongside current Illinois head coach Justin Spring, caught Peters’ attention as a young gymnast and shortly after, became his idol. “I was always striving to be like (Pummer),” Peters said. “I wanted to go to Illinois when I was a little kid and then it left my mind when he graduated. But once I was getting recruited, it came back again.” During the time when Peters was being recruited, the 2012 NCAA Championship title was a far-off goal the Illini had set. For Peters, that title did not play a factor in his decision. He wasn’t looking for the biggest or the best school, Peters wanted to replace something that he would be greatly missing when he left for college. “Growing up, I was always working out by myself,” Peters said. “In club gymnastics, it is very individualistic. This was totally different and it was the biggest factor for me. Not so much joining the best team or the best academic school, it was finding the closest family.” Peters competed not only on the club level, but the national and international level as well. He was a national team member in 2011 and 2012 and recently competed in the Junior Pan American Championships in Colombia this past summer. These experiences and the success he achieved made Peters a top recruit for many schools. But after visiting with the Illini, Peters connected with a new role model. He was someone who Peters was closer in age with and whom he would be able to compete alongside. His name was C.J. Maestas. “I had Paul (Ruggeri) when he was a senior and I was a freshman, so I had someone to look up to a little bit to feel that college vibe,” Maestas said. “When (Joey) came in, the roles reversed. I was now the older guy and he was the younger one. He pushes me and I push him. It’s nice to have that duo again.” Peters refers to Maestas as his “big brother” and attributes a big part of why he chose to come to Illinois to him. Maestas tore his tricep during the preseason, not too long after Peters had officially joined the program. Though he no longer trains with him, Maestas continues to play a huge role in Peters’ gymnastics career. “Even though I’m not there gymnastics-wise, I still want to have my energy felt in the gym and I want to feel like I’m still part of the team,” Maestas said. “As long as I bring that emotion in everyday to the gym, then he will vibe off that. Even though I’m not pushing him in the gymnastics sense, I’m pushing him emotionally and I’m still that shoulder he can lean on.” Last Saturday, Illinois participated in its season opener against Illinois at Chicago. A combination of the hard work Peters had put in during the preseason, along with injuries to the roster, allowed him to make the all-around lineup with junior Jordan Valdez. This was the first time Valdez had competed in the allaround since his freshman year. “We bounce ideas back and forth off each other,” Valdez said. “I kind of help make him more efficient. He likes to warm up every single skill one or two times. So I tell him: ‘You aren’t going to have time for that in a meet, you need to get it down to two turns. Figure out what you need to warm up.’ I keep the flow of practice moving.” The meet against UIC was Peters’ first time representing the Illini. Wearing orange and blue, he surPORTRAIT BY BRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI

See PETERS, Page 3B

Illini hockey welcomes alumni back for series against Cyclones will also be honored during the game Saturday night. Head coach Although the Illinois hockey and former player Nick Fabbrini team may be shorthanded on the said he hopes an event like this ice this weekend against No. 13 brings the network of former Iowa State, there players closer will be no shorttogether. age of hock“The idea is to get more peoey players in Champaign. ple involved,” In conjunction Fabbrini said. with the team’s “Hopefully series against No. 13 Iowa State No. 9 Illinois more people can (15-8-2) (15-13-2) give back to the the Cyclones, program.” this weekend Friday, 7:30 p.m. For those who marks alumIllinois Ice Arena ni week for the can’t attend this Illinois hockey The Illini face the Cyclones in front of weekend, Fabprogram. With a brini said the large contingent of alumni. large contingent alumni are planin town, there ning a gatherwill be an alumni lunch Satur- ing at the ACHA Tournament in day, followed by a game and party Bensenville, Ill., in early March. after the Illini and the Cyclones With attendance down over the play Saturday night. The alumni first semester of the season, FabBY STEPHEN BOURBON STAFF WRITER

at

brini said he hopes that rallying alumni will boost program funds. The alumni event, along with the NHL on the brink of returning to the ice, is a factor that the team hopes will draw a big crowd this weekend. “We certainly need it,” Fabbrini said. “With NHL hockey coming back, hopefully it will generate a lot of excitement for us. Plus, Iowa State is one of our big rivals.” The Cyclones (15-13-2) have had an inconsistent season so far. They’re just 1-3 in 2013 after playing No. 2 Robert Morris and No. 6 Ohio the past two weekends. When the Illini came to Ames, Iowa, on Oct. 26-27, the two teams put up fireworks in both contests. Iowa State took the first game 6-4, while the Illini came back to

See HOCKEY, Page 3B

DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Head coach Nick Fabbrini looks to the referee for an explanation of a penalty call during the game against No. 2 Ohio at the Ice Arena on Nov. 3. Fabbrini and the Illini will host Iowa State this weekend.


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The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, January 18, 2013

Men’s tennis opens spring season in Ind. BY J.J. WILSON STAFF WRITER

The No. 16 Illinois men’s tennis team will open its spring season with a couple of matches against Toledo and Ball State on Saturday. The Illini will play the Rockets in Indianapolis. Illinois will take on Ball State in Carmel, Ind. Two returning seniors join three sophomores and four freshmen, signaling a lack of collegiate experience, though they played at last week’s Illini Open in Fort Myers, Fla. Even sophomore Ross Guignon has a low-match count, having suffered from an osteochondral defect in his right knee after a season-long strain. But head coach Brad Dancer said he isn’t letting the inexperience bother him. “I think one thing that everyone will see, whether its students, fans or anyone that comes out to watch, you’ll see a team that plays with a lot of enthusiasm and a lot of gumption.” Dancer said. Given the freshmen class’s passion, Guignon and senior Stephen Hoh both agree the best way to help freshmen is to set examples in practice and stay productive, in hopes others will follow their lead. “Our seniors have been through a tremendous amount in their time here, and they’ve seen it all,” Dancer said. “The next step for them is can they play a role in teaching these guys in terms of where they need to be.” The one challenge Dancer anticipates is the match’s unfamiliar scoring format — every game will contribute to the overall score as opposed to matches as wholes. “This team requires a lot more one-on-one communication, and that’s something that I think is a strength of our staff,” Dancer said. Illinois defeated Toledo 6-1 in the teams’ last matchup, but that was four years ago. Illinois defeated Ball State 7-0 last season. “I know we’re going to work hard in practice and fight hard, but it’s just a matter of if the team can execute,” Hoh said.

J.J. can be reached at jjwilso2@dailyillini.com.

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Tonja Buford-Bailey was voted by The Daily Illini as the Top Illini of Title IX on July 2, 2012. Columnist Emily Bayci reminds readers of the importance of Title IX.

Title IX ramifications are more important than an anniversary Women’s opportunities have come far in 40 years, but still have far to go EMILY BAYCI Sports columnist

L

ast year, the 40th anniversary of Title IX, was a year of celebrations. There were special dinners commemorating those who spearheaded the influential piece of legislation, newspaper series to recognizing the most well-known athletes since the law’s inception and endless debate regarding the impact and progress of this law. All of this was magnificent for the understanding and appreciation of Title IX, but now the year of the anniversary and celebration is over. It’s time to put everything away and let the dust build up on the shelves until 2022, when the 50th anniversary happenings will bring the law into the public spotlight once again. Title IX should not be ignored for the next decade. Even though the anniversary year is over, it’s still more important than ever to remember the groundbreaking law and to continue pushing for progress. Title IX represents opportunity and progress for women and men, in all fields. Something that I found frustrating throughout last year was the

misconceptions individuals had about Title IX. Most people believe it’s a law that pushed for equality in men’s and women’s sports. However, there is no mention of women or athletics in the wording, which states, “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.” Title IX was originally conceived because no laws prohibited sexual discrimination. Before the law passed, the majority of women would get rejected from law schools or medical schools simply because of gender. It wasn’t until the law almost passed that it was realized athletics would be affected under the broad language of Title IX.

“Even then I didn’t realize the magnitude of it and how women in athletics were being discriminated,” Bernice Sandler, a Title IX pioneer, said in June. “I thought maybe women could have more athletic activities on field day.” The law had a tidal wave affect after it passed in 1972, and women’s athletic programs grew across the nation to be equitable with men’s athletic programs. The last time I participated in organized athletics was during my senior year of high school, when I was the captain of my cross-country team, though I only participated in one meet the entire season. Clearly I’m not much of an athlete, but Title IX still affects me every day. I’ve been very fortunate in my opportunities as a female sports reporter. I’ve been in men’s locker rooms multiple times, I’ve been at countless sporting events where I’ve been the only female reporter and I’ve been constantly asked, “Why are you here?” This combination of opportunity along with scrutiny was nonexistent

I still find a depressingly minimal number of women pursuing careers as sports reporters — there’s only five females on the Daily Illini sports staff, myself included. It’s important for everyone, men and women alike, to take a moment and recognize how Title IX affects them.

Illinois wrestlers ready to blow Nebraska away BY DAN BERNSTEIN STAFF WRITER

40 years ago. There were barely any women involved with sport in any form. That is what I remind myself, and I promise to make sure that the next generation of women have it even better than I do. I still find a depressingly minimal number of women pursuing careers as sports reporters — there are only five females on the Daily Illini sports staff, myself included. It’s important for everyone, men and women alike, to take a moment and recognize how Title IX affects them. You don’t have to be an athlete to reap the benefits of Title IX. This is a law about equity and opportunity, not just about athletes and sports, even though that is what’s most recognized. Maybe Title IX opens you up to new connections or opportunities that wouldn’t have previously been made available to you. Maybe Title IX gives you courage to go beyond general roles and try something that truly suits your interests. Let’s make sure that substantial progress gets done in the next decade, that men and women can have equitable conditions on all platforms from education, to athletics, to the professional workplace. Use Title IX as an inspiration in your daily life. Take a moment to appreciate people and athletes of all sexes, on all levels. If you see someone being denied an opportunity they deserve, stand up for them. Don’t let this law be forgotten until the 50th anniversary.

After defeating Purdue last Friday in its Big Ten home opener, the No. 5-ranked Illinois wrestling team will be put to the test when it heads to Lincoln, Neb., to take on the No. 14-ranked Cornhuskers on Friday. The Illini are currently ranked in every weight class but two, with 141-pound B.J. Futrell ranked highest at No. 3 in the country. Despite missing All-American Jesse Delgado at 125 pounds and No. 9 Daryl Thomas at 133 against Purdue, the Illini were still able to capture the victory. Delgado and Thomas seem to be back to full force and will be ready to wrestle on Friday. “Jesse and Daryl are fine, actually. We weighed them both in with the idea that we could wrestle them (against Purdue),” Head coach Jim Heffernan said. “If we won at least three of the first four matches we were going to rest them. All it did really was just buy them a couple other days but they’re fine and healthy and have been training hard.” The Illini have not wrestled against Nebraska since the 2002-03 season but lead the overall series 3-2 against the Huskers. Wrestling at 174 pounds, No. 8 Jordan Blanton will face Nebraska’s No. 4-ranked and returning NCAA Championship qualifier Robert Kokesh. “To be honest, I couldn’t be more excited for it just because there is no better way to prepare than to be the fire,” Blanton said. “It’s nothing new to me. I really want to focus on wrestling hard for seven minutes, getting to my attacks and forcing my style on my opponents.” No. 11 Tony Dallago will face Nebraska’s No. 7-ranked and three-time NCAA qualifier Josh Ihnen at 184 pounds on Friday. At 197 pounds, Junior Mario Gonzalez will take on Caleb Kolb. “I think I should go out there and just blow this guy out of the water,” Gonzalez said. “I think our good guys are better than their good guys, so overall I think we should beat them.” Gonzalez also added that a win against Nebraska is very important to the team before heading to No. 4-ranked Minnesota on Monday.

Emily can be reached at bayci1@dailyillini. com. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyBayci.

Dan can be reached at daberns2@dailyillini.com and @yaboybernie11.

Illinois emphasizes competitive energy for Illini Classic One event Turk foresees a solid day from is pole vaulting. Led by As the Illinois men’s track and field Cody Klein, the pole vaulters won the team prepares for its second meet in title in the event at the Illini Open as many weeks at the Armory, the uni- and have been hailed by Turk as one fying themes among head coach Mike the team’s stronger field events. He Turk and various athletes is to simply expects a breakout season after two remain competitive during the early seasons of growth. Turk also credseason meets. A consistent showcase ited the pole vaulting squad for their of competitive energy is mainly what the maturity and offseason preparation, team will look to emphasize at this week- something that he hopes will benefit end’s Illini Classic. the squad throughout “All I really want the season. Illini Classic to see during these Turk is also focusFriday, 4 p.m. early season meets ing on another standArmory out performance in is competitiveness from everyone on the the 60 hurdles. FolThis is the last home meet of the team,” said Turk. “I season and continues on Saturday lowing the loss of one know none of the guys the Illini’s best track with two sessions. are at midseason form athletes in team hisyet, but all I hope to see tory in Andrew Riley, from them is some fire and to compete Turk hopes to see continual growth with a lot of heart to put on a show for from a young hurdle squad. After last week’s standout debut from Viney, the our fans on Friday and Saturday.” Following a solid showing at last team expects to see major contribuweek’s Illini Open, in which the Illi- tions from him and teammates Joseph ni won seven individual titles, nota- Vanier and sophomore Gary Ford in bly freshman Cam Viney’s title in the the hurdles. 60-meter hurdles and Ryan Lynn’s perAnother storyline for the Illini this sonal-record setting title in the mile, weekend is senior Ryan Lynn’s transiIllinois hopes to replicate the success tion from the mile to the 600 meters. of last weekend with an equally strong Lynn is also returning to his signature event a week after putting a careerperformance. BY DAN ESCALONA STAFF WRITER

THE DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Illinois’ Cody Klein competes in the pole vault at the Illini Classic held in the Armory on Jan. 21. Which Mike Turk said was one of the strongest fields.

best effort at the mile. Along with getting back to form in the event he is most comfortable, the 600 meters, Lynn hopes to maximize a leadership role on the team as a senior for the younger and less experienced runners. “It will definitely be a challenge for me to go from competing in one event one week to another event the next week,” he said. “I’m confident that as long as I compete hard and do what I know I have in me, I’m sure I’ll do fine in my best event.” Making his season debut in the 60and 200-meter events will be sophomore Brandon Stryganek. “I’m excited for me and the guys to start the year out strong,” he said. “I feel that I had a strong offseason and I’m ready to go for Saturday.” Turk summed up his thoughts on the weekend’s meet, speaking about what he hopes the team can improve upon following last week’s Illini Open, saying: “I want to see much more camaraderie and a greater sense of team togetherness among all the guys. That will be much more of a focal point and we’re challenging everyone to bring their best.”

Dan can be reached at descalo2@ dailyillini.com.


The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Friday, January 18, 2013

3B

Men’s gymnastics face 5 opponents in Chicago BY GINA MUELLER STAFF WRITER

The Illinois men’s gymnastics team that competed last weekend won’t look the same at the Windy City Invitational. The Illini suffered multiple injuries to their starting lineup during the preseason, but the majority of those previously injured will be able to compete this weekend. The absence allowed some gymnasts the opportunity to compete when they normally would have been on the sidelines. Freshmen Joey Peters and Fred Hartville had standout performances, with each earning their first event titles in their collegiate career. Peters also took the all-around crown, surpassing junior Jordan Valdez. The starting lineups are now chosen from an almost completely healthy roster. “Lineups are a mess right now,” head coach Justin Spring said after Tuesday’s practice. “We have a 20-man squad and you can only compete 15 guys, so we always have to be aware of that. If I had to choose a lineup right now, I couldn’t do it.” Among those returning will be captain Vince Smurro and junior all-around competitor Cameron Rogers. Team leader C.J. Maestas will still be cheering from

PETERS FROM PAGE 1B

DARYL QUITALIG THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Alina Weinstein completes her balance beam routine during the Orange and Blue Exhibition at Huff Hall on Dec. 9. The women’s gymnastics team will compete at No. 2 Michigan on Saturday.

passed Valdez in the all-around, scoring an 84.650. Peters was awarded the all-around crown as well as the parallel bars title. It can be hard to keep a mental focus during a competition when fans’ screams are echoing in the arena and your competitor is performing on an event at the same time as you are, but Peters doesn’t hear or see either. After canceling a morning workout to give the team a break, Spring was told that Peters woke up early, walked to the ARC and did weight training alone. “I actually had to yell at him and tell him, ‘You need recovery!’,” Spring said. “The funny

Women’s gymnastics prepares for loud Michigan environment HOCKEY BY NICHOLAS FORTIN STAFF WRITER

If people were to stumble into Kenney Gymnasium on the northeast side of campus anytime in the past week, they may have been surprised not only by what they saw — a cluster of gymnasts performing various tricks on the second floor of what appears to be, from the outside, a normal campus hall — but also by what they heard. In preparation for a loud environment this Saturday at No. 2 Michigan, the Illinois women’s gymnastics team has been practicing with artificial crowd noise. “We have been trying to recreate the feeling of competition in practice so that we can translate how great we look in practice into the meets,” senior Alina Weinstein said. “Sometimes we’ll throw on some crowd music — it’s a CD that literally claps the whole time — and other times we’ll all gather around and cheer as loud as we can for somebody that’s going and try to create that meet feel and put them on the spot.” Illinois should have success, she added, as long as its nerves are under control.

“I don’t really think that our first meet really represented what we’re capable of,” Weinstein said. “We have a lot of talent on our team and a lot of the mistakes we made (at our last meet) were really uncharacteristic. They were due to the nerves that we encountered last week. As long as we learn from our mistakes, this meet will go much smoother.” Illinois had some falls in its season-opening meet at Arizona last Saturday, which led to a third-place finish. The Illini will face a common foe in Michigan. Last year the Wolverines beat the Illini in their regular season meeting and the Big Ten Championships, both by no more than .525 points. “Michigan is always looking good and is always one of our biggest rivals,” senior Jaclyn Kantecki said. “But we have to focus on ourselves while we’re there and pay attention to our own gymnastics and we should be good.” Illinois will have a tough task in beating Michigan this year. The Wolverines are off to their best start in school history, averaging 196.738 points per meet. The Illini totaled 193.750

points in their first meet. The Wolverines feature the reigning Big Ten Women’s Gymnast of the Week in Joanna Sampson, who won the all-around title last week against Nebraska. “It’s a great Michigan team that has a lot of talent,” Illinois head coach Kim Landrus said. “But we also have a lot of talent on our squad. We just have to go and compete our hearts out and do what we know how to do.” Landrus added that the team is only focusing on the factors it can control. “It’s really important that we focus on ourselves and execute our routines as flawlessly as possible. If we do that, we’ll walk out of Crisler Center extremely happy,” she said. The team agreed that to have success it must have conviction. “We just have to go in there with confidence.” Kantecki said. “We know we’ve done more than enough work and are more than prepared for this meet, so we just have to go there and hit our routines just like we do in the gym.”

Nicholas can be reached at goldwyn2@dailyillini.com and @IlliniSportsGuy.

MEN’S BASKETBALL FROM PAGE 1B Illini cooked up in the second half. This was just like last year, but then Northwestern had all-hustle Big Ten forward John Shurna and the margin of defeat was only four, not 15. “That’s two games in a row where we came out and I thought we let the other team be the aggressor,” Groce said. “To me, the whole deal starts with the defense. Our defense has got to get better. It’s got to tick guys off more when we get scored on. They got to take it more personal.” Similar to Saturday’s game against the Badgers, Illinois fell behind early by the dagger of the 3-pointer. Northwestern hit its first four shots from distance to build a comfortable lead, while Illinois once again struggled to hit much of anything, shooting 3-for-20 downtown and 39 percent from the field. “If you make shots, you become a better coach,” Northwestern head coach Bill Carmody said. “I thought Illinois had some good looks and missed them.” Groce wasn’t quite as happy as Carmody about his team’s shot attempts, which he blamed on Illinois’ “atrocious” defense. Without stops, Illinois hasn’t moved the ball at all in transition and is only moving further from the attacking, fast-paced system Groce first brought to Illinois. “Until we get our defense addressed, the results don’t change,” Groce said. The Illini haven’t shot above 16 percent from three in their last three games, a stark contrast from their strongest weapon during nonconference play. But the Illini have more deep-seated problems than just 3-point shooting. Groce said his team practiced with the best of them Monday but didn’t show up in the same capacity Thursday. He had no answers for why, wishing for a magic wand. “We’re not going to jump off a cliff or anything,” Groce said. “I don’t know what good that does. Last year, I was sitting on my couch somewhere in Athens

FROM PAGE 1B earn a split with a 5-3 victory in the finale. “I expect them to come out with a lot of speed,” Fabbrini said. “They’ve got defensemen that can make a lot of plays and get the puck out.” The Illini will have a short bench as they continue battling through injuries. The list of players who are out includes defenseman Josh Baker (broken ankle), forward Derek Schultz

the sidelines because of injury but said he is ahead of schedule with his tricep recovery. “It’s hard to see them come back and I’m sitting next to the training table,” Maestas said. In the first meet against Illinois at Chicago, one of the weakest events was the vault. Though Illinois took three of the top-five spots in the individual results, four of the six Illini fell. An outstanding performance from Hartville secured the top spot on the event for Illinois with a 15.3. “We really stepped up this group to do some upgraded vaults, but we aren’t landing them,” Spring said. “Now we are stuck early in the season with that big debate of, ‘Do we stick with the high level of difficulty and hope it gets there?’ or ‘Do we start reformatting routines and watering down a little bit to start hitting now so we can get the consistency?’ It’s only been one meet, but we are getting to the point where we need to start looking at that.” At UIC, Hartville competed on vault and floor for the Illini, earning first and eighth on the events, respectively. When the team seemed to be falling apart on the vault, he brought back the energy the team needed with a perfect landing. “Fred’s vault was amazing,”

Smurro said. “There is a lot of potential on floor as well. I think once he works those kinks out he could be one of our top floor competitors at the end of the season.” Unlike past years, when Illinois began the season with the Windy City Invitational, the team was able to participate in a dual meet. This weekend, the Illini will again travel to Chicago, where they will compete against Ohio State, Michigan, Minnesota, Iowa and UIC. Many of the teams will open their season with this meet, giving Illinois a slight advantage of already having competed this year. “We’ve been a team that’s pretty good at consistently hitting around our top score in postseason, and that’s really all you can train for,” Spring said. “You do that by learning a little bit, adapting a little bit and getting a little bit better every time. Everyone knows exactly what they need to do. They’ve seen their routines in review, they saw their score and if we can improve a little bit on everyone’s routines, those tenths add up and all of a sudden we’ve shot up five points in our team score.”

thing is, that’s just Joe.” Peters’ mental focus is what led him to the top of the leader board against UIC and is part of who he is as a gymnast. Though it provided great results for him in the first meet, Spring said it could become his enemy if he doesn’t find a balance. “It’s almost his weakness as much as his strength,” Spring said. “He’s almost too much in the zone and so he fails to see the bigger picture sometimes. As a coach, I’ve got to constantly pull him out of his stare. ... It’s easier to do that then to have to motivate someone to give everything they have every turn they take. I’ll take 10 Joey’s over the counter.” Starting off the season with the all-around title seems to be just the beginning for Peters’

career at Illinois. Spring said that “he is going to be a leader no matter what” this season for the Illini. Though Peters is only a freshman, he not only leads by his performances, but also through his character. “Joey is the type of kid that will be the first one in the gym and he’s the last one to leave,” Maestas said. “He wants to do anything and everything to be the best gymnast out there. If it was snowing outside, he would give me the shirt off of his back to walk home, so I would be warm. That is just the type of personality he has. I think he is going to do great things with this program and keep the legacy going on.”

(sore knee), defenseman Ricky Kokoszka (broken finger) and forward Kyle Varzino (shoulder/collarbone). Forward Nick Stuercke is questionable to play after sustaining a mild concussion against Lindenwood. Fabbrini said the team’s recipe for success will be similar to last weekend’s plan: get a lot of shots on net and block a lot of shots in the defensive zone. The Illini blocked 28 shots in their 2-1 victory over the Lions last Saturday, and Fabbrini said anytime the team can block over 20, it is a great sign.

Illinois’ defense has had its faults, having been a point of concern for the coaching staff much of the season. The Illini surrendered seven goals in last Friday’s loss to Lindenwood, including four in the opening period. “It’s been better this week in practice,” Fabbrini said. “I guess we’ll see when the lights come on. That’s really when you get to tell, nothing really gets up to the real thing.”

BRENTON TSE THE DAILY ILLINI

(Ohio), and I saw (Bo Ryan) after a tough loss and he said: ‘What do you want me to do? Hit somebody or strangle somebody?’ I don’t have many options. So you have to stay the course.”

Ethan can be reached at asofsky1@dailyillini.com and on Twitter @AsOfTheSky.

Gina can be reached at muelle30@ dailyillini.com and @muelle30.

Stephen can be reached at sbourbo2@dailyillini.com and @steve_bourbon.

Rebounding, forced turnovers help lead women’s basketball to victory at Nebraska Illinois now stands 4-1 in away games

the 5:21 scoring drought, Illinois had five turnovers and six misses. Led by stellar defense, the Illini went on a 14-2 run after BY MICHAEL WONSOVER Nebraska’s rally. A 14-9 drought STAFF WRITER turned into a 23-16 advantage Illinois accomplished some- for the Illini. thing against Nebraska that Illinois took a 27-20 lead into it hadn’t done in more than a halftime, led by six points, eight decade: win three straight road rebounds, two steals and a block from Penn. games in the Big Ten. After a 62-52 victory over Nebraska was held to only six Nebraska (12-6, 2-3 Big Ten) field goals on 24 percent shootin Lincoln, Neb., on Thursday, ing in the first half. Illinois also Illinois (10-7, 3-2) won its third outrebounded Nebraska 23-22 straight Big Ten road game for despite a large size disparity in the first time since the 2000-01 favor of the Cornhuskers. season. The win also marked The Illini continued their the first victoabi l it y to ry in Lincoln in wreak havoc program histoon opponents ry. Illinois also by forcing 16 moved to 4-1 in Nebraska turntrue road games overs in the this season. first half, 10 Northwestern Illinois T he I l l i n i (8-9, 0-4 Big Ten) of which were (10-7, 3-2) steals. Senior were lead by guard Lindsey 12 points, 18 Sunday, 2 p.m. rebounds, three Moore, who Assembly Hall steals and two entered Thursblocks from Illinois defeated Northwestern 65-47 day’s ga me last time the teams met. leading the Big senior forward Ten and 19th Karisma Penn in the country and 19 points, seven rebounds and two steals in assist-to-turnover ratio, had from senior guard Adrienne one assist to six turnovers in GodBold. the first half. “I thought our Buzz defense Despite winning by a doubledigit margin, the Illini didn’t changed the game in the first always have control of the game. half,” Illinois head coach Matt Illinois began the contest on Bollant said. Illinois brought that same a 9-0 run, sparked by four early points from Penn. Nebraska intensity into the second half, missed four shots and turned storming on a 15-3 run after the ball over twice during the Nebraska was within three run. The Cornhuskers were held points. For the 6:42 second without a field goal until the stretch, Nebraska’s only field 16:52 mark, when junior forward goal was Moore’s 3-pointer Jordan Hooper hit a 3-pointer. at the 12:10 mark. The lead Nebraska responded with a expanded to 50-35 and Illinois run of its own, streaking on a would never look back, winning 14-0 spurt. A jumper by God- by a final score of 62-52. Bold at the 12:18 mark ended Although both teams shot almost a six-minute field goal similar percentages from the drought for the Illini. During field — Illinois 34.4 percent

at

Illinois’ Tyler Griffey is fouled while driving to the basket during the Illini’s loss to Northwestern at Assembly Hall on Thursday.

Gina can be reached at muelle30@ dailyillini.com and @muelle30.

Illini, Wildcats meet again For the second time in 10 days, the Illinois women’s basketball team will play Northwestern when the Illini take on the Wildcats on Sunday at Assembly Hall. In the first meeting between the two teams, the Illini defense dominated the Wildcats’ offense in a 65-47 win. Illinois forced 34 turnovers and held Northwestern to 30.8 percent shooting. Since the win in Evanston, Illinois is 0-1 with a 79-75 loss to Michigan State on Sunday and Thursday’s game. Northwestern is winless in conference play, dropping its first four games to Penn State, Indiana, Illinois and Michigan. and Nebraska 32.8 percent — rebounding and ball security decided the outcome. Illinois outrebounded Nebraska 45-36, including 16 offensive rebounds. Penn led Illinois with 10 offensive boards. “Karisma (Penn) got every rebound down the stretch,” Bollant said. “When we had to have some rebounds, she went and got them.” Although Nebraska turned the ball over only two more times than Illinois, the Illini stole the ball 16 times, compared with only three by the Cornhuskers. Sophomore guards Ivory Crawford and Taylor Tuck each led the Illini with four steals. “They’re a really good basketball team, so to come in here and win by double-digits, I’m really proud of our team,” Bollant said. “Obviously, we’re a different team with Adrienne back. And I thought we did enough defensively to win.”

Michael can be reached at wonsovr2@ dailyillini.com and @The_MDubb.


4B

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BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY In the Daily Illini and dailyillini.com

The Daily Illini: Volume 142 Issue 82  

Friday, Jan. 18, 2012

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