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Diversity chair out

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Vol. 147 Issue 56

Moms take over Campustown

ISG voted to impeach Minik BY CORI LIPPERT STAFF WRITER

The Illinois Student Government voted to impeach Andrew Minik, senior in Business, citing his neglect for his position and his misconduct while serving as chair of diversity and inclusion. Walter Lindwall, junior in LAS and student body president, said the incident that brought him over the tipping point to file impeachment charges was an email Minik shared with members of Turning Point USA, an organization in which Minik holds the position of the president. The email, sent privately to Minik by an undocumented student and calling for the cancellation of the “Build the Wall” event organized by Turning Point USA, was shared with members of the orgaSABRINA YAN THE DAILY ILLINI

SEE ISG | 3A

Moms Weekend brought students and their families together on campus Saturday. Despite gloomy weather, Campustown saw an increase in visitors for the event.

Mike Ingram to run for county board UI signs open letter

condemning Sinclair

BY OLIVIA WALSHANS STAFF WRITER

First-time political candidate and promoter at Canopy Club Mike Ingram has been elected as the District 6 Democratic candidate for Champaign County Board in the November general election. Ingram said he was spurred into action after Donald Trump was elected president. “It felt like it was time to stop talking about stuff and actually do something,” Ingram said. Although he had friends pushing him to consider filling other offices or have loftier goals and ambitions, Ingram said he felt the Champaign County Board was the place to start. Ingram was sponsored by organizations such as the Champaign County Young Democrats and two local branches of labor unions: the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. Dave Beck, staff representative of AFSCME Council 31, said it backed Ingram because it thought he would support labor in the county. Ingram also aligned with its opinion on the treatment of the Champaign County Nursing Home, a key issue in this election. “Mike has said throughout his candidacy, since day one, that he wanted to do whatever we could do

STAFF WRITER

The University has been added to a growing list of journalism programs voicing disapproval of Sinclair Broadcast Group, a broadcast network that has issued conservative-leaning must-run segments to local news stations. Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko, interim dean of the College of Media, joined 15 other journalism colleges in signing an open letter denouncing Sinclair. “My signature on this letter reflected a relatively narrow case of not adequately disclosing the motives of the story that went out over a large number of local stations,” Chodzko-Zajko said. “I think that Sinclair Broadcasting overstepped the line.”

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INSIDE JOSEPH ABE-BELL THE DAILY ILLINI

Mike Ingram, a first-time political candidate and Canopy Club promoter, will run in the Champaign County Board general election in November as the District 6 Democratic candidate.

to save the nursing home and keep it a county nursing home. That was sort of the primary issue that drove the decision,” Beck said. The Champaign County Nursing Home has housed generation upon generation of people in Champaign

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INSIDE

T he open let ter, addressed to Sinclair Executive Chairman David Smith, began at the University of Maryland and has been circulating to deans of journalism schools across the country, Chodzko-Zajko said. “The fears articulated in the Sinclair script regarding an extreme danger posed to democracy by news media telling the public what to think describes our fears about the impact of the Sinclair must-carry script,” the letter said. A video of Sinclair news anchors reciting the same must-run script about “fake news” went viral after it was published on April 2. “They did not disclose

BY THERESE POKORNEY

County, but the home was hit hard by the state budget crisis and fell increasingly into debt, Ingram said. When a referendum came up that would give the Champaign County Board the decision power to sell the nursing home, Ingram said his district highly

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opposed it. “For the very hawkish, fiscal types of people, it is hard to justify why the county shouldn’t sell the nursing home, but it discounts a lot of the good the home does and represents

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Calling “cut” on abuse in Hollywood

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2A Monday, April 16, 2018

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According to the report, the University-owned van, which has an estimated value of $3,500, was last seen parked outside the building Monday or Tuesday. An arrest was made on charges of aggravated assault and resisting a police officer near Green and Third Streets around 12:30 a.m. Friday. According to the report, the 22-yearold male was not cooperative with police and lunged toward an officer when confronted.

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local gas station before exiting the store. An arrest was made on charges of domestic battery on the 2400 block of Prairie Green Drive around 8 a.m. Thursday. According to the report, witnesses observed the 32-year-old male chasing the victim and taking her phone as she was trying to call 911. The arrestee was later located and transported to jail. An arrest was made on the charges of property trespassing on the 800 block of Green Street around 3:30 a.m. Friday. According to the report, The 47-year-old male had previously trespassed on the business’s property and had a no-contact order with the victim.

Cannabis possession was reported on the 1600 block of Cunningham Avenue around 3:30 a.m. Thursday. University According to the report, the 35-yearTheft was reported at the Phys- old male threw a plastic bag containical Plant Building, 1501 S. Oak St. ing cannabis over the counter at a news@dailyillini.com

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Theft was reported at Wirco Incorporated Foundry Division, 1700 W. Washington St., around 11 a.m. Thursday. According to the report, a flagpole was stolen from the business. Theft was reported on the 500 block of Bradley Avenue around noon Friday. According to the report, a license plate was stolen sometime over the last several months. Theft was reported on the 700 block of South Mattis Avenue around 11:30 a.m. Friday. According to the report, the victim said a package delivered to her residence was stolen by an unknown offender.

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Students admitted by the School of Music have been shadowing current students to help them decide if the University is the right fit for them. This year, admitted students could choose to shadow for one day between March 28 and April 9, according to the School of Music website. Angela Tammen, admissions and public engagement director of the School of Music, said she thought of the idea several years ago, but she couldn’t organize its implementation until last year. When students are admitted to a school, they already have most likely researched it. Tammen said. “The missing link that they haven’t really experienced is the community of the School of Music, and I think that’s a crucial part in considering a school of music because different schools of music have kind of a different vibe,” she said. When admitted students come to shadow current students, some of them may already be committed, while others

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Bowen Song, senior, practices between his classes Thursday at the Music Building. Newly admitted students in the School of Music can now shadow current students.

are still in the process of deciding, Tammen said. She said the current Music students enjoy volunteering with admittance and with recruiting students. “They enjoy meeting incoming students and sometimes they’re people from their high school that they already know,” Tammen said. Jake Rottier, freshman in Music, said he did not shadow anyone as an admitted student, but he had the opportunity of being paired with a student this year.

“It would be nice to know where places on campus are before actually coming to school,” Rottier said. “When I first came, I had no idea what anything or where anything was. I was lucky enough to find people who would just show me.” Tammen said having a shadowing program works well for the School of Music because there are so many majors, so admitted students are paired with similar current students. Usually, admitted students are paired with freshman or sophomores,

because those schedules are most similar to what a student’s first year will look like, she said. “The seniors are doing upper-level classes, and we don’t want to scare anybody away,” Tammen said. The shadowing program is about peer-topeer recruitment, which is important to the program, Tammen said. “I just think this is a really positive program; we’re really happy with it,” she said. sjboyle2@dailyillini.com

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Corrections When we make a mistake, we will correct it in this place. We strive for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editor-inChief Abby Paeth at (217)-337-8365.

Initiate date is Wednesday 11, 2018 FACULTY Dr. Kevin T. Pitts

PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS Bridget Clancy David Liss Judson Tucker Smith Morgan Elizabeth Stoddard

GRADUATE STUDENTS Roberto Acosta Alessandra Affinito Mahmood Humaiyid Hamed Al-Wahaibi Sowmya Balachandran Ander Beristain Murillo Amanda E. Bloomfield Manuel Breschi Meaghan E. Carpenter Rebekah L. Carroll Raegan Leigh Carter James Castree Brett Catington Jessica R. Chia Sarah Clark Raquel Doke Kristen Frost Joel Garcia Daniel Gartley Rachel V. L. Gonzalez Laura Katherine Harting-Lemon Molly Hathaway Wei He Amy Ho Sunjie Hou Irati Hurtado Ruiz Zion Hwang Irene Eliza Jacob ArCasia D. James Priscilla Y. Jantuah Mengmeng Ji Anna Karwowska Adrian King Melissa A. Kneller Alexis Korbe Tara Kristoff Zoe Yung Sook Kudla Anna Kuure-Kinsey Yuriy Kuzma

Chih-Hsiang Lai Graham M. Lambert Ching-Yen Lin Mary E. Lyons Nicolas Maire Sarah Danielle Marshall Isabel G. Martinez Gina McGovern Nathan Patrick McKee Erfan Mohagheghian Manuel Anthony Moreno III Jessica Lynn Murray Victor Orozco Ryan Joseph Palmer Peter Matthew Parys Abigail Pennington Phorn-Arpha Phutphithak Yi Qian Lara Kaiser Reem Allison Kay Repking Justin J. Rose Jason R. Sanders Briana Racquel Santos Michael Schasane Eleanor Schumacher Christopher Segura Ellen P. Sellinger Minjae Seo Gaurav Ranjan Sinha Jessica Soule Erin Stansifer Alicia Marie Tagtmeyer Nianfan Tang Noah Peter Stone Taxis Heather Michelle Timm Amber Urich Vincent Warren Dustin K. Wenger John W. Westcott, IV Amy Beth Wildman Henny Wong Yiqin Wu Erica Zhang Hanye Zhou

SENIORS Kristen Abrahamson Brittany L. Albrecht Kelsey W. Barnett Kaitlyn Nicole Baughman Monica Beaulieu Anthony Borrino

Cori Braun Austin Michael Burnette Jiehao Chen Jennifer Zhu Cheng Anne Coulomb Andrew T. Eberlein Shannon Elizabeth Flynn Abigael Q. Fogarty Luis Eduardo Garcia Mia S. Goodman Grant C. Greenberg Margret A. Gruben Annalisa Hammeleff Spencer P. Haydary Callahan Hennessy Nima Homami Miriam Horsley Madeline Houde Rachel Janovsky Emmanuel A. Joseph Anna Kanfer Yukyeong Stella Kim Robert C. Klein Aron Klopper Oksana Dlaboha Kuzma Peter Laudeman Justin Alexander Lee Helen W. Liu Zachary Lo Andrew Miranti Alexa Maria Nelson Raebekkah Pratt-Clarke Olivia Schifferer Olivia Isabel Schmitt Kira B. Schnitzler Gabrielle Field Sherman Nora Field Sherman Amber Simmons Lauren I. Solberg Julia Szumny Brianna Marie Tyler Meghan Viebrock Qingyi Wang Yuwei Wu Eva Zhang

JUNIORS Zachary Dane Belanger Jacob Carr Le (Lexi) Chen Mark Cockburn Samuel Garrett Drazner

Matthew G. Francesconi Kelly Gillespie Megan Lynn Grako Jonah Halpern Amanda Hedberg Gertrude Rae Heimerdinger Johnathan Y. Ip Kevin Iwatsuki Corbin J. Kakac Kara Kilpatrick Ji Woon Kim Kyle Krumm Dante Marcozzi Meegan Elizabeth Mayer Matthew James McClintock Catherine Nield Anna Osborn James Grant Semonin Junyu Song Clark Mitchell Stevens Paulius Juozas Vitas Liwen Wang Allie E. Ward Songling Zhou

2018 Phi Kappa Phi Junior Scholarship Zachary Dane Belanger

2018 Phi Kappa Phi Freshmen Essay Award Lauren Lindow

Officers of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Chapter 046 2017-2018 Soo-Yeun Lee, President Robert Chappell, Jr. Haoen Cui Kim Graber Amanda Houser Amy Woods


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MONDAY April 16, 2018 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

NEWS

Schlesinger leaves donation after death BY KAREN LIU NEWS EDITOR

Former University professor Michael Schlesinger died at age 74 in his Champaign home Wednesday due to a heart attack. Schlesinger was a professor in the atmospheric sciences department since 1989, after coming to Illinois from Oregon State University. “Being a professor was his life. He loved teaching. He loved inspiring the next generation. He was a very eclectic and unique personality, but despite that, people really loved him,” said Mylynda Massart, Schlesinger’s daughter. Bob Rauber, head of the atmospheric sciences department, worked with Schlesinger for nearly three decades. He said in an email Schlesinger said on more than one occasion that he would never take a vacation or sabbatical. “His work was his passion throughout his career,” Rauber said. “The world has lost a strong advocate for climate change research and solutions.” Massart said leaving the University in the fall was a horrible experience for Schlesinger, but his love for the University never waivered. Schlesinger left a generous donation to the University from his estate, as well as several scholarships in the names of his parents and brother who preceded him in death, according to Massart in a follow-up email. Massart said Schlesinger studied climate change and global warming at UCLA in the 1960s and went around trying to stop companies from polluting, even though nobody knew what global warming was at the time. “Everyone just thought he was crazy, and he went on to do all this research to really open everyone’s eyes, and now climate change is really recognized as a tremendous thing that

FROM 1A

ISG nization, eventually leading to the email being posted on social media, Lindwall said. Turning Point USA organized the “Build the Wall” event to memorialize victims of crimes committed by undocumented Americans. Minik said the impeachment charges were a direct attack on his political beliefs and caused by personal issues other senators had with him. “The purpose of the event was to bring awareness to victims of violent crimes that are often overlooked due to a broken system. We weren’t proposing any alternatives, rather bringing awareness,” Minik said. Lindwall said ISG is not allowed to suppress the work or political opinions of someone while they are outside of the student government, but it is a problem when work in ISG combines with work in other organizations. He said that happened when Minik sent the email he received as the chair of diversity and inclusion to the other members of Turning Point USA. “He used his role to basically incite harassment against another student,” Lindwall said. “If he had just stuck to a strict divi-

FROM 1A

INGRAM and not just on the part of the people living there but the people who work there,” Ingram said. A large part of his campaign was trying to figure out the best way to engage with people, Ingram said.

we must pay attention to around the world,” Massart said. “He really made a significant impact there.” Rauber said Schlesinger brought a strong program in climate change research to the department at the exact time when the world’s concern over the issue was just coming into the news. Massart said he was still working on a paper on global warming when he left the University. She said the teaching, the research and the commitment to the protection of our planet were his whole life. “Professor Schlesinger was one of the most intelligent people I have ever worked with. As a professor, he was very demanding of his graduate students, always insisting on the highest quality work, and as a result, his students have gone on to very successful careers,” Rauber said. Navin Ramankutty, professor at the University of British Columbia and former master’s student of Schlesinger’s from 1991 to 1994, said in an email Schlesinger took a chance on him when he applied to graduate school. Ramankutty said he developed respect, fondness and a good working relationship with Schlesinger during his three years of graduate

PHOTO COURTESY OF MYLYNDA MASSART

Michael Schlesinger, former professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, passed away at 74 last Wednesday.

er set the trajectory of his career. He also continued to think of Schlesinger as a significant person in his life who shaped his career after leaving the University. “More than any accomplishments, I grew to respect him as someone who would not compromise on his principles,” Raman-

“He was a very eclectic and unique personality, but despite that, people really loved him.” MYLYNDA MASSART DAUGHTER OF MICHAEL SCHLESINGER

school, despite his struggles with the coursework and Schlesinger’s high expectations. Ramankutty said coauthoring on two key publications with Schlesing-

in an email Schlesinger is a colorful character and added vibrancy to life. “We all knew Dr. Schlesinger, and there was no denying that he was a crusty old curmudgeon. But he was our crusty old curmudgeon. You only had to meet him once to remember him for life,” Davison said. Davison said Schlesinger was completely unapologetic in who he was and what he believed in. “Craggy and with sharp edges that could cut you – you could bruise yourself-battering against his stubbornness. But he was dependable and reliable in who he was and what he stood for,” she said. “The world will be a little less vibrant without him.” Memorial visitation in Schlesinger’s honor will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday at Sunset Funeral Home in Champaign.

kutty said. “Especially in this world of unprincipled leadership, a man like him is rare. I am sad to hear that he is no more.” Jennifer Davison, former student of Schlesinger, said karenl3@dailyillini.com

FROM 1A

SINCLAIR

democracy,” Holden said. “Over time, it could lead large numbers of people to not understand what objective news is. To the extent they know what objective news is, they may come to believe that the news business is just an arm of whatever political entity happens to control that news business.” According to The Washington Post, Sinclair is owned by Republican donors who ran 15 exclusive interviews with Trump and none with Clinton during the 2016 campaign. Chodzko-Zajko said he believed the problem with Sinclair centers around undisclosed commentary and not politically slanted journalism. “I don't think this is about right- or left-leaning journalism; it’s really about the importance of fully disclosing the nature of material that is being conveyed, and that's why I was willing to sign the letter after I had reached out to my colleagues in the Department of Journalism,” Chodzko-Zajko said. “My biggest concern is about the stories and the way they’re written.” Journalism professor Joshua Hueman said he believes this letter will start conversations about broadcast news practices and policies. “Though I don’t think the open letter will have a direct impact on its own, I’d like to think that it carries some weight in a larger public conversation,” Hueman said. Holden said without awareness of what Sinclair is doing, viewers of Sinclair-owned stations will believe the biased views news anchors are showing. “Journalism should be in the business of reporting what’s happening in those markets and in those communities,” Holden said. “I want to salute Dean Wojtek for having the courage and the foresight to stand on the side of democracy, and the side of the First Amendment, and the side of a free press.”

efficiently that this was actually editorial commentary coming from Sinclair Broadcasting as an organization,” Chodzko-Zajko said. “I think that’s where the real problem comes, because the viewer would have felt that this was a story written and originated at the local level, and it’s very important to remember that these are local TV stations.” The letter condemns Sinclair for forcing its 173 local news stations to air ‘mustrun’ statements warning viewers about biased reporting. Journalism professor Benjamin Holden said it was essential the University join with other journalism schools in the signing of the letter denouncing Sinclair. “I teach my students that your job is not to be a politician or to be on anyone’s side, and if you happen to be blessed in America to own news organizations like Sinclair, you are doing a tremendous disservice,” Holden said. “You are committing a kind of light-weight stand against democracy when you engage in this overt bastardization of journalism by forcing your employee to engage in non-objective, politically slanted news production that is masquerading as real news.” Sinclair’s behaviors cause confusion for people who rely on local news as an accurate source of information, and the scripted speeches outrage those who understand free speech and embolden people who care more about their own political and social agendas, he said. Holden said due to the number of American households Sinclair is able to access, the organization has the ability to change news for political purposes and alter the political beliefs of their viewers. “I think the effect is corrosive, subtle and over time, if unchecked, will do great damage to this tpokor3@dailyillini.com

mittee chairs were. ISG had asked other committee chairs to resign over the course of the year, due to their neglect of the position, but Minik wouldn't resign when he was asked to do so, Lindwall said. “We definitely tolerate all sorts of view points, it is when things like discrimination and racism come in that we want to draw a firm line,” Lindwall said. Jack Johnson, sophomore in Engineering and ISG senator, said in an email it was not fair to impeach Minik, since most of the articles of impeachment focused on his activities outside of the student government. “This behavior is exhibited by all other ISG chairs minus one or two, yet not one has even been reminded or set straight by exec, let alone impeached,” Johnson said. “Clearly a witch hunt that started the night he was elected over their hand-picked successor.” The student government voted to impeach him, but the Judiciary will decide if JEAN PABON THE DAILY ILLINI he should be removed from Members of the Illinois Student Government talk at a meeting. The ISG voted to impeach Chair of Diversity and Inclusion his position. From there, Andrew Minik due to misconduct and neglect of duties, causing some negative backlash from University students. the speaker and the director of the senate will decide sion between Turning bly wouldn’t have brought times, and Minik was only meant to start. if they will take the judiPoint and the student gov- forth (the impeachment able to attend a few meetThe committee was never ciary’s recommendation ernment and not basically charges).” ings. Lindwall said Minik late putting forward work, on whether Minik will be encounter issues of diverThe Committee of Diver- also sent in agendas and Minik said. He said he was removed from his position. sity and inclusion between sity and Inclusion was only reminders just minutes being held to a higher stanthem, (then) we proba- able to meet five out of 11 before the meeting was dard than the other com- coridl2@dailyillini.com This involved going doorto-door and talking with people in his district, and campaigning across social media. Ingram said there were a couple times when the campaign became more negative than he expected. Various things took him by surprise: a disappearing yard sign, posts

saying he can’t be trusted and mail sent to voters by one of his sponsors in support of him that contains negative quotes from one of his opponents. “It wasn’t from me, but it still had my name on it because they were saying, ‘Vote this in as an alternate.’ I didn't know how to feel about that,” Ingram

said. In November, Ingram will be going up against Republican candidate Richard J. Montgomery, another first-time candidate. Republicans in District 6 do not always put forth a candidate for the County Board election, so Montgomery said he decided to run to give people more

options during the general election and to hold elected officials and politicians more accountable. “I always had the belief that the voter should have the option for two or more candidates, so I decided I would offer them a choice in this election,” Montgomery said. Although Montgomery

originally ran to give people another option, he said he became more interested in actually taking the position as his campaign progressed. He said he wants to improve and modernize the jail, and look into a mental health facility once funding is freed. okw2@dailyillini.com


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OPINIONS

MONDAY April 16, 2018 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

Learn to step away from the stress of your phone imity, allowing us to know what occurs in the world. They’re miracles, really, of both communication and convenience. As with any “miracle” nxiety” seems to invention, though, smart be a bit of a buzzphones carry their own word lately; from cumbersome list of cons. the recent mass shootSometimes these “gateways ings to President Donald to the world” can isolate Trump’s administration us; why meet up when you to simply our daily lives, can FaceTime? Why call, stressors abound. I seleven, when you can text? dom speak to someone who Why text when you can hasn’t experienced some Snapchat? kind of problem with anxiWe obsessively check our ety at some point in his or phones for news, messagher life, especially my peers. es and updates. What proSome sources of stress portion of this is producwe cannot control. I have tive? How much time do no power over what Trump you spend scrolling through tweets, for example, and, nonsense until you don’t although I have boycotted even read, eyes glazed over, and blocked his account, doing it more out of habit the stress associated than anything else? with them creeps into my Your phone does somepsyche whenever they are thing worse than just draw mentioned. you to check it, though; it Other aspects of life, constantly threatens you. It however, the ones that are threatens that it may buzz arguably more impactful or ring or light up at any givand important, are (someen second. what) in your control; speEven when you aren’t cifically, that smart little using your phone, it’s probmetal device you keep on ably pretty close to you. yourself at all times. The And, subconsciously, you one on which you read this know you might receive a column, perhaps. text, see if someone liked Our phones are gateways your photo or be notified of to the world. They connect any number of things at any us, allowing us to check in time. on those with whom we do I, myself, am guilty of this not share physical proxphone anxiety — as I write

“A

this, my phone is right next to me. And I’ve checked it somewhere around five times. I received a Snapchat from my friend, a picture of a plastic bag with the caption “idk what im doing lol.” Important stuff. Like it or not, we’re chained to our phones. You can turn it on “do not disturb” mode, though. Or, even better, airplane mode. Or you could lock it in your closet. Or throw it in Boneyard Creek. Actually, don’t do that. I suppose the best thing you could do is limit the outlets you can check on your phone; do you need to check Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and whatever else multiple times a day? Probably not. You probably wouldn’t miss them after a few days if you deleted the apps. Maybe start with not using your phone when walking to classes. Look around, smile at strangers, notice the Illini service dog across the Main Quad, the birds chirping and the trees blossoming. Maybe you’ll work your way up to never having your phone on you — to being truly uninhibited. Then throw it in Boneyard Creek. Ellen is a freshman in LAS. ellenmb2@dailyillini.com

MARIEL ELOPRE THE DAILY ILLINI

Paul Ryan to be out with a whimper There should be fair

trade for our privacy

AUSTIN STADELMAN COLUMNIST

P

aul Ryan is set to retire from his position as Speaker of the House of Representatives, and as representative from Wisconsin’s 1st District, at the end of this term. The Speaker claims that the sole reason for his departure from Congress comes from a desire to spend more time with his family. Having spent nearly 20 years in Congress (Ryan was first elected in 1998 at only 28 years old), it is understandable that such a demanding job can take away from raising a young family to a father’s fullest extent. But to many, his explanation seems a bit short. Speculation will fly as to what the “real” reasons are for the Speaker’s retirement. One includes the Republican Party, once the bolster of fiscal responsibility and the free market, which is turning into a party of populist appeal. For a man once considered an ambitious fighter of principled conservatism, maybe Ryan would rather not go down with the ship. Regardless of the reasons behind Ryan’s departure, what will be most remembered about his tenure was his rise as a deficit hawk brought into the Speaker position by the Tea Party movement, to his fall of political prominence as a Trump enabler. His ascension to the national stage was catalyzed by relentless attacks on the Obama Administration for running budgets deficits, yet he authorized a tax bill that will expand the deficit by $1.9 trillion in the next 10 years. One possible reason for this is that in a crucial election year, with many Republican seats at risk, saving the average American a few hundred dollars may keep, or sway, their loyalty to the Republicans. This is the aspect of Ryan’s career that he never had much of a problem with: winning. During his 20-year ten-

ments are exactly what’s missing in the process for LUYUYANG LI users when they sell their COLUMNIST personal data for online services. As it is right now, there are no negotiations he recent Facebook and no dialogue, unlike scandal has caught other services we paid for. huge public attention When people pay their about our privacy on the phone bill, they have the internet, making the word chance to choose how much “privacy” the most urgent data traffic they want, the agenda to address. On one different plans they can hand, people are concerned select and a fair, marketfor the abuse of user data, controlled price they can and on the other hand, pay. After the purchase, those same people continu- information on how much ously enjoy the convenience data traffic is used, how and efficiency data brought many phone calls are made to our lives. So, what could and how many texts are be the solution here? As sent are then visible to strange as it sounds, the users. answer might be fair trade. But, in the trade of priWhen signing up for vacy, people cannot choose Facebook for the first time, how much data they want there’s a little tiny line to buy and how many big of words under the “Credata services they want ate Account” button that from the company. There’s says, “By clicking Creonly one price and one ate Account, you agree to option to the user: surrenour Terms and that you der their privacy or don’t have read our Data Policy, use the services. In terms including our Cookie Use.” of a competitive market, as These lines give Faceevery online service probook the right to use user vider implements similar data. The same goes with policy, the market of privasocial media and other tech cy for services is basically a companies like Google. monopoly. Therefore, when acceptMost people are not ing these policies, users are wholly against online seractually trading their usage vice companies using users’ data in exchange for these data; rather, the problem is companies’ services. The to what amount, how and only difference is these ser- to what extent our data is vices are paid with data — being used. In fact, using not money. data can improve user In his book “A Brief Hisexperience greatly. tory of Tomorrow’s,” Yuval If the companies offer Noah Harari explains how their customers free choice data could be the next capi- of how much, how often tal of human society, rather and how exactly their data than money. Data is already is traded for various linebeing used to maximize ups of online services, there the efficiency of markets will be less complaints by monitoring trends for about invasion of privacy modifying production. It and more satisfaction with might even be used to set their services. political agenda or, even While the lawmakers worse, cause manipulation are busy questioning Faceof public opinion. Howevbook about privacy and er, despite the controverPresident Donald Trump sial arguments about how is being passionate about these companies should negotiating “fair trade” use data, maybe it’s a good with China, maybe it’s not idea to turn the attention a bad idea for them to think to how they attain it in the about fair trade for our prifirst place. vacy. After all, privacy is According the World Fair one of the most sensitive Trade Organization, fair parts of our lives. trade is a dialogue-based, transparent partnership Luyuyang is a freshman in LAS. with respect. These elell11@dailyillini.com

T

PHOTO COURTESY OF TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

House Speaker Paul Ryan attends the annual Friends of Ireland luncheon on Capitol Hill on March 15 in Washington, D.C.

ure as a representative from Wisconsin’s 1st District, he has won every congressional race since his first election, with an average of 63.4 percent of the vote. This was certainly a factor as to why he was thought of as a potential successor to John Boehner. His wits and numerical evidence for balanced budgets made him a strong conservative player in the political game, and he became accustomed to political success during his tenure at the House Budget Committee from 2011 to 2015. But the reality many politicians face once they take office, especially higher office, is that the world is not so black and white. With Ryan as Speaker of the House, the Freedom Caucus, an ultra-conservative wing of the Republican party, and moderate Republicans alike believed they had their best player to guide policy that would truly be in the American interest. Reality tells a very different story. Though Ryan may fundamentally believe that the best outcome for America is one in which the wealthy benefit from low taxes and low accountability, while

the poor are cut from economic safety nets, most Americans do not think that way. Ryan’s welfareless, regulation-less American state turned out to be nothing more than a fantasy molded in the eyes of financial elites, detached from the reality of the American people. The result of Ryan’s apparent slickness and intelligence is best put by The Atlantic’s Derek Thompson: “For all his singular laurels, Paul Ryan turned out to be a cliche.” It’s these cliche figures like Ryan who were the campaign targets of populist leaders like Donald Trump, meshing the Capitol insiders and politicians as part of an unholy “swamp” of Washington, actively working against the interest of the American people. Perhaps recognizing his shortcomings, Speaker Ryan may have planned to retire upon a Hillary Clinton victory. Working with another Democratic president would certainly not have been appealing, in addition to fearing the overall direction his party was headed. However, once Trump won the election, Ryan may have either seen an opportunity with a

Republican president or, on the opposite end, felt obligated to guide the party in this tumultuous stage. Regardless if there is any truth to that idea, Ryan failed to act as the leader he was positioned to be. The most powerful man in Congress, with a united government, could not deliver on reforming health care (which he considers his biggest failure), could not protect American trade interests abroad and could not protect Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients, who he vowed Congress would protect. Instead, he failed to rally Congress around health care while stepping aside and letting the president haphazardly make statements and decisions on trade and DACA without Congress. All things considered, holding political office is not an easy job, let alone at the nation’s highest level. Regardless, there are those who do the job well and those who do not. Perhaps Paul Ryan and the rest of us can learn from his experience that winning is easy, but governing is harder. Austin is a sophomore in LAS. aas3@dailyillini.com

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5A

Monday, April 16, 2018

FROM 6A

SOLAR Tess said. “You have a solar array that has a 25-year warrantied life, and it’s gonna pay for itself in seven to 10 years.” Rena said the financial benefit was one of the main reasons she invested in solar power. She also got money back after she and her husband installed their first 18 panels in June 2006. “Originally, we were given a tax credit of $2,000 for the project,” Rena said. “But then, it actually increased to 30 percent of the cost of the project.” This was due to the Solar Investment Tax Credit. According to the SEIA, the tax credit was passed in 2006 and provides a 30 percent federal tax credit for solar systems installed on residential or commercial properties. They used that money to install six more solar panels in September of the same year. In 2007, they installed 10 additional panels. “By then, 30 percent of the cost of the project was covered by the federal tax credit and the state also was paying 30 percent of the project, so for the last 10 panels, 60 percent was paid by government money,” Rena said. Rena said the initial cost of installing her solar system was $44,300. She received a $14,400 rebate from the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economics and $6,000 in federal tax credits. She said the final cost for her solar system was $23,900. Tess said he thinks the cost of solar will go down in the future. “The solar market in Illinois is fairly new and undeveloped,” Tess said. “In the next decade, it’s gonna become far more developed. There will be more installers (who will) be more experienced and more efficient, and prices will go down.” This decrease in price has led to an increase in the solar capacity installed in the U.S. as a whole. Solar capacity is the maximum amount of energy that panels can produce, according to the SEIA. However, Rena said solar panels don’t always produce as much as they can. She said one factor that heavily influences production is the season. “(Production) has to do with how the angle of the sun is in orientation to the panel,” Rena said. “It has highest efficiency when (the sun hits) it straight-on.”

CINDY OM THE DAILY ILLINI

In the winter, she said the sun is a little low, so the solar panels aren’t producing maximum energy. In the summer, she said, the sun is high, so the panels are producing more energy. She said during the spring, summer and fall, their solar system produces approximately 1,000 kilowatts of power a month. In the winter, it produces approximately 600 kW a month. Rena said she’s glad to see solar energy becoming more accessible to people throughout the U.S., because the undeveloped solar market is why it took the Joneses so long to install panels on their home in 2006. They had to spend a significant amount of time researching how to install the panels. “There was no recipe on how to install solar panels at that time,” Rena said. “Panels didn’t come with installation instructions; they were just panels. There was very little online. Now there is just a plethora of information.” Since Rena had problems finding exactly how to install solar panels, she said she and her husband hired a contractor to help guide them in the right direction. However, they didn’t hire him to install the panels himself;

they simply paid him for his expertise. She said her husband Drew and the contractor finished installing the panels in one day and they were up and running the next. According to SolarCity, solar power systems are made up of five components:

that we did it, we had over 100 people show up.” Drew, Rena’s husband, said the event ran longer than it was supposed to due to such high interest. “It was supposed to go from, like, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and it ended up being until something like 7 p.m.,” Drew

“Fossil fuel will expire; it will come to an end. And the sooner that we can transition to renewable resources the better position the world will be in.” RENA JONES SOLAR ENERGY HOME OWNER

an inverter, electrical panel, utility meter, utility grid and solar panels. The solar panels are what actually get put on top of someone’s house. To get even more people in the area installing solar panels, Rena said she and her husband often try spreading the word about solar power in Champaign County. “Every year there is an open house that (the Illinois Solar Energy Association) asks us and others anywhere in the country to participate in,” Rena said. “The first year

said. Rena said attendance at the open house has decreased over the years, but she doesn’t attribute this to a decreased interest in solar power. “I think that now there are so many other sources of how you can learn about alternative energy that (people) don’t really have to go to open houses,” Rena said. Since the demand for solar power has increased, Champaign County has also increased its efforts to

gets its citizens to use solar power. In 2016, Tess said the City of Urbana partnered with the Midwest Renewable Energy Association to form Solar Urbana-Champaign, a group buy program for solar power in Champaign County. Since it’s a group buy program, there are savings for each participant, because the program orders panels in bulk. Prior to this program, Tess said he’s unsure how many people in the area installed solar. However, he said with Solar UrbanaChampaign, they will be able to see what the demand for solar power is like in the area. “We know we had 81 contracts last year,” Tess said. “What we’ll be able to see after this year is at least a two-year trend.” The Joneses recently encountered a problem that Rena said could be common to those who decide to use solar panels in Champaign County: squirrels. “They actually chewed through the wires, so my husband took down all those panels that are on this first array (of 18), and he rewired them and he just put them up again,” Rena said. Although they had to

“learn the hard way,” she said they are taking precautions to make sure it doesn’t happen again. “We’re going to actually put a wire mesh grid all the way around the panels so that the squirrels can’t get underneath there,” Rena said. “(Drew) also reinforced all the tubing ... so they’re like industrial strength wires now.” Apart from the squirrels, Rena said their solar panels have worked “flawlessly” for the past decade. “There are millions of people who are now feeling more strongly than ever that we have to be looking to alternative energy sources,” Rena said. “Fossil fuel will expire; it will come to an end. And the sooner that we can transition to renewable resources, the better position the world will be in.” Rena said it’s nice to finally see others around her doing what she and her husband have done for years. “It gives people hope that if they have any inclination or want to move in this direction,” Rena said. “That they can identify with us, because we’re just average people, and if we could do this, maybe they think they could too.” rbolek2@dailyillini.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

buzz calendar Want to submit an event? Email calendar@readbuzz.com

ACROSS

1 Parts missing from the Venus de Milo 5 Ancient Greek market 10 What hairy dogs do in the spring 14 Boyfriend 15 Toilet paper layers, e.g. 16 Architect Saarinen 17 Complain querulously 18 *Monster outsmarted by Odysseus 20 Drivers doing 90, say 22 With mouth wide open 23 Indian queen 24 Tin lizzies 26 *Rat Pack member who sang and danced 30 Parts with irises 31 Actor Morales of “La Bamba” 32 See 39-Across 35 Dawn, to Donne 36 Like clothes in the hamper 38 Servant in “Young Frankenstein” 39 With 32-Across, what the answers to the starred clues each have 40 Brief moments, briefly 41 Frighten 42 *Black face card whose face is seen in profile 45 Indy or Daytona 48 What two fives are change for 49 Cancel at Cape Canaveral 50 “Star Wars Episode IV” subtitle 54 *Comic character on a gum wrapper 57 Satanic

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PUZZLE BY JOHN R. O’BRIEN

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1 Things learned in “The Alphabet Song” 2 Harvest 3 Stallion’s mate 4 Hero who’s neither a bird nor a plane 5 Tack on 6 Steinem who co-founded Ms. magazine 7 Classic paintings 8 Spanish king 9 Biter of Cleopatra

10 Folk legend Pete 11 Blood-related 12 Blow, as a volcano 13 Amounts in a hypodermic needle 19 Pilgrim to Mecca 21 February has the fewest of them 24 Aerosol spray 25 Start of “The StarSpangled Banner” 26 Sport originally part of a Shinto ritual 27 Shakespeare’s stream 28 Parisian mother 29 Left page in a book 32 “Heavens to Betsy!” 33 Bygone times 34 “___ Tú” (1974 song) 36 Ten: Prefix 37 Highly off-putting 38 “Allow me” 40 Handled, as a task

41 Blow, as from a volcano 42 Saint known for translating the Bible into Latin 43 Spread, as people in a search party 44 The Lone Ranger’s Silver and others 45 Former Israeli P.M. Yitzhak 46 Lessen 47 Cheat 50 “When it’s ___” (answer to an old riddle) 51 Squished circle 52 Prop for Sherlock Holmes 53 Two-time Oscarnominated actress Lanchester 55 The Colonel’s restaurant 56 “I am, you ___, he is”

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.


6A

MONDAY April 16, 2018 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

LIFE

CULTURE

Juuling legal inside Champaign bars BY EMMA PALATNIK STAFF WRITER

At nearly every bar in Champaign, students use Juuls. It is not uncommon to see students Juuling at The Clybourne, The Red Lion or KAM’s. Juuling, however, is not limited to beer gardens. People Juul inside bars as well. And it turns out that Juuling, or vaping indoors, is legal in Champaign. Champaign’s city liquor ordinance does not address Juuling, said Matt Roeschley, city deputy liquor commissioner. This is why, unlike the use of cigarettes, the use of Juuls is allowed indoors. Chapter 16 of the Champaign Municipal Code defines smoking as “inhaling, exhaling, burning or carrying any lighted or burning cigarette, cigar, pipe, hookah pipe, pipeweed or other lighted tobacco product in any manner or in any form.” Vapes, Juuls and e-cigarette products are considered “alternative nicotine products” because they don’t involve lighting or burning a tobacco product. So, they are not regulated by Champaign ordinances. However, it is illegal to sell alternative nicotine products to individuals under 18 years old. Smoking cigarettes at bars is allowed outside in designated areas like beer gardens, but not indoors. According to the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District Smoke-Free Illinois Act brochure for businesses, “Outdoor, unenclosed beer gardens or other similar seating areas are not covered by the (Smoke-Free Illinois Act).” These areas do not have permanent or temporary walls, so they are not enclosed. The Smoke-Free Illinois Act prohibits smoking in enclosed areas, such as the inside of a bar. The act was passed in 2008. The lack of regulations is not unique to Champaign. There are no state or federal regulations about indoor e-cigarette use. Talia Shaw, health educator at the CUPHD, wrote

TONI PANTONE THE DAILY ILLINI

in an email that at the time the law passed, e-cigarettes were very new and were not included in it. Even though Champaign has no regulations on the indoor use of Juuls, vapes or e-cigarettes, Shaw wrote that individual businesses or municipalities can create their own policies regarding this use. “We have a growing number of businesses in Champaign-Urbana that have included e-cigarettes in their

establishment’s non-smoking policy,” Shaw wrote. “As an emerging public health topic (especially since we are seeing astronomical increases in youth users), I expect we’ll see some changes in the months and years to come, as more research is done.” The University has a different policy, unlike Champaign. “From a police standpoint at least, we treat e-cigarettes or vaping or Juuling — any-

thing like that — we treat it the same as regular tobacco cigarettes,” said Patrick Wade, communications director for the University of Illinois Police Department. “So that means no smoking on campus property, no smoking indoors. If anyone’s caught doing that, they would be subject to a citation under the SmokeFree Campus Act.” The Smoke-Free Campus Act defines tobacco products as all forms of tobacco

environment and improve fire safety. The University of Illinois Campus Administrative Manual V-B-2.1 says, “As of January 1, 2014, smoking is prohibited on all Campus Property at the University of Illinois at Urbana– Champaign, both indoors and outdoors, in university-owned vehicles and in privately-owned vehicles parked on Campus Property. The advertising, sale or free sampling of Tobacco Products is also prohibited on Campus Property. Littering the remains of Tobacco Products or any other related waste product on Campus Property is further prohibited.” Wade said the UIPD deals with the Smoke-Free Campus Act by responding to calls about smoking or Juuling and sending an officer to the area. What realistically happens is by the time the officer arrives, the person who was smoking is gone. “It’s a pretty low-priority call for us, so it might take a little while for someone to get there if they’re dealing with some other business,” Wade said. For the UIPD, Wade said smoking on campus hasn’t been a large problem. But the UGL tweeted on March 29 asking students to stop Juuling in the library. The tweet said, “I CANNOT believe we have to keep saying this, but you can’t vape in the library, my dudes. No vapes/e-cigarettes/Juuls/whatever are allowed in the library. Please stop.” Even still, Wade said the police department has not received too many calls about Juuling during classes. “We certainly haven’t gotten a whole lot of complaints (about Juuling in class). I think if people are having an issue with it, definitely give us a call and we’ll do everything we can to address the issue,” Wade said. “Certainly if it becomes an overwhelming problem where it’s happening in a lot of classes, we’d want to deal with that.”

“including but not limited to cigarettes, cigars, cigarillos, pipes, beedies, kreteks, water pipes, bongs, and hookahs, electronic cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, snuff, chewing tobacco and any non-FDA approved nicotine delivery device or product.” The act was passed to create a healthier environment on campus for faculty, staff, students and visitors. It also seeks to reduce the effects of secondhand smoke, to promote a more sustainable emmacp2@dailyillini.com

Going solar: Urbana family uses renewable energy BY RACHAEL BOLEK MANAGING EDITOR FOR ONLINE

At a home in Urbana, one family loved the idea of using renewable energy to help the environment, so they installed their own solar panels and wind turbine. Rena and Drew Jones designed and built their house in 1998 with the hope to one day utilize renewable energy. Between 2006 and 2007, they installed a total of 34 solar panels on their roof. In fall 2007, they built a 55-foot-high wind turbine.

2018

COMMENCEMENT

Since then, Rena said their electric bill has been as low as $6. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the average electric bill in the U.S. in 2015 was $114.03; in Illinois, it was $89.91. This was the most recent data available. “We were only the second house in this entire region to actually be grid-tied with Ameren to participate in net metering,” Rena said. According to the Solar Energy Industries Associa-

tion, net metering “allows residential and commercial customers who generate their own electricity from solar power to feed electricity they do not use back into the (utility) grid.” Rena said if their home produces too much energy and doesn’t use it all, Ameren gives them “credits,” which means when they don’t produce enough solar power to cover what they use, those credits go toward that month. However, Rena said the

Forgot to order your cap & gown? If you missed ordering academic regalia for Commencement, a make-up session has been scheduled in the Illini Union Bookstore

Wednesday, April 25 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

credits go back to zero every April. “If they move forward and forward, there comes a month where you no longer get your credits,” Rena said. “It’s not advantageous for us to send too many back, or we may not get the credit that we deserve.” Back in 2006, Rena said it was difficult to become gridtied with Ameren because at that time, Ameren didn’t have a specific contract for residents who wanted to use solar power.

“The representative from Ameren said, ‘I’m going to email you a contract and you need to look through it and fill out all the pertinent information and then send it back,’” Rena said. “I watched the screen and it was loading 30 pages and I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, how is that possible?’ It’s because we were considered a small power plant.” On Ameren’s website, there is now a one-page application to apply for net metering. Rena said the fam-

ily’s initiative most likely helped motivate Ameren to create this application. Scott Tess, environmental sustainability manager of Urbana, said the increase in demand for solar power in Champaign County can be attributed to its financial benefits. “Generally, these equipment installations are gonna save the owner money on their utility bill over the life of the piece of equipment,” SEE SOLAR | 5A

Aatfresh look Champaign-Urbana

This is the last in-person opportunity to place an order. Or order online at herffjones.com/illinois. $20 late fee applies. University-wide ceremony tickets will be available at the make-up session. Commencement participation instructions and information may be found at

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1B

MONDAY April 16, 2018 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

SPORTS

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

Morgan O’Brien makes US National team BY MEGHAN REST ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

If you asked freshman Morgan O’Brien about her volleyball career five years ago, the answer would have been vague. The defensive specialist has been a cornerstone defensive presence for Illinois after just one season with the team. But O’Brien’s biggest athletic success came unexpectedly this spring, well after the regular season had concluded. O’Brien was one of three Illini who tried out for the U.S. National Team back in early March. Junior Jordyn Poulter, freshman Megan Cooney and head coach Chris Tamas also made the journey to the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. The threeday tryout included players from schools across the NCAA. O’Brien approached the opportunity hoping to gain experience. She said she had no idea she would be one of 24 players selected to the team. “I wasn’t really thinking that I would make the team,” O’Brien said. “Just that this will be fun and really cool to get to play with other people for a weekend.” According to O’Brien, the initial tryout went well, but she had to wait a month before finding out exactly how well she did. “We came back and I kind of forgot about it,” O’Brien said. “Then they emailed me one day saying, ‘We selected you for this, would you want to do it?’” O’Brien  began normal spring workouts with the

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois defensive specialist Morgan O’Brien passes the ball during the match against Stanford at Huff Hall on Sept. 8. The Illini lost 3-0.

rest of her teammates, but her competition will continue into the summer, as the national team’s season runs from June 22 to July 1. The pool of 24 players will eventually split into two teams of 12 that compete in the remainder of

summer matches. For O’Brien, her transformation into a Division I athlete has been a process. According to the libero, making the U.S. National Team wouldn’t have been a thought for her five years ago when she tried out

SOFTBALL

Illini lose to Badgers STAFF WRITER

thinking this will be a good experience.” The experience opened new doors for the U of I freshman on the court and also on a personal level. O’Brien said that she and SEE VOLLEYBALL | 2B

Illinois shows strong at home BY JARED FARMER

Junior Devin Quinn broke his own facility record in the 100-meter dash at the Illinois Twilight Meet. His time of 10.11 is the third fastest 100-meter time in school history. Quinn’s accomplishment highlighted an overall team victory, in which the Illinois men’s track and field team won 10 event titles

BY BRIAN BINZ

performance. “I definitely expected just to do it for the experience, because I was brand new to the team last year, so I’m thinking I’m just going to wanna work up to it,” O’Brien said. “When I entered it, I was going in

MEN’S TRACK

STAFF WRITER

4-2 After coming up short in a seventh-inning rally the first game, the Illinois softball team took the field at Wisconsin behind its ace pitcher, Emily Oestreich. Three batters into the game, the score was 1-0 Wisconsin, and there were runners on second and third. Head coach T y ra Perry pulled Oestreich and the Illini never recovered from the deficit, dropping  both games of their doubleheader against the Badgers. “She wasn’t fighting,” Perry said. “When she’s not fighting, the batters own the box.” This is something Perry has seen before in junior college transfers, but that lack of a fight is something she said affected the whole team. “It ’s the Big Ten; nobody’s gonna roll over,” Perry said. “If you want to win a game, you have to fight.” Akilah Mouzon took over on the mound after that and was able to calm the storm, throwing three scoreless innings before the fourth, where a threerun home run stretched the Wisconsin lead to 4-0. “I remained calm and knew that if I throw the pitch my coach calls, ever y thing  (w ill) be alright,” Mouzon said. Perry said the Illini were not their usual aggressive selves at the plate, leading to the offensive struggles. “We watched pitches go by and did not swing,” Perry said. Doane agreed, saying the Illini didn’t follow their game plan. After scoring 20 runs in one game against Maryland, Illinois managed only four runs in two games, with

for the Libertyville High School volleyball team in Libertyville, Illinois. She said she had just started thinking about the possibility of playing in college someday — since then, she has continued to surprise herself with her

after honoring its 14 graduating seniors. In the field, Illinois recorded four of its 10 team victories. Seniors Parker Deloye and Matsen Dziedzic won their events, as Deloye placed first in the high jump (6’2.75”), and Dziedzic took the title in the long jump (13’10.25”). Junior Jacob LaRocca also picked up victories in the hammer throw (198’3”) and the pole vault (16’8”)

respectively. “I thought Matsen competed really well,” said head coach Mike Turk. “The first three years with Matsen came with a lot of struggles and not much success. Last year, he started to show some glimpses, and this year he’s winning track meets and performing well, and that’s a reflecSEE MEN’S TRACK | 2B

WOMEN’S GOLF

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois right fielder Maddi Doane catches a fly ball during the game against Minnesota at Eichelberger Field on April 1. The Illini won 4-3.

only two of those coming off the bat of an Illini, the others on a fielder’s choice and an error.  The Illini struggled offensively but  received some h ig h l ig ht-r e el defensive plays from their outfielders. Carly Thomas and Doane made diving grabs in left and right field, while Kiana Sherlund also had  a sliding, overthe-shoulder catch in centerfield. However, for Perry, the highlights may tell an incomplete story of their defensive performance. “It was great to see that, but we had some plays overall between both games that would’ve helped us in

addition to those plays,” Perry said. “We’re just a bit inconsistent.” Perry has preached consistency all year, but it looks like she’ll have to wait one more week. “I think we’re right t here,” Per r y sa id. “And that’s why it’s so frustrating.” The Illini were supposed to play one more game on Friday against the Badgers, but it was canceled due to the weather. The team's next matchup will be a doubleheader at home against Green Bay on Wednesday.  @binzy_20 brianb2@dailyillini.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK JONES

Senior Dana Gattone takes a swing of her Callaway club. The Illini golfers carry their clubs and so much more onto the course.

More than just clubs in Illini golf bags BY RACHAEL SPENCER STAFF WRITER

According to the United States Golf Association, a golfer can carry a maximum of 14 clubs in their bag at any given time. Along with those clubs, there are often a number of other objects that players may need during an 18-hole meet — golf balls, tees, ball markers, scorecards, yardage books and occasionally even a snack or two. Add to that an umbrella or a wet weather suit, and the average golf bag weighs somewhere  between 25 to 30

pounds. A skilled golfer needs to have a good understanding of each club in his or her bag to compete at the highest level. Every course is different, and golfers must be flexible with their game and club selection. Currently, most of the Illinois women’s golf team play with some model of Callaway clubs, including senior Dana Gattone. “I play all Callaway clubs, which is pretty rare to play all one brand, but my swing coach at home got me into those, so I’ve stuck with

them ever since,” Gattone said. Like many athletes in other sports, golfers don’t shy away from using their equipment to express themselves. Whether through a club cover or a stamping on their wedges or putters, the Illini try to find a way to show off their personality through their clubs. Senior Pailin Ruttanasupagid is especially proud of the customization on her putter. “I got this my freshman SEE GOLF | 2B


2B Monday, April 16, 2018

THE DAILY ILLINI  |  WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

VOLLEYBALL

Illinois finds continued success in spring BY MEGHAN REST ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

able to make changes on the fly, and I always like to adjust based on what everyone else is doing.” Some of the teams for the Illini are brand new, and so are the combinations on the floor. Illinois is getting acclimated to playing without some familiar faces. Senior libero Brandi Donnelly is not competing in the spring season, which leaves the Illini without one of their strongest defensive cornerstones in program history. But, the spring season has given  Illinois a chance to operate under new assistant coach Alfee Reft. According to Tamas, the new staff members are all after one common goal, and that’s something everyone has been able to push for so far during the spring campaign. “I’ve known (Reft) for almost half my life; he’s one of the best training coaches,” Tamas said. “He set the groundwork for what we do over the summer. And the rest has been on us as coaches and on the players moving forward.”  

Spring volleyball isn’t anything new for the Illini, but some of the teams they play are. Illinois has faced Kentucky several times in previous fall seasons; however, local teams like Bradley and Illinois State represent uncharted territory for Illinois. So far during the spring season, Illinois has twice overturned opponents 4-0, blanking Bradley and ISU at home. The Illini are winding down the abbreviated season with a final match against the Iowa State Cyclones this Friday in Davenport, Iowa. According to head coach Chris Tamas, there isn’t a lot Illinois can do to prepare for a team its never played before. Being able to adjust on the fly, however, is perhaps Illinois’ strongest skill, he said. “We want to have a general idea what (other teams) do,” Tamas said. “We have film from previous years. We could have an idea of what they do and then they could come out with something @Meghan_Rest completely different. We’re merest2@dailyillini.com

FROM 1B

GOLF year; it’s an Edel putter with my name on it,” Ruttanasupagid said. “They painted my name pink and the little dots pink and I got my grip pink too; it’s my favorite color. I don’t think I’m going to switch anytime soon because it’s a personalized putter, so it’s fixed to the way my eyes work when I look at the line and stuff like that.” Often, players can find themselves competing against nature as often as their opponents. Inclimate weather, unpredictable temperatures, wildlife and insects all can have an effect

FROM 1B

VOLLEYBALL her teammates were able to branch out and enjoy more than just volleyball during their tryout. “Being at the dorms where all of the (athletes) stay and eating at the cafeterias were great because all of the food was so good,” O’Brien said. “It was also really pretty because the entire Olympic Center is surrounded by mountains.” Since only three Illini made the journey to Colorado in March, there was

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois head coach Chris Tamas talks to his team during a timeout in the match against Michigan at Huff Hall on Nov. 5. The Illini won 3-2.

on a player’s game. With that being said, senior Grace Park always makes sure to carry "After Bite" in her bag. Sophomore Tristyn Nowlin also keeps mother nature in mind when she hits the course. “I’m from Kentucky; I’m extremely fair-skinned, so I have a ton of sunscreen,” Nowlin said. “100+ SPF. That’s something that I always have to carry with me.” Lastly, the more unique aspects of the Illini’s golf bags carry important memories from home to remind them of why they play. Nowlin has a prized club cover from the 2017 PGA Championship at Quail

Hollow, where she saw her favorite golfer, Jordan Spieth, compete. Senior Chayanid Prapassarangkul always has both a photo of her and her mom and a tiger charm from her caddy back in her home country of Thailand as well. Freshman Ali Morallos also carries a touching piece of home with her on the course. “I have this bracelet,” Morallos said. “There was this kid who went to my high school; he was on the golf team for a little bit, but then he had leukemia and passed away, but I still keep the wristband on my golf bag.”

plenty of time for O’Brien to connect with players from across the country. “There were a lot of people; not really anyone I knew on a talking basis, but definitely people I knew of,” O’Brien said. “I think a lot of people went into it without teammates there, so everyone needs or wants someone to talk to. I feel like it will be fun to meet a lot of these people, and if my teammates were there, I feel like I would stick with them and not really get to know a lot of other people.” At the end of the day, O’Brien hopes the sum-

mer campaign will help her grow as an athlete. A lthough the experience presents challenges, O’Brien said she is eager to sharpen her skills alongside some of the country’s best volleyball players. “I think I learned a lot by playing with so many different people already,” O’Brien said. “Everyone is coached by a different coach and comes in with a different perspective, so it’s fun to see how other people play.”

sports@dailyillini.com

@Meghan_Rest merest2@dailyillini.com

FROM 1B

MEN’S TRACK tion of growth in both him and the program.” Along with the three victories, seniors Mo Maat and Michael Hyc each set new personal bests after finishing in the top three in the long jump and shot put. Hyc threw for 56’3.25” while Maat cleared 23’10.25” in the long jump. On the track, the meet kicked off for the Illini with the steeplechase. Sophomore Caleb Hummer held his pace and freshman Brayden Hamblen recovered from a rough start early on, to pass his teammate around the nine-minute mark. Hamblen finished second with a time of 9:32.21, a new personal best. Quinn debuted in the 4x100-meter relay, in which the unit of Quinn, junior Joe Haight, senior Cole Henderson and freshman Jason Shannon finished first, with a seasonbest time of 39.74. The finish marked the second time that the Illini have finished the 4x100-meter relay in under 40 seconds this season. “I thought the 4x100 races were solid,” Turk said. “I thought the men hit a really nice groove, and

connect with us.

while they weren’t great, they were definitely solid. The exchanges last week weren’t very good, and I wasn’t happy about it, so they went out and fixed it.” Senior Alex Gold snagged the second Illinois victory on the track in the 1,500-meter run, going neck-and-neck with junior teammate Dan Lathrop for first. The two finished within a tenth of a second of each other, running 3:57.29 and 3:57.39, respectively. Senior David Kendzeira was next to pick up a victory for the Illini, winning for the seventh time in the outdoor season, as he clocked in at 13.52 in the 110-meter high hurdles. He remains undefeated in the event this season. Junior Jonathan Wells also finished runnerup with a time of 14.12. After the hurdles, Quinn broke his 100-meter personal best with a time of 10.11, the fastest 100-meters any Illini has ever run under assistant coach Adrian Wheatley. Joining Quinn in second and third were Shannon and Henderson, with the former setting a personal best time of 10.42 en route to a runner-up finish. “Devin is really elevating himself to a higher level in the sport and within the NCAA,” Turk said. “I think that as he grows, he’s going

to see new challenges, so for meets like this, it’s nice that he can go out there and compete free and easy. I think he’s feeling really confident and there’s not a whole lot of pressure on him, and as we go into bigger meets, I hope he continues that mindset.” The Illini picked up their last three victories in the 200-, 400-, and 800-meter run. Haight won both the 200-meter and 400-meter events, while fellow junior Dennis O’Callaghan ran 1:51  for his first-place finish in the 800-meter. Trailing behind O’Callaghan was senior Luke Brahm, who finished second with a time of 1:52.64. “For me, it’s very hard not to have a personal feeling about this meet because, while it’s not the end, it’s our last home meet with a lot of really special seniors, men and women both,” Turk said. “I love them all to death, and ... it’s really sad for me to know that we’re at that point, but it’s gratifying, too, that they’re the people they are. I’m so proud of them all. I think this meet sets us up now to finish the season really strong and have a great experience.” @jaredefarmer jaredef2@dailyillini.com

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THE DAILY ILLINI  |  WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

Monday, April 16, 2018

3B

BASEBALL

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois pitcher Joey Gerber delivers a pitch during the game against Rutgers at Illinois Field on Friday. In the first of a three-game weekend series, Illinois baseball walked away with a 13-12 victory against Rutgers on Saturday April, 14.

Baseball sweeps Rutgers in wild weekend BY TATIANIA PERRY STAFF WRITER

With one of the strongest starts the Illini had this season, scoring nine runs in the first inning, the baseball team walked away with a 13-12 victory in the first of a three-game weekend series. “It was a fun win,” said catcher Jeff Korte. “It wasn’t how we pictured, but we got the win and that’s all that matters.” To open up the night, Andy Fisher took to the mound for Illinois. First up to bat was Rutgers’ Mike Nyisztor, who singled but a quick double-play ball from Dan DiGeorgio ended the their first inning. Next, it was the Illini’s turn at the plate, and the bats were on fire. Illinois centerfielder Zac Taylor led things off, sending a ball out of the park on the second pitch he saw which put Illinois up early 1-0.   On a hit to the left side by Jack Yalowitz, an alreadyon-base Michael Massey came around to score, while the Illini’s Doran Turchin moved from first to second.  Illinois’ first baseman Michael Michalak drew a walk to load the bases. The designated hitter for the day, Bren Spillane, then hit a triple to center field, clearing the bases to make it 5-0.  The score didn’t stay that way long, as catcher Jeff Korte smacked a home run to right field, bringing the first inning score to 7-0. Illinois battled aroundits lineup with only one out. After two walks backto-back for third baseman, Grant Van Scoy and Taylor, shortstop Ben Troike singled to left field to load the bases once again. Massey, up to bat, then hit an RBI double. Finally, a Turchin flyout and Yalowitz groundout ended the first inning with the Illini up 9-0. Illinois didn’t allow Rutgers to get on base in the second or third innings at all, but the fourth inning was a different story.  With the Illini still up 9-0, an RBI double from Scarlet Knights third baseman Carmen Sclafani got Rutgers on the board. Second baseman Kevin Welsh then followed one batter later with another double into right field. An error by the Illini and a couple of steals later, the Scarlet Knights cut the lead to 9-7. The bases were then loaded for Rutgers, with new pitcher Sean Leland in the game for the Illini. A fresh face on the mound didn’t help Illinois, as centerfielder Jawuan Harris hit an RBI triple for Rutgers to take the lead from the Illini 10-9.  “I’m disappointed with pitching,” said head coach

13–12 Dan Hartleb. “We didn’t pitch for the lead, flat out.” Rutgers returned in the fifth inning with a homer by designated hitter Milo Freeman. The Illini didn’t retaliate until the bottom of the sixth, when a Rutgers error caused Troike to score, cutting the Rutgers lead to 11-10. With the bases loaded, Michalak’s fielders choice scored Yalowitz and tied the game 11-11. Korte, with Turchin now standing at third, singled to left field to score Turchin and take the lead to 12-11.  “I was seeing the ball pretty good all day,” Korte said. “I was up 1-0 and I thought, ‘I’m going to sit on a fast player’ because he was throwing curveballs all night. Then he just loops up a curveball I just couldn’t pass up.” Ryan Schmitt, on the mound after relieving Leland, allowed a run on a single to tie the game back up 12-12 in the bottom of the seventh.  In the start of the eighth inning, Ryan Thompson as the Illini’s fourth pitcher of the night. “The game dictated that we needed to go (through) the bullpen,” Hartleb said. The right-handed sophomore only allowed a single hit and no runs. In the bottom of the eighth, Yalowitz continued his hot-hitting day and ended up on base with a single to center. A pitch-hitting Mark Skonieczny was then walked, advancing Yalowitz to second. Korte got his third hit of the day and fourth RBI as he singled into right field to score Yalowitz and make the score 13-12.  Illinois then turned to closer Joey Gerber in the final inning. Living up to his title, Gerber did not allow a single hit to close out the game with a 13-12 victory. “Baseball is crazy,” Hartleb said. “You see games like this happen all the time. You hope that you can get the nine runs and keep tacking on, but that didn’t happen. But again, baseball is a crazy game and our guys don’t panic.” On Saturday, the bats cooled down for both teams as the Illini once again walked away with a victory by one run, 2-1.  Pitcher Quinn Snarskis hardly allowed the Scarlet Knights to get on base. “Every day is a new day,” Snarskis said. “Yesterday, the wind was blowing out pretty hard, so I was just gonna come in and pound the zone and make an adjustment if they were jumping on me.” Despite the low score

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois catcher Jeff Korte throws to second base during the game against Rutgers at Illinois Field on Friday.

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois infielder Michael Massey hits the ball during the game against Rutgers at Illinois Field on Friday.

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois outfielder Zac Taylor (37) celebrates with his team after winning the game against Rutgers at Illinois Field on Friday.

of the game, Hartleb was pleased with the day’s performances. “It’s just baseball, and we did a good job getting the bases loaded,” Hartleb said. “We didn’t have the quality at-bats there and we didn’t look very good, but you also have to look at the fact that their pitcher threw some really good pitches in some tough situations.” By the end of the game, Illinois had collected nine hits off of Rutgers pitcher Harry Rutkowski. “All in all, today I think that there were only maybe two or three at-bats that I wasn’t pleased with,” Har-

tleb said. “Sometimes you just don’t get a great pitch to put a great swing on.” Illinois opened the game with a solid groove defensively, forcing Rutgers in the first inning. As for the Illini, they were on the board rather quickly. Ben Troike singled to right field on his first swing, stole second and was sent home by Doran Turchin’s single up the middle. The Scarlet Knights finally reached base two outs into the second on a walk, but still collected no runs. In the bottom of the third,

the Illini gained another run as Turchin tripled out to right center. The junior was then brought home by Jack Yalowitz’s single to left field. The score was 2-0 by the end of the fourth. Rutgers finally circled the bases in the top of the seventh, when Carmen Sclafani singled to right field. Tyler McNamara reached on an error by Illini Grant Van Scoy and Sclafani advanced to second. Finally, Kevin Welsh hit an RBI single into right field to bring Sclafani home. Snarskis completed six innings, striking out two,

allowing four hits and two walks. Zac Jones and Ryan Thompson saw appearances at the mound before closer Joey Gerber came in and finished out the game. “We kept it light,” Snarskis said. “Good things were going to happen. They’ve been happening all year.” On Sunday, the Illini picked up the series sweep with a 10-4 victory over the Scarlet Knights. Illinois (23-8, 9-3) will play Valparaiso at home on Tuesday at 6 p.m. @tati_perry14 tp3@dailyillini.com


4B Monday, April 16, 2018

THE DAILY ILLINI  |  WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

# BDROOMS

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THE DAILY ILLINI  |  WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

Monday, April 16, 2018

Scene Maker profile: Ward Gollings stirs CU music BY EMILY PEASE

5B

buzz calendar

CALENDAR EDITOR

Ward Gollings continues to fuel the Champaign-Urbana music scene as the most notable agent in the area. He has been booking shows and stimulating the music scene for nearly 20 years. A University of Illinois alumnus and Midwest native, Gollings came to the University to pursue a degree in psychology and, upon graduating, stayed to continue booking shows around the C-U area.  During his studies at the University, Gollings began in the local industry where most other college students start: listening to music and playing in bands. At 18, Gollings found himself being moved by the bands The Clash and 7 Seconds. “Both of those bands shaped and molded a young 18-year-old version of me in the best possible way,” Gollings said. His love for music pushed him into the local music scene early on. Gollings played in the band Gutter Poets, helped out friend and roommate Chris Corpora promote shows at Tritos Uptown and worked in local music establishments like Record Swap and Parasol. While working at Record Swap, Gollings was introduced to the co-owner of The Blind Pig, ultimately resulting in him booking shows there for eight years and The Highdive/Accord, now 51 Main, for over 18 years. Today, Gollings continues to book into his 15th year at Cowboy Monkey and organizes the Great Cover Up alongside Mike Ingram. Now in its 27th year, the Great Cover Up is an annual benefit that raises money for charities. This past edition of the Great Cover Up ran in February and donated its proceeds to the C-U One-to-One Mentoring Program, the Matthew C. Farrell Memorial Scholarship Fund

BY EMILY PEASE AND KAYLA BROWN BUZZ CALENDAR EDITORS

The buzz calendar is a compilation of events happening in the Champaign-Urbana area. Follow our top picks in Monday’s and Thursday’s papers for ideas on what to do on any night of the week, from where to eat to what to watch. Want to submit an event? Email calendar@readbuzz.com.

MONDAY, APRIL 16

Earth Week: Meat-Free Monday Lunch & Talk

 Noon-1 p.m.  University YMCA, 1001 S. Wright St., Champaign  Free, all ages Learn about the benefits of going “meat-free,” even for one day a week. The YMCA will be serving free vegan/ vegetarian options from local restaurants. Community members and students will be giving short talks about why they chose to be #meatfree.

Free Escape Room on the Quad BEN TSCHETTER THE DAILY ILLINI

Ward Gollings, a staple to the Champaign-Urbana music scene, on April 3. Along with being a prominent show booking agent, Gollings is also the founder of the Great Cover Up.

and Urbana Middle School’s band program. Each year, over 30 performers pick an artist and create a surprise tribute act for 20-30 minutes. “Some pay homage to a band that has influenced them. Others choose something silly and fun,” Gollings said. In addition to the Great Cover Up, the list of Gollings’ successes is extensive, with hundreds of shows booked and work done on events like The Pygmalion and Summer Camp Festival. Reflecting on his career, Gollings accepts his long history in the local industry. “I’m simply happy to have been a middleman connecting the dots all these years,” Gollings said. “From the incredible touring and local artists, to the booking agents/ managers, to the various ven-

ues and then eventually to the ears and eyes of all the music lovers of C-U. It has given me immense joy to be the vehicle for so many shows and bands.” However, Gollings sports more insight than is seen in his impressive resume and the stories to tell within it. At heart, the agent is a happy man who loves his city, his family and his music. Gollings’ passion for these things makes him a fantastic agent with a unique ability to spread that same love to the masses. “Music is magic, music is love,” Gollings said, “Put on those headphones or go to that live concert and find that beautiful spot, that wave of happiness that can wash over you and take you to another place so sublime.” epease2@readbuzz.com

WPGU 107.1 PRESENTS

2018 SPRING FRATTLE OF THE DJS

 1-6 p.m.  University of Illinois Main Quad  Free, all ages Champaign-Urbana Adventures in Time and Space presents an exciting, free popup escape room experience on the Main Quad. Meet in front of Davenport Hall and test your wits and problem-solving abilities with your friends in teams of 2-6 players. The fastest teams of the day win escape room discounts and a $100 gift certificate to CU Adventures!

TUESDAY, APRIL 17

“The Wood Floaters”: Film Screening

 4-7 p.m.  Spurlock Museum, 600 S. Gregory St., Urbana  Free, all ages A screening of the documentary film “The Wood Floaters” (“Platagony”) followed by a discussion with the director, Kirill Makarenkov. Platagony (also translated as ‘rafters’) are men employed in the transport of lumber from the outermost forests of Russia to the processing plants nearer to populated areas. Kirill Makarenkov’s documentary is an intimate portrait of these workers.

Answering the Why? with Larry Gies

 6-8 p.m.  Business Instructional Facility, Deloitte Auditorium, 515 E. Gregory Drive, Champaign  Free, all ages Don’t miss Business alumnus Larry Gies, CEO of Madison Industries, as he shares his investment philosophy and important life lessons.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18

YPCU Morning Brew: Hammerhead Coffee

 7:30-9 a.m.  Hammerhead Coffee, 608 E. University Ave., Champaign  Free, all ages Kick off your morning with YPCU! Please join us for morning coffee at Hammerhead Coffee in Champaign. There is no cost to attend.

Spring Book Sale!

 10 a.m.-4 p.m.  Gregory Hall, 810 S. Wright St., Urbana  $1-2, all ages Looking for some summer reading? The History honor society Phi Alpha Theta is here with its spring book sale to help out! Stop by the first and third floors of Gregory Hall to pick up some delicious puppy chow and some great books! They will have all types of books, including textbooks!

Art Exhibit: Untold

 4:30-6:30 p.m.  Illini Union Art Gallery, 1401 W. Green St., Urbana  Free, all ages Come out to the opening reception of artist Lori Fuller’s exhibit, Untold.

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6B

MONDAY April 16, 2018 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

buzz

REVIEW

New memoir bolsters #MeToo campaign BY ELANI KAUFMAN BUZZ EDITOR

In the age of #MeToo, it can seem like with each day comes another revelation about a culturally beloved figure. Then comes the backlash. It appears that with each new allegation, the public follows the same routine. An allegation comes out, and the criticism against the survivor blares from all sides: the Internet, mainstream media and even discussions among friends. “Why did they wait so long to say anything?” “What are they trying to get out of this?” “How do we know they are telling the truth?” Even when allegations against one person rise up to the triple digits, because of the culture we live in, there is still doubt. “The Director,” a memoir about a woman’s experience with abuse in Hollywood, tries to clarify these doubts but, instead, raises more questions. The memoir is composed of J.K. Stein’s unedited journals that she kept during her five-year relationship with a director. A graduate student

allured by the prospect of starring in a film, she enters a relationship that quickly turns from being professional to abusive. Stein uses a pseudonym to protect her identity. Likewise, the eponymous director remains unnamed throughout the book. However, by the end of the first chapter, the identity of the director is easily deduced with two minutes of searching on Google. To her credit, Stein can recreate the unease and, at some points, the abject horror many women experience when being pushed into uncomfortable situations with powerful men. Much of the director’s questionable behavior creates a growing sense of tension, spiraling the longer he monologues and pressures Stein. And at every chance Stein takes to tip the power imbalance in her favor, the director manages to take even more agency away from her. Every meeting about the ‘movie’ would be the director’s attempts to get Stein to perform sexual acts, not unlike some of the stories that have come out in light of #MeToo. “The Director” also looks at the dynamics of consent and how a pow-

er imbalance can affect it. Multiple times, Stein would refuse something, only to have the director chip away at her self-esteem, or argue with her to settle on a lesser — yet unwanted — act. Or Stein would feel as though by not playing to the director’s requests, the film may not happen, leading her to agree to things she did not want to do. While Stein states in the foreword that the release of this book aims to help her reconcile with her past, that does not appear to be the main reason. More than once, Stein mentions she knew she would write a book about this relationship. In the foreword, Stein lists publishing the book because she always intended on publishing it before the reconciliation or empowerment. “Part of the reason I continued to ‘see’ The Director was because I thought my experiences were too strange and cinematic not to record,” she wrote. “If I didn’t write this book, I believe I would have forever lived in regret that my experiences were ‘for nothing.’” This isn’t the last time this idea of staying in this relationship with

the director to write a book comes up, and that changes the narrative. Detractors of women who come forward will always find some excuse to negate their experiences, saying that by coming forward, they want something. This idea that Stein always intended to publish a book about the relationship feeds right into that narrative, which is a dangerous one. In a time where the #MeToo movement is struggling to take hold of industries outside of Hollywood, doubts like these can make that process even slower. In all fields, women who come forward face many consequences, from job security to public slander. “The Director” seeks to give insight as to why women don’t come forward in a world where women’s bodies are controlled by power dynamics, and to serve as comfort for other survivors. Even where the memoir faults, it is a necessary read in this day and age, and it will only become more relevant as more women speak up. buzz factor: ekaufmn2@readbuzz.com

New album ’Age of Today’ creates new sound for trio Animal Confession BY SHELBI VOSS STAFF WRITER

Canadian hard-rock trio Animal Confession released its latest album, “Age of Today,” this past Friday, but the band doesn’t plan on slowing down any time soon. Hailing from Ottawa, Ontario, the group was formed in 2011 after vocalist and guitarist Andrew Gharib premiered his first demo. He began working with bassist Patrick Quesnel in 2012. After releasing their first record together, Trevor Grey joined them with vocals and drums. The band’s mix of metal, punk and hard rock sounds was first heard on their LP “Bright Light, Dark Eyes,” which was released in 2012. According to Quesnel, their sound has been inspired by groups such as the Deftones, Muse and the Foo Fighters.

“They’ve all influenced us in their hooks, beats, energy and layering,” Quesnel said. However, in writing “Age of Today,” he said Animal Confession was not influenced by any group in particular. “We wanted it to be a bit more fun-sounding, but we still wanted to maintain (the) depth of lyrics and message, and have it have a lot of replay value.” Quesnel described the band’s style as alternative and hard rock music that has pop sensibilities on occasion, which comes through on “Age of Today.” “There’s not a lot of breaths to take, and it just kind of hits you one song after the other until it’s finished. Our first record was more of a slowburn and more cerebral, and had a lot more space,” Quesnel said. “Ritual,” a song off “Age of

Today,” was released as the band’s first single and was accompanied by a music video that features various shots of people going through tough trials in their lives. “Just kind of being stuck inside a repetitive life is a theme we’ve written about before, and I think we hit on it again with ‘Ritual,’” Quesnel said. This daily repetition can be mind-numbing, he said, which is evident in the anguish shown by the characters featured in the music video. Animal Confession is gearing up for a busy 2018. While it plans to branch out into western Ontario and Quebec in the future, the trio is currently preparing for a number of upcoming performances throughout the Ottawa area, including Ottawa’s Bluesfest and Toronto’s

Canadian Music Week. Quesnel said the band is most looking forward to playing at Bluesfest. “We’ve all attended over the years, watching it grow bigger and bigger,” he said. “And now to actually be playing on the big stage will be pretty surreal, and we can’t wait to milk every second of it.”  Quesnel also said he and his bandmates have admired many of the other performers who will be featured at Bluesfest, which is a reason why the experience will be so special. “Telling people we’re sharing the same stage as Rise Against and Three Days Grace is definitely not something we expected, and (it) is about as exciting as it gets for PHOTO COURTESY OF HELENS PHOTOGRAPHY us,” Quesnel said. Guitarist of Animal Confession Andrew Gharib performs with savoss2@readbuzz.com

other members of the trio. Animal Confession is preparing for its upcoming shows in western Ontario and Quebec, Canada.

CHAMPAIGN’S ALTERNATIVE

LIVE STREAM AT WPGU.COM

The Daily Illini: Volume 147 Issue 56  
The Daily Illini: Volume 147 Issue 56  
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