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THURSDAY February 16, 2017

THE DAILY ILLINI The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

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Rauner switches position, supports MAP Grants

51˚ | 38˚

Vol. 146 Issue 41

LONGFORM

BY ANGELICA LAVITO STAFF WRITER

Governor Bruce Rauner proposed a significant increase in Monetary Award Program, MAP, Grant funding during his budget address to state lawmakers Wednesday. This comes after previous action by Rauner to veto bills supporting MAP grant funding. “When it comes to higher education, we understand the hardship being felt by students who rely on state assistance to go to college,” Rauner said. “That’s why we’re proposing a 10 percent increase to MAP grant funding — so those students can focus on learning and not their next tuition bill.” MAP grants are state funded, need-based scholarships. The program is an approximately $30 million venture at the University of Illinois system, according to University spokesman Tom Hardy. The program has been affected by the two-year state budget impasse, with the state not providing funding for it this school year. The University has paid advances to support the program for now in anticipation of lawmakers passing a state budget with MAP Grant money included. If Rauner’s proposal is included in the state budget, it would cover current MAP grants and pay for additional awards. Besides the proposed grant increase, Rauner did not further address higher education funding. The budget impasse has hit colleges across the state, including the University of Illinois. The budget also had a call for $7.686 billion for further K-12 education funding, a $213 million increase to this year’s number. Programs for English language learners would get $38 million more and funding for transportation would receive an additional $107 million increase compared to last year. Rauner’s speech showed that he is open to increasing income and sales tax, and that there is a budget plan in the Illinois Senate that could possibly give the state its fi rst full spending plan since July 2015. Rauner said the income tax increase will only be approved if there is a permanent freeze on local property taxes, and that the proposed increase will not affect food and medicine taxes. He also said that he is opposed to collecting retirement income taxes.

Wounds heal,

GUN VIOLENCE LINGERS PORTRAIT OF ROBBIE SHEPARD BY HANNAH AUTEN THE DAILY ILLINI

In recovery, victim embraces new normal BY ELYSSA KAUFMAN STAFF WRITER

Robbie Shepard was calm. On a windy Thursday afternoon, he stood in an infamous spot. He retraced his steps, remembering what happened in this place four months before. It’s a spot students remember from an Illini-Alert, sent early Sunday morning on Sept. 25. It’s a spot that now seems forgotten, where people walk past without a second thought. It’s a spot where, on that day, one was killed and four were shot. The memories of that night all came back to him. But not in the way that you would expect. On that early morning, an apartment fight broke out, which led to a deadly shooting involving bystanders walking on Green Street in Champaign. Shepard, a recent University graduate, was shot in the right arm. The incident led to months of physical therapy and the inability to use his dominant hand.

But when students remember that night, they don’t know Shepard’s name or his interests. They just remember a statistic. Four shot. One dead. Four months since that day, Shepard is still one of the names in those numbers. “It all happened so quickly that there was really no moment for me to do anything other than realize, ‘OK, I’ve been shot,’ and then get someone to help me,” he said. “I didn’t know anything about what had happened beforehand, I didn’t know what was happening after. “I just got shot, had to get an ambulance, and that was it.” He remembers the details. Shepard was walking with friends along Boneyard Creek just past Evergreen Tobacco, when he saw a large group of people leaving an apartment building. “We were almost past the parking lot, and that’s when the gunshots went off, and that’s when we got hit,” Shepard said. “When we got hit, I immediately

lost where everyone else was.” After getting shot, Shepard walked toward Second Street and found a couple, who then called 911. The couple sat Shepard down on Green by a bus stop, where the police and an ambulance reached him. For Shepard, one of the hardest parts of dealing with this incident is understanding that it happened for no reason at all. “This didn’t give me any enlightenment. I don’t have any wisdom for this. It was so random. I went to the hospital, now I’m healing,” Shepard said. “I don’t have any wisdom for students. I don’t have any kind of sage advice. “There is nothing I can tell them that can prevent this for them. There is nothing I can tell them to make them feel better about this. There is nothing I can tell them to even make them change this.” But when it comes to his stance on gun laws, his pessimism has only been reaffi rmed.

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Second interim provost to brings campus budget reform BY MEGAN JONES STAFF WRITER

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Alpha Delta Pi's sorority house serves lunch on Wednesday. This sorority is one of many addressing food waste.

Greeks struggle to reduce food waste in houses BY KAREN LIU STAFF WRITER

When students in Greek houses pass over the sloppy joes or green beans at lunch, this untouched food often ends up in the trash. Chefs and other caterers are forced to dispose of the leftovers due to strict regulations contributing to food waste. “It’s the liability that comes with the food product, especially leftovers.” said Arnaldo Posadas, chef for the Alpha Delta Pi sorority. “We have a policy of 24 hours. After 24 hours, we will have to throw it away.” This often comes with a large amount of leftovers generated each day. However, the food is not allowed to be donated, even if it is

unused or untouched. Food that was never served on the buffet line can be frozen since there is no risk of contamination. The sorority has a twoweek rotating menu, so the ingredients can be kept in the freezer for two weeks until the next time they can be used. Alpha Delta Pi uses a food service company exclusively for fraternities and sororities called College Chefs. They’re not alone. Many greek houses on campus chose to sign a contract with a caterer or a campus chef. One popular one is Hendrick House. Hendrick House currently contracts with 19 fraternities and sororities on campus. Adam

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Malone, Greek accounts manager for Hendrick house, said most contracts are with sororities. Greek houses can choose to work with Hendrick House in two different ways. Malone said larger houses with kitchens usually choose to sign a contract with a chef. The chef then communicates with the house and produces a personalized menu according to respective specificities. As for the smaller houses, Malone said Hendrick House offers drop-off services. Roughly 14 fraternities do not have adequate kitchen space or equipment, so they use Hendrick House’s drop-off service.

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Another name was added to the list of interim administration positions Monday, as the University tapped Dean of Libraries John Wilkin to serve as the next interim provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs. Wilkin joined the University in 2013. Previously, Wilkin served in various library-related roles at the University of Michigan for two decades. At the University, he has served as the executive director of associate univrsity librarian for publishing and technology and of HathiTrust, a large scale digital collection of research titles from around the world. When Chancellor Robert Jones notified Wilkin on Feb. 6, he said a lot of things weighed in on his decision to accept the position. “I have an 11-year-old son and a nice life outside of work, and I was reluctant,” Wilkin said. “But Jones told me that a number of people had recommended me and I talked to Nick, my son, and Maria, my wife, and everyone was supportive — that was what nailed it for me.” Wilkin is set to begin Feb. 18,

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replacing Interim Provost Edward Feser, who will start as the provost of Oregon State University Feb. 28. “Ed has been a tremendous leader who is very inclusive in his processes and very frank about issues and that flows over into his transition,” Wilkin said. “If it wasn’t for Ed, I think transitioning would be a much harder job.” The provost works closely with the chancellor, serves as the top academic officer and is in charge of the campus budget. Wilkin is set to earn $320,000 a year, an increase from the $249,000 a year he makes as the library dean. But Wilkin already has experience with the campus budget. He currently serves as the chair of Feser’s Budgeting Reform Steering Committee, which aims to help decrease the University’s reliance on state funding. “For me, what is most exciting is our ability to move forward with the budget reform process — not because of wonky budget reasons, there is always that, but it is going to give our institution the tools to be nimbler and more strategic,”

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Thursday, February 16, 2017

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Copyright © 2017 Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini is the independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The newspaper is published by the Illini Media Co. The Daily Illini does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of the University of Illinois administration, faculty or students. All Illini Media Co. and/or The Daily Illini articles, photos and graphics are the property of Illini Media Co. and may not be reproduced or published without written permission from the publisher. Editor-in-chief Masaki Sugimoto editor@ dailyillini.com Managing editor Michal Dwojak reporting@dailyillini.com Managing editor Annabeth Carlson online@dailyillini. com Creative director Hannah Auten hauten2@dailyillini.com News editor Claire Hettinger news@ dailyillini.com Asst. news editors Jason Chun Samantha Jones Toal Joseph Longo Asst. daytime editors Aaron Navarro Vivienne Henning Sports editor Charlotte Carroll sports@dailyillini. com Asst. sports editors Mike Gasick Thomas Polcyn Hunter Warning Eli Schuster Features editor Lillian Barkley features@dailyillini.com Asst. features editors Abby Paeth Opinions editor Matt Silich opinions@dailyillini.com

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Asst. opinions editor Courtney Boyer Longform editor Sarah Foster spfoste2@dailyillini.com Photo editor Jessica Jutzi photo@ dailyillini.com Asst. photo editor Brian Bauer Design editor Michelle Tam design@dailyillini. com Asst. design editor Jacob Singleton Supplements editor Madeline Galassi supplements @dailyillini.com Asst. supplements editor Brooks Berish Buzz editor Josh Peterson Video editor Jean Kang video@dailyillini. com Copy chief Samantha Skipper copychief@dailyillini.com Asst. copy chief Caitlin Bremner Social media director John Wong disocial@dailyillini. com Co-Publishers Kit Donahue Melissa Pasco

Today’s night system staff Night editor: Abigale Svoboda Copy editors: Shelly Chang, Pooja Deshmukh, Alex Greulich, Meg Kasner, Tina Lies, Megan Shaffer, Ella Schindler Designers: Nicole Mormando, Cindy Om, Colleen Romano, Bryan Wong Page transmission: Joseph Longo Photo night editor: Patrick Li Web manager: Shankari Sureshbabu

A 35-year-old male and a 37-yearold female were arrested on the charge of aggravated assault at Lincoln Square Mall, 201 Lincoln Square, around 8 a.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the suspects placed the victims under reasonable apprehension of receiving a battery outside of the shopping mall. Two 23-year-old males were arrested on the charges of criminal damage to property in the 100 block of West Park Street around 2 p.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the offenders damaged property in a local park and were both arrested and transported to Charlotte County Sheriff’s Office.

A 29-year-old female was arrested on the charge of theft at Schnucks, 200 N. Vine St., around 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the suspect concealed a food item and attempted to leave with the item without paying.

University

Nothing to report.

Champaign

A 31-year-old male was arrested on the charge of possession of cannabis in the 1400 block of Holly Hill Drive around 6:30 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, the offender was stopped in traffic due to an improper

signal. The stop resulted in the seizure of the cannabis. Aggravated battery was reported at Joe’s Brewery, 613 E. Green St., around 6:30 p.m. Monday. According to the report, three male offenders were involved in the aggravated battery, though the suspects have yet to be identified. A burglary was reported in the 600 block of Alabama Avenue around 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the offender stole multiple items from the residence including a safe and drivers license.

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Middle and high school students participated in a one-day event organized by Girls Who Code in Siebel Center on Feb. 12.

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University, Girls Who Code start local chapter BY LUKE COOPER STAFF WRITER

The national group Girls Who Code is partnering with the University’s wellknown computer science department to encourage sixth through 12th grade girls in the central Illinois area to study computer programming. Girls Who Code held their first official meeting on Jan. 22 in the basement of the Thomas M. Siebel Center for Computer Science. The group will follow with weekly meetings from 1-3 p.m. on Sundays at the same location. The national organization Girls Who Code aims to educate girls from all backgrounds in computer programming with the goal of closing the gender gap in the field of technology. Prior to the chapter’s start, Girls Who Code’s pres-

ence on campus only came through summer immersion programs. Girls Who Code's CEO and founder Reshma Saujani graduated from the University in 1997 with a double major in political science and speech communication. “It seems like a no brainer that we should also have a club from this person who started this wonderful organization, who also went to Illinois,” said Cynthia Coleman, club facilitator and associate director of external relations at the Computer Science Department. Coleman hopes to partner the local chapter with Saujani. Coleman said her chapter is the only official club in the Champaign-Urbana area. Overall, 35 girls are now enrolled in the club, which is double the initial 15 members.

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She said girls come as far as Danville to attend the weekly meetings. Enrollment is larger than expected according to club curriculum planner and Engineering student Kate Milleker. She previously worked with the UIC chapter, which started with 17 members. “I was going off of what (UIC’s Girls Who Code) experience had been so I was very surprised to see such strong demonstrated interest,” Milleker said. Coleman said the club hopes to recruit more help from University computer science students and to have faculty come speak. She also said that the department is fully funding t-shirts to help the girls feel “proud of their club.” All experience levels from beginner to advanced are accommodated in the

club , Milleker said. “From a department standpoint, we would just encourage anyone to learn some coding and programming even if it’s not something they’re going to do for the rest of their lives,” Coleman said. Eleven-year-old club member Byla Chapman said she has learned a lot through the club already. She had previously attended the Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program. The girls keep coming back each week motivated and excited to learn, Milleker said. “It’s really cool to see them kind of figure things out that they didn’t think they could before,” she said. “Everyone is learning together and kind of succeeding together.”

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Corrections When we make a mistake, we will correct it in this place. We strive for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editor-in-Chief Masaki Sugimoto at (217) 337-8365.

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THURSDAY February 16, 2017 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

NEWS STATE NEWS

CU pressures Rep. Davis to oppose executive orders about immigration Immigration Forum hosts letter writing campaign BY GILLIAN DUNLOP STAFF WRITER

Passionate members of the Champaign-Urbana community joined together on Monday to participate in C-U Immigration Forum’s “Dear Rodney: Where are you?” letter writing campaign. The campaign, which took place at the Champaign Public Library, was directed toward Representative Rodney Davis as a way to pressure him to take a stand against President Trump’s executive orders about immigration. “(We want constituents) to make their voices heard about various immigration issues that (Davis has) historically been on the fence about,” said Megan Flowers, secretary officer of the Immigration Forum board of governors.. “We survived the Republicans before and we’ll survive again,” community member Patricia Larsen said. “But we need to make sure that we let them know that we’re watching.” The C-U immigration forum is calling for “humane immigration” as well as an open dialogue about these issues. “(I want to) get everyone together and have an Illinois town hall meeting,” Flowers said. “We’re

FROM 3A

FOOD However, such delivery service requires a fi xed menu because the food is cooked in large portions and divided up upon various houses for delivery. Malone said leftovers are often placed into the student's’ individual refrigerators for later.

THE DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Two University students walk towards the State Capitol in Springfield in April 2009.

Proposed new bill would prevent unwarranted searches of undocumented immigrants in Illinois PHOTO COURTESY OF ANITA SAY CHAN

Champaign residents gather at the Champaign Public Library on Monday to write letters to Rep. Rodney Davis to voice their opinions on legislation. encouraging a traditional and personal town hall to speak with (Davis’) constituents.” Demonstrations against Trump’s executive order on immigration have popped up in recent weeks, with protests occurring on

“Your representatives work for you, so it’s important to add your voice.” MEGAN FLOWERS

IMMIGRATION FORUM SECRETARY

the Quad as well as at the Champaign airport. “We have to keep the momentum going to let Trump know that we are not going to stand by and let them take actions against the people that we

Hendrick House is also combating food waste with its rooftop garden, which takes excess food and uses it as compost to fertilize the soil. Malone said it would be ideal for greek houses to incorporate the rooftop garden system on their own property, but that might not be a viable option. “We have to be careful about it though, because it’s

love,” Larsen said. Sample letters were provided for any community member unsure of what to write. “Your representatives work for you, so it’s important to add your voice, whether it’s calling or writing a letter,” Flowers said. “(Davis) is representing us so we need him to speak for our district.” Larsen has never taken the time to write directly to the government before but could not resist this time. “(Letter writing) is a small thing, but if we get a lot of people doing it, it makes a difference to the people who are in power right now,” she said. “Everybody in this room is a descendant of an immigrant, we’re all working together.”

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gotta be monitored closely to make sure drunken idiots aren’t doing something bad to it,” Malone said. The company also participates in a cooking oil recycling system program and buys locally grown produce to increase sustainability, Malone said. They also recently terminated the use of trays.

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BY AARON NAVARRO ASSISTANT DAYTIME NEWS EDITOR

A group of Chicago area lawmakers have submitted a bill that would prevent law enforcement agencies from conducting unwarranted searches of undocumented immigrants. HB0426, or the “Immigration Safe Zones Act,” would allow schools, places of worship and medical facilities to deny any searches for undocumented immigrants by local and state agencies without an appropriate warrant. The bill is currently awaiting consideration by the Illinois House of Representatives after having been passed by the Human Services Committee yesterday. Illinois' 11th district state representative Ann Williams is a co-sponsor of this bill. “My colleagues and I are committed to ensuring equal treatment for all residents, and believe immigrants should be allowed to live without fear,” Williams said in an email.

FROM 3A

PROVOST Wilkin said. Wilkin said he does not want to be a candidate for the permanent provost position, and he will meet with others to select an acting University Librarian to lead while he serves as provost. “I am a library director. I like leading libraries and I

“We are a nation of immigrants … Our communities have been and continue to be strengthened by immigrants.” Williams said a similar bill in early January did not advance past committee, but HB0426 did. A recent call to make the University of Illinois system campuses of sanctuary was denied by President Timothy Killeen due to the administrators’ fear of losing federal funding over open defiance against federal immigration laws. Jan Dennis, an assistant director in the Office of University Relations, said that the University’s legal staff is currently reviewing the bill on how the University system might specifically be affected by the proposed legislation. “The U of I System and its three universities continue to advocate for undocumented students,” Dennis said. Williams said that the bill will impact Illinois campuses directly by denying law enforcement agencies

unwarranted investigation or detaining of individuals for immigration violations. “The bill also prohibits school officials from asking about a student’s immigration status or the status of their family members,” Williams said. A new website was launched by the University detailing information and resources, such as scholarships and ally training, for undocumented and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals students. The bill comes in light of President Donald Trump’s executive order allowing law enforcement to apprehend and detain immigrants in the country. Trump has also threatened to cut federal funding to "sanctuary cities," including Urbana. “America is built on a foundation of welcoming immigrants and refugees,” Williams said. “Everyone deserves to be treated with dignity — that is what America is all about.”

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like playing a part in building this great University, so I look forward to being back in the dean’s position and to play any role I can in getting a good permanent provost in place,” Wilkin said. Jones has begun hiring a search firm to assist with finding a permanent provost. The search committee is expected to begin its work by mid-March and the process is expected to be com-

pleted by the fall, Jones said. Currently, the budget reform committee makes recommendations to the provost, so Wilkin does not know if he will continue to chair the committee. Wilkin is making the most of Feser’s time before he leaves, with meetings set for Tuesday and Friday.

majones5@dailyillini.com @MeganAsh_Jones

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Thursday, February 16, 2017

In recovery, shooting victim reflects on gun violence FROM 1A

GUN VIOLENCE

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ELYSSA KAUFMAN STAFF WRITER

hepard has always had a negative view on gun laws. “All (the shooting) did was make me more pessimistic,” Shepard said. “After being shot, I realized just how little anyone cares about the individual involved in the shooting.” Shepard knows the gun laws he wants to see implemented, but deep down, those aspirations are futile — he sees pro-gun groups, like the NRA, opposing them. “No one cares that I got hurt,” he said. “No one is going to stop this from happening to other people. And it really just depresses me.” Rather than hoping things will get better, Shepard says he is just trying to adjust. Refocusing is how Shepard will respond and cope with his experience in the shooting. Gun violence is an issue, Shepard says, but he doesn’t believe it’s a common topic of conversation. It’s almost as if students have become desensitized to this issue. “I think gun violence, when you see it represented in the media, is representative of what we see and what we want,” Shepard said. “A lot of gun violence in the media is that kind of ‘playing with your toys violence.’” Shepard noticed the presence of guns in his favorite television shows. For example, the show “Atlanta” has a scene involving a drunk altercation involving a gun in a bar. But Shepard sees a difference between fantasy violence in the media and a comedy show that is aimed at making viewers laugh. “When it’s in the media, it’s fantasy violence; it’s pretty easy to separate it,” he said. “But, when it’s shown on a comedy show, I think that’s more indicative of, that’s the writers and actors showing their reality. That’s them finding humor and absurdity in what actually is happening.” Unlike the characters in violent action movies who immediately get up after they are shot, Shepard’s recovery has become part of his lifestyle. “I don’t even watch broadcast journalism just because it is so depressing once you realize that each of those people has a family; each of those people has friends,” he said. Shepard has an idea as to how gun violence, across both Champaign-Urbana and the world, can be prevented. “The only way to prevent that is to have no guns in the first place,” Shepard said. “I realized in that situation there is no way a gun would help the situation. I just really want to get guns out of the situation.”

Local gun violence

Just because it’s not broadcasted in an Illini-Alert doesn’t mean shootings are not happening in the areas outside of campus. Police reports obtained through Freedom of Information requests show Champaign-Urbana is not immune to gun violence, and even though 2016 may have seemed like a violent year near campus, it was not the worst for the area statistically. Between 2011 and 2016, 149 shootings occurred in Champaign, while 169 took place in Urbana. Two years ago, Champaign had the most gun violence, with a total of 45 shootings — more than twice the amount of shootings in 2014. Urbana had the same amount of gun violence in both 2014 and 2015, with 36 events each year. Patrick Connolly, chief of police for the Urbana Police Department, said shootings escalated in February 2015 on the east side of Urbana on Dodson Drive. At one point, 19 bullet holes were found in a nearby home. Since then, the police began to see a trend where people were shooting into homes occupied by many people, most of whom were children. Within a three-day period, Connolly said 68 rounds had been fired by 28 different people at seven different events.

In 2016, there were 60 total shootings across Champaign-Urbana — one being the incident with Shepard. A second occurred near campus less than two months later during the night of the Chicago Cubs’ World Series Game 7 on Nov. 2. Both Champaign-Urbana police departments defi ne acts of gun violence not by the number of casualties or injuries but rather in the number of shots that are fired. As of Feb. 13, there have been eight total shootings in the ChampaignUrbana area in 2017, according to Jeff Christensen, chief of police at the University of Illinois Police Department. At this time last year, six had occurred. “This problem was much bigger than Dodson Drive,” he said. “It’s Champaign, Urbana and reaches down to the University. With the numbers, it was evident that there is a violence issue in the community, and that is why we are working hard with the gun task force and other ways to address it.” This shift has resulted in local police departments starting an initiative called “Don’t Shoot,” an outreach program designed to turn offenders away from crimes in their corresponding communities. In addition, he said police are trying to use the “Fresh Start Initiative,” which offers support to people with violent criminal records who want to change their behavior. “Many of the people who have been involved with this type of behavior have been involved … before, meaning prior engagements with gun violence,” Connolly said. “We need to look at that to see what we can do to stop the recidivism from occurring. If people are found to be involved in gun violence on more than one occasion, maybe we need to look at a different approach than the direction we are going currently.” Like University students, Christensen has been impacted by the recent shootings near campus. “We are very much haunted by the community violence that is happening throughout the nation and in our community,” Christensen said. “Unfortunately, that kind of discontent has been brought to reality with what happened at Third and Green.” Gun violence goes beyond the criminal justice system, according to the University police chief. At a national level, Christensen believes more programs are needed to address the violence — similar to “Don’t Shoot” or “Fresh Start Initiative.” “We are not going to arrest our way out this; we are not going to prosecute our way out of this,” he said. “But, that’s our job that we need to do, which is identify the offenders that are doing this and bring them into the criminal justice system because it’s endangering our community.” But Christensen has certain ideas for how students can stay safe in the meantime. “We can never completely protect ourselves from crime and gun violence,” he said. “What we need to do is reduce the risk. Stay informed, be aware of your surroundings. (What’s) really important is looking out for each other.”

A different view

For Tim Murray, safety is a priority when legally handling firearms. “I support using firearms, obviously. I own a gun range. Doing it safely is our number one concern here,” said Murray, CEO at High Caliber Training Center and Indoor Range in Urbana. When people visit High Caliber, they are required to watch an eight-minute educational video on how indoor ranges work. They also are required to read through, understand and acknowledge a four-page liability and rules packet. This is the fi rst step, and afterward, visitors must demonstrate they know how to function their firearms correctly. Visitors have to shoot five shots from five yards away on an 18-inch target. If they cannot accomplish that, Murray said the range requires them to complete private instruction with one of the certified instructors. Once patrons have the proper shooting technique, others at the range

“This didn’t give me any enlightenment. I don’t have any wisdom for this. There is nothing I can tell them that can prevent this for them. There is nothing I can tell them to make them feel better about this. There is nothing I can tell them to even make them change this.” ROBBIE SHEPARD UNIVERSITY ALUMNUS AND SHOOTING VICTIM

PORTRAIT OF ROBBIE SHEPARD BY HANNAH AUTEN THE DAILY ILLINI

Robbie Shepard, University alumnus, stands a block away from Evergreen Tobacco on Third and Green streets. In the early morning of Sept. 25, Shepard was shot in his right arm while walking along the Boneyard Creek waterway with a group of friends. know the person beside them at least has that minimum fi rearm safety training. Safety is also a main focus in the gun selling process for Murray. In order to buy a gun from High Caliber gun range, customers have to fill out a ATF Form 4473. Depending on their answers, the range can either reject them right away or continue with the process. The form is then taken to the Illinois State Police, where there is a verification process to ensure that the patron does not have a criminal background. The police then decide if the individual can purchase the firearm. Murray said attitude issues or concerning comments are enough for the police to reject the potential gun user. “If for any reason, the person that comes in, we don’t feel comfortable selling them a firearm, we don’t sell them a firearm,” Murray said. It’s similar to the way fire education is taught in the country, he says. “There were all kinds of issues with fire-related deaths, and they put fire education in elementary schools and taught kids the proper way to be safe when dealing with fire,” he said. “They completely changed the whole persona of fire-related deaths across the

country. “They can easily do the same with firearms.” Murray has a different idea. “Banning guns isn’t going to stop violence,” Murray said. Murray compared the recent shooting to car injuries due to DUIs and knife fights on the streets. “The only common factor among all things is the human being,” he said. “It’s the person that is the problem; it’s not the means by which they decide to inflict violence.” The gun range CEO said that in order to reduce gun violence in the Champaign-Urbana area, the problem behind the guns needs to be addressed. “I think you would come to find out it’s gang-related, drug deals and criminal activity,” he said. “If you could find a way eliminate some of the criminal activity, I think you would eliminate some of the gun violence that goes with it. It goes hand in hand.” He said criminals do not care about laws in the first place. “You can’t punish the law-abiding citizens who are doing everything they are supposed (to),” he said. “They do the training; they buy from legitimate gun stores. They are doing it legally. If you go and take it away from every-

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Police officers investigate a shooting that took place early Sunday morning on Sept. 25. Sixty total shootings occurred in Champaign-Urbana during 2016, two of which were near campus.

body, the only people that are going to comply with that are going to be the law-abiding citizens.” While Shepard calls for a ban on guns, Murray calls for a national standard. “There’s at least 50 different ways to have a firearm because there are 50 different states,” Murray said. “All of the states have different requirements, training, criteria. I think it needs to be more of a national standard, so that everybody is on the same page, and everybody gets the same training.” He compares this need for a national standard to a driver’s license. “For driving a car, you are required to do 60 hours of mandatory training to know how to operate one safely, so it is no different than anything else,” Murray said.

A lifestyle of recovery

This random act of gun violence has led Shepard to a long road of recovery — a routine that has become part of his lifestyle. February marks four months since Shepard started physical therapy. He goes three days a week to regain movement in his right arm and hand. While he has regained more movement, he still cannot bend some of his fingers, including his pointer finger and thumb. “Part of the physical therapy process is taking measurements every week to see my progression,” he said. “Even with the progression, I still have a lot of difficulty doing basic tasks.” Basic right hand operations have gotten better, but simple tasks — like buttoning shirts — will take more work. Shepard has even had to put cooking his favorite dishes on hold. “If you can imagine making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, you hold it with one hand and do it with the other,” he said. It requires a lot of balance. But he has still seen some improvement. He can complete necessary tasks, like bathing and dressing himself. But still, that is the minimum. Many of the activities he enjoys involve fine motor movement with his dominant hand. He can only write and use a computer to type for a short time. While Robbie will continue physical therapy, Christensen and other police chiefs will work to reduce gun violence in the Champaign-Urbana area. Murray will continue to teach others the proper safety measures needed when handling firearms at his range. Shepard remains calm as he readjusts, like everyone else since Sept. 25. For now, campus has returned back to daily life. But Shepard’s life after the event has changed drastically, in ways beyond what an Illini-Alert or statistic could inform. “I knew it was going to be tough,” he said. “I wasn’t surprised. There is a good deal of things that are frustrating that I just can’t do for months until I am back up to everything being healed.”

eskaufm2@dailyillini.com

If you get an Illini-Alert about an event of gun violence, the University of Illinois Police Department has tips to remain safe. • Text or call any friends who might be in the area • If you do not get a response, call the police • If you see something suspicious, call the police • Do not walk alone, and call SafeWalks if needed • Walk in well-lit places

Shots fired in Champaign-Urbana 50

45

40

36

36 31

30 20

29

26

24 21

22

17 18

13

2012

2013

10 0

2011

Urbana Champaign

2014

2015

2016

TOTAL SHOOTINGS: 318

MICHELLE TAM THE DAILY ILLINI SOURCE URBANA POLICE DEPARTMENT, CHAMPAIGN POLICE DEPARTMENT

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OPINIONS

THURSDAY February 16, 2017 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

THE DAILY ILLINI

Feb. 16, 2017

EDITORIAL Sep. 25, 2016

Stay vigilant in war against gun violence

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he Daily Illini’s longform team published a story Thursday about Robbie Shepard, an innocent bystander whose arm was injured in the crossfire of the campus shooting in September. The Daily Illini Editorial Board wrote numerous editorials following the Sept. 25, 2016, shooting, each of which revolved around the idea that something needed to change to reduce the frequency of similar horrifying moments of violence across the nation. But as readers will notice in “Not A Statistic,” it seems little has improved since that night. Shepard was gracious enough to talk to our reporter, and he shared that he doesn’t think his shooting or any other will lead to significant changes. We wish we could say that we don’t share his cynicism, but we can’t. Despite continued gun violence, regulations have actually worsened nationally, given Wednesday’s decision to permit gun purchases for people with mental disorders. The prospect of further restrictions in the future looks bleak, given President Donald Trump’s election and the Republican Party’s devotion to the NRA. The day after the shooting, we warned students and those in the community not to become numb to what happened here. But sadly, we believe this is exactly what’s happened: Our campus has forgotten about the shooting within just a few months, and we’ve moved on with our lives.

We don’t think people should live in fear at every second — that’s no way to live — but it’s hard to disagree with Shepard’s cynical attitude when change seems so distant. Our longform story reveals that gun shootings in the area are down, but that doesn’t mean gun violence can be discounted. This revelation should only encourage students and community members to fight more. Shepard and several others were shot by someone who had just left jail for another crime. To Shepard, the lower statistics don’t make a difference, because they only reinforce society’s tendency to view victims of gun violence as unfeeling numbers in a larger equation of struggle. We don’t claim to know how to solve this — few actually know. Shepard believes all guns should be taken off the street, and that’s certainly a radical thought, given our nation’s history of armed citizens. Whether or not you agree with Shepard’s view, it should be agreed upon that limiting gun violence doesn’t involve following the status quo. We’ve been inspired by the millions of people across the nation protesting and fighting when they see injustices of other kinds. This issue requires the same vigilance. Protesting and fighting for what you believe is the best way to keep our community safe. That’s how we prevent those in power from reducing Shepard, and the millions of others devastated by gun violence, to mere numbers.

Remember that ‘It happened here’ Editor’s note: The Editorial Board is republishing our editorial about the Sep. 25 campus shooting because of Thursday’s longform story, centered around the victims of the shooting. he bubble burst early Sunday morning. While students of the University were out drinking with friends, finishing that last problem in the library or just sleeping, reality hit Champaign-Urbana. We’ve all seen those tweets, Facebook posts and headlines that inform us of gun violence in Chicago or St. Louis, but most of us quickly move on with our lives. That doesn’t directly affect us; it can’t hurt us, so why should we care? We live in Champaign-Urbana, and senseless gun violence, for the most part, doesn’t touch us here. But last night, a man visiting campus needlessly lost his life. Five more victims are just beginning the physical and emotional recovery process, as new Chancellor Robert Jones mentioned in his Massmail to the campus community Sunday afternoon. Countless other friends, family members and witnesses must cope with the trauma as well. So, like many different parts of the country have been before us, we’re left with questions. Who did this? Why? Who are the victims? Why would you even bring a gun to a party? This type of violence — careless cruelty — has been happening in Chicago for years, but most students are detached from that reality. There were 22 shootings in

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Chicago on Saturday night. There hadn’t been a single shooting in Champaign in over two months. Students living in the Chicagoland area may see those headlines and move on with their daily lives as if nothing happened. The number of people shot increases every day, but the reactions stay the same. Safety is not a conscious concern for most people on this campus. But some things, like the events of Sunday morning, can and should disrupt that mentality. A new reality sets in: It could have been you. It could have been anyone. The Main Quad is the center of our campus, but Green Street is the center of our campus lives. This weekend was indistinguishable from any other during the school year. There was no warning. But now is the time where we learn from those before us and come together. That’s a characteristic that we students are proud to exemplify. You could already see the compassion on display last night: whether in frantic texts to friends, supportive posts on social media or even those who assisted the wounded. We’ll mourn, we’ll help each other and we’ll emerge stronger. Don’t let Sunday become part of a numbing process, where we slowly lose feeling and forget that those numbers aren’t just digits, but lives. For those of us who’ve seen this happen everyday, our sanctuary has been violated. For those of us who grew up away from the violence, these moments are no longer foreign. It happened here.

Undeserving personalities cash in on new type of fame SAKETH VASAMSETTI Columnist

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hirteen-year-old Danielle Bregoli used to be just another troublesome teen with a bad attitude. She lives in Florida with her single mom and has an eccentric life fi lled with violent fights, stealing cars and running away. Upon first impression, one would wonder how anyone could possibly deal with such an intolerant and rude individual.

And to be honest, most people would never think that Bregoli would end up becoming one of the biggest internet sensations of all time. She starred on an episode of Dr. Phil in September 2016, but rose to fame in early 2017 with the help of her attitude and famous saying, “Cash me ousside, how bow dat?” The internet swooned. Every social media site was plastered with memes of the video and before you knew it, Bregoli was known across the nation.

Bregoli’s video from Dr. Phil now has over 21 million views and a countless number of shares across Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Bregoli even started her own YouTube channel earlier this month and already has over 30,000 subscribers. To add to her fame, upand-coming rapper Kodak Black gave her the spotlight in a new music video for his song “Everything 1k,” which currently has over 10 million views on YouTube. Bregoli was handed a

career by simply not being a good person. Bregoli’s new fame is part of a developing trend of Internet memes becoming “employable,” which is leading to a rather obscure category of celebrity. These are celebrities who are famous for reasons that they may or may not want to be defi ned by. Chris Crocker was one of the earliest of these celebrities. He was thrown into fame after uploadeding a video that we all know as “Leave Britney Alone.” The video is basi-

cally an emotionally driven monologue from Crocker regarding the infamous Britney Spears meltdown. Crocker later admitted the video wasn’t serious, but his entire career was defi ned by it. You probably didn’t even know Crocker’s name until I mentioned his video. While his video was purposeful, Bregoli’s wasn’t. The horrible attitude she displayed on the show is actually who she is as a person. People took to social media to praise it because they saw it as

“funny” and “eccentric.” But promoting that type of behavior is going to open a window for more people trying to become “internet” famous by doing the same things Bregoli does, or potentially much worse. Especially in a time of such distress, the general public could use more positive influences, instead of pushing negative people into fame.

Saketh is a freshman in DGS. ssv2@dailyillini.com

Glorification of specialized diets does more harm than good JAMIE LINTON Columnist

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et another celebrityendorsed trend has entered mainstream culture. In a society so heavily influenced by the actions of the rich and famous, it’s no surprise that weird food trends like Beyoncé’s liquid-only diet or Megan Fox’s Paleolithic (eating “like a caveman”) diet, have been widely adopted by men and women everywhere. It’s admirable that the general public has decided to embrace clean eating, especially given that the U.S. has the 12th highest obesity rate in the world, at 35 percent of the popula-

tion. However, it’s concerning that we praise bizarre food trends for being nutritious when data has proven otherwise. Additionally, restaurants and cafés have used these food intolerance trends to drive up prices, leaving those with actual allergies no choice but to pay a premium due to health reasons. Food establishments now offer options for gluten and dairy-free alternatives, based off celebrity endorsed allergen-free diets. But in the grand scheme of things, their endorsements do more harm than good. Because certain public figures have glorified illnesses like celiac disease, which inhibits the incorporation of those affected diets, restaurants are

introducing alternatives at astronomical costs. This is convenient for those who can afford to pay extra for their already overpriced coffee; however, for the everyday sufferer who has to constantly purchase specialized groceries, maintaining a healthy lifestyle is expensive. This, in addition to the amount of money they may have to spend on medical care for their illnesses, can eat up a majority of their income. Popularizing the diets of people who are gluten or lactose intolerant could be understandable if they didn’t have adverse effects on the health of a typical individual. According to a study in Spain, “a month on a gluten-free diet may hurt our gut flora and immune function, potentially set-

ting those on gluten-free diets up for an overgrowth of harmful bacteria in their intestines.” Though side effects of special diets will affect everyone differently, cutting necessary food groups out of your diet without accounting for the nutrients you're losing can result in malnutrition. It’s important that those who are concerned with legitimate food allergies and intolerances see a doctor that can help them make a diet change; however, it’s due to the actions of those who make unnecessary changes that companies are profiting off the glorification of specialized diets.

A 2008 study by the Dalhousie Medical School found that gluten-free grocery items were 2.42 times more expensive than the price of the same items with gluten.

CINDY OM THE DAILY ILLINI

jlinton2@dailyillini.com

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Thursday, February 16, 2017

La Casa and Krannert host first ‘Latin Dance Night’ BY NATASHA MOSQUERA STAFF WRITER

The Krannert Center Ambassadors and La Casa Cultural Latina will be hosting the very first Latin Dance Night — Noche de Baile Latino — on Friday at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts from 9:3011:30 p.m. free of charge. Monique Rivera, the codirector of engagement at Krannert and co-adviser to the Krannert Ambassadors, said she was at a resource fair when a group of students in the International MBA program at the College of Business brought up the idea. “Most of the students were actually from Asian countries, and there were a few from Latin American countries who came up and said, ‘Do you all ever do like just a dance night at Krannert?’ and I said, ‘You know, we haven’t yet, but that’s something I would love to take back to take my colleagues and talk about it,’” Rivera said. “So we were inspired by students, which is why we are here — really to serve students as best we can.” Rivera said the event

“That’s why I want to invite everybody. It’s not going to be centered on only one side of who we are. I think that we want to bring all sorts of music from all the traditions ...” GIOCONDRA GUERRA PEREZ DIRECTOR OF LA CASA CULTURAL LATINA

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DACA break down stereotypes in the classroom. “As a DACA student, I often find myself explaining what DACA even means,” Cardoso said. “Most people have never heard of it. I think education is truly significant to combat the

aims to bring international and domestic students together in a public space, because it furthers one of Krannert’s three themes — classroom, laboratory and public square. “That public square aspect, having the lobby as big as it is, we can hold about 3,000 people in it — comfortably, actually — and we just thought that bringing all these different student groups together, different student cultural populations, all those things, would be a great way to celebrate mid-semester and have people engage with the space in a different way,” she said. The Krannert Center Ambassadors will be in attendance to share information about a studentinitiated campaign that is focused on spreading awareness about the Krannert Center fee that both undergraduate and graduate students pay. Because a public ticket price for touring artists performances can reach up to $60, Rivera said the student fee is really important to both Krannert and the students because it allows them to offer students $10 tickets. “We’re really encouraging students across the disciplines, no matter what you might be studying, to come and experience art with us, to really take advantage of the amazing talent that is on our stages, which is really the world on our stages,” Rivera said. Rivera also said Krannert is really excited to have this collaboration with La Casa because it will help strengthen their evolving relationship and bring more unity to the campus community. Giocondra Guerra Perez, director of La Casa Cultural Latina, said La Casa decided to collaborate with Rivera on Latin dance night because in her three and a half years of working at La Casa, it has never done anything like it. Perez said the idea is to showcase the diversity of the music because it is important for the community at large to learn about the different Latin American cultures. “We tend to put Latinos in one box, and we tend to group us really homogenous, but Latinos are very heterogeneous,” Perez said.

“That’s why I want to invite everybody. It’s not going to be centered only on one side of who we are. I think that we want to bring all sorts of music from all the traditions in Latin America and Latinos in the U.S.” Perez said the 9:30-11:30 p.m. time slot is not very long, but she wants students to have fun, dance and enjoy the time because music is an element that is very relevant to their culture. “I mean, it’s for the students. I know like after 11:30 they will go to the bars or other places, but I’m telling everyone: ‘you start

there and then you go,’” she said. Perez also said the opportunities at Krannert are endless, and she really wants all students, especially Latino students, to take advantage of all the events and programs they have to offer. “It’s right here on campus. We’re like, ‘who is not going to come? Everybody should come.’ This is our idea. We really want to have like 800 people there,” said Perez. “We think that if we bring that many people, we can have an annual Latino dance every Febru-

ary. We’re trying this year, we see what happens next year.” Ragini Srikrishna, senior in LAS, said she attended a salsa, bachata event last semester and had a lot of fun. “I think a huge reason why I go to events is because I like meeting people so much and meeting different people from different backgrounds. Everybody has a different story, right?” Srikrishna said. She also said whether someone goes as a spectator or as a participant, supporting events like these is

supporting the arts — something that is really huge in her family because her mother is a singer. Srikrishna said she encourages anyone to attend because she thinks there’s a wider audience that also enjoys dancing, and it is something that can be enjoyed from multiple perspectives. “It’s a great way to get out of your comfort zone, take out your dancing shoes, meet new people and listen to some great music,” Srikrishna said.

stereotypes that exist. It is important to open people’s minds so when they express opinions, they are doing it using accurate facts.” Overall, Cardoso feels that educating people on the issue is the best way to fix it, which is why she is helping with the student ally training. “I have come across people that barely understand

how the immigration system works, legal or illegal, and I feel like it is one of my duties to share my story so they can begin to imagine it,” Cardoso said. Megan Flowers, communications director at the University YMCA, attended the first training session last year. She explained how one student shared how she

wanted to study abroad and applied for parole. She later decided not to go on the trip because she found out that if she left the country, she had no guarantee that she would get back in. Flowers also shared many of the programs that the YMCA on campus offers for undocumented students. “We are in the process

of becoming accredited in order to give legal advice on immigration law so that we can begin to work with students from other organizations like La Casa,” Flowers said. Ramirez said it is important for faculty and staff members to become educated on the needs of undocumented students, because every student at the Uni-

versity has value. She said professors need to be aware that students look to them as a resource. “Sometimes we can’t afford books or have trouble understanding material. To go to a professor and say that I am undocumented, I just don’t want to be judged,” Ramirez said.

RYAN FANG THE DAILY ILLINI

Students rest in La Casa Cultural Latina on March 7. The center pairs up with Krannert Center to host Latin Dance Night.

KRANNERT CENTER TH FEB 16 5PM

Krannert Uncorked with Lyric Theatre // Marquee

7:30PM

René Marie and Experiment In Truth: Sound of Red // Marquee

7:30PM

Sonic Illinois: Jupiter String Quartet with Todd Palmer, clarinet // Marquee

FR FEB 17 10AM

Dance for People with Parkinson’s // Marquee

7:30PM

Illinois Wind Symphony // School of Music

7:30PM

René Marie and Experiment In Truth: Sound of Red // Marquee

SA FEB 18 7:30PM

René Marie and Experiment In Truth: Sound of Red // Marquee

7:30PM

The American Century // Sinfonia da Camera

SU FEB 19 3PM

Young Concert Artists Winner: Zorá String Quartet // Marquee

View events, download programs, find what’s free: KrannertCenter.com SPONSORS MAKE IT HAPPEN. THANK YOU.

DISCOVER M O R E!

Nmosque2@illinois.edu

beberle2@dailyillini.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Across

1 Route follower 4___ Conference 7 Word following 1-/4-Across, appropriately 12 Not clued in 14 The scandal of Watergate, essentially 17 Its distance is measured within a meter 18 Japanese flowerarranging art 19 Going “Huh?!?” 20 Pours a certain way 21 Brewing need 24 Subject of some prep classes 25 Vents frustration 29 Some piano music 33 Edwin M. ___, war secretary under Lincoln 34 Slipped by 35 Government stance on texting while driving 36 Santa ___ 37 Word following 35-/36-Across, appropriately 38 Throw on the floor 40 How things typically are 43 Lamebrains 44Fruity libation 45 Give meds 46 Ones attending to patients, for short 47 Tiny bit 51 Pity evoker 55 Called from a stall, say 58 Sequentially 59 What you might accidentally try to put your head through when getting into a sweater

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puzzle by joe krozel

60 Antacid brand 61 “Dude!” 62 ___ doll 63 Words following 61-/62-Across, appropriately

Down

1 “___ how?” (words of disbelief) 2 Spanish article 3 Instrument in swing 4 Entree in a shell 5 Some are named after presidents 6 Something a shopaholic might be in 7 Biting 8 Put a finger on, in a way 9 With, to Renoir 10 Onetime CW sitcom

11 It could carry a tune in the 1950s 13 Big brand of sports equipment 15 Savage 16 Walloped 21 Subject of an old wives’ tale? 22 Its postal codes start with K, L, M, N and P — but, oddly, not O 23 Well-known octet 26 Old video game maker 27 Coffee shop offering 28 Hitches 29 Times when musicians don’t play 30 Leader of the pack 31 Ancient physician

32 Pulling a prank outside a house 39 Out of bed, in a way? 41 Cleaned just before drying 42 Atomic clock components 48 “Well, I guess” 49 Marketer’s start? 50 Gulf of ___ (waters off the coast of Djibouti) 51 Voice-activated assistant 52 Like Mr. X, but not Malcolm X 53 Dummy 54 Where annoying things stick 55 Arrest 56 Foozle 57 “If you ask me …,” in texts

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.


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THURSDAY February 16, 2017 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

LIFE & CULTURE

PHOTO COURTESY OF DEJA GARDNER

Students perform at last year’s Cotton Club variety show. The Central Black Student Union hosts the variety show and fashion show, which focuses on black student talent, including a featured clothing line.

black excellence shines Cotton Club shows highlight black student talent BY MARISSA PLESCIA STAFF WRITER

Averi Simpson came to campus looking for ways to engage with the black community. Both of her parents attended the University, and the junior in Media wanted get involved in activities similar to what they were part of when they were students here. One of these activities is the Cotton Club Variety Show and Fashion Show. “When I told them about it, they were excited, just because that was a big part of their college experience too,” Simpson said. The Cotton Club Variety Show and Fashion Show will include a multitude of performances by University students. The fashion show will be held at 7:30 p.m. Friday in the Student Dining and Residential Programs Building, and the variety

show will be held at 2:30 p.m. Saturday in Foellinger Auditorium. The show has been a tradition for at least 30 years, and is organized by the Central Black Student Union. It was created as a place for black students to showcase their talents in fashion, singing and dancing. Each year, different themes are chosen for the shows. This year, the fashion show’s theme is Black Magic, inspired by different eras of movies and music. The show will also spotlight freshman Kalief Dinkins, who has his own clothing line for the show. The theme of the variety show is Showtime at the Apollo, and it will pay tribute to several important black figures in pop culture, such as Eddie James and Chance the Rapper. “It’s really broad and makes it easy to pay homage to so many

amazing black artists, singers, rappers, poets and pop performers from numerous eras,” Simpson said. Months of preparation have taken place for these shows. The show coordinators started planning back in September and have been busy ever since in order to put on a good performance for their fellow students. In preparation for the fashion show, coordinators held auditions for models and had to plan out spacing, lighting and music. In addition, coordinators also had to gather clothing for the models, which was either contributed by the models themselves or donated from stores such as Plato’s Closet, Charlotte Russe and Forever 21. Models each have to learn different walks in preparation for the show. “It’s a little bit stressful, but the

outcome always makes it worth it,” said Krista Franklin, senior in LAS and producer of the fashion show. The Variety Show went through a similar process with auditions and planning. They also hosted a series of practices in order to prepare for the main event. The creators of the show believe it is an important event to attend on the University’s campus because it serves as a forum to support fellow students and admire the multitude of talents this school holds. “It allows us to see what U of I has to offer. Yes, we’re known for our academics across the nation, but also we do have students with various talents and we would like to showcase that,” said Deja Gardner, president of the Central Black Student Union.

plescia3@dailyillini.com

Undocumented students teach UI faculty about DACA program BY BROOKE EBERLE STAFF WRITER

For Nancy Ramirez, being an undocumented student isn’t easy. Ramirez was born in Mexico City and moved to

Illinois when she was one years old. She, like many on campus, currently has DACA status, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, and faces many obstacles because of it.

To better inform people about this, the Women’s Resources center will be holding an Undocumented Student Ally training for all University staff and faculty on Friday. The train-

ing will be about three hours long and was developed by both La Casa Cultural Latina and I-CAUSE. “The main idea is to better support students who are undocumented on

BRAIN BAUER THE DAILY ILLINI

Students and residents of Champaign and Urbana gather at Willard Airport on Jan. 29 to protest President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration. The Women’s Resources Center will hold Undocumented Student Ally training for University faculty and staff on Friday in an effort to provide more support to undocumented students on campus.

Religious Services

University Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod A Congregat ion of St udents in the Hear t of Campus Life

Divine Services Su nday 10 : 30 a m 604 E. Chalmers | 344-1558

SUMMER SESSIONS STAR T MAY 22 AND JUNE 5. Start planning your summer now at harpercollege.edu/summer

campus,” said Jorge Mena Robles, assistant director of La Casa. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals was developed under formerPresident Obama to allow students who came to the country under the age of 16 to get an education. Undocumented students need to apply for DACA every two years and pay $465 each year, plus legal expenses, Ramirez said. Ramirez also explained how being a DACA student on campus can be difficult. “We started it because we were all undocumented had a lot of administrative problems,” Ramirez said. “We used to be charged for out-of-state tuition, or we were screened for different vaccinations at McKinley because, in the system, we are listed as international students even though we’ve lived in Illinois for most of our lives.” Ramirez also said proving residency to the University was not an easy task. “We needed to explain that we were Illinois residents and graduated from Illinois schools so we deserve in-state tuition,”

Ramirez said. “They also requested a lot of private documents to prove residency, so all of us were getting emails to bring in our high school diploma or Visa or permanent resident card.” In the end, Ramirez said, many undocumented students were left with a sense of confusion about what to provide. She said there was a lack of communication from the administration regarding what requirements need to be met. Mel Cardoso, graduate student in Social Work, will be one of the trainers along with Ramirez. Cardoso is also an undocumented student and is originally from Sao Paulo, Brazil. She, like many undocumented students, has a passion for immigration reform. “I became a member of I-CAUSE because I attended one social event in the beginning of the year that La Casa hosted called La Paleta Social and I started talking to people and asked how I could get involved,” Cardoso said. Cardoso also said the training is important to

SEE DACA | 7A


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Thursday, February 16, 2017

La Casa and Krannert host first ‘Latin Dance Night’ BY NATASHA MOSQUERA STAFF WRITER

The Krannert Center Ambassadors and La Casa Cultural Latina will be hosting the very first Latin Dance Night — Noche de Baile Latino — on Friday at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts from 9:3011:30 p.m. free of charge. Monique Rivera, the codirector of engagement at Krannert and co-adviser to the Krannert Ambassadors, said she was at a resource fair when a group of students in the International MBA program at the College of Business brought up the idea. “Most of the students were actually from Asian countries, and there were a few from Latin American countries who came up and said, ‘Do you all ever do like just a dance night at Krannert?’ and I said, ‘You know, we haven’t yet, but that’s something I would love to take back to take my colleagues and talk about it,’” Rivera said. “So we were inspired by students, which is why we are here — really to serve students as best we can.” Rivera said the event

“That’s why I want to invite everybody. It’s not going to be centered on only one side of who we are. I think that we want to bring all sorts of music from all the traditions ...” GIOCONDRA GUERRA PEREZ DIRECTOR OF LA CASA CULTURAL LATINA

FROM 8A

DACA break down stereotypes in the classroom. “As a DACA student, I often find myself explaining what DACA even means,” Cardoso said. “Most people have never heard of it. I think education is truly significant to combat the

aims to bring international and domestic students together in a public space, because it furthers one of Krannert’s three themes — classroom, laboratory and public square. “That public square aspect, having the lobby as big as it is, we can hold about 3,000 people in it — comfortably, actually — and we just thought that bringing all these different student groups together, different student cultural populations, all those things, would be a great way to celebrate mid-semester and have people engage with the space in a different way,” she said. The Krannert Center Ambassadors will be in attendance to share information about a studentinitiated campaign that is focused on spreading awareness about the Krannert Center fee that both undergraduate and graduate students pay. Because a public ticket price for touring artists performances can reach up to $60, Rivera said the student fee is really important to both Krannert and the students because it allows them to offer students $10 tickets. “We’re really encouraging students across the disciplines, no matter what you might be studying, to come and experience art with us, to really take advantage of the amazing talent that is on our stages, which is really the world on our stages,” Rivera said. Rivera also said Krannert is really excited to have this collaboration with La Casa because it will help strengthen their evolving relationship and bring more unity to the campus community. Giocondra Guerra Perez, director of La Casa Cultural Latina, said La Casa decided to collaborate with Rivera on Latin dance night because in her three and a half years of working at La Casa, it has never done anything like it. Perez said the idea is to showcase the diversity of the music because it is important for the community at large to learn about the different Latin American cultures. “We tend to put Latinos in one box, and we tend to group us really homogenous, but Latinos are very heterogeneous,” Perez said.

“That’s why I want to invite everybody. It’s not going to be centered only on one side of who we are. I think that we want to bring all sorts of music from all the traditions in Latin America and Latinos in the U.S.” Perez said the 9:30-11:30 p.m. time slot is not very long, but she wants students to have fun, dance and enjoy the time because music is an element that is very relevant to their culture. “I mean, it’s for the students. I know like after 11:30 they will go to the bars or other places, but I’m telling everyone: ‘you start

there and then you go,’” she said. Perez also said the opportunities at Krannert are endless, and she really wants all students, especially Latino students, to take advantage of all the events and programs they have to offer. “It’s right here on campus. We’re like, ‘who is not going to come? Everybody should come.’ This is our idea. We really want to have like 800 people there,” said Perez. “We think that if we bring that many people, we can have an annual Latino dance every Febru-

ary. We’re trying this year, we see what happens next year.” Ragini Srikrishna, senior in LAS, said she attended a salsa, bachata event last semester and had a lot of fun. “I think a huge reason why I go to events is because I like meeting people so much and meeting different people from different backgrounds. Everybody has a different story, right?” Srikrishna said. She also said whether someone goes as a spectator or as a participant, supporting events like these is

supporting the arts — something that is really huge in her family because her mother is a singer. Srikrishna said she encourages anyone to attend because she thinks there’s a wider audience that also enjoys dancing, and it is something that can be enjoyed from multiple perspectives. “It’s a great way to get out of your comfort zone, take out your dancing shoes, meet new people and listen to some great music,” Srikrishna said.

stereotypes that exist. It is important to open people’s minds so when they express opinions, they are doing it using accurate facts.” Overall, Cardoso feels that educating people on the issue is the best way to fix it, which is why she is helping with the student ally training. “I have come across people that barely understand

how the immigration system works, legal or illegal, and I feel like it is one of my duties to share my story so they can begin to imagine it,” Cardoso said. Megan Flowers, communications director at the University YMCA, attended the first training session last year. She explained how one student shared how she

wanted to study abroad and applied for parole. She later decided not to go on the trip because she found out that if she left the country, she had no guarantee that she would get back in. Flowers also shared many of the programs that the YMCA on campus offers for undocumented students. “We are in the process

of becoming accredited in order to give legal advice on immigration law so that we can begin to work with students from other organizations like La Casa,” Flowers said. Ramirez said it is important for faculty and staff members to become educated on the needs of undocumented students, because every student at the Uni-

versity has value. She said professors need to be aware that students look to them as a resource. “Sometimes we can’t afford books or have trouble understanding material. To go to a professor and say that I am undocumented, I just don’t want to be judged,” Ramirez said.

RYAN FANG THE DAILY ILLINI

Students rest in La Casa Cultural Latina on March 7. The center pairs up with Krannert Center to host Latin Dance Night.

KRANNERT CENTER TH FEB 16 5PM

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Illinois Wind Symphony // School of Music

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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Across

1 Route follower 4___ Conference 7 Word following 1-/4-Across, appropriately 12 Not clued in 14 The scandal of Watergate, essentially 17 Its distance is measured within a meter 18 Japanese flowerarranging art 19 Going “Huh?!?” 20 Pours a certain way 21 Brewing need 24 Subject of some prep classes 25 Vents frustration 29 Some piano music 33 Edwin M. ___, war secretary under Lincoln 34 Slipped by 35 Government stance on texting while driving 36 Santa ___ 37 Word following 35-/36-Across, appropriately 38 Throw on the floor 40 How things typically are 43 Lamebrains 44Fruity libation 45 Give meds 46 Ones attending to patients, for short 47 Tiny bit 51 Pity evoker 55 Called from a stall, say 58 Sequentially 59 What you might accidentally try to put your head through when getting into a sweater

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puzzle by joe krozel

60 Antacid brand 61 “Dude!” 62 ___ doll 63 Words following 61-/62-Across, appropriately

Down

1 “___ how?” (words of disbelief) 2 Spanish article 3 Instrument in swing 4 Entree in a shell 5 Some are named after presidents 6 Something a shopaholic might be in 7 Biting 8 Put a finger on, in a way 9 With, to Renoir 10 Onetime CW sitcom

11 It could carry a tune in the 1950s 13 Big brand of sports equipment 15 Savage 16 Walloped 21 Subject of an old wives’ tale? 22 Its postal codes start with K, L, M, N and P — but, oddly, not O 23 Well-known octet 26 Old video game maker 27 Coffee shop offering 28 Hitches 29 Times when musicians don’t play 30 Leader of the pack 31 Ancient physician

32 Pulling a prank outside a house 39 Out of bed, in a way? 41 Cleaned just before drying 42 Atomic clock components 48 “Well, I guess” 49 Marketer’s start? 50 Gulf of ___ (waters off the coast of Djibouti) 51 Voice-activated assistant 52 Like Mr. X, but not Malcolm X 53 Dummy 54 Where annoying things stick 55 Arrest 56 Foozle 57 “If you ask me …,” in texts

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.


1B

THURSDAY February 16, 2017 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

SPORTS

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Michael Finke won’t be needing a haircut yet BY MATT GERTSMEIER ILLINI HOOPS COLUMNIST

Michael Finke’s barber may not recognize the Illini forward the next time he comes in for a haircut. That is, if Finke ever gets a haircut. It’s hard to miss Finke when he’s on the court. While he stands 6-foot-10, his height might not be his most noticeable feature. It’s been over a year since Finke has gotten a haircut; with the combination of his beard, he almost looks like a werewolf in midst of transformation. His hairstyle for this season was influenced by his brother, but it wasn’t supposed to last as long as it has for Finke. Finke’s younger brother, Nick, played basketball at Champaign Central High School last year. During his senior season, Nick committed to Army — an academy chalk full of tradition, discipline and a strict hair policy. Nick realized he was going to have to adapt to a military style haircut when he enrolled, so he decided to grow his hair out for one last hoorah. Michael decided to join him. When school started in August, Nick was already at West Point and Michael was headed back to

Illinois, but Michael was keeping his hair. “Once he went off to school I was like well, I’ve gone through all this trouble, some awkward stages, so I’ll just keep it going and now I’m just too lazy to get it cut,” Michael said. “I kind of like it, so I’m just going to keep it going.” Michael says family is important to him. A native of Champaign, being close to family is one of the reasons he chose Illinois. He talks every day with his family in a group chat. His conversations with Nick will sometimes drift more towards basketball. Army does not redshirt athletes, but instead sends younger players to play for its prep school to play junior colleges and other prep schools. Nick has been spending his year there. Michael and Nick will discuss one another’s games and give feedback, despite challenges. “In his dorm they don’t have Wi-Fi or even cable, so he’s not able to watch as much, but he’ll get online every once in awhile and check highlights and everything,” Finke said. “We just talk about the game and I’ll talk to him about his game and he’ll send me some highlights and I’ll talk to him

about it.” Michael has been averaging about seven points per game while shooting about 49 percent from the field and 42 percent from three. In a recent game against Northwestern, Michael came up big with 11 second half points to help spur Illinois to an upset over the Wildcats. During that game, Michael had a chance to chat with Gavin Skelly. The Northwestern forward used to rock long hair similar to Michael’s but recently cut it. “Skelly was growing his hair out for Northwestern, and I asked him at the free throw line why he cut it, and he said he was playing bad and the coaches woke him up one day with a phone call saying he had to go cut it,” Michael said. “And I said dang, I hope that never happens to me.” Head coach John Groce doesn’t mind the hair, according to Michael. His teammates have had mixed reactions. Illinois assistant coach Dustin Ford has expressed disinterest in the hair, Michael said. While Groce hasn’t actively told him to cut it, Michael’s

Sophomore • Played in all 26 games • Fourth on team in 3-pointers with 31 • Third on team in rebounds, averaging 4.3 per game and tied with Maverick Morgan for the most offensive boards

Freshman • Played in 33 of 34 games, starting 16 times • Fifth on team in scoring, averaging 7.5 points • Averaged 3.7 rebounds and led Illini with 45 offensive boards

SEE FINKE | 2B

BASEBALL

ILLINI OF THE WEEK

Illinois excited to display youth in opening weekend The freshman posted a .293 batting average with runners in In Jack Yalowitz’s fi rst game scoring position to go along with batting leadoff last season, he 10 two-out RBIs last season. began with a single. “I defi nitely do like leading Then, senior Jason Goldstein off and setting the tone,” followed two Yalowitz said. batters later “I think Doran (Turchin) would with a double down the thirdbe capable as base line to well of doing that (this year) score Yalowitz as well, but and put the Illinois baseball it’s defi nitely a te a m a he ad very important p o s i t i o n , early against Illinois State. especially DAN HARTLEB A pi nch because last ILLINI BASEBALL HEAD COACH runner replaced yea r our Yalowitz after offe n s ive he was walked productivity was kind of low.” later in the Yalowitz and the Illini will game, but head coach Dan Hartleb knew he may have found begin their season Friday a new leadoff hitter. against Milwaukee-Wisconsin in The Illini defeated the Redbirds Beaumont, Texas. The two teams 7-1 that day, and Yalowitz kept will meet again on Saturday. his spot in the order for 17 more SEE BASEBALL | 2B games that season. BY MIKE GASICK

ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

“We’re going to go out and learn a lot of things these first few weeks.”

PORTRAIT OF NICOLE EVANS BY RYAN FANG THE DAILY ILLINI

Softball’s Evans leads on, off field BY TATIANIA PERRY STAFF WRITER

In her four years as an Illinois softball outfielder, Nicole Evans has made quite the name for herself: leader, teammate, friend, and sometimes even “Nickel” — because her mom's name is Penny. Evans played in 41 games as a freshman, starting in 32 of them primarily in the right field. In her sophomore season she started in all 53 games, appearing in the left field. In her junior year she went back to right field, starting in all 59 games. Now as a senior,

she is once again in the left. Evans said her movement depends on her fellow teammates' positions and who can best gel with the centerfielder. "You need to have a really strong arm to throw them out at fi rst and in the left you have to have a lot of range," Evans said. "It's a lot of coaching decisions that I am happy I don’t have to make." Even though she's happy she isn't a coach, Evans is still looked at as a leader, especially for her communication. "I have a big mouth when we

are playing, but off the fi eld I'm involved in the Student Athletic Advisory Commission and have done a few things in the community,” Evans said. “Leading by example in that way is one of the best things I can do for the team.” Growing up Evans had always been part of an athletics in one way or another. Her father, Kevin Evans, played basketball at the former Marycrest College, rocking the number 40 — a number she now

SEE IOTW | 2B

FOOTBALL

FOOTBALL

Smith more comfortable at start of spring season BY STEPHEN COHN STAFF WRITER

Sophomore quarterback Jeff George Jr. sat back in the pocket and pump faked to his right. George whipped the ball to freshman wide receiver Carmoni Green, but sophomore linebacker Justice Williams jumped the route, intercepted off the ball and returned it for a touchdown.

Defensive back Stanley Green ran to Williams in the end zone, and the pair celebrated. Williams’ play would have a Memorial Stadium crowd going wild in October. Instead, his pick-six happened during Illinois fi rst spring practice in 2017 on Tuesday. His play – and the ensuing cel-

SEE FOOTBALL | 2B

Former NFL player added to coaching staff BY STEPHEN COHN STAFF WRITER

Illinois football has added another former NFL player to its coaching staff. On Wednesday, football head coach Lovie Smith announced Donnie Abraham as a defensive assistant coach, replacing linebacker coach Tim McGarigle. McGarigle left the program to become the defensive quality control coach with the Green Bay Packers. Last week, said the position would be fi lled by the start of spring ball. Spring practices began Tuesday. "His background with our staff here at Illinois will be extremely helpful as we continue to implement our defensive philosophies," Smith said in a press release. "Donnie is an excellent communicator and will help in our recruiting efforts in the state of Florida and oth-

er places he has connections. I'm very pleased to be able to bring someone of his caliber to

“His background with our staff here at Illinois will be extremely helpful as we continue to implement our defensive philosophies.” LOVIE SMITH ILLINI FOOTBALL HEAD COACH

our staff." Abraham grew up in South

Carolina and graduated from East Tennessee State University in 1996. He was drafted in the third round of the NFL Draft in 1996 by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and had a nine-year playing career for the Buccaneers and New York Jets. Abraham, Smith and defensive coordinator Hardy Nickerson were all together in Tampa from 1996-1999 for four seasons. He was most recently the defensive coordinator for IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida. IMG Academy is a boarding school and sport-training destination. Four-star 2018 recruit and current IMG cornerback Houston Griffith announced via Twitter he is visiting Illinois this weekend.

secohn2@dailyillini.com @stephencohn14

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Quarterback Jeff George Jr. throws the ball during spring practice on April 16.


2B

Thursday, February 16, 2017

THE DAILY ILLINI | WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Complain all you want, Groce will still be around MATT GERTSMEIER Illini hoops columnist

Y

ou can complain, boo and tweet all you want. Yell until your lungs get sore and type as fast as you can to get #FireGroce trending. But it isn’t going to do anything because John Groce isn’t going anywhere. Illinois sits at No. 13 in the Big Ten standings with five games remaining on the schedule. If the season were to end today it would be the worst Big Ten fi nish in Groce’s five years as head coach. But, I don’t think he will be fi red. Here’s why. Groce and Director of Athletics Josh Whitman appear to have a close relationship. Whitman ultimately has the power to fi re Groce, but the fact that they have a strong bond is going to help Groce stick around. When Whitman was hired by Illinois in February 2016, he made a statement that Groce was the right guy for Illinois basketball. This was right after he fi red football coach Bill Cubit and after

FROM 1B

BASEBALL Hartleb said he is excited to see what his other young players can do for his team this year. “We’re going to go out and learn a lot of things these fi rst few weeks,” Hartleb said. “Hopefully two or three weeks down the line, we’re going to be able to make intelligent decisions and get guys in positions to help us really win.” Despite the team's plentiful talent, it is hard to ignore the lack of age and experience throughout the group. The Illini’s youth will be refl ected on the pitching mound. The team has lost two pitchers to MLB fi rst round draft picks within the last two years. Doug Hayes was the Illini’s No. 2 starter last season and returns this year, looking to take the role as the ace of the staff. Hayes went 6-5 with a 3.58 ERA last season. Luke Schilling will also be in the mix for more innings. The right-hander competed in the Northwood League over the summer, posting a 2.76 ERA in 39 innings. Sophomores Cole Bellair

FROM 1B

FOOTBALL -ebration with Green – nonetheless, highlights a new, energetic brand of Illinois football. “I saw a lot of effort and I saw a lot of fun,” junior quarterback Chayce Crouch said. “Guys were flying around. We were looking forward to spring ball to start, and when we hit the field, everybody was loose.” The Illini did not begin spring ball in 2016 until April 1 due to the delayed hiring of head coach Lovie Smith and his staff. Director of Athletics Josh Whitman fired head coach Bill Cubit on March 5.

Groce’s team had a rough 2015-2016 campaign both on and off the court. Whitman’s confidence hasn’t seemed to falter. In fact, I would even go as far to argue that Whitman is Groce’s No. 1 supporter. Whitman has been seen at almost every home and away game for the Illini this season. There’s video of the two embracing after recruit Jeremiah Tilmon committed to Illinois and I even spotted the two in the same box at the Dierks Bentley concert last October. Whitman has Groce’s back. I don’t think this necessarily means Groce has an indefi nite grace period. I would bet there is some mutual understanding of what Whitman expects Groce to accomplish in the next couple of years. And next year has the potential to be a special season. I believe Groce’s incoming recruiting class has saved him for this next season. If he gets fi red there is the fear that he will lose his recruits, and I’m certain Whitman is considering that. This incoming class of 2017 is one of Illinois’ best recruiting classes in the

last 15 years and by far the best Groce has signed for Illinois. If Groce gets the axe, all of that talent could be threatened. From what I’ve seen on Twitter and during their official visit to campus, this recruiting class has a special bond. I’m not sure how all of the recruits would feel if Groce was gone, but one recruit would for sure be upset. One of Groce’s biggest advocates is his fourstar commit Trent Frazier. The 6-foot2 guard is averaging about 28 points per game for his high school in Wellington, Florida, and has been active on Twitter supporting Groce. On Dec. 29, 2016, Frazier sent out a string of tweets saying, “Don’t get rid of my guy, GROCE, he needs to be there when I’m there” and “Coach Groce is one the best coaches in College basketball that’s my guy”. Groce is contractually obligated to be Illinois’ guy through the 2018-2019 season. The University isn’t going to want to pay both Groce and his replacement for the next two seasons if he were fi red. I don’t think that

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Groce shouts instructions to his team from the sideline during the game against Iowa Jan. 25, 2016. Illini hoops columnist Matt Gertsmeier believes Groce has another year with the program. means Illinois is going to keep him until his contract expires, but I think it makes a strong case to keep him for the remainder of this season and possibly all of next year.

I’m not writing this column to pledge my support of Groce or to campaign against Groce. I’m writing it to advise everyone to save their breath and rest their thumbs.

FROM 1B

and Quinten Sefcik are also in the mix for starting positions. Senior Pat McInerney will lead the heart of the order for the Illini. The fi rst baseman batted .301 with an .829 OPS last year. Following McInerney in the order might be Turchin, who will add versatility to the Illini again this season. The sophomore hit in seven different spots last season to go along with four home runs. The team began last season’s campaign with two losses to Tulane, but Hartleb said he has distinct expectations for his team this season. “My expectation for us is to go out and play clean baseball and have an opportunity to win toward the end of the game,” Hartleb said. “If you have those expectations before it’s all said and done, then you’ll fi nd ways to win.” Milwaukee is coming off a 32-26 year. The Panthers won their opening game against Valparaiso in the Horizon League Tournament but then eliminated after dropping two-straight games. The Illini will stay in Texas for two more games against Lamar this weekend. Lamar boasted a 35-19 record last season

and lost both its games in the Southland Conference Tournament.

gasick2@illinimedia. com mike_mgasick

Senior running back Kendrick Foster said there is a sense of comfort with starting spring practice ahead of schedule. “Starting early alone allows people to recover their bodies because we’re done early,” Foster said. “We have five more weeks until we start back up (after spring ball).” Illinois currently has 99 players on its spring roster. Senior James Crawford and many of his teammates look to use individualized coaching in spring ball to improve their skills and technique. “I’m looking (this spring) to get better each and every day,” Crawford said. Former head coach Tim Beckman recruited Craw-

ford to be a linebacker and play the STAR position on defense. Smith and defensive line coach Mike Phair began transitioning the undersized 6-foot-2, 220-pound Crawford to the defensive line last season. Crawford took snaps on the first day of spring ball with the first-team defense. “It was very comfortable (playing on the defensive line),” Crawford said. “I’m more into the playbook as a defensive lineman and working on technique, so I’m getting better.” George was also getting reps with the fi rst-team. Crouch is recovering from a shoulder injury and is limited in spring practice. Smith reiterated in a press

conference last week that Crouch is the team’s current starter. Crouch took reps in non-contact drills Tuesday. “Right now, Chayce’s role is a little bit different,” Smith said. (He’s a) leader. He’s just taking mental reps right now, but that can do a lot, imagining what it’s like to be out there.” Even Smith himself is more comfortable in his second season with the Illini, no matter what is happening on the field a few practices into spring ball. “I didn’t know all of our players (last year),” Smith said. “We’re a lot farther along.”

IOTW proudly wears. Her stepfather Dave Weinstein played tennis at Illinois in 1978. Being part of an athletic family, Evans also played soccer, which she said was too much running, volleyball and softball. Growing up with six brothers, Evans thinks of her team as a second family and has fi nally found the sisterhood she wanted. “They are defi nitely a group of people unlike any I have ever experienced,” Evans said. “I am really thankful for that.” However, it isn’t just the team that is family, it’s the

FROM 1B

FINKE

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois starting pitcher Doug Hayes delivers the pitch against St. Louis University at Illinois Field on Saturday, April 16, 2016. Hayes will be Illinois probable ace next year.

secohn2@dailyillini.com @stephencohn14

parents aren't fans — a week ago, Michael ran a Twitter poll asking his followers if he should keep it or cut it because of the pressure from them. “Both parents hate it,” Finke said. “My mom liked it a little a few months ago, but now she hates it and wants me to cut it, but I think that’s honestly why I’m going to keep it growing.” Sixty-two percent of his followers suggested he cut it and 38 percent said to

Groce is going to be here longer than you think.

Matt is a junior in Business. gertsme2@dailyillini.com @MattGertsmeier entire athletic program, which she said is central to the meaning of being an Illini. She said that she gets around six texts from former Illini and alumni fans before each game. Along with the texts, Evans gets into the game mode with her music, even it is just two seconds of each song she said. On her playlist, the go to artists are J. Cole and the Black Eye Peas, specifically “Let’s Get It Started.” This weekend, Evans will be listening to that playlist as the team heads to California to compete in the Mary Nutter Collegiate Classic.

tp3@dailyillini.com @tati_perry14 keep it. M ichael responded to t he p ol l w it h disappointment and stated he was going to continue to grow it. When asked if he’s waiting for a specific achievement or accolade like a Big Ten Championship to then cut his hair, Michael laughed. “No I’m good, I’m just going to let it grow,” Michael said. “I think it will be cool in the summer to have it long and we’ll see what happens.”

gertsme2@dailyillini.com @MattGertsmeier

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Finke goes up for a hook shot during the game against Wisconsin on Jan. 31, 2016. Finke’s hair has been the topic of plenty of discussion within the basketball program.

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707 S. Sixth St., C.

1,2

F

44

Great Location, Nearby parking, Beverage Chillers, Queen Bed (1Br), Secure Entry

1,2

F

44 4 4

Granite Countertops, LED Lighting, TV's (2Br), Near Krannert, Covered parking Available

Advantage Properties

217-344-0394

www.advantageproperties.com

217-359-6108

www.jsmliving.com

203 N. Gregory, U.

1,2

F

44 4

1Br & 2Br with Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D, sec bldg

701 S. Gregory St., U.

204 N. Harvey, U.

1,2

F

44 4

1Br & 2Br with Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D, sec bldg

Klatt Properties

306 N. Harvey, U.

2

F

44 4

Luxury 2Br 2BA Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D

204 E. Clark, C.

1-3

F/U

4 4 4

$785-890, laundry on site, most utilities included

1003 w. Main, U.

2

F

44 4

Newest Luxury 2Br 2BA Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D

505 w. Springfield, U.

2

F/U

4 4 4

$890, laundry on site, most utilities included

1003 w. Clark, U.

1

F

44 4

1Br with Hi Speed int, near Engr, w/D

409 w. Elm, U.

2

F/U

4 4 4

$890, laundry on site, most utilities included

1005 w. Stoughton, U.

1

F

44 4

1 Br Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D, sec bldg

603 w. High, U.

5

4

4

$450/bedroom, can be split into 2 apartments

1010 w. Main, U.

1,2

F

44 4

1 Br & 2Br 2BA with Hi Speed int, near Engr, Dw, w/D, sec bldg

710 w. California, U.

1-6

4

4

House - 400/bedroom

Group Houses

2,3,4

F

44 4

2,3, & 4 bedroom houses fully furnished, advantageproperties.com

712 w. California, U.

10 bed F/U 4

4

House - 375/bedroom

705 w. California, U.

7 bed

F/U

4

4

450/bedroom

7 bed

F/U

4

4

450/bedroom

Bailey Apartments

217-344-3008

www.baileyapartments.com

F/U

1010 w. Springfield, U.

3+4

F

4 4

Totally remodeled 2.5 blocks to the Quad

707 w. California, U.

111 S. Lincoln, U.

2

F

4 4

3 blocks to Quad corner Lincoln + Green

Lincolnshire Properties

911 w. Springfield, U.

1

F

4 4

Quiet Building/office location

111 S. Busey, U.

3

F

44 4

901 w. Springfield, U.

1+2

F

4 4

Large units

714 w. Elm, U.

2

F

4 4

1004 w. Springfield, U.

1

F

4 4

Super balconies from $595

Lofts 54

Bankier Apartments

217-328-3770

www.bankierapartments.com

217-367-6626

www.klattproperties.com

217-398-1998

www.lincolnshireprop.com www.lincolnshireprop.com; $1,200 www.lincolnshireprop.com; $850-$950

217-366-3500

www.lofts54.com

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 TH F

44 4 4

oNE spring space remains, $0 down, no sec. dep., just blocks from ArC

106 S. Coler, U.

3

F

44 4

Near the Engineering Quad. 2 Full Baths. patio/Balcony

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 A

F

44 4 4

FALL 2017 - short term leases avail, $240 gift card to red. rates, great location

202 E. Green, C.

1,2,4

F

44 4

Gym. Balcony, jacuzzi tubs, 50" TV

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 B

F

44 4 4

FALL 2017 - short term leases avail, $250 refer a friend, pET FriENDLY complex

303 w. Green, C.

1,2,3

B 44 4

private gated community with spacious apartments

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 B2 F

44 4 4

FALL 2017 - short term leases available, reduced rates, largest flat in senior land

410 E. Green, C.

1,2,3

F

44 4

Conveniently located in the heart off campus. Lots of updates

54 E. Chalmers, C.

4/2 TH F

44 4 4

FALL 2017 - short term leases avail, new low rates or $240 giftcard, pet friendly complex!

519 E. Green, C.

2

F

44 4

First class living in an unbeatable location. LEED certified. Gym

MHM Apartments

1107 S. Second, C.

4

F

44 4

Balconies off every bedroom. Close to Memorial Stadium and the ArC.

314 E. Clark, C.

2,3

F

44 4

Huge lofts, private baths, Free internet, Flat-screen TV, wine cooler, by County Mkt.

217-239-2310

303 S. Fifth, C.

1,2,3,4 F

44 4

BrAND NEw! Free internet, priv. baths, flatscreen TV, wine cooler, skylites, Sec. Garage

Lofts, Balconies, FrEE internet, Underground Garage

Burnham 310

www.burnham310.com

217-337-8852

www.mhmproperties.com

310 E. Springfield Ave., C

1

F

44 4 4

101 E. Daniel, C.

1,2,4

F

44 4

310 E. Springfield Ave., C

2

F

44 4 4

102 S. Lincoln, U.

2,3,4

F

4 4

FrEE internet, Balconies, Sundeck, walk to Engineering

310 E. Springfield Ave., C

3

F

44 4 4

808 S. oak, C.

2,3,4

F

4 4

Lofts, Balconies, FrEE internet, Low priCES!

310 E. Springfield Ave., C

Studio

F

44 4 4

Old Towne Apartments

Campustown Rentals

204-206 w. washington, U. 3

F

44 4

Shlens Apartments

4 4

$240 Gift Card or New Low rates, Strategic locations close to Green St.

1004 w. Stoughton, U.

4

F

4 4

Carpeted, onsite laundry, Flatscreen TVs, leather furniture, Buses close

F

4 4

$240 Gift Card or New Low rates, heart of campus, balconies

1002/904 w. Stoughton, U. 4

F

4 4

Carpeted, onsite laundry, Flatscreen TVs, leather furniture, Buses close

4

F

44 4

Spring 2017 – $299 first month, last month free

Smith Apartments

1-5

F

4 4

5 Month Leasing, pet Friendly Fall 2017

1106. S. Second, C.

1

F

4 4

$585 includes water, parking $60-$70, on site laundry

507 w. Church, C.

1

B

4 4

$530-550 includes water and one parking, on site laundry

4

F

44 4

109 John, 515 Bash, 913 Third

3

F

305 Green, 306.5 Green

3

101 Green, 207 Green Campustown rentals

Capstone Quarters

217-367-7368

www.capstonequarters.com 1,2,3,4 B 4 4 4

$240 Gift Card or New Low rates, minimal full apartments remain

5

WANT TO LIST YOUR PROPERTY?

Contact us at: diclassifieds@illinimedia.com or call 217-337-8337

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY ILLINI

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

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Small 24x47 8 medium 3 inches 9 ($20), 31x47 inches ($25) and

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D O N U T

U N T A M E

Email vandercar@comcast.net

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A T A R I

T R A N S I S T O R R A D I O

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Stonegate Village offers you luxury living at an affordable price! These spacious 1, 2, and 3-bedroom apartments come quipped with dishwashers, central air, fieplaces (in some units), and private balconies. With a community swimming pool, 24-hour maintenance staff, and optional garages for rent, you can experience the luxurious life without the luxury price tag! Call us today (217) 352-1129

301 E. Chalmers; nice/neat students; own furnished bedroom; 2 bathrooms; washer/ dryer in unit. Great location! Lease through July 2017.

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D E B T

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Stonegate Village Apartments by Royse & Brinkmeyer

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Email resumes to: info@roysebrinkmeyer.com

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dailyillini.com • dailyillini.com • dailyillini.com

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Read us online!

Must find sublet-will subsidize! Females only 1-bdr of 4-bdr Apt $540

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217 - 337 - 8337

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For more info or help placing your ad, contact us at: diclassifieds@Illinimedia.com

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Deadline: 2:00 p.m. one business day prior to publication

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VERY AFFORDABLE HOUSING($275/4BR - 1100FT2) SPRING/SUMMER ‘17 TRYING TO SUBLEASE 1 ROOM IN CLEAN 4BR/2BATH TOWNHOUSE. 2 ROOMMATES DURING SCHOOL YEAR, BUT ALL WILL BE GONE IN SUMMER ROOMMATES VERY FRIENDLY AND RESPECTFUL. SUBLEASING AT MAJOR DISCOUNT! $275 MONTH PER ROOM (WILLING TO NEGOTIATE) FREE 1 CAR PARKING IN SUMMER 10-MINUTE WALK FROM THE ILLINI UNION. RIGHT NEXT TO BUS STOPS FOR GREEN, SILVER, AND GOLD DIRECT MESSAGE FOR MORE DETAILS EMAIL NAIKNAV2@ILLINOIS.EDU

you have a genuine smile, an enthusiastic attitude, and a willingness to learn? Then Royse & Brinkmeyer may be the place for you! Looking for a Seasonal Leasing Agent to show and lease apartments through the spring and summer. If you enjoy meeting people, have the ability to learn quickly, and enjoy the challenge of working in a fast-paced environment, then we have the job you are looking for! Must have own transportation. No experience is needed, as we’ll train you on everything you need to know!

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In addition to PAID ads for commercial businesses, we offer FREE ONLINE ads to UIUC students who sign into their accounts with “Illinois.edu” addresses.

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Help 8 Wanted

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9 $740-930, parking 3 $50-70, on site laundry

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$1100, includes one parking

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Help to make well known of sudoku-topical.com! You like this website? Then recommend it to your friends. If you own yourself a website, place a link to sudoku-topical.com If you print out the sudokus then print them twice and give one to one of your friends. Tell your acquaintances, friends and teammates about sudoku-topical.com. Just help to make this site well known.!

Sign in to set up an account with us. Pricing is available on the site upon login. You can place ads in The Daily Illini print publications on Mondays and Thursdays, or on our dailyillini.com website, or both.

217-384-1925

www.smithapartments-cu.com

B Part4 $570-600 includes water and one parking, on site laundry A 4 Skill: F 44 4 $1550, parking $50-70

3511 w. Church, C.4

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217-344-2901

www.shlensapt.com

511 w. Church, C. 29. Jul 2010 1 53 E. Chalmers, C. 2

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B U S U N A W T A X I L H O P S U N L O S T A N B A N A R E A N I T W D O S E I N E I G A R M H B R O

Large, quiet 2Br; $680; Free parking; race at washington

$240 Gift Card or New Low rates, minimal full apartments remain

101 Green, 309/311 Daniel

1901 N. Lincoln Ave., U.

217-531-2255

www.campustownrentals.com

217-356-0017

www.oldtowneapts.com

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Enter the numbers 1-9 in the blank spaces so that each row, column and 3x3 square contains only one of each number. There is only one solution. (solution in Classifieds and online at www.dailyillini.com).


4B

Thursday, February 16, 2017

THE DAILY ILLINI | WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

Mardi Gras Open House FEBRUARY 16TH | 12PM-5PM | THE TOWER AT THIRD CLUBHOUSE

CASH GRAB MACHINE + SPIN TO WIN: Kendra Scott

Nintendo NES CLassic

FUJIFILM Instax Mini 7S Camera

Apple Watch

and more!

EVERYONE IS A WINNER!

Construction is right on schedule! 24

NEW LOW RATES @

$729

+ SAVE $160 WITH ZERO DOWN

MOVE-IN AUGUST 24TH

We’re so confident, we’ll pay $1,000.

Apply online today at

SUITES3RD.COM

Leasing Center: 302 E John St #100 Community: 707 S Third Street 217.367.0720 Rates/installments, renderings, dates, prizes & fees are subject to change. Rates/installments do not represent a monthly rental amount (and are not prorated), but rather the total base rent due for the lease term divided by the numner of installments. In the event that your accommodation within the community is not ready for occupancy on 8/24/17, we will compensate you in the amount of $1,000 in the form of a gift card. Excludes early move-ins. To remain eligible for On-Time Move-in Guarantee resident must comply with all terms & conditions of their lease agreement. Acutal prizes may vary. While supplies last. Limited time only. See office for details.

The Daily Illini: Volume 146 Issue 41  
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