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THE DAILY ILLINI

THURSDAY December 1, 2016

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The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

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Vol. 146 Issue 28

To judge a major, look beyond enrollment BY ANGELICA LAVITO STAFF WRITER

Kirk Halverson ranks at the top of his class — and at the bottom. He is the only student at the University pursuing a bachelor’s degree in the teaching of Latin. Halverson started as a mechanical engineering major and switched after his freshman year. He spent a good portion of that year doing math, but realized he didn’t want to do that for the rest of his life. So, he registered for Latin classes because he enjoyed the four years he spent learning the language in high school. But he didn’t know what he could do with the language until his University advisor told him he could

always teach high schoolers Latin. He realized he found his new major. “All the people I’ve worked with, the professors, are amazing,” he said. “They just know everything; it’s insane. You can just genuinely see how passionate they are about the material.” Now a senior, Halverson is happy with his decision, even though he’s the only one who made it. Teaching of Latin is one of 17 programs at the University with 10 or fewer students majoring in it this year, according to data from the Division of Management Information. The Division of Management Information records count only one degree per student, so dou-

ble majors are excluded from the totals in the data. This year, there are 1,530 double majors, according to data from Division of Management Information. The programs include crafts, classics, religion, music composition, horticulture, teaching of Spanish, Russian, eastern european and eurasian studies, comparative literature, individual plans of study, musicology, germanic language and literature, music open studies, Italian, interdisciplinary studies, sculpture and slavic studies. The number of students enrolled in those 17 programs pales in comparison to the 10 most populous

SEE ENROLLMENT | 3A

Majors with five or fewer students enrolled These stastics reflect only students without double majors.

Slavic studies Teaching of Latin Sculpture Interdisciplinary Italian Open Studies Germanic Lang and Lit Musicology Individual Plans of Study students

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Source: Division of Management Information’s MICHELLE TAM THE DAILY ILLINI student enrollment by curriculum and class level SOURCE: DIVISION OF MANAGEMENT INFORMATION MICHELLE TAM THE DAILY ILLINI

LONGFORM

An infinite connection

What’s it like to dedicate your career to proving someone else’s work? For University professor Bruce Berndt, it’s all he’s ever known. Now in his 50th year teaching, Berndt looks back on what led him to enter the mind of one of history’s greatest mathematicians: Srinivasa Ramanujan. SEE INFINITE | 6A

PORTRAIT OF BRUCE BERNDT COURTESY OF BRUCE BERNDT

Student senate OKs Columbus Day name change BY GILLIAN DUNLOP STAFF WRITER

While some simply associate Columbus Day with a day off from school or western exploration, for Thereza Lituma, president of the Native American and Indigenous Student Organization and sophomore in FAA, Columbus Day represents the genocide of thousands of Native Americans and indigenous peoples. The Native American and Indigenous Student Organization startMITCHEL FRANSEN THE DAILY ILLINI

Pro-trans GoFundMe explodes STAFF WRITER

When the results of the U.S. presidential election became clear, Assistant Professor in Gender and Women’s Studies Toby Beauchamp started a GoFundMe page to assist members of the transgender community in changing their legal names and genders. In just 19 days, the page has raised nearly $23,620. The goal is $24,500. The effort has had a bigger reach than Beauchamp had ever anticipated. “It was started as something to collect donations, but it went viral really fast,” Beauchamp said. Initially, he released the page for friends to access. Since then,

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Both Chancellor Robert Jones and alumnus Robert Carr have two strong principles of belief: the importance of higher education and the power of a scholarship for young adults. Carr received a $250 scholarship from a women’s club of Lockport while in high school, and Jones received a small scholarship to attend Fort Valley State College. He later received his master’s degree from the University

would have made a big difference to me as a son of a sharecropper from southwest Georgia,” Jones said. “Maybe I would have had to only work five jobs instead of eight jobs to work my way through college.” He said the event is a stark reminder for him about why education is so important. “It was a life-changer and gamechanger for me because there is no reason why the son of a share-

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OPINIONS

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UI Bike Renovations

Editorial

An interesting ride

University plans to add 1,000 new bike spaces around campus

Give your spare change to WPGU’s Operation Santa

Wes Lunt’s quarterback career was anything but ordinary

STAFF WRITER

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of Georgia as well as a doctorate from the University of Missouri. Carr made a vow to help others receive the same opportunities as himself, so he formed the Give Something Back Foundation in 2003. The Tuesday following Thanksgiving, commonly recognized as Giving Tuesday, Carr’s foundation presented a $1 million check to the University to provide full scholarships for 50 students. “I wish we had this program, and a person like Bob Carr was around, in the late 1900s because it

BY MEGAN JONES

he has received over 100 requests from people of all ages, including his friends and strangers from both rural and urban areas. In July of 2016, President Barack Obama issued an executive order to regulate locker and bathroom access by gender identity, not biological sex. However, a federal court in Texas has since blocked the order at the request of several states who did not wish to comply. But a major push is required to help transgender individuals legally change their name to reflect their gender identity instead of their sex. “One of the ways trans people get some measure of protection is

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about how it might be a step in the right direction in promoting cultural inclusivity, especially on a campus where traditionally it has not been very welcoming to indigenous students.” The idea began with an event the Native American and Indigenous Student Organization held during the second week of October. It welcomed students and community members to view

Alumnus gives $1 million for scholarships

Transgender students and supporters protest the election of Presidentelect Donald Trump at the Alma Mater on Nov. 11.

BY ASHNI GANDHI

ed a petition to change the name on campus from Columbus Day to Indigenous People’s Day to promote indigenous culture and inclusion. This petition was then picked up by Illinois Student Senate VicePresident Internal Spencer Haydary. He helped turn it into a student senate resolution for action, which was subsequently passed by the senate. “It was an amazing idea,” Haydary said. “(The petition) talked

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2A Thursday, December 1, 2016

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A residential burglary was reported in the 900 block of North Randolph Street around 1 a.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the unknown offender burglarized the victim’s residence and stole several items and damaged two windows. Some of the items stolen include: luggage, ammunition, computer software, a firearm and a television. A 24-year-old male was arrested on the charges of aggravated domestic battery and criminal damage to property in the 1500 block of West Kirby Avenue around 12:30 a.m. Tuesday. According to the

report, the offender battered the victim and damaged the victim’s vehicle.

Urbana

A theft was reported at Circle K, 809 W. Green St., around 2:30 p.m. Tuesday. According to the report, four offenders entered the store and took merchandise without paying for it. The offenders have not been identified or located. A 20-year-old female was arrested on the charge of theft at Walmart, 100 S. High Cross Rd., around 11:00 p.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the offender stole items on five separate occasions while she

was working.

University

A broken window was reported at Allen Hall, 1005 W. Gregory Dr., around 10:30 p.m Monday by University Housing Security. The damages are estimated to cost around $500. A theft was reported at the Activities and Recreation Center, 201 E. Peabody Dr., around 7 p.m. According to the report, someone stole a student’s cash from his wallet, which was in an unlocked locker.

Compiled by Sabrina Yan news@dailyillini.com

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Bicycles are locked up outside Hopkins Hall on October 19th which marks the biannual Campus Bicycle Census where volunteers count all of the bicycles on campus. Additional bike racks are being added to high-traffic bike parking areas.

UI to add 1,000 bike rack spaces around campus BY ASHLEY HARRIS STAFF WRITER

Bicyclists will soon have an easier time finding places to lock up. The University is adding 1,000 spaces of bike parking around campus. Renovations to improve bike safety and convenience are underway and will continue through next semester. Facilities and Services is adding U-shaped racks that create room for about two bikes to be locked in place in the same spot. “The new racks will make it easy for cyclists to lock both wheels and the frame to the bicycle rack using a u-lock and cable,” Lily Wilcock, a coordinator at Facilities and Services, said in an email. It was made possible through funding provided by the Student Sustainability Committee in hopes that

more convenient bike racks will promote bicycling and have a positive environmental impact. “The proposal is an example of a project that fits perfectly into our goal of giving back to the student body,” Paul Couston, president of the SSC said. “These bike racks increase the incentive to bike to class by faculty and students, decreasing the potential carbon footprint and as well as contributing to a more sustainable campus culture.” Facilities and Services looked for funding to make campus more bicycle friendly for years when the SSC offered the grant for improvements. In October 2014, there were close to 5,500 bikes on the campus. The most recent census from the Campus Bike Center said there were 2,600 bicycles;

but there were fewer volunteers to count them this year, so Wilcock thinks there are probably closer to 4,500. Students are required to register their bikes online, which makes it easier to both find and return stolen bikes and to plan better for future renovations on bike additions, according to the Facilities and Services website. In addition, Champaign County provides resources that can help students learn to properly lock their bikes. The bike racks will be placed outside of over 20 facilities, including some more populous areas such as the Main Library. The University was recognized as a bronze level Bicycle Friendly University in 2011 by the League of American Bicyclists for its support of the bicycle community, which was a

key part of the University keeping its bicycle friendly environment. The University is trying to promote a good environment for bikers, but there are some areas on campus that could still use renovations, Joseph Borrelli, a freshman in Engineering, said. During the renovations students will have other places to place their bikes, but each location will be marked with construction signs ahead of the work schedule. “The biggest benefit is convenience,” said Alex Bryk, freshman in LAS. “There are a few buildings that don’t have bike racks close to them, but now the bikers won’t have to worry about searching for them when they reach their destination.”

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Corrections In the Nov. 28 issue of The Daily Illini, the article titled “Professor seeks change for spanish education,” stated that Spanish Professor Ann Abbott said the Spanish language has “traumatically” changed when it should have said “dramatically.” The Daily Illini regrets this error.

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3A

THURSDAY December 1, 2016 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

NEWS

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ENROLLMENT departments. This year there are 1,414 undergraduates pursuing a degree in psychology, the largest degree program. In the tenth largest program, civil engineering, 757 students are pursuing an undergraduate degree, according to the Division of Management Information records. And as the University faces a $190 million budget shortfall and uncertainty about state funding, the University

University releases report on programs with low enrollment Major enrollment came into focus last year when the state required universities to review its “low producing programs,” with number of degrees granted as the sole measure for production. The Illinois Board of Higher Education released its first report in June 2015 and identified the programs that awarded less than six baccalaureate degrees on average over the last five years. For a full list of flagged undergraduate programs, go to dailyillini. com. Biophysics was the only program cut after the report was released, and administrators say it was already in the process of elimination and the report simply expedited it. Provezis, who works on academic assessment, said the University will never use the report as the sole reason to close a program. It will likely become a component of mandatory reviews, but it is still unclear how it will be incorporated.

cuts what it can. Eliminating programs with few students may seem like an easy solution, but administrators say it’s not that simple. “Higher education is a much different enterprise than most companies,” said Staci Provezis, assistant provost for assessment. “When people think of products, not as many people are buying diet cherry Pepsi vanilla — just get rid of it. Here, there’s so many other things that are happening, so it becomes one of those things that’s really hard to explain to our external stakeholders.” Another consideration for the University is while some departments have few graduates, they teach more students through general education courses. Plus, administrators say, cutting programs that already exist may not be as cost-effective as people think. “It’s a bit of a misnomer to say because your enrollment is small, it’s costing other kinds of resources,” said Kristi Kuntz, associate provost for academic programs and policies and executive director of the Campus Center for Advising and Academic Services. “Those resources are already in play, and by taking that program off the books or whatever somebody might suggest, it actually doesn’t result in any kind of savings or freeing up of resources for that.” The administration cannot simply cut programs, as the addition and subtraction of degrees must filter through the department, college, the academic senate and ultimately the Board of Trustees. But the administration does encourage departments to respond to changes, including those in the job market.

Dealing with decreases

Science, technology, engineering and math programs have dominated enrollment statistics since at least 2006 as the gap between its disciplines and others have widened. In the last 10 years, students began to turn away from liberal arts majors and instead major in math- and science-based areas. Humanities have experienced the most dramatic decrease, with enrollment plummeting by 53.6 percent since 2006. Social science enrollment fell 21.4 percent, art and design enrollment

fell 21.3 percent and education enrollment fell 14.1 percent. Meanwhile, enrollment rose by 37.8 percent. These changes mirror national trends. The percentage of bachelor’s degrees awarded in the humanities dropped from 12 percent in 2007 to about 10 percent in 2013 before falling to 6.1 percent in 2014, according to research from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Alan Mette, director of the School of Art + Design, said in 2011 there was a “major shift” away from studiobased programs. One degree program that suffered was sculpture, which has two undergraduate students enrolled this year, according to DMI records. Some of the school’s programs, such as photography, have started increasing to pre-recession numbers, Mette said, but they have not entirely bounced back. “Part of this is fear of parents, too, in terms of them not wanting their child to be living in their basement in the future,” Mette said. “They think this is an expense entry to come to the University of Illinois for a college of education. We take that real seriously.” The School of Art + Design has amped up its recruitment efforts with some success. It enrolled 155 freshmen this year compared to 108 last year, Mette said. Other departments are adjusting their recruiting strategies, too. Jennifer Anderson Bliss, comparative and world literature’s new undergraduate adviser, does not sense any pressure from the outside, but feels internal pressure to “stop the hemorrhaging” of the number of majors and “build up.” She thinks the comparative and world literature program has suffered because it has hardly been advertised. Antonette Martin stumbled upon the program when she wanted to switch majors her freshman year. She was majoring in Russian literature and realized she did not want to focus on one language, and she wanted a broader education. When Martin found the program on the University’s list of majors, she knew it could be a perfect match. “It’s kind of broad. You get to pick and choose what you

FROM 1A

CARR EVENT

PHOTO COURTESY OF MEGAN JONES

Robert Carr presents his donation, providing 50 scholarships.

FROM 1A

INDIGENOUS the 2011 film titled "Columbus Day Legacy." After the showing, the organization held a discussion with the attendees about why Columbus Day still exists and how changing the name can help the community. “We decided that we wanted to do something on Columbus Day against Columbus Day,” Lituma said. “Indigenous People’s Day is something that is happening across the nation and it’s important to bring to the University.” During the organization’s presentation at the senate meeting, not all senators were in support of the name change: most notably, Vice President External Alex Villanueva. “As a student of history and someone whose family is Spanish, I don’t see

(Columbus Day) as a 'hooray we killed all the Indians' day. I see it as a day to recognize our roots and how Europeans came to the New World and made the New World what it is today,” Villanueva said. A common argument against the name change is that Columbus Day celebrates Italian heritage, but to these students, this particular Italian is not one to be celebrated. “There are a lot of really wonderful Italian historical figures in art, philosophy and history,” Lituma said. “Columbus was not one of those people.” The point of Indigenous People’s Day is to celebrate the culture of indigenous people instead of recognizing a historical figure who committed violent acts and did not actually discover America, Haydary said. Another argument people make is that Native Ameri-

cropper should be standing here before you as the chancellor for one of the greatest land grant universities in the country,” he said. “It was only through education.” In its first year, the foundation gave five students full scholarships, but this year the foundation will fund over 200 students from various universities. Next on the foundation’s list are the University at Albany, State University of New York, where Jones served as president, and Parkland College. Students are selected their

can Heritage Day already exists on the day after Thanksgiving. However, the day after Thanksgiving is more commonly known as Black Friday, so attention is focused on stores having cheap deals. Lituma said the average student doesn’t know about Native American Heritage Day and students who do recognize the holiday cannot celebrate at the cultural houses because the University is closed. But Lituma remains hopeful that a bigger change regarding Columbus Day will occur. “(The change) is about Illinois and the board of trustees taking initiatives and having them on the right side of history,” she said. “As a native student, it would mean so much to me to have the University do this."

gdunlop2@dailyillini.com

EMMA LI THE DAILY ILLINI

Kirk Halverson, standing on the Main Quad. He is the only student majoring in the teaching of Latin.

like to study within what the courses allow,” Martin, now a junior, said. “So whatever’s interesting me at the time, I can take, which is really helpful.” Martin is one of just seven students majoring in comparative literature. The degree is similar to English, one of the most popular programs. And although English remains one of the largest undergraduate programs, it too has suffered losses. In 2008, 799 students were pursuing an English degree. This year, there are 345 students, or 56 percent fewer students, pursuing an English degree. Despite the decrease, Karen Carney, associate dean of LAS, credits the English department for teaching rhetoric, a general education requirement, to a large swath of undergraduate students. And English is just one among many departments that reach more than its own students. Humanities courses often teach more students than just those pursuing humanities degrees since they fulfill general education requirements. To some professors, the total number of students a program teaches is more important than the number of students majoring in that program. Michael Finke, head of slavic studies, is one of those professors. In his department, students take GedEd courses in the topic but don’t

major in it. Other students take slavic language classes but may major in something else like political science or business, he said. “You have to realize, too, that majors and minors aren’t the only way a unit serves the University,” he said. “So the number of majors you graduate doesn’t really tell the story of whether you’re pulling your weight as a unit at the University.” Eleonora Stoppino, Italian undergraduate adviser, values the small program’s size. There are three majors, according to DMI enrollment records, but there are more double majors. She said the size allows the professors to know their students “really well.” Emanuel Rota, associate Italian professor, compares it to artisanal size versus industrial size. He said mass production was favored for a long time at American universities, but now people are increasingly interested in the “artisanal,” or the quality size of things. “I think that’s what we are a little bit,” he said. “We are not a gigantic Kraft factory, we are literally a kind of fantastic small restaurant you go to because the experience is going to be with you for a while.” Some programs require small sizes. Ariana Traill served as the teaching of Latin department head since 2004 before stepping down in August. She said the program can enroll only three students at

maximum to support observations with a local Latin teacher and practicum placements in Chicago. Halverson enjoys the experience of being the only undergrad studying teaching of Latin. “(Humanities are) where higher education came from, and they’re completely important because they set the foundation for everything else,” he said. “They’re truly about the human experience. You can’t rank any one humanity over the other. You can’t rank one over the other just because of what the job market says.” The popularity of programs can fluctuate. “Who could have envisioned the centrality of Arabic studies now to a lot of what we do?” Carney said. The Arabic Studies minor was almost nonexistent 15 years ago, she said, but has grown with changes and conflict in the Middle East. “If 20 years ago someone had said, ‘do you really need Arabic studies?’ And you’re like, ‘yeah, you’re right. We don’t need to teach Arabic studies anymore. Who’s going to use this?’ she said. “You don’t always have a way of predicting which disciplines are going to be really central.” Enrollment in popular programs may change with the job market and global affairs. For now, some majors may be lonely, but they are here to stay.

freshman year of high school and take advanced placement courses, while maintaining a B-average. High school counselors work with the foundation to select students. Alumna Shannon StoffeyKeagle graduated from the University in 2007 thanks to a scholarship from the foundation. She said the process of enrolling was foreign to her family as a first-generation student. Her family didn’t know about FAFSA, couldn’t travel to tour campus and had a large amount of financial stress. When she was a sophomore in college, her high school sweetheart said he

wanted to go to college, but his mother said college was not for blue-collar workers. “This is some of the barriers that these students are going through,” she said, adding that breaking down barriers and telling people they deserve an education are important. Carr graduated from the University in 1966 with a bachelor’s in mathematics and went on to receive a master’s in mathematics and computer science in 1967. This year, he sold his company, Heartland Payment Systems — a Fortune 1000 company — for $4.3 billion. The foundation is funded by donations and Carr’s

estate. He credits the scholarship he received all those years ago for why he is motivated to continue giving back today. “Champaign-Urbana was where I came to when I escaped from a pretty miserable home at 17,” he said. “It was an amazing and wonderful time. I started a company here. I adopted my oldest child while living here. A lot happened in Champaign-Urbana.” The foundation has become his life’s work and his business interests continue so he can give more back to the foundation, he said.

president,” Tilley said. This threat is personal for Tilley, who identifies as part of the LGBT community. “I’m a lesbian, and I know how long it has taken me to be a ‘full’ legal citizen,” Tilley said. “While some of my rights may also be in jeopardy, those of my transgender friends are truly precarious.” This program is attracting not only a wide range of donations but also a diverse group of requests on a firstcome-first-serve basis. There are no requirements to prove financial need, and transgender status is not necessary to qualify for a donation. Not everyone is fully on board with Beauchamp’s Go Fund Me page, though. Kylie Ashton, freshman in ACES, criticized the lack of security in the requests. Ashton wants to know exactly where the money is going. She thinks people could easily falsify information.

“There are no background checks to see if people are lying or not — overall, there needs to be more security,” Ashton said. But Beauchamp is not concerned. Because of the specific need addressed, he doesn’t worry about people scamming the system to get free money. He said someone who does not truly need the money wouldn’t go through this trouble to get it. Overall, the success of the effort demonstrates a shift in awareness in the population, Beauchamp said. He noted the funding is a concrete way for people to help the transgender community. “I think there is a greater awareness of the problems trans people are facing,” he said. “The big interest in this fundraiser is showing that the public is more aware — that this is a big issue for trans people.”

More than a major

FROM 1A

GOFUNDME by having their correct name and gender in their identification documents,” Beauchamp said. Beauchamp believes that since the presidential administration is shifting, now is the time to act. He explained that this effort is not affiliated with his job: For him, advocating for transgender rights is a personal endeavor. His GoFundMe page has attracted many people to the cause, including Associate Professor in the School of Information Sciences Carol Tilley. She said in a Facebook message that she donated to secure basic protection for transgender people. “I fear that the small gains our country has made toward treating transgender persons fairly and equally both in law and society will fall away under the watch of our next

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4A

OPINIONS

THURSDAY December 1, 2016 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

MITCHELL FRANSEN THE DAILY ILLINI

Students march on the Main Quad protesting President-elect Donald Trump. Columnist Hayley Nagleberg says the South Sudan group, Ana Taban, models ways to overcome division through art.

Students can learn from peaceful, artistic South Sudan protests HAYLEY NAGELBERG Columnist

Y

our alarm goes off and you think to yourself, “I’m tired.” You begrudgingly get out of bed, get read, walk to class and again think, “I’m tired.” You then sit through a night exam all the while still thinking, “I’m tired.” And, if you’re anything like me, there’s probably another dozen times every day you think this exact thought. In the newest country in the world, South Sudan, this phrase has recently taken on a very different meaning. A group of

activists have named themselves “Ana Taban” — Arabic for, “I’m tired.” The group is a collection of artists who have launched a campaign for peace. The goal is to call for an end to the civil war that broke out just two short years after the country became independent in 2011. There’s been a lot of tension in this country and on campus in the last few months, which has led to a lot of divisiveness among students. In an effort to express themselves, students have held protest marches and rallies, created trending hashtags and memes to express their thoughts, chalked the Main Quad with slurs and

aired their grievances to administrators. This has not solved any problems and, if anything, has caused more frustration to arise. In contrast, for the last few months the South Sudanese Ana Taban group has been painting murals in public places, writing pop songs for the radio, performing plays and holding dancing and singing gatherings in public forums. These responses have brought people together and have been noticed by the authorities, starting a new conversation about change that needs to take place. Though America is made up of people from different backgrounds,

we are all supposed to be one people. America is thought to be a melting pot of cultures, experiences and perspectives. But we have turned against each other, and each day it feels as though violence is intensifying and the sentiment of disunity is growing. There are over 60 tribes and ethnic groups in South Sudan. Battles between the different groups have led to tens of thousands of deaths over the last few years. The Ana Taban group recognized art as a way that everyone could connect despite language barriers or ethnic beliefs. Just a few weeks ago, over 1,000 people in South Sudan gathered on a soccer field for an evening

concert. They expressed their thoughts in the form of music and dance and tried to send a new message of unity to the people of the country. When tensions run high and anger surrounds, it is easy to take the approach of responding with frustration. It makes us feel good to fi nd others equally mad and come together to pronounce how upset we are. But if we can take a step back and gain new perspective on our issues — if we can stop pointing at our differences and fi nd commonalities and come together — then we can send a different message to the rest of our country. There is no reason to not follow the lead of

movements like this one in South Sudan. On this campus, if we found ways to bring together different groups and promote our plans for the future, it would be incredible. We don’t need to band together in defeat. We don’t need to see ourselves always as victims. Our lives in this world will be what we make of them. So we need to change the way we address our societal imperfections. We may be tired, but that doesn’t mean we can’t start a change in how we act moving forward.

Hayley is a sophomore in ACES. nagelbe2@dailyillini.com

THE DAILY ILLINI

EDITORIAL Share holiday cheer with WPGU’s Operation Santa

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earing up for the holiday season can be tough when you’re seriously strapped for cash and stressed out over your five finals. Somehow, though, our friends at WPGU managed to get in the holiday spirit in the best way possible. Our sister radio station will host a DJ lock-in Thursday and Friday to raise money for the 23rd annual Operation Santa, a fundraiser to buy gifts for local children in need. This year, the gifts will be donated to children at the Crisis Nursery and Parent Wonders of Rantoul. Regrettably, the members of The Daily Illini Editorial Board have little to do with this. Some of

us will help wrap gifts, or donate a few dollars, but that’s nothing compared to the hard work the managers and DJs at WPGU put into Operation Santa each year. The time, money and heart that goes into making this happen is more than we could match, so we decided to contribute with what we know best: a persuasive editorial. Dig through your couch cushions for spare change or skip the regular stop at your favorite drunk-food place — better yet, skip an entire night out — and donate what you save. Even if you feel that you can only give a dollar, give it. Every cent helps. Some of these kids asked for a small toy, and that will brighten their day, but

most asked for basic necessities like coats and scarves. Any contribution you can make will help keep a child happy, warm or maybe even both. If a monetary donation simply isn’t an option, find a local organization where you can donate your time. Giving even an hour of it to an organization in need will do a whole lot of good. Not only will you be helping people who sincerely appreciate and deserve it, you’ll certainly feel a little uplifted too. You absolutely deserve to spend a day bingewatching all of your favorite Christmas movies while stringing lights across your dorm or apartment, but this season we hope you’re inspired to give a little back as well.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Bilingual education key to reducing academic prejudice As an immigrant student, I am deeply moved by columnist Shankari Sureshbabu’s piece, “Immigrants Can Use Big Words Too." In her article, Sureshbabu responds to the unfortunate case of Tiffany Martinez, a Latina student from Suffolk University in Boston who was falsely accused of plagiarism due to the sophistication of her word choice. While Sureshbabu calls for acceptance and equality for the immigrant students, I want to bring your attention to the root of our struggle with the linguistic gap and a potential solution for such problems. According to National Center of Education Statistics, Latino elementary and secondary students continue to score over 20

points lower than their white peers in both reading and math for decades. This disturbing achievement gap might provide some explanations to the action of Tiffany Martinez’s professor — our educators’ beliefs are shaped by their experiences. But what caused the gap in the first place? An obvious answer might be that we never had the access to an adequate linguistic transition which is crucial to academic success. I can still recall my own rocky journey as an English Second Language student in the sixth grade. I was taken out of my regular classes and placed in a classroom with other ESL students, where we struggled to understand instructions given in a language

that we were foreign to in the first place. Multiple studies on bilingual education programs have demonstrated that a successful twoway language immersion not only leads to visible academic success, but also meets the psychological need of minority students to appreciate their native origin while adapting to their identity as American citizens. More importantly, such an education system would expose educators to a truly inclusive environment, thus discouraging the prejudice of Tiffany Martinez's professor.

Shiwei Zhang is a freshman in LAS. opinions@dailyillini.com

Fake news on Facebook could be influencing young minds JAMIE LINTON Columnist

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hen’s the last time you picked up a newspaper? If you’re reading this in print, you’re in the minority. According to Pew Research Center, only 5 percent of Americans between the ages of 18 and 29 get their news from a print newspaper, while 38 percent of Americans reported online content to be their main news source. Since such a large portion of the American public relies on social media to provide it with news coverage, it is quite alarming to hear that fake news sites are allowed to advertise on popular websites like Facebook and Google. In the immediate aftermatch of the already controversial election, it was reported that numerous fake news outlets were prominently featured on both sites during the election, meaning that they could have swayed political opinions during a particularly volatile period. And unlike false tabloid stories, this fake news isn’t as outlandish as one would assume. A BuzzFeed graph shows that the most popular fake news article announced that Pope Francis was endorsing Donald Trump,

while others had clickbait titles centered around popular controversies such as the Hillary Clinton email server and her ties to the FBI. These reports were completely made up, but they aren’t so outrageous as to be immediately considered fraudulent by the common Facebook or Google user, which is why Mark Zuckerberg’s lack of urgency surrounding this issue is problematic. While the CEO of Facebook is proud of his social network’s ability to allow people to voice their opinions throughout the election and connect candidates to their followers, he is hypocritical to claim that Facebook is a technology company rather than a media company. When a networking outlet’s main utility is to allow people to share their thoughts and network with others, it becomes a media tool. And since the scope of Facebook’s usership is so vast, it becomes a source of major influence. It’s clear Zuckerberg’s statement was made to protect the interest of his company and avoid confl ict due to what its users post. However, it’s one thing for your crazy Aunt Sue to post viral fake news websites because she doesn’t know better, and another to allow the algorithms that

control advertising on your website to mass circulate false information that seems like it has been published from a credible news source. In a Nov. 12 statement made by Zuckerberg on Facebook, he claims that “more than 99 percent of what people see is authentic.” But when these fake news articles gain over 900,000 engagements each, this “minor” problem is sure to have an impact on public opinion. According to Pew Research, 18 percent of American adults state that their main source of news is through social media. Zuckerberg said the idea that Facebook could affect the election is a “crazy idea,” but the statistics show otherwise. Although Facebook is likely gaining a lot of revenue from these fake news sources, such as the one backed by Macedonian teenagers, it is Zuckerberg’s responsibility to tweak algorithms and ban fraudulent websites, something he has fortunately pledged to do since the outbreak of this information. Hopefully, this becomes a problem of the past and not a persistent issue in elections to come.

Jamie is a freshman in Media. jlinton2@dailyillini.com

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS | opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.


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Thursday, December 1, 2016

5A

“The Nutcracker” intermixes change with C-U tradition BY MELISSA WAGNER STAFF WRITER

This year’s performance of “The Nutcracker” will feature a new Christmas tree, a new costume for the Rose Queen and even new choreography for the battle scene. Krannert Center for the Performing Arts welcomes C-U Ballet to dance “The Nutcracker” for their 19th year from Thursday to Sunday. Tickets are available for $45 general admission, $30 for students and $21 for kids ages 12 and under. This will be the third year that the Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra will provide live music to accompany the performance. Kay Greene, executive director of CU Ballet, said this year’s performance feels different, but it isn’t because of the additions or changes. Instead, it’s because the Midwest has experienced unseasonably warm temperatures for the month of November, making it difficult to get into the holiday spirit. “It felt like we had all this time because the weather has been so warm; it fooled us,” Greene said. “In fact, it’s just seven days away from tech week.” Erin King, freshman in

FROM A6

CONNECTION pressure, because I enjoyed the work.” Berndt’s process went on for 21 years, and eventually, nearly all of Ramanujan’s results, totaling to around 4,000, were proved correct by Berndt and his colleagues. Not only were Ramanujan’s fi ndings unique, but so was Berndt’s decision to dedicate his career to proving them. Mathematicians are usually encouraged to develop their own ideas, not the

Business, is also facing some changes this year. After 14 years of dancing ballet and over 12 with CU Ballet, King is taking on the acting role of the Rat Queen. “You’re wearing a mask so you have to use the rest of your body to portray a really important character,” King said. “This year it’s much more acting, so I’m gonna have to really rethink what I’m doing.” Greene said it is a big transitional year for King, going from a dancer to a character artist. While both are performance arts, acting doesn’t necessarily come naturally for dancers. “I’m not really more concerned about my ballet technique as I am how I’m doing and how it comes across visually to other people because that’s what acting is, but I think a lot more of that will come once we get to the theater and I have to get in costume and portray it to the entire audience,” King said. Nick Hittle, freshman in LAS, is dancing the lead role of the Cavalier in one cast. Surprisingly enough, it isn’t the role he is most excited for. “I am most excited to be the Arabian prince because it is a role that I haven’t done

yet,” Hittle said. Hittle has danced with CU Ballet for six years, so being assigned a different role in a show that’s performed annually presents him with a new challenge. Luke Worland, junior in FAA, is dancing the titular lead role of the Nutcracker. He said they spend on average over 20 hours each week rehearsing. The dancers agreed that ballet is a year-round activity. Many spend summers doing intensives, which are programs hosted by companies around the nation to hone dancers’ skills that last one to two months. “It can be a little stressful at times but I think it’s worth it,” said Lauren Frost, a junior at Unity High School. “It’s a lot of fun, it’s very energetic.” Frost is dancing the roles of the Ice Fairy and the Rose Queen.While many dancers at CU Ballet spend summers apart, they still seek support from their local peers. “We tend to find a lot of support within the company, so with other dancers who maybe you know are older than us, who have been here a year longer, know how to handle school or know how to handle

ideas of someone else. But Berndt felt it was more important to prove what Ramanujan had left behind. “I guess I just felt that Ramanujan’s ideas were so much better than my own,” he said. “If I could figure out what he was doing, this would be better than what I could do.” He never thought anything of it, and never questioned himself. “I was just so happy to see Ramanujan’s results and try to prove them,” he said. Today, Berndt is known as the international expert on Ramanujan.

A personal connection

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRUCE BERNDT

Srinivasa Ramanujan’s home in India. The family living in the house taped a portrait of Ramanujan above the door frame.

Aside from studying Ramanujan as a mathematician, Berndt also became interested in Ramanujan as a person. He has traveled to India 10 times, twice to visit the home of Ramanujan. “There’s no way I can describe how thrilled I was to see the home in which Ramanujan lived,” he said. Today, the home is a museum, but when he fi rst visited, it was occupied by another family. The only indication that Ramanujan had once lived in the house was a small picture of him that the family had cut out from a newspaper and taped above the entrance to the home. Berndt also met Ramanujan’s wife, Srimathi Janaki, who married Ramanujan when she was 10 years old, and never remarried after his death. She lived to the age of 95 and spoke fondly of her husband. “She told me that he worked on mathematics up until four days before he died,” Berndt said. “She said the pain just became too great.” After studying mathematics at the University of Cambridge for five years with mathematicians G.H. Hardy and John Littlewood, Ramanujan fell ill and died in 1920. He was 32. “He was just absolutely amazing,” Berndt said. “The amount of mathematics that he was able to do in just 32 short years of life, and starting so many different kinds of thoughts and taking them down roads; he would take them down

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PHOTO COURTESY OF C-U BALLET

Ballerinas of the C-U Ballet rehearses for its annual production of “The Nutcracker.” whatever we may be going through dancing and how to take care of all the things that need to get done,” King said. The balancing act between school and ballet may be difficult, but it didn’t scare away Hittle or King. They decided to attend the University and planned to remain members of CU Ballet even after graduating high school.

Greene said “The Nutcracker” is one of CU Ballet’s most popular shows. The dancers agreed that it serves as a holiday tradition for many families in the area, as well as those who live hours away. “It’s such a family holiday tradition,” Greene said. “They look forward to coming every year, bringing their

roads, a long way, but then he would start another road, and he’s left a lot of it. A lot of things for us to do.” Berndt’s work has led to an increased interest in Ramanujan. Today, there is more research in applying his work to mathematics and physics. “It has been received well in the sense that there are many research projects and discoveries that would not have been possible without this because there would’ve been no starting point,” Andrews said. But Berndt’s work on Ramanujan is not his only accomplishment. His colleagues said his dedication toward his duties as a professor, journal editor and graduate student adviser is just as admirable. “I think the world of him,” Andrews said. “His virtues stretch well beyond just what a pleasant man he is to collaborate with.” One of his colleagues, Alexandru Zaharescu, a fellow mathematics professor at the University, said Berndt is always willing to take the time to sit down and work on a problem. With a laugh, he compared his colleague to the Energizer bunny — always going and full of energy. “And there are no signs of slowing down,” Zaharescu said.

mathematician they have grown to know in such a unique way. Berndt and Andrews have published four books together and are currently working on a fi fth, which they expect to fi nish sometime within the next year. “I suppose we’ll feel a sense of relief, and probably some sort of a little let down with the idea that with this major project is now complete,” Andrews said. “Mostly we will be pleased that we’ve actually accomplished this.” The book will be Berndt’s final publication on Ramanujan, ending a career’s worth of work that allowed him to gain a personal connection with the man. But that connection lives on. It has pervaded through the 40 years that have passed since Berndt fi rst learned of Ramanujan almost by chance, through his time spent bringing the work of one of history’s greatest mathematicians to the world and through new research that is still being generated. It’s an infi nite connection, through dances with people and places and mathematical formulas, but it is still not enough to fully decode the extent of Ramanujan’s genius. And this still leaves Berndt in awe. “You would think that after 100 years, we’d be able to start to get into his mind on these things, but we haven’t,” Berndt said. “There isn’t anyone like him in the history of

A final chapter

Nearly a century has passed since Ramanujan’s death, and still, after decades of studying him, Berndt and Andrews fi nd themselves admiring the

family after the Thanksgiving holiday. We look forward to having them as well, so it’s a great partnership.”

mhwagnr2@dailyillini.com

“You would think that after 100 years, we’d be able to start to get into his mind on these things, but we haven’t. There isn’t anyone like him in the history of mathematics.” BRUCE BERNDT

MATHEMATICS PROFESSOR

mathematics.” At the heart of Berndt’s work lies this admiration for a man he has never met and an admiration for the beauty of mathematics. “Just like a composer composes music, it’s beautiful, and it’s the analogous for a mathematician — we like the beauty of the ideas and especially if we’re involved in creating this beauty,” Berndt said. Ramanujan had so many beautiful ideas, and so many beautiful theorems. It’s this beauty, that is hard to describe to someone not in mathematics, that really moves us. This is what keeps me going, and is the main thrust in terms of my own life.”

emscott5@dailyillini.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Across 1 Blu-ray ancestor 4 European History and Physics C: Mechanics, for two 11 One may be open at the bar 14 Fair-hiring inits. 15 Midriff-showing garment 16 “Kinda sorta” 17 Area ___ 18 Tile in a mosaic 19 The “World’s Most Dangerous Group” 20 Like fish and chips 22 Like many celebrity memoirs 24 Some gold rush remnants 25 Sister publication of 16 Magazine 26 What’s done in Haiti? 27 Suffix with drunk 28 Column on an airport screen: Abbr. 29 #1 hit for Bill Withers (1972) and Club Nouveau (1987) 32 ___ es Salaam 34 Address not found on a GPS 35 Full of ghosts … like four answers in this puzzle? 37 “Now I ain’t sayin’ ___ a gold digger” (Kanye West lyric) 40 ___ Pérignon (brand of bubbly) 41 Milton Berle hosted the world’s first one 43 Berry said to have anti-aging qualities 46 Crew leader, for short 47 Advice between “buy” and “sell” 48 Zapper 51 Campfire entertainment 53 Monster film hit of 1984 54 How the fashionable dress

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puzzle by milo beckman

56 Grp. that brought Colbert to Baghdad 57 “That was over the line” 59 Like on Twitter, informally 60 Bleu expanse 61 School assignment specification 62 Word before “Happy New Year!” 63 It went boom, for short 64 Repeat offenses, metaphorically 65 GPS lines: Abbr. Down 1 Sink or swim, e.g. 2 Package delivery person 3 Fit for a queen 4 It follows a curtainraising 5 Inauguration V.I.P.: Abbr. 6 Comedian Daniel

7 Brief records, in brief 8 Knight’s ride 9 Shredded 10 4,200 feet, for the Golden Gate Bridge 11 One involved with underground rock bands? 12 “This ___!” (fighting words) 13 Tête-à-têtes 21 Element #50 23 Ingot, e.g. 25 Home of the Thunder, the Double-A affiliate of the Yankees 26 Certain bug 27 ___ Darya 30 “Now you’re talking!” 31 “Smokey, this is not ___. This is bowling. There are rules” (“The Big Lebowski” quote) 32 Joe Biden’s home: Abbr.

33 Suffix with hater 36 Ted Cruz’s home: Abbr. 37 Aimed at 38 Suriname colonizer 39 Last song recorded by all four Beatles, with “the” 40 German article 42 By way of: Abbr. 43 Reunion attendees 44 Welfare worker’s workload 45 Of ___ (so to speak) 46 More adorable 49 Boxing segments: Abbr. 50 Joint ailment 51 Bit of dust 52 Tap options 54 Take a long bath 55 Fashion’s ___ Saint Laurent 58 Early fifth-century year

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.


6A

LIFE & CULTURE

THURSDAY December 1, 2016 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRUCE BERNDT

Mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan’s first three notebooks. University professor Bruce Berndt has dedicated his career to proving the results written in these pages.

An infinite connection

Years of research binds the lives of two mathematicians together BY EMILY SCOTT STAFF WRITER

On the wall of his office in Altgeld Hall is Bruce Berndt’s favorite picture of himself. In it, he smiles, holding a black writing slate to his chest. Although the slate is blank, etched in it forever is a deeper meaning. It belonged to a man who used it to teach himself mathematics, a man who went on to make remarkable discoveries and become one of the greatest mathematical minds in history. Opposite Berndt’s picture, on the wall behind his desk, is a portrait of the man to whom the slate belonged: Srinivasa Ramanujan, a renowned Indian mathematician. Ramanujan lived and died years before Berndt was even born, yet the majority of Berndt’s career as a mathematics professor at the University has been dedicated to proving the discoveries Ramanujan left behind before he died in 1920 at the age of 32. It is rare for a mathematician to spend his career studying another mathematician’s work so deeply, but this is what Berndt did. He was the first person to ever take on the task of proving all of Ramanujan’s results — a task made more difficult by the fact that these results were stated without proofs. But Berndt was always sure this was the mark of a genius. “These results of Ramanujan’s were so interesting and beautiful that I couldn’t stop,” he said. His research spans decades, countries, languages and cultures. Now, in his 50th year as a professor at the University, he is finishing up what will be his last book on Ramanujan. They were separated through time, but the path of Berndt’s life led him closer and closer to the man behind the slate, inspiring Berndt to spend years of his life proving another man’s work. Through numbers, they became connected.

Strength in numbers

It was as if Berndt had been dancing with Ramanujan all throughout his life — but this dance was at a distance, separated by time and space. Certain aspects of his life would lead them closer to their connection, but not fully. They were not yet touching. Berndt grew up on a farm in the small town of Stevensville, Michigan, and attended a two-room school through the seventh grade. In high school, his main interest was sports; he ran track and was on the football team. During the summer, he would work in the fields, picking black raspberries and sour cherries. “I didn’t want to do that for the rest of my life, so that was a motivation for me to do something else,” he said. His upbringing was religious, and he would often think about theology, which led him to contemplate complex topics — such as the philosophical and theological implications of quantum mechanics — on a regular basis. With a scholarship and a summer job, he was able to pay his way through his undergraduate education at Albion College in Michigan, where he studied

their connection. physics. For the next few months, Berndt used But soon, he found his strength was his theorem to try and prove as many with numbers. He switched his major to mathemat- of Ramanujan’s formulas as possible. He learned that these formulas were ics, and decided to continue his studies in graduate school at the University of from a famous set of manuscripts that Wisconsin, where in his third year, he Ramanujan left behind: his notebooks. took his first course in number theo- In the traditional sense, they aren’t ry, the area of mathematics that would sheets of paper bound together, but later become his specialty. Ramanujan more than 700 loose leaf papers that was also a number theorist. contain around 4,000 findings. Berndt went to the library at the instiBerndt wanted to teach abroad, and his acceptance into a program to teach tute where he was studying, checked out at a university in India came close photocopies of the notebooks, and saw to giving him the chance to live in all of these findings for the first time. Ramanujan’s native country. “I got hooked,” he said. “I got hooked He had never been out of the Mid- for the rest of my life.” west, let alone the country. He and his Through these notebooks, Berndt wife Helen were set to leave, but then, was able to enter the mind of one of the Kashmir crisis in northern India history’s greatest mathematicians. broke out. The program was canceled. The mathematical discoveries conHowever, his dance with Ramanujan tained within the notebooks were largecontinued. ly the result of a selfBerndt decided to education. Growing instead go to the Uniup in India, Ramanujan taught himself versity of Glasgow in Scotland, where he mathematics, reading on his own and workmet Robert Rankin, ing on a writing slate whose adviser had been G.H. Hardy, the because he could not mentor of Ramanujan. afford paper. He had He finished up his little formal educagraduate studies and tion in mathematics, his time in Glasgow. but the results he proHe started applying duced were far ahead BRUCE BERNDT of his time. for teaching jobs, MATHEMATICS PROFESSOR Berndt was perincluding one at the University, but he was plexed by these determined to find a results, but he kept position at a small college like Albion. working on proving them. While he was still in Glasgow, he He and his wife then left for a trip to received a job offer from the University. Europe and Israel, making a stop to visit “My wife and I said, I’ll teach here Rankin at his home in Glasgow. Before for two to five years, and then I’ll have dinner, Berndt spoke with Rankin about my feet on the ground, and in the mean- his findings. time, I’ll look for a good, small college,” “Of course, I was very excited about Berndt said. “I’m now here in my 50th my research on Ramanujan, and I told year. As it turned out, I’ve loved teach- him I had proved these formulas from the notebooks,” Berndt said. “And so ing here.” Berndt started his teaching posi- (Rankin) said, ‘Well, I just got a lettion in 1967, but he would not learn of ter from India, asking me to contribRamanujan’s work until many years ute to a memorial volume later. on Ramanujan’s work. And I threw it in the Discovering Ramanujan wastebasket.’” As a junior faculty member, Berndt Rankin immediately would often referee papers, meaning he went to his wastebaswould read mathematical publications ket and fished out the submitted by others to see if they were letter. He gave it to Berndt. fit for publication. On one particular day in the earThis conversation ly 1970s, he refereed two papers that led him to writing proved some formulas by a man named his first paper on Ramanujan. Ramanujan’s work. He read them, recommended them At the end of the for publication, and thought nothing spring semester of it. in 1977, he gave A few years later, in February 1974, himself a perhe came across the papers again when sonal challenge: he was on sabbatical in Princeton, New to prove all 87 Jersey. of the formu“I suddenly realized that I could also las Ramanujan prove these formulas by using a theo- stated in the rem I had proved a couple of years ear- 14th chapter lier,” Berndt said. “So, I did this, and I of his second was very excited I could prove all these notebook. He formulas using my theorem.” worked on It was a meeting by chance, but now, a this for over theorem could bring together two math- a year. ematicians from different lifetimes. Then, a Through this, they could grow in new discov-

“These results of Ramanujan’s were so interesting and beautiful that I couldn’t stop.”

6

ery led to a new kind of challenge. George Andrews, a mathematician whom Berndt had previously met in 1969, had discovered a fourth notebook of Ramanujan’s, known by mathematicians as his “lost notebook,” which contained results that Ramanujan compiled in the last year of his life. Berndt has said that the discovery of this notebook “caused roughly as much stir in the mathematical world as the discovery of Beethoven’s tenth symphony would cause in the musical world.” Andrews and Berndt decided to collaborate on studying this notebook, thus opening up a new way for he and Ramanujan to become better acquainted.

Following his path

No one had ever studied Ramanujan’s work so fully before. What was once largely uncharted territory became more than 180 publications on Ramanujan’s work that Berndt has authored. But the task of proving these results was uniquely challenging. Unlike most mathematicians, Ramanujan wrote his results without proofs; however, almost all of them were later proved correct. Berndt often solved these results by using methods that were not yet established in mathematics during Ramanujan’s time. “This is always very troubling to me, and I try to get back to how Ramanujan thought,” he said. “But in many instances, I can’t do this.” There are several theories for why Ramanujan didn’t write down his proofs along with his discoveries, but this is also what makes his work remarkable. “He started off on many paths, and he didn’t take the paths to the end,” Berndt said. “He let the rest of us continue to work on the paths that he started.” Often, Berndt would reach out to colleagues when he got stuck, or have his graduate students help prove the results. But he never was discouraged. “I was never bored or anything,” he said. “I had never felt under any

SEE CONNECTION | A5

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1B

SPORTS

THURSDAY December 1, 2016 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

FOREVER

HOME

Lunt may be graduating from Illinois, but he knows he can always come home BY COLE HENKE STAFF WRITER

The fi rst time Wes Lunt played football at Memorial Stadium was during his junior year of high school. He stepped off the bus with his fellow Rochester Rockets and walked into a stadium he had been to countless times as a fan, but never as a player. That was the start of a long, crazy ride for Lunt in Memorial Stadium. He started his college career at Oklahoma State before transferring after his freshman season to Illinois — a place where he was both familiar and comfortable. “I came back here for the reason of home,” Lunt said. “I came to a lot of games when I

was a kid." At the time, Lunt’s exper ienc es at Memorial Stadium had been overwhelmingly positive. As a fan, he got to watch Illinois teams, like the 2008 Rose Bowl squad, dominate. As a player, he drove the Rockets' offense up and down Zuppke Field on their way to two straight state titles. But, his career in an Illini uniform did not follow the path he was expecting. “There has been so much adversity,” Lunt said. “My

career has been crazy honestly, but I wouldn’t trade it for anything.” The Illinois football program went through a tumultuous period

SEE LUNT | 2B AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILYILLINI

May 10, 2015

Former Illinois offensive lineman Simon Cvijanovic called out head June 17, 2013 Oct. 4, 2014 coach Tim Beckman Wes Lunt decided Lunt broke his leg on Twitter for to transfer from against Purdue; he’s mistreating players Oklahoma State ruled out for 4-6 and ignoring University to Illinois. weeks. injuries.

Aug. 30, 2014

Lunt started his first game as a member of the Illini. He completed 28 passes for 285 yards and 4 touchdowns in a 28-17 win over Youngstown State.

Nov. 15, 2014

Nov. 9, 2015

Athletic director Mike Thomas was fired because an external investigation found evidence supporting claims against Beckman.

Aug. 28, 2015

Lunt returned to the Former Illinois head football coach field in the Illini’s game against Iowa. Tim Beckman was fired a week before the season opener. Offensive coordinator Bill Cubit was named interim head coach.

Feb. 17, 2016

The University hired Josh Whitman to be the new Athletic Director.

Nov. 28, 2015

Bill Cubit got his interim tag removed, signs a two-year contract to be head coach of the Illini.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

March 7, 2016

The University hired Lovie Smith to be head coach of the Illini.

March 5, 2016

Bill Cubit was fired months after signing his new contract and finishing up his first recruiting class.

Nov. 12, 2016

Lunt returned from back injury to play the second half against Wisconsin.

Oct. 8, 2016

Lunt injured his back in the game against Purdue.

Nov. 26, 2016

Lunt played his final game in an Illini uniform. Illinois lost to Northwestern 42-21.

TENNIS

Illini will have difficult task in VCU’s ‘Havoc’ defense BY LUCAS WRIGHT STAFF WRITER

The Illinois men’s basketball team has been plagued by staunch defenses this season, shown by back-toback losses against West Virginia and Florida State last week. The next team on the schedule has one of the most chaotic defensive strategies in the country. The Illini with travel to Miami to battle VCU and its defense, which is appropriately dubbed “Havoc.” The “Havoc” nickname stemmed from the days of VCU’s former head coach Shaka Smart, but the defensive mindset has stayed true with the program. The roster, headlined by seniors Mo Alie-Cox and JeQuan Lewis, has had its fair share of NCAA tournament experience and is poised to deal with the experience of

the Illinois roster. All eyes will be on the Illini’s ability to handle the defensive pressure Saturday. The Illinois offense has been overwhelmed by turnovers this season, averaging nearly 15 a game. When asked if his team was ready to face the VCU pressure, head coach John Groce said, “We’ll see.” Groce responds to criticism with lineup change Illini fans have been vocal during the past few weeks, voicing concerns over Groce’s lineups and how he has been spreading playing time among his players. While Illinois was on its three-game losing streak, Groce stuck with the heavily-criticized Jaylon Tate who had been inserted into the starting lineup for Aaron Jordan early in the season. However, in the Illi-

ni’s recent win over NC State, Tate was limited to nine minutes of time on the court and was benched for the entire second half. Tate had a negative plusminus stat in the fi rst half while freshman Te’Jon Lucas was playing well in his limited minutes in the half. Groce said he played the lineup with the hot hand; outscoring NC State by 15 with Tate on the bench will surely force his hand in the near future. Groce has not commented on his starting lineup for the weekend matchup with VCU.

Leron Black finds his groove

Sophomore Leron Black had his fi ngerprints all over the win against the Wolfpack. Black tallied 15

SEE BASKETBALL | 2B

WENYUAN CHEN THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Aron Hiltzik attempts to return the ball during the meet against No. 21 Michigan at the Atkins Tennis Center on April 17.

Hiltzik takes fighter’s mindset to court

New mentality makes big difference in performance BY MEGHAN REST STAFF WRITER

Illinois’ Aron Hiltzik has always been a talented tennis player, but in order to reach where he is now, something had to change:

his mindset. Instead of thinking like a tennis player, he is now thinking like an MMA fighter. “I’ve been using a bit of a motivator from MMA fighters,” Hiltzik said. “They have such a high level of discipline. I’ve geared that toward my tennis mentality and it’s worked well; it’s really changing me.”

Despite all of his success in past seasons, changing his mindset has payed off for Hiltzik and the Illini so far. Head coach Brad Dancer said that it has made a noticeable difference. “No question in my mind that the number one goal is to get better and (Hiltzik) will be one of the best

SEE TENNIS | 2B

HOCKEY

Illinois returns home for in-state competition BY DRAKE PENA STAFF WRITER

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Jaylon Tate brings the ball up the floor during the game against North Carolina State at State Farm Center on Tuesday. Tate didn’t play during the second half.

As students left campus and returned home for the much-needed Thanksgiving break, the Illinois hockey team was gifted a break of its own. The team’s last contest took place over two weeks ago when it shut out Ohio University and they will play this weekend against Northen Illinois University. Illinois rose recently in the ACHA men’s Division I rankings from No. 17 to No. 15. Lindenwood, whom the team recently dropped a series to, ranks just above the Illini sitting at No. 12. Minot State remains the top dog holding its No. 1 ranking with an 11-1-1 record. Head coach Nick Fab-

brini said that his team played well leading up to the break, especially against Lindenwood. Even though

“We haven’t played poorly in the games that we lost, but there were a couple we could of played better.” NICK FABBRINI HOCKEY HEAD COACH

they weren’t able to come away with the win, Fabbrini knows that limiting mistakes can be key in the future. “I thought we played really well in both games,” Fabbrini said. “We haven’t

played poorly in the games that we lost, but there were a couple we could of played better. A lot of them came down to mistakes and this weekend we were really able to cut down on them.” The Huskies come to Champaign with a threegame winning streak and are looking to keep the momentum going against a Division I team. Illinois will lean heavily on its scoring leader Eric Cruickshank. The center leads the team in points, goals, power-play goals and ranks third in assists. Fabbrini believes that his leader has benefited from some continuity with his linemates. “Cruickshank has been

SEE HOCKEY | 2B


2B

Thursday, December 1, 2016

THE DAILY ILLINI | WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Cattenhead nationally recognized for off-court contributions Illini nominated for WBCA Good Works Team

Illinois 70 – 79 Wake Forest Key Performer: Brandi Beasley recorded her first career doubledouble, scoring 14 and grabbing 11 boards. She also had 3 assists.

THE DAILY ILLINI SPORTS STAFF

Hidden Stat: While the Illini had 20 offensive rebounds to Wake Forest's 9, Wake Forest scored three more second chance points than the Illini (16-13).

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Kennedy Cattenhead shoots a three during the game against Indiana at the State Farm Center on Feb. 10. She was nominated to the All-state WBCA Good Works Team.

FROM 1B

LUNT during Lunt’s time. He had three different head coaches, two different offensive coordinators and two different athletic directors, along with an interim athletic director. His senior season was building to be a special one after the Illini hired Lovie Smith as head coach. Lunt and the Illini fi nally had some stability. Then he got hurt and spent half of the season on the sidelines. The Illini finished with a 3-9 record, and Lunt completed his collegiate career. Despite all of the turnover and problems with the program through his career, Lunt is still one of the best quarterbacks in Illini history. He ranks seventh in passing yards (5,900) and completions (550), and he ranks eighth in touchdowns (36). But as the face of the program, he took a lot of criticism. “Wes has been through the ringer,” offensive lineman Joe Spencer said. “And

28

games played

that is the nature of the quarterback. People don’t always look at me when I play bad, but he never caught a break. You talk about a guy being strong through it all, and being a leader through it all. I give so much credit to Wes Lunt. He is one of the greats.” Lunt has been seen as a potential NFL quarterback ever since he came to Illinois, and his resume at Oklahoma State was more than enough to warrant the talk. He was the first true freshman to start a season-opener at quarterback for the Cowboys since 1950. In just six games, he threw for 1,108 yards and six touchdowns. Illinois offensive coordinator Garrick McGee knew what he was getting into with Lunt as a player when he joined the coaching staff last spring, but Lunt’s aspirations later in life caught him off guard. “I didn’t realize that he was going to end up being the athletic director here at some point,” McGee said with a laugh. “I didn’t know that part. But I think that once Josh (Whitman) retires years from now, Wes will take over, or Wes will be on

550

total completions (7th all-time in Illini history)

FROM 1B

TENNIS players in college tennis,” Dancer said. “To be an elite player you have to compete at a consistent basis. First you take it one step at a time and to do that you have to get in the NCAA tournament.” As Hiltzik moves into a new season, his goal of going to the NCAA tournament in the spring fuels his new mentality. Dancer has said that Hiltzik improved individually, but that his leadership skills have also improved. Th is season a lso marks the first year Aron will compete without his older brother, and former Illini tennis athlete Jared Hiltzik. “I’m sure he misses Jared, they had a very close relationship,” Dancer said. “It’s hard to pinpoint, but there is a vacated space and I think Aron is becoming more com-

Josh’s staff.” Lunt has been wanting to be an athletic director for some time now. He is currently pursuing his Master’s Degree in Sports Management. After being in the front row as coach after coach got fired from Illinois, he said he likes the stability that comes with that job compared to being a head coach — a postion that doesn’t appeal to Lunt as much. “I ask him all the time if he wants to coach,” McGee said. “He always says ‘No, I want to be up in the press box during games.'” Lunt’s rollercoaster career has taught him to take things one step at a time and never look too far ahead. Even the week before the last game of the season against Northwestern, after Illinois had already been eliminated from bowl contention, all he could talk about were the Wildcats. He said he'd think about the other stuff later, and has stuck with that statement. Wide receiver and fellow Rochester alum, Zach Grant, confirmed the same. After playing all the way through high school and

5,900

total passing yards (7th all-time in Illini history)

fortable moving into that space and leading.” Although the brothers have crossed paths at tournaments this fall, Aron has fine-tuned his c ompetition. M a k i ng adjustments to his fall tournament schedule is also an adjustment that

36

total touchdowns (8th all-time in Illini history)

ment, USTA Charlottesville Men’s Pro Challenger and snatched a runner-up title at the USTA Futures Tournament in Houston. Dancer was also a big component in helping to restructure Aron’s schedule, and he thinks that the results have been

“I’m focused on growing as a player and strictly hard work and what hard work can play off for.” ARON HILTZIK ILLINOIS MEN’S TENNIS PLAYER

has lead to success. “I’m focused on growing as a player and strictly hard work and what hard work can play off for,” Hiltzik said. This fall, Aron has made appearances at the Champaign Challenger, ITA Regional Tourna-

beneficial. Most recently, Aron didn’t win a title at Illinois’ Champaign Challenger on Nov. 15, but redeemed himself by qualifying in the Columbus Singles Championships in Columbus, Ohio. Pushing through defeat

Thanks to countless hours of service, Junior guard Kennedy Cattenhead has been nominated as a candidate for the Allstate WBCA Good Works Team, announced in a press release sent Wednesday. The Good Works Team is one of the most prestigious awards in all of women’s college basketball. The team is selected by Allstate, along with college coaches. The goal of the award is to recognize players for not just their time on the court, but also what they do for their communities. On the court, Cattenhead

is seen as a leader. This season, she is averaging 21.4 minutes, 6.8 points and 4.8 rebounds per game. She has been shooting nearly 43 percent from the field. Cattenhead is also being recognized for her time serving the community. She volunteers for the Boys and Girls Club, OneGoal and Fighting Illini Leadership Academy, in addition to representing her team on the Student Athlete Advisory Committee. She is one of 97 nominees from across the country. Only 10 players will be selected to make the fi nal team. Five players will come from the NCAA’s Division I, while the other five will be from Divisions II, III and the NAIA. The fi nal team will be announced in February.

sports@dailyillini.com

AUSTIN YATTONI THE DAILY ILLINI

For Wes Lunt, Memorial Stadium will always be home. He was Illinois’ starting quarterbackfor the past three years. most of college together, the two played their last game together in the loss to Northwestern. Grant may not know what Lunt will do next, but he believes that it honestly won’t matter what he decides to do. “Whatever it is, if he does decide to train, I know he will tear it up," Grant said.

12

total interceptions

would always feel welcome, just from the administration over there," Lunt said. "It is bigger than just the coaches. Just the camaraderie of the University of Illinois, and just being a student and a graduate of here will always make me feel welcome.”

ehenke2@dailyillini.com @cole_henke

210.7 -298

is one way Aron is staying disciplined and fueling his success. “He’s got an interesting mindset,” Dancer said. “When he played his last round in the Challenger, it was interesting match for him. He had a good tournament, but wasn’t playing how he needs to play.” Hiltzik was defeated in the single main draw at the Champaign Challenger, but bounced back the next week in Columbus. “Going to Columbus was a great rebound for Aron and showed how well he could collect himself and get dialed back in,” Dancer said. Hiltzik’s mental toughness has not only sparked a strong desire to succeed, but has allowed him to step into a larger leadership role on the team. “It was kind of my time to take over the team and be the leader, (my brother) was always a great role model,” Aron said.

merest2@dailyillini.com

No matter where Lunt goes next, he knows that he can always come back to his home. He will always be able to walk into the stadium just as he did all through college, and just like he did during his junior year of high school. “I feel like even if it is a completely different staff I

average yards per game

total rushing yards

1

career rushing touchdowns

FROM 1B

FROM 1B

BASKETBALL

HOCKEY

points and eight boards in 26 minutes, making seven of a team-high 14 field goal attempts. “The energy level from Black was just contagious. He plays the game with such enthusiasm,” Groce said. “You almost feel like every time he shoots it from 15 to 17 feet, it’s going to go in.” Black operated in isolation in the midrange to low-post areas on the floor well against NC State, but he truly shined in midrange catch-and-shoot opportunities that Groce mentioned. As Black has progressed through his fi rst four games of the season, he has become more of a cornerstone for the Illini offense, and Groce’s comments point toward him becoming an even more integral part.

lswrigh2@dailyillini.com @LucasWright95

playing very well so far this season,” Fabbrini said. “We put him on a line that he was pretty familiar with last season and it was a very good line for us.” Illinois has experience against Division II competition, taking a series against Lewis University earlier in the year. The team scored a combined 14 goals in two games against the Flyers. Illinois will be looking for another similar scoring output after only netting three goals in the series against Ohio. Having a chance to play at home will be big for the Illini as well. The team has not played on its home ice since Dad’s Weekend on Nov. 5 when the team exploded for an 11-0 shutout of in-state rival Illinois State. Illinois plays its next two series at home with an opportunity to move further up the next set of rankings which come out Dec. 7.

dapena2@dailyillini.com

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Thursday, December 1, 2016

3B

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Big Ten tests limits of the College Football Playoff DAN ESCALONA College football columnist

W

ith just days to go before the final unveiling of college football’s top four, the unnerving and unpredictable sport is promising one last bit of wildness. College football’s final regular season weekend is shaping up to be one of potentially nightmarish proportions for the College Football Playoff selection committee, given that, arguably, 10 teams are still alive for playoff berths. Unlike some college football anarchists out there that would like nothing more than mass chaos, the selection committee would instead like nothing more than a series of outcomes to make decision day just a bit less hectic. The outcomes this weekend that would be kind for the selection committee would be the following: an Alabama victory over Florida, a Clemson victory over Virginia Tech and a Washington victory over Colorado. Yet, those three outcomes listed above occurring would only make the job of the selection committee marginally less stressful. The real stress for the committee come Sunday morning will be what to do in the event that Penn State defeats Wisconsin in the Big Ten championship game. Normally, the winner of

the best conference in the country (the Big Ten has four teams ranked in the most recent AP Top 25) would be all but guaranteed a spot in the playoff. If this conference champion had entered the championship game on an eightgame winning streak that included a victory over arguably the second-best team in the nation, there would be no argument that it deserved a playoff spot. If the Nittany Lions are able to get past another tough top 10 opponent in the Badgers, the selection committee will be faced with its biggest dilemma since the inception of the College Football Playoff. Should it choose a team that not only won the toughest conference in the country but also beat the current second-ranked team (Ohio State) or choose a team that did not even win its division but has consistently been considered the second-best team in the country all season after Alabama with signature victories over Oklahoma and Michigan? This is the plight to test the limits of the playoff system — a system better than the Bowl Championship Series, though nonetheless imperfect. The larger question this dilemma will push to the fore is the following: Should the selection committee choose the best four teams throughout the entirety of the season or should it give deference to conference champions, even if such champions may not be the

PHOTO COURESY OF TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Penn State running back Andre Robinson darts past Michigan State defenders for a touchdown at Beaver Stadium in University Park, Pennsylvania on Nov. 26. Penn State has the potential to disrupt the College Football Playoff. best teams throughout the season? Conference championship winners are typically the best teams in the country overall, though that may not be true this season when discussing the cases of Penn State and Ohio State. With the exception of a fluke loss at Penn State, Ohio State has clearly been the second-most dominant and consistent team over 12 games. Ohio State also beat Michigan, the same team that blew out Penn State

earlier in the season. Penn State, on the other hand, would argue that it’s supposedly “fluky” victory over the Ohio State is anything but, and that its recent play proves the team is one of the country’s best four. Of course, the predicament between both teams could be easily resolved by a Wisconsin victory in the Big Ten championship instead. A Wisconsin victory would play into the hands of Ohio State, as it boasts

the head-to-head edge over the team. But, alas, in that situation more dilemmas would appear on the horizon for the selection committee. The winner of the Oklahoma-Oklahoma State game would then have as legitimate argument for a playoff spot as Wisconsin. Even more headaches could conceivably emerge if either Washington, Clemson or Alabama falter in their conference championships (or if all three some-

how lose). Regardless of all the wild scenarios that could conceivably occur during championship week, the potential dilemma between Penn State and Ohio State could shape the College Football Playoff for years to come, forcing the selection committee to consider the criteria it values most in choosing the four finalists.

Dan is a graduate student in Media. descalo2@dailyillini.com

WEEKEND PREVIEW

Martinez returns as reigning NCAA Champion, eyeing three-peat Wrestling

The Illinois wrestling team will travel to Cedar Falls, Iowa, to take part in the Northern Iowa Open this weekend. The team last competed in the meet in the 2012-2013 season, coming away with two individual fi rst-place titles. The Illini fi nished tied for ninth place at last year’s NCAA Championships. Isaiah Martinez highlights the returners for Illinois this year. Martinez repeated as the NCAA champion, taking down Penn State’s Jason Nolf in a 6-5 decision. The meet takes place Saturday at 9 a.m.

Men’s Gymnastics

The Illinois men’s gym-

nastics team will partciapte in the Orange and Blue Exhibition this weekend. This will be the team’s fi rst organized competition of the season. The exhibition will allow the Illini a chance to participate in all of the events in which they will be competing throughout the season. The Illini fi nished fourth at the NCAA Championships last season. Brandon Ngai won the pommel horse competition, and Tyson Bull and Alex Diab earned All-American status on the high bar. The Illini have a young squad this season, with 12 underclassmen and only four seniors out of the team’s 23 athletes. The Exhibition begins

Sunday at 2 p.m.

Women’s Gymnastics

The Illinois women’s gymnastics team will also participate in the Orange and Blue Exhibition this weekend. The Illini will head to Huff Hall to face off with each other. Last year, the Blue team edged out the Orange team, 11-9. Last season, the team did not compete as a whole at the NCAA Championships, but Lizzy LeDuc made it to the event as an individual competitor. LeDuc scored a 9.6375 on the floor routine, which was a career-best for the then-freshman. The Exhibition begins Sunday at 2 p.m.

sports@dailyillini.com @di_sports

DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Illini Isaiah Martinez wrestles against Brandon Kingsley from Minnesota at Huff Hall. Martinez is the reigning National Champion for the past two years.

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5B

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111 S. Busey, U.

3

F 4 4 4

2 Baths, 1 block to campus. Modern. $1425. Avail. Fall 2017

Continental Plaza Apts

2,3

U

4 4

Laundry on site.

714 W. Elm, U.

2

F

2 levels, 1 block to campus. Modern. $950. Avail. Fall 2017

Stoneleigh Court Apts.

1,2

U

4 4

Laundry on site.

Ginger Creek Apts

1,2

U 4 4 4

Klatt Properties

4 4

217-367-6626

www.klattproperties.com

217-352-1129

Garages available. Some laundry in units

204 E. Clark, C.

1-3

F/U

4 4 4

Laundry on site. Most utilities included

Smith Apts.

505 W. Springfield, U.

2

F/U

4 4 4

Laundry on site. Most utilities included

610 W. Stoughton, U.

1

F

4

4

$580, includes water and one parking, on-site laundry

409 W. Elm, U.

1-2

F/U

4 4 4

Laundry on site. Most utilities included

1004 S. Locust, C.

1

F

4

4

$600, parking $50-$70, on-site laundry

1106 S. Second, C.

1

F

4

4

$585-$600, incl. water, parking $60 - $70, on-site laundry

507 W. Church, C.

1

B

4

4

$530-$550, includes water and one parking, on-site laundry

511 W. Church, C.

1

B

4

4

$570-$600, includes water and one parking, on-site laundry

53 E. Chalmers, C.

2

F 4 4

4

$1550, parking $50-$70

408 W. Illinois, U.

4

603 W. High, U.

5

710 W. California, U.

217-384-1925

www.smithapartments-cu.com

4

4

1-4

F/U 4

4

710 W. Church, C.

1

F/U 4

4 4

617 W. Springfield, U.

1

F/U 4

4

58 E. Armory, C.

2

F 4 4

4

$1100, includes one parking

508 W. Washington, U

1

F/U

4

201 E. Armory, C.

2

F

4

4

$1010, parking $70, on-site laundry

503 S. State, C

2

F/U 4

Some utilities included

1004 S. Locust, C.

2

F

4

4

$740-$930, parking $50-$70, on-site laundry

306 W. Washington

1

F/U 4

Some utilities included

1009 W. Clark, U.

2

F

4

4

$870, includes one parking, on-site laundry

1010 W. Clark, U.

2

F

4

4

$965, includes one parking, on-site laundry

1012 W. Clark, U.

2

F

4

4

$870, includes one parking, on-site laundry

511 W. Church, C.

2

B

4

4

$765-$825, includes water and one parking, on-site laundry

201 E. Armory, C.

3

F

4

4

$1395, parking $70, on-site laundry

Marlin Apartments 710 W. Western, U.

Can be split into 2 apartments.

4

Most utilities included

217-649-4591

email: jackcorgi@sbcglobal.net 2 large

F 4 4 4

Fall 2017; $840; 1 block from Lincoln and Greenw

WANT TO LIST YOUR PROPERTY? Contact us at: diclassifieds@illinimedia.com or call 217-337-8337

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY ILLINI Help to make well know You like this website? T If you own yourself a we If you print out the sudok Tell your acquaintances, Just help to make this sit

Located 10 blocks West of the U of I Library. Features spacious downstairs and large, covered front and rear porches. Pet friendly with fully fenced side yard. Private parking lot.

www.dailyillini.com/page/classifieds

Sign in to set up an account with us. Pricing is available on the site upon login. You can place ads in The Daily Illini print publications on Mondays and Thursdays, or on our dailyillini.com website, or both. In addition to PAID ads for commercial businesses, we offer FREE ONLINE ads to UIUC students who sign into their accounts with “Illinois.edu” addresses. 6

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These units include: Secure access building, off street parking, Stainless Appliances, Hardwood floors, and leather furnishing.

1

5 A S S O R T

C A U S E S

No Security Deposit Required. 3 bedroom home in historic east urbana neighborhood. Right on multiple bus lines, including Green Grey, and Red. Walking distance to Schnucks and Urbana Library. Dark hardwoods, french doors, colorful painted walls, modern bathroom, gas stove kitchen. Unfinished basement with washer dryer and plenty of storage space. Detached garage and off street parking. Fenced in backyard. Walk up closed front porch. Lease begins 1/1/2017 - security deposit paid!

Now leasing for Fall 2017: Luxury furnished loft apartments in Campus’s only historic landmark property.

7

A L B U M S

A C T T I W N I N O H D O I E R T E N D S

P R E S S N A M G R O U T

T E S T S O P T O P S S E R A H W R I T E E N A R D M E D A U N T E D T E L E C O X U N S T S S M A T C O O L E D A T E R I K E S

M I N T T B E A R R S T H H O O R R T F O R

Help Wanted

2

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Historic landmark property, secure access, Internet included

Help Wanted

I S W E A R

C H A N T S

H O L Y L A N D

E N D Y V E S

Talented in WordPress? we want you. Illini Media is looking for a student with WordPress experience to join our Creative Team.

3 BR House in Historic East Urbana,

The Electrum Group

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dailyillini.com • dailyillini.com • dailyillini.com

R E G I O N A L

More information at: joelwardhomes.com

For interest in this property, please contact: leasing@rentchampaign. com Call: 217-328-279 or text: 217-766-7628

Read us online! C O U R T F I L E U R

Rentals

4th & University, C.

217-649-0761

www.theelectrumgroup.com

113 Stanage 4bd/2ba

Classified advertisers can now place print and online classified ads directly at:

V E R B

FOR RENT

The Electrum Group

Water, Internet, and Garbage is included! Washer and Dryer in unit! Energy-Efficient heating and cooling with 11’ ceilings! For more information or a private viewing: call (217) 649-0761 email at info@theelectrumgroup. com or visit the sites: www.theelectrumgroup.com or www.nearnorthcu.com

Email availability and resume to:

kit@illinimedia.com

Success!

Looking for some great sales experience to help beef up your resume? Illini Media is currently looking for a few energetic, resourceful, friendly and motivated sales/advertising folks to complete our sales team. Yes there is some cold calling, but there are also existing client lists and trained sales reps to learn from. Our sales reps get great hands-on experience so they’re ready to step into a job in media, sales, advertising and/or marketing when they graduate and leave us. Sales Reps at Illini Media have an opportunity to make commission and bonuses based on meeting and exceeding sales goals. They’ll also gain real world experience selling print and digital media as well as radio and other non-traditional avenues.

Come join our team today! Please email Melissa Pasco to apply. mgpasco@illinimedia.com

29. Jul 2010

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6B Thursday, December 1, 2016

THE DAILY ILLINI  |  WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

The Daily Illini: Volume 146 Issue 28  
The Daily Illini: Volume 146 Issue 28  
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