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THURSDAY September 12, 2019

THE DAILY ILLINI The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

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Campus concerns spark interest in student government you serve,” Josellis said. “My plan for that this year is listening sessions at different cultural houses, RSOs and Greek life to ask what we can do to complete plans and make their lives better.” Josellis said he also wants the trend of increased young voter turnout and activism to continue on campus with public campaigns to register and get out to vote in the upcoming primaries. “In 2018, we had one of the highest turnouts in decades, and I like to think that was partly due to the student government ’s efforts,” Josellis said. “We want to bring some candidates to campus, get students excited and push them to vote.” Josellis said in the end, the true power to push for change lies with the University’s student body. “ With our diverse, 44,000-student body, we can make noise, and the University knows that,” Josellis said. “(ISG) has a microphone and a platform that we can use to speak out on behalf of all the students, we have connections with administration and our main role is to shine a spotlight on students fighting for change so the administration will listen.”

BY CLARE BUDIN ASSISTANT DAYTIME NEWS EDITOR

In response to increasing activism and mounting concerns over college expenses, campus divisiveness and student safety, Illinois Student Government is establishing plans to create a more secure and satisfying University experience for all students. Susan Zhou, junior in LAS and speaker tempore of the student senate, said the student government acts as a powerful mediator between concerned or frustrated students and members of University administration who can enact official change. “Being the official voice means that we have direct lines to many within University administration who are obligated to listen to what we have to say and recommend,” Zhou said. Student body president and junior in Media, Connor Josellis, said he intends to establish proposals based on his campaign platform of environmental sustainability, campus and textbook affordability, student safety and student advocacy. “Textbook affordability is something I’m really interested in,” Josellis said. “It’s just an egregious cost on students. Something I’ll be looking into this year is

AKI AKHAURI THE DAILY ILLINI

The Illini Student Government meets on the second floor of the Illini Union on Sunday.

pushing open-source textbooks, which are basically online, free and just as credible as the ones you’d get at the bookstore.” In the wake of an incident at Allen Hall last week where a noose was discovered in a dormitory elevator, a symbol largely perceived

as a racist threat referencing lynchings, Josellis said ISG took steps to make the voices of students who were directly affected by the event heard. “Most recently the vice chancellor, the new dean of students and a few others from the vice chancellor’s

office came to our meeting to listen to black students across campus about the noose incident that happened,” Josellis said. “It’s making sure that we have detailed plans that we can present them and they can follow through on.” Payal Patel, sophomore in

Business and ISG’s chair of public relations, said in an email the organization and its members plan to host listening sessions with different University groups and communities to gauge specific needs and concerns. “The question is how do you reach out to the people claredb2@dailyillini.com

Campus coffee shops go green pose naturally in the environment. In order for that to happen, microorganisms metabolize and break down plastic. This is less harmful to the environment than traditional plastics. There are two forms of biodegradable plastics: injection molded and solid. Food containers and water bottles use the solid form of biodegradable plastic. Although Espresso Royale recently changed the lids on their drinks to be more eco-

BY LUIS VELAZQUEZ STAFF WRITER

Local coffee shops have been showing an effort to help the environment by using eco-friendly plastic straws, cups and lids. However, not all establishments have caught up with the latest trend. Students may have come across biodegradable products, such as bags and straws, at coffee shops on campus. According to Precision Engineered Products, biodegradable plastics decom-

SEE GO GREEN | 3A

MADELINE PIERCE THE DAILY ILLINI

Kayla Stewart, sophomore in LAS, and Haki Shabazz Materre, senior in AHS, being interviewed at the Bruce D. Nesbitt African American Cultural Center on Friday. A report for the 2018-19 academic year showed 475 African American students enrolled in the University last fall.

UI sees drop in African American enrollment BY KIMBERLY BELSER STAFF REPORTER

The University is working to improve campus diversity after a report for the 2018-19 academic year showed a decrease in the number of African American students enrolled last fall. The report showed 475 African American students enrolled in the University last fall, compared to the 500 students in 2017 and 548 students in 2016. The class report for 2019 was released on Thursday.  Based on various surveys given to students who declined their admissions offer, it’s common for cost to

be listed as the primary reason for choosing to attend a different university, said Kevin Pitts, vice provost for undergraduate education. According to the 2018 decline survey data provided by Daniel Mann, associate provost for enrollment management, said in an email 32% of underrepresented minority students chose “extremely” as a response to whether cost influenced their decision not to attend the university, with only 14% responding “not at all.” Haki Shabazz Materre, senior in AHS, said while he thinks tuition is a influential component in a pro-

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spective student’s decision, other factors like mental health and structural racism play a role as well. Materre said events like the swastika vandalism in 2016 and a recent incident involving a noose left in Allen Hall caused him to reconsider his safety on the University’s campus. Kayla Stewart, sophomore in LAS, said along with tuition, recruiting is another factor to consider when looking into the decreased enrollment rate of African American students. “In terms of recruiting, it’s as if U of I isn’t an option for black students in inner

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cities or in-state,” she said. MARK CAPAPAS THE DAILY ILLINI Stewart, who is from Chi- The interior of the Espresso Royale in Urbana is pictured on cago, said while a lot of her May 6. Espresso Royale recently changed the lids on their friends were considering drinks to be more eco-friendly by making them straw-less in-state schools to apply to, they didn’t apply to the University. “It’s like they don’t reach out to us in ways that they should,” she said. “So it’s always like we’re not welcome, it’s not accessible to us and along with cost, I think the topic of retention also needs to be addressed.”  In hopes of increasing Features: Sports: not only diversity, but Meatless options Betiku produces also support for students from all backgrounds, more popular on field for Illini the University designed on campus

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2A Thursday, September 12, 2019

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pied apartment during a police crisis intervention. When confronted, the suspect physically resisted the arresting officers.

Members of the Champaign-Urbana community will be able to visit the dentist cost-free, thanks to a partnership between two dentist offices in Champaign. Both the Family Dental Care of Champaign and Champaign Dental Group will be hosting Free Dentistry Day on Saturday from 8 a.m.12 p.m., which will provide individuals without dental insurance with the opportunity to visit an office without having to pay.

“Dental care is definitely not something that is cheap, and unfortunately, it’s something a lot of people can’t afford,” said Breanna Durack, practice manager of operations at Family Dental Care of Champaign. “We want people to achieve better overall health by getting dental care that they need.” On Free Dentistry Day, dentists will be providing services to patients that include fillings, extractions and cleanings.   A major reason dental offices participate in this event is to remind people

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of Holly Hill Drive around 10 • An arrest was made on the p.m. Monday. According to the charges of domestic battery and report, residents of a home assault, which was reported in reported having their house shot the 1500 block of West Kirby multiple times. Avenue around 10 p.m. Monday. • An arrest was made on the chargAccording to the report, the suses of trespassing and resistpect was arrested after an altering arrest in the 2000 block of cation with his girlfriend Moreland Boulevard around 10 • Aggravated assault and aggraa.m. Monday. According to the vated discharge of a firearm report, the suspect was discovwere reported in the 1500 block ered to be living in an unoccu-

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of the importance of oral health, said Dr. Kyunghwan Min of Champaign Dental Group. “The mouth is more of a gateway to our overall health,” Min said. “If there are things that are going on such as heart disease or any high blood pressure, they will start to show up in the mouth as a first sign.” Free Dentistry Day is a nationwide event that has provided patients free dental care since 2010. Min said one of his most memorable experiences of Free Den-

tistry Day was helping a patient get over his fear of going to the dentist. Min assured his patient along the process of getting some teeth extracted. “Ever since then, he realized that his mouth is important, oral health is to be looked at and the dentist is not someone he should be scared of,” Min said. “Through Dental Day — because everyone was very cheerful and everyone was smiling — I think it’s put a different perspective of what a dental office is like.”

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3A

THURSDAY

September 12, 2019 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

NEWS FROM 1A

Indiana firearm suicides decrease post-enactment of red flag law

Unlike many issues involving gun control, red flag laws often have bipartisan support, according to Grossman. “It’s not as much gun control as a lot of people on the left would like, but it’s still more gun control,” Grossman said. “It’s probably more gun control than a lot of people on the right would like, but it still leaves law abiding and legitimate and peaceful, responsible gunowners alone.”  He wrote an article following the recent Dayton, Ohio and El Paso, Texas shootings encouraging policymakers to utilize red flag laws, as both states do not have any form of ERPOs. In the incident of the Dayton shooting, Grossman explained the shooter had several warning signs, including the shooter stating he was afraid of what he might do. These concerns could have been brought to the courtroom and, ultimately, prevented the tragedy. 

“(The events leading to the shooting) was an example where not only would people potentially bring him to a judge but where he might have even been okay with it,” Grossman said. Besides a threat to others, though, Grossman said deaths through gun use are more likely due to personal threat or suicide.  According to Pew Research Center, suicides accounted for six in 10 U.S. gun deaths in 2017 and have long accounted for the majority of U.S. gun deaths.  Diane Zell, president of the National Alliance on Mental Health Illness in Champaign, said often, family members have no idea what to do when their loved one becomes mentally ill.  “It gives a tool for roommates, for family members, for concerned friends to help in a way that they couldn’t previously,” Zell said.  Zell explained while an individual is waiting to get access to treatment, which is not always an easy or quick

process, personal harm is a threat. She said with the proliferation of guns in our society, individuals have easy access to guns, making it very dangerous. Grossman explained the idea is if someone is showing suicidal tendencies, the law should confiscate firearms for varying periods of time, depending on the case. If the individual still attempts to harm themselves, they could try; but it would be harder than using a gun.  According to the NAMI website, one in five adults suffer from mental illness in a given year.  Zell said that is no different for Champaign-Urbana.  “(Red flag laws) pretty much a guarantee that a gun is going to work if somebody puts it in the right place,” Grossman said.  Since Indiana enacted their form of red flag laws in 2005, they saw a 7.5% decrease in suicide rates since enacted in the 10 years that followed.  Patrick Wade, commu-

nications director for University police, said firearms are strictly prohibited on campus and, to his knowledge, the University has not had any incidents where the Firearms Restraining Order Act has been invoked. David Smysor, detective for the Urbana Police Department, said law enforcement does not legally have to be involved, although in a practical sense, would be involved at some point in the process.   He explained in an email a family member or friend can go directly to the courthouse and petition the court to issue a Firearms Restraining Order upon the individual, without technically going through any police force.  “This act is really intended for how law enforcement and family members can remove firearms from people who present a clear and present danger to themselves or others,” Smysor said. 

the Illinois Commitment program brought into action this fall, Pitts said.  “We absolutely believe that this will help with racial diversity, but also it’s socio-economic diversity,” Pitts said. “There are some downstate counties where the median family income is in the $30,000 range, so we hope that this will provide access to the University of Illinois to students from across the state who previously either fell toward or understood that it was too expensive.”  Pitts said location is also a deciding factor commonly listed on survey results for prospective students, although the University doesn’t “know quite what that means.” “It could mean, ‘I didn’t want to live in UrbanaChampaign,’ it also could mean that it was ‘less expensive for me to live at home and attend a different school,’ for example. So in the decline survey for students who declined admission in fall of 2019, we tried to ask more information about the role that location plays because we know it plays a role but we don’t know in what ways.” Pitts said the University is certainly aware of last year’s decreased enrollment count of African American students, and they’re working hard to try and improve in that category, but also in all categories.  Last year’s enrollment count also showed a larger number of Latino students enrolled in fall 2018 compared to previous years, and an overall increase in racial diversity. “Wvaae’re very committed to providing opportunity and access for students and we want to improve racial and ethnic diversity,” Pitts said. 

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said owner of Caffe Paradiso Young Jeon. Caffe Paradiso offers biodegradable forks, spoons and knives. Jeon said although they are expensive to access, they can make a difference. Jeon values the environment and her own establishment for having biodegradable products for their drinks.  “A lot of people are inter-

ested in saving the earth, even my kids are, too,” Jeon said. “I personally believe people can make a change (in) the world, little by little.” Andrew Park, manager at Caffe Bene on Green Street, said the coffee shop offers some biodegradable cups for cold drinks. Park believes more people should be aware of environmental needs. However, most cus-

tomers of Caffe Bene focus more on their food rather than the cafe’s biodegradable products. “I know a lot of testimonies that people say they hate paper straws because they get soggy and don’t work as well, so I don’t think people think of the environment in that sort of way,” Park said. Linda Martinez, sopho-

more in LAS, appreciates many coffee shops’ decisions to have eco-friendly lids and straws to try to make a difference. Although, she believes this is long overdue. “We have ignored climate change for so long that now the consequences of even using a plastic cup is too much of a risk that none of us are willing to take,” Martinez said. “I mean obviously

everyone knows that plastic straws harm the environment, and so I see why a lot of establishments are going to stop using them, but also they can be doing other things as well that can be around the same range.” Espresso Royale was unable to respond in time for publication.

2005 Red flag law enacted

2015 7.5% decrease in firearm suicide Source: American Psychiatric Association CHANTAL VACA THE DAILY ILLINI

‘Red flag laws’ restrict access to guns BY REBECCA WOOD STAFF WRITER

Since the enactment of the Firearms Restraining Order Act in January, Urbana police have not enforced it, according to officials. The Firearms Restraining Order Act is Illinois’ version of “red flag laws” or Extreme Risk Protection Orders, which temporarily restrict an individual’s access to guns, according to Gillford’s Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence.  Nicholas Grossman, professor in LAS, said red flag laws allow people to prove to a judge that, if someone is a danger to themselves or others, the court can issue an order restricting or confiscating an individual’s firearms.  “The idea behind (red flag laws) is almost like a restraining order,” Grossman said. “So it’s a way to not make any sort of blanket bend that says ‘no one’s allowed to have this type of gun, or no one’s allowed to have any guns.’” 

FROM 1A

GO GREEN friendly by making them straw-less, other coffee shops are still in the process of changing their products. “Our paper cups for hot drinks are not biodegradable, but I’m planning to change that as soon as my supplier can provide them,”

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An iced coffee with the new eco-friendly top sits on a table in Espresso Royale on Tuesday. Students at the University may have come across biodegradable products — such as strawless, eco-friendly lids — at coffee shops on campus.


4A

THURSDAY

September 12, 2019 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

LIFE & CULTURE

The Collective revamps CU art community BY ANNA PEVEY STAFF WRITER

When Emma Sielaff was a sophomore, she and her friends felt the student art community, while ubiquitous, was also unorganized. “There were a lot of our friends that were in different social groups that were all interested in the same things and being creative but didn’t have a central place to express that or be a part of a collaborative environment,” Sielaff, now a senior in FAA, said. “So we realized we wanted to try to be that outlet for people.” The Collective Magazine was founded by Sielaff and siblings Chantal and Adriana Vaca in fall 2017, and their first issue was published that same semester.   The magazine and its members focus on inclusivity, uniqueness and being able to express yourself, no matter what one studies which is “just the type of thing that, we think, our campus needed,” Adriana, senior in LAS, said. “(The Collective) is really about bringing people together, no matter who you are or what your major is,” Adriana said. “(It’s) being able to collaborate on something that helps out the community. It is for and from the community.” As a younger student, Adriana had been part of Pizza FM, a student-run radio station on campus. She attributes these ties to other arts outlets on campus to helping the club get started. 

The Collective offers writing and designing opportunities for students. The club also brings the publication to life with different events like art galleries or house shows. Since Chantal, senior in Media and Illini Media C ompa ny employe e, pitched the idea in 2017, The Collective has published four issues featuring art and articles written and designed by its members. Adriana said putting out the magazine and getting feedback is rewarding and makes preparation for the next publication that much more exciting. Sielaff, the head of event planning and a contributing artist for the magazine, was pleasantly surprised at the turnout for their first gallery. “A lot of the artists who displayed their work had never shown their work at a gallery-type setting, (myself) included,” Sielaff said. “It was really rewarding to do that and has been every time since.”  Adriana is particularly excited by the inclusivity and diversity of the club, especially at the top. “It has been so cool to start a club that is specifically inclusive to anyone and to have a executive board made up of exclusively women and members that include people of color and queer men and women,” she said.  The inclusivity attracts many new members.  Jenna Glassman, soph-

PHOTO COURTESY OF KEVIN ZAVALA

Keegan Gulick of Ghoul Jr. performs in the basement of Chez Bon Bon at The Collective Magazine’s Fall 2018 Art Gallery. The magazine was founded by Emma Sielaff, Chantal Vaca and Adriana Vaca in fall 2017 and published its first issue the same semester.

omore in LAS, joined her freshman year and is grateful to “have an outlet like this on campus.” “The Collective was the first club that I joined last

year as a freshman, and when I showed up, I immediately noticed how diverse the club was,” Glassman said. For students who do not

formally study art at the University, it can be difficult to find a creative space with like-minded people. Glassman believes the diversity of the club is reflected in the art they create. “The magazine is something that embraces uniqueness and wacky people, and I think it shows in the amount of diverse art and visuals, whether it be in the magazine or at a gallery that we have, and that is so cool to me,” Glassman said.

ple could enjoy the art. “It was so nice to see everyone’s work displayed and to have people who are or are not in the club just genuinely enjoying the art and visuals,” she said. “We try to make every experience a good one through the art and the events we plan.” Adriana reflects back on how the publication has grown in its three years. She is most grateful for the artists she was able to connect with and the commu-

“The magazine is something that embraces uniqueness and wacky people, and I think it shows in the amount of diverse art and visuals, whether it be in the magazine or at a gallery that we have, and that is so cool to me” JENNA GLASSMAN SOPHOMORE IN LAS

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PHOTO COURTESY OF KEVIN ZAVALA

Julia Morrison sells her artwork at The Collective Magazine’s Fall 2018 Art Gallery at Chez Bon Bon. The magazine, started in 2017, stands as a place where students explore creativity and collaboration.

Recently, The Collective hosted a student art gallery at KAM Fest held at the Krannert Art Museum. Different types of visual and interactive art were showcased, as well as screen printing demos from Noble Print Club and music by DJ Silkee. Sielaff was happy to help provide a space where peo-

nity she was able to help build. “We knew we were going to be filling in a gap in the arts community on campus when we started,” she said. “But the recognition and how many dedicated members we have has been the greatest.” pevey2@dailyillini.com

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5A

Thursday, September 12, 2019

Students veg out with meatless options BY AYSE PIRGE STAFF WRITER

Staying healthy during the school year can be hard. For those with dietary restrictions, it is important to know the options available for students on campus. Meggie Gaddy, senior in ACES, is a member of University Vegetarians, an RSO that began as a graduate club. Gaddy said this group “focused a lot on University dining, and they actually collaborated with them to get these (vegan) options on the table.”  While staying at Allen Hall her freshman year, Gaddy and her friend Haley Ware, also a member of University Vegetarians, found a great all-vegetarian dining hall called Field of Greens. “They serve all vegetarian food, like a stir-fry maker, and the stir fry even has vegan meat and you can add all your veggies or rice or noodles to it,” Gaddy said. Ware added sometimes they even have vegan cookies. Besides the LAR dining hall, Gaddy said dining at the Ikenberry Commons is also a good choice that always serves at least one vegan option. Gaddy said she thinks University dining has improved since she was eating in the dining halls as a freshman. She said the options available now were not as accessible before she came to campus. “The majority of dining halls provide at least one (option) — they might not be the most appetizing

options, sometimes,” she said. “I know from personal experience being at Allen Hall that vegan option would just be a mixture of vegetables or something, not ideal.” She said that it is nice they have any option at all. Gaddy said in the future of the University Vegetarians club, they would like to continue to push for even more options that are not just healthy but also appetizing and compete well with the other non-vegan options. Gaddy thinks the school dining is willing to add these options, but said people just have to make it known they want them. She said students do not have to go very far on campus to find vegan options outside of the dining halls as well. “There’s a new place called Signature Grill that we’ve just tried, and they have a really good Indian curry base dish with a chickpea masala that’s really great, and then there’s a lot of Thai foods and other Indian restaurants.” she said. Ware also said Taco Bell, which she called, “the easiest vegan fast-food place, besides Burger King, which now carries the impossible burger.” University Vegetarians has an upcoming event which will bring people to a farm animal sanctuary. The idea is for everyone to go around the sanctuary interacting with the animals. This way, people who may not have interacted with farm animals before now can see them

SAMANTHA BOYLE THE DAILY ILLINI

LAR dining hall offers a vegan egg substitute from JUST Eggs, which comes in both liquid and patty forms. The substitute is made out of mung beans and will help expand food options for students with special dietary needs.

in a different light. This gives them a look at farm animals other than in an industrial setting so they can see the animals as indi-

viduals, not just products. “A lot of spots on campus just have vegan food in general,” said Andres Munoz, senior in LAS. Munoz stayed in a residence hall during his freshman year and said he always went to Field of

Greens and the Dancing Dog. “There’s also a ton of options at the (Ikenberry dining hall), and they have, like, the impossible burger now, which is just like a brand name vegan burger that they provide.”

“Having a little support group with people that are vegan and also people (who) know about nutrition because I know a lot of vegans struggle with getting the exact nutrients that they need, would be nice to have.” ANDRES MUNOZ SENIOR IN LAS

He also said one of the main reasons he came to Illinois is because the school was rated one of the top schools for vegans. Munoz said he thought it would be cool to have a focus group with just people who are vegan to meet with people who are responsible for choosing what kind of food is in the dining halls. “Having a little support group with people that are vegan and also people that know about nutrition, because I know a lot of vegans struggle with getting the exact nutrients that they need, would be nice to have,” he said. “(There are) options available all over campus that provide all the iron and protein and everything.” apirge2@dailyillini.com

THE DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

The Dancing Dog Eatery and Juicery is located at 126 W. Main St. in Urbana. The restuarant serves as one of the many vegan options in the area.

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

ACROSS

FALL 2019

9/4 9/19 10/5

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10/11

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CHERUB

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GO TO WPGU.COM FOR MORE INFO!

1 José, to amigos 5 Going rate 9 Motion pictures? 14 Company with a for-profit foundation? 15 Improvisational style 16 Gondolier, maybe 17 *Boo during a baseball game 19 See 60-Across 20 Ricky’s player on old TV 21 Around 20%, typically 23 Modern alternative to a garage sale 24 2/ 25 *Tin has been in them since 1929 29 “I’d like another” 31 Philistine-fighting king 32 Org. with Huskies and Bulldogs 33 One way to get help 35 Class for a physiology major, informally 37 *Tar remover 43 Letters on an N.L. Central cap 44 Was first 45 Spanish feminine pronoun 46 Implores 49 Number one 51 *Ken, for one 55 Campground sights 56 Prefix meaning “height” 57 Cable news anchor Cabrera 58 Home of about 25% of U.N. member states 60 With 19-Across, reconsider … or a hint to the starts of the five starred clues

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62 *Can components 66 Member of Dubya’s cabinet 67 843 acres, for New York’s Central Park 68 Princess whose brother is not a prince 69 Invited over for lunch, say 70 Crawl (with) 71 Its min. score is 120

DOWN

1 Possible maker of a muddy footprint 2 Law school class 3 Climbing vegetables 4 Discontinues 5 Letter that sounds like an expression of relief 6 Be dramatic? 7 Stickers in a plant store

8 Law school class 9 Not dither 10 Casualties of violent storms 11 Out, of sorts 12 Show the highlights 13 Hearts that don’t beat very much? 18 ___ de gallo 22 “Buckle Up, Dummies” ad, e.g. 24 A fan (of) 26 ___ tradition 27 Interlace 28 Lazy river transport 30 Winner of five swimming gold medals at the 1988 Olympics 34 Jon of Arizona politics 36 Figures calculated using crude estimates 38 Pianist Templeton

39 Jazzman Stan 40 Object of veneration 41 Part of a notable 1993 breakup 42 Some parlor designs, informally 47 Scholarship application fig. 48 Portable shade provider 50 Zenith 51 Close securely 52 L.P.G.A. great Lorena 53 Daily monotony 54 Angola’s northern neighbor, once 59 Place to grow some herbs 61 Family 63 “Well, I’ll be!” 64 Topping on a Hawaiian pizza 65 Lost one’s standing?

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.


6A

THURSDAY

September 12, 2019 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

OPINIONS THE DAILY ILLINI EDITORIAL

Don’t get discouraged by career fair hysteria

T

he buzz of the madding crowd of people heading to career fairs is already permeating campus. LinkedIn profiles are being updated feverishly. Handshake accounts are being frantically set up. The frightened but determined look of the job seeker is all too familiar. Why is it, though, that the attendants of the fairs feel such severe anxiety while still weeks away? Despite the prophecies of our career counselors, career fairs are not the final word on your career. While they are, of course, useful for making in-person connections, their importance is often over-inflated.  If you’re caught up in the hysteria right now, take a step back and breathe. You’re OK. Let’s remember a few

things. Firstly, career fairs were designed for students. The University puts on the whole shebang for you. It’s not for the mobs of employers, nor the underpaid faculty; it’s for you so that come time for you to don a cap and gown, you have somewhere to go and something to do. It’s almost like a party in your honor. With this in mind, the fairs lose some of their sharp edge. After all, who would be stressed about their own party? So, relax; you own the room.  Secondly, we should remember that while these fairs can be one path to a job, they are far from the only. Online applications are widely popular, and interviews over the phone or video chat are also options. So if you really

feel like you didn’t sell yourself well enough, or you didn’t get the chance to talk to one of the companies you wanted to, don’t feel discouraged. Use the available technology to your benefit. Don’t forget: Career fairs also aren’t the only way to network. Are they good practice and maybe even a good place to start? Sure. But they are not the be-all-endall. You can network in many professional settings including social events hosted by your college, lunches with mentors and professors and during those summer internships. So, relax; you have options.    Thirdly, we need to remember things have a way of working themselves out. How often do we stress endlessly about things that turn

9:00

Interviewer

CASSIDY BRANDT THE DAILY ILLINI

out to be not as bad as predicted? What’s meant to be will be, and you will land on your feet. We’re growing up in a Trump-run America; we can handle anything. So, relax; everything is going to be alright. If you’ve reached this point and you’re think-

ing, “Well, I still want the career fair to be my path,” that’s OK. For some people, that is the path, and there is a multitude of on-campus resources available to help you walk it. The Career Center on Wright Street and the Humanities Professional Resource Cen-

ter in 105 Gregory Hall, to name a few, are great places to go to have your resumes polished and elevator pitches perfected. So, get out there, and get those jobs, Illini! Whether it be through the career fair or not, know that Alma is proud of you.

Centrism is a failing strategy US decline alters political choices BY ANDREW PROZOROVSKY

As

COLUMNIST

Democratic hopefuls jockey for the party’s endorsement for the 2020 presidential candidacy, the divided Democratic Party must decide yet again whether to proceed with a progressive candidate or a centrist one. Through media and party messaging, the party has seemed frightened by the prospect of a progressive candidate winning the nomination and has encouraged voters to choose someone with ostensible appeal to more voters — a moderate.  The Democrats nominated moderates like Barack Obama and conservative Democrats like Bill Clinton. They expected the captured groups of voters to the left of center to eat their vegetables and fall in line. In 2016, then radical candidate Donald Trump won an unprecedented victory for manifold reasons, but one was that his main opponent, Hillary Clinton, was a moderate. As Democrats conduct the routine autopsy report on their loss, one conclusion should be painfully unambiguous: Centrism is a losing strategy. Clinton lost for a variety of reasons surrounding personality, career record and shoddy campaign strategy. She also struggled as a moderate. Some progressives, lacking enthusiasm for her or her policies, proved the liberal wing of the party would no longer be a guaranteed monolith. People always want change. Being a centrist candidate often means supporting the status quo and lacking real beliefs in change that should be brought to the country. Even if a voter is doing well under the status quo, he or she will always want it to be better. Furthermore, politics is an emotional field. Voters love passion. It is difficult, however, to be passionate about centrism — especially when much of it hinges on unenthusiasm toward both sides. Candidates who promulgate the status quo find it difficult to inspire passionate supporters the way fringe candidates can. Similarly, revisionist candidates have a much easier time staying on message because of the radical change they propose. Center-left and center-right candidates often bicker about who can best do what

officials have been doing, but extremists can more easily retain their message and unique ideas while seeming like the country’s sole Messiah. They carry more political convictions that can potentially scare off centrist independents but also have a chance of exciting a large turnout of impassioned ideologues. Additionally, it is a partisan’s duty to propose and support ideas that may be seen as extreme. Support for the extremes may not be good for bipartisanship, or unity, but from a prudent standpoint, it is healthy for the party. Fringe candidates help keep “extreme” ideas within the political mainstream. Senator Bernie Sanders proposed “Medicare for All” during his 2016 presidential run, an idea that was berated for being too radical. Ignoring the ahistorical ignorance of that statement, “Medicare for All,” is now within the realm of mainstream political thought, because Senator Sanders gained a platform and media attention and persevered in the face of those who called it extreme.  Furthermore, according to historical trends, one of the two major parties will capitalize on the opportunity to double down on their extreme whenever one party moves closer to the center. If one party moderates its stances and the media attempts to maintain its image of fairness in depicting both sides, the “center” of American political thought shifts in the direction of the other party. Ergo, moderating concedes

ground to the other party. Finally, centrism is no longer the popular ideal it used to be. The “enlightened centrist” is often satirized as a smug political layman who does not have a stance on any issue and prioritizes above all else finding middle ground on issues in which there just is not. This negative depiction of the modern day centrist has helped to foster this reluctance to support one. The only thing centrists have to contribute is the potential for unity in a divided country. But voters seem to prefer meaningful change that agrees with their ideology over unity every time. The amount of Bernie– Trump voters in 2016 demonstrates that many people will vote for someone with ideas on how to change the country in profound ways. This isn’t an impassioned cry for radicalized partisans to feel morally justified in their position. It is an acknowledgement that good political strategy is moving away from the center. It is hard to be the poster child for boring, old middle ground compromise in a divided country. It is difficult to take down the romanticized fringe candidate who will solve all the countries’ problems. Status quo Joe Biden at a recent campaign fundraiser said to rich donors during a Biden presidency, “nothing would fundamentally change.” And well, this is not exactly a campaign slogan to inspire the disgruntled masses. Andrew is a sophomore in LAS.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL STOKES

Former Vice President Joe Biden addresses the crowd at his kickoff rally for his 2020 presidential campaign. Columnist Andrew remarks on the failing practice of centrism, a common strategy intended to unite voters.

BY JOSEPH DILLIER

T

COLUMNIST

he sentiment of American decline is not just an abstract political idea, but something felt by Americans at home. According to a Pew Research Center poll, most Americans believe the country is in decline and will be less important on the world stage by 2050. In a time of incredible political polarization, it is almost darkly funny one of the few things we can agree on is the country is broken. More so than just a feeling about the trajectory of America, the spirit of decline is the lens through which all politics is now viewed. Since both sides agree America is ill, each side must blame the other for the current state of affairs. This is possible because fiscal conservatism commands the economy while left-wing ideology dominates the culture. So left-leaning voters see America’s decline as a failure of neoliberal capitalism while conservatives see it as a result of “degenerate” liberal culture. If there ever was such a thing as a culture war, liberals won. In the 1980s, there was a belief the religious right was going to win back some of the ground it lost in the Sexual Revolution. Conservative religious figures, like Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson, rose to prominence as political ones. Their affiliated organizations, such as the Moral Majority, campaigned to make pornography illegal, amend the constitution to define marriage as heterosexual, criminalize abortion and reinstate prayer in public schools. Although these organizations and ideas are no more than a few decades old, these policies feel antiquated because of how badly the religious right lost the culture wars. Even a candidate like Donald Trump, whose amoral lifestyle would have made holding office untenable just a decade ago, is widely supported by evangelicals. The religious right has widely abandoned its own principles. Similar to the religious right’s abandonment of its own cultural ideals, the Democrats have mostly given up on the New Deal redistributive policies once

PHOTO COURTESY OF PETR KRATOCHVIL

Columnist Joseph recognizes the feeling of America’s decline in modern political spheres. He argues people vote against the party they blame for this deterioration.

considered moderate. But the popularity of Reaganomics and the pro-Capitalist sentiment created by the end of the Cold War forced many Democrats to reconsider the feasibility of their politics. Thus arose centrist Democrats, like Bill and Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, who believed in limited social welfare, unlike their predecessors— the New Deal Democrats. Obama, following Bill Clinton’s neoliberal lead, attempted to defund both Medicare and Social Security by billions of dollars. He bailed out large corporations using taxpayer money without prosecuting anyone for the irresponsible speculation, which created the financial crisis. While his leftleaning claim to fame is the Affordable Care Act, it is based on a plan that came from a healthcare blueprint created by the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank. It was hardly a radical plan. For a man called a socialist by his enemies, he was a very bad one.  Compare this to President Nixon who, despite being a Republican, created the Environmental Protection Agency and lobbied for the creation of a universal basic income and national health insurance. He sounds more like Bernie Sanders than Trump. However, it goes to show how in less than 50 years, America’s right wing has narrowed the Overton Window to exclude any policies further left than Obama’s. This also helps explain

why Trump won in 2016. His slogan, “Make America Great Again,” concisely tapped into the idea that something has gone awry in America. Foolishly, the Democrats offered no real counter narrative. Compare the 2016 Republican and Democratic National Conventions. Many pundits observed in an odd reversal of roles, the DNC was far more patriotic than the RNC, with Hilary Clinton declaring “America is already great” and inviting speakers, like Michael Bloomberg, whose political objective is to maintain the status quo. This was a rhetorical flop; it stood in ignorance to how most Americans actually feel about the state of the country. Instead of recognizing their grievances, Dems tried to paper over it with hollow patriotism. While the lens of decline holds true for the political left and right, centrists are the only group generally content with the state of America. What determines people’s political views in the Trump era is how they perceive decline. If you believe political correctness, diversity and immorality have led to America’s decline, then you vote conservative. If you believe income inequality, the hollowing of the middle class and the possibility of climate catastrophe is bringing about America’s downfall, then you vote liberal. Whoever you blame for our decline is who you vote against. Joe is a senior in LAS.

dillier2@dailyillini.com

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS | opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.


1B

THURSDAY Sept. 12, 2019 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

BASEBALL

SPORTS VOLLEYBALL

Team optimistic after offseason progress BY GABBY HAJDUK STAFF WRITER

After a disappointing end to the best season since 2015, Illinois baseball has taken the summer to reflect on the four straight postseason losses in the spring. With a chip on their shoulder and unfinished business, the Illini have used the off months as a catalyst for growth. Nine Illini played in either the Cape Cod League or the Northwoods League over the summer in hopes of improving their individual games before coming back to Champaign for the fall season. Among those players was pitcher Aidan Maldonado, who appeared in 13 games as a freshman, starting five of them with a 6.58 ERA. The sophomore played for the Falmouth Commodores this summer in the Cape Cod League where he proved his potential, ranking third in the league for strikeouts per nine innings. “I went to Falmouth, figured out some stuff mechanically,” Maldonado said. “The people were awesome there, coaching staff, teammates really helped me get back on track where I need to be. I’m just working really hard on mechanics and figuring out what I did wrong my freshman year.” “Going from not being able to control the ball to being able to throw multiple pitches for a strike. That was a confidence boost for me, and I really found my love for the game again.” Without star pitcher Andy Fisher and frequent starter Cyrillo Watson, Maldonado’s improvements could earn him more action on the mound in his second season. At the same, junior pitcher Jimmy Burnette also made some noise during the summer on the Rockford Rivets of the Northwoods League. Burnette only appeared in 12 games between his freshman and sophomore seasons, all in relief. For the Rivets, Burnette posted a 3.07 ERA over 34 innings pitched. The junior had 43 strikeouts and was selected to the Great Lakes All-Star Team in July. “I got a lot better this summer,” Burnette said. “Coming back this season, I’m going to feel a lot more confident in myself being out there. I never really had the confidence in myself, which now, I finally have, and now, I think everything else is catching up.” Sophomores Branden Comia and Cam McDonald also played for the Rivets this summer. Both Illini proved to be impact freshmen last season; McDonald started all 57 games and

posted a .281 batting average while Comia started in 42 and hit .255. McDonald, who was an All-Big Ten freshman team outfielder, said he took the summer to “learn how to use (his) body better while hitting and get reps at third base”. Head coach Dan Hartleb agreed the summer highlighted the potential of several returning Illini. Hartleb, entering his 15th season with the Illini, is more excited to see that offseason work be put to the test in the team’s fall season. With 12 freshmen on the 2020 roster, the already young Illini team have a lot of technicalities to learn. However, Hartleb said the leadership of the upperclassmen adds great confidence to the team. “This group is coming back with a very good outlook and energy,” Hartleb said. “Our returners have done a tremendous job of being good role models for the new players. They’ve done a good job of helping us teach and letting the young guys know what is expected in the program.” While the upperclassmen have provided the freshmen with guidance and leadership, the young group has created a new sense of healthy competition as the players fight for their starting spots. “It’s positive having all the young guys because everybody has a chip on their shoulder, everybody wants to play,” McDonald said. “There’s no spots that are taken. Nobody has a spot, and everyone is working to earn their spot.” After an abrupt ending to the season in the spring, Hartleb is using the fall season as a learning period for both the players and coaches and looking to see what adjustments need to be made before the regular season. Illinois will begin their quick fall stint on the road at Butler this Saturday before hosting Indiana State and Great Lakes Canadians on Sept. 28 and Sept. 30, respectively. The Illini are looking forward to playing good competition early but are more excited to be back in Champaign and return to the field. “You come back, all your close friends are here, you’re just ready to get after it,” Maldonado said. “We have a really young team, but we’re all determined for one goal ... I’m just excited to be back with my friends. We’re working really hard, and we’re ready to get after it.” @gabby_h11 ghajduk2@dailyillini.com

THE DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Illinois outside hitter Beth Prince spikes the ball during a match against Nebraska in the Final Four of the NCAA tournament at the Target Center on Dec. 13. Nebraska defeated Illinois 3-2.

Illinois strives for comeback BY GABBY HAJDUK STAFF WRITER

The last time Illinois volleyball dropped its third match of the season was in 2016, the year before head coach Chris Tamas took over as head coach for the team. Over the weekend at the Big Ten/Pac-12 Challenge, the Illini fell to 2-2. No. 16 Washington beat No. 6 Illinois with a fifth set win, and unranked Colorado swept Illinois. “We played two quality opponents, and you’ll obviously learn about yourself in those moments,” Tamas said. “It’s about being disciplined and not resting on what happened last year to carry us through some of those moments.” Unsuccessful results this early in the season for Illinois might be surprising to Illini fans and NCAA volleyball followers considering last year’s Final Four appearance for the team. While the Illini weren’t anticipating such early

losses either, they knew a younger team would force a rebuild of team chemistry. Tamas said the tournament proved their team dynamic isn’t perfect yet as the coaching staff is still working to find the “right mix of players” to create positive results. “It’s always a process, and it doesn’t happen overnight,” Tamas said. “We’re building toward it every day. We had nine returners and eight newcomers, and it takes time to integrate everyone into the mix.” “I feel like every day is a better day than the one before. That’s really what we’re looking for. We’re looking for improvement from day one to however many days until the end of the season.” Redshirt freshman Diana Brown believes the loss to Washington especially proved how much of a team sport volleyball is. Individuals like Brown, senior Jacqueline Quade

and redshirt senior Beth Prince all improved from a statistical perspective. However, the team struggled to perform as a whole, which resulted in the fifth set loss. “You can’t just have a star match as an individual and expect to win, so maybe we did have great hitting percentages and great passing stats,” Brown said. “But if we don’t put it all together, the outcome is not going to be positive. I thought individually, we did our job, but collectively, we were not all on the same page.” Prince also added the Illini didn’t communicate effectively enough, causing “foolish errors” and free points for Washington and Colorado. While Prince and Brown both said the losses taught the team a lot, they don’t believe the results are detrimental to the team’s future. “We’re just trying to put the pieces together in the

puzzle right now,” Brown said. “It’s the beginning of the season. It’s not going to be perfect. It’s not time to peak. Time fixes things.” The Illini will have more time this week to make adjustments before taking the court at the Redbird Classic at Illinois State this weekend. “Having another opportunity to go out there with these girls is always something to fall back on as inspiration and is an optimistic feeling,” Prince said. “We’re very fortunate to get the chance to go back out there next weekend and get better. It’s kind of that simple sometimes.” Success for the Illini might be as easy as just getting another chance to play together as a full, healthy team. The Illini started the season with three injured players in Prince, redshirt freshman Bruna VrankovSEE COMEBACK | 3B

FOOTBALL

New recruits show promise for Illini BY MILES POWERS-HUANG STAFF WRITER

This offseason, Illinois dipped into the graduate transfer market on several occasions – none bigger than the additions of quarterback Brandon Peters from Michigan and defensive end Oluwole Betiku from Southern California. Both have been key contributors thus far, leading Illinois to victory at Connecticut Saturday. Next up for the Illini is Eastern Michigan.

Peters Early Success

PHOTO COURTESY OF MEGHAN ROSE/FALMOUTH COMMODORES

Junior pitcher Jimmy Burnette (left) poses for a picture with sophomore first baseman and catcher Kellen Sarver (right) during a game between teams in the Northwoods League.

Consistent production in the passing game is an element that hasn’t been there during the Lovie Smith era. On Saturday, Brandon Peters demonstrated the Illini aerial threat may be more potent this season. After a slow start, including a pick-6 on the first drive, Peters threw three second-quarter touchdown passes and added a fourth in the third quarter. Labeled a slow, stationary pocket passer coming in, Peters has quickly disproven that narrative with an impressive rushing touchdown week one against Akron, as well as a scramble, before finding Josh Imatorbhebhe on the

JONATHAN BONAGURO THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois wide receiver Trevon Sidney runs for a touchdown against Akron on Aug. 31. The team is confident it can keep up this momentum with its new players.

opposite side of the field for a touchdown at Connecticut, Saturday. “I told you he’s sneaky athletic. He’s got (something) to him,” said offensive coordinator Rod Smith. “He’s not (an) oak tree back there. He can move when he needs to. You don’t (get) division one basketball offers out of high school if you’re not a little bit athletic.”

In 2018, then-Illini quarterback AJ Bush had a single-game record of only two passing touchdowns, but as is the case with nearly all facets of the team, Lovie Smith wants to forget about last season completely and focus on the games ahead.

top may be surprising. After two weeks of play, Betiku has more sacks than any player in the country with 5.0. “(Betiku) has been outstanding with his play, and everybody is gonna talk a lot about him,” Lovie said. “When (he’s) leading the Betiku Leading the Nation country in sacks, you should Take a quick look at the talk about him.” NCAA leaderboard in sacks, and the name that sits at the SEE RECRUITS | 3B


2B Thursday, September 12, 2019

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Thursday, September 12, 2019

3B

ILLINI OF THE WEEK

Betiku finds support in family, dreams of bowl game win BY JARED FARMER STAFF WRITER

It’s been six years since Oluwole Betiku Jr. has seen his family. He sends his parents his highlights since they can’t watch his games from their home in Nigeria. His parents aren’t overly familiar with gridiron football, so Betiku usually explains the game. But even though they don’t have all the X’s and O’s down like Betiku does, their support remains unwavering. “They know what I’ve been through, the type of journey I’ve had,” he said. They’ve been with me since I was born. Every time after a game, I call them and tell them how I performed. I’ll tell my mom how many sacks I had, but she really doesn’t know what sacks are. But she still knows that I’m doing well, and that makes her happy.” Betiku has come a long way, but he’ll be the first to say he still has a long way to go. One of several players to come to Illinois from Southern California, the junior transfer has made an immediate impact as a defensive end, leading the Big Ten in tackles for loss (6.5) and leading the nation in sacks (5.0) in his first two games as an Illini. “I’m just trying to win as a defense,” Betiku said. “We all want to win as a defense.

ILLINI OF THE

WEEK

JONATHAN BONAGURO THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois lineman Oluwole Betiku Jr. tackles Akron quarterback Kato Nelson on August 31. The Illini won 42-3. Betiku currenly leads the NCAA leaderboard in sacks at 5.0 and hopes this will help the team win its first bowl game under Lovie Smith.

When I play, I don’t even count. People ask me on the sideline how many I have, but I don’t know. I’m just playing to win.” Betiku originally committed to USC back in 2016. He was a 5-star prospect, the top defensive end and the No. 15 overall player in his recruiting class. He didn’t pick up football until high school, but thanks to his dad, who he both shares a name and a birthday with, he’s always had an athletes

training regimen. Betiku Sr., a mechanic, made his son’s first set of weights using detached flywheels from the spare parts at his job. “I wouldn’t be playing sports if it wasn’t for my dad,” Betiku said. “He’s always wanted me to play soccer. My mom used to always tell me that she didn’t want me playing with street boys, but my dad was always like ‘Nah! Go outside and go play and get stronger.’ so he’s

really excited. We have the same name and were born on the same day, so he kind of lives through me. That makes his day whenever I send him (my highlights), and I’m glad I get to make him happy.” “I can’t wait to reunite again, to come out of the tunnel and see my whole family is watching. That’d be awesome.” While it looked like Betiku’s story might be one of overnight success – a student

MENS TENNIS

picking up football in high school and committing to a PAC-12 program – his time at USC proves otherwise. He never lived up to the expectations at USC. He left the Trojans with just two tackles and no sacks in three years and only played 14 games during the 2016 and 2017 seasons combined. Then in the 2018 offseason, he had a hip surgery that would cost him his 2018 season. @jaredefarmer Betiku did some serious jaredef2@dailyillini.com

FROM 1B

Illini to make most of fall semester RECRUITS

Betiku picked up 3.5 sacks at Connecticut Saturday, as his combination of size and speed was simply too tough for the Huskies’ offensive line to handle. Rated as a five-star recruit by all major recruiting services coming out of high school, Betiku was unable to break into a talented defensive line early on at Southern California and couldn’t stay healthy once he’d gained enough experience to start. However, the physical gifts of the fourth year junior have never been in question. “He’s a physical guy playing the run, Smith said. “He’s playing a sixtechnique (as) a guy that’s over the tight end most of the time. We knew that he could play there. If you just look at his athletic ability, you’d assume he can rush the passer, too – had a couple of good pass rushes, good spin move. I’m anxious to see him take another step this week.” Betiku gets his final shot against undersized groupof-five lineman Saturday and will look to pad his sack total before Big Ten play begins.

BY MEGHAN REST SPORTS EDITOR

The men’s tennis team is no stranger to success. But after finishing second at the Big Ten Championship and sending two athletes to the NCAA tournament, the Illini are focused on one thing this fall: Making the most out of opportunities.   While Illinois’ regular tennis season doesn’t officially begin until January with conference play scheduled to start the first week in March, the fall is still a busy time for the team. Illinois’ fall season is sprinkled with tournaments in all corners of the country, but these aren’t any old college contests.  In contrast to the team’s spring schedule, the fall docket boasts a slew of professional tournaments.  According to head coach Brad Dancer, the fall months are filled with a mix of college and professional outings, where athletes are not only exposed to different levels of tennis but also opportunities to boost their rankings and improve overall.  “You look at our (fall) calendar, and it looks just absolutely jam-packed,” Dancer said. “The difference is not everybody is going to play every single week. So what we’re looking at will be two guys here, two guys here. But we stay within APAC limits in terms of missed class days and so forth. We’re always balancing it, and obviously, academics is a huge priority for everyone on the team, so we find a way to balance that, and other than that, we try to get a good mix of college and pro events where they’re getting exposure throughout the year, but they’re also working on their college ranking, pro ranking and trying to figure out where they fit in both ways.” Dancer said the coaching staff is using the build-up to the regular season as time to test athletes and provide ample exposure. Come springtime, the Illini will be more focused on mental, according to Dancer. Dancer and the team kicked off their fall season by hosting the Illini Open, the third of four profession-

FROM 1B

COMEBACK ic and sophomore Mica Allison. All three Illini saw action over the weekend but are still working on finding

JONATHAN BONAGURO THE DAILY ILLINI

Illinois’ Aleks Kovacevic returns the ball during the match against Duke at Atkins Tennis Center on Feb. 1. The Illini won 6-1. The team has a busy schedule planned for the fall semester.

al tournaments that have, and will, come to the Atkins Tennis Center this year. The Open began on Friday and will continue through tomorrow. But while the home pro tourney has been one of the many opportunities the Illini have to improve and shed off-season rust, the timing of the Illini Open could overlap with other premier events around the country. This weekend, select athletes are traveling to Tuscaloosa, Alabama, for the Crimson Tide Four-in-theFall tournament. According to Dancer, the decisions to compete in certain tournaments depend on several factors, including progress in adjacent events, such as the Illini Open and athletes’ health.  Although the team is poised to divide and conquer for the remainder of the fall, the Illini are focused on individual improvement, so

the entire team can flourish in the spring. “We’re gonna give all those guys an opportunity, and whoever earns it is going to compete in the most opportunities come January, and that’s when the proof is in the pudding there, in early January,” Dancer said. “We’ll set ourselves up for the dual season from there, but right now, it’s really about creating the most amount of opportunities for all of our guys throughout the way.” August through November is also a crucial time for athletes to build their professional resume by collecting ATP points and climbing in rank. Since Illinois has created a pipeline to the pros through its development-focus program under Dancer, making appearances in professional tournaments, including the Illini Open, is crucial for young tennis players. 

“We put a lot of time and effort, and the people supporting our program put a lot of effort into it,” Dancer said. “It’s basically for that, so we can continue to sell ourselves as the premier developmental school and the premier school in terms of the most opportunities at the next level.” While there are lots of opportunities to come this fall for the men’s tennis team, athletes such as Vuk Budic are still focusing on one match at a time.  “My goal for the fall, I know it sounds a little basic, but is to win every match that I can,” Budic said. “I feel like having a really good fall puts you in a good position for the spring, so it’s a really good time to play against people that aren’t on our team and to prove yourself.”

the flow with the rest of the team. With another week of practice before the trip to ISU, the Illini will have more time to integrate Prince, Vrankovic and Allison, giving them the strength to be a more dynamic team.

“We’re trying to find the right mix of players, but at the same time, we are in very deep, and if we needed a boost from a player, we could easily put them in and mix people around and cause issues for our opponents,” Tamas said. “I’m

excited about the depth we have, and I think we’re going to need a handful of players throughout the year to get us to the next level.” After a tougher practice on Monday, the Illini are excited to get a new chance to play top competition

soul searching while recovering from his injury. During his time away from rehab, Betiku made art and music, worked on his core balance and picked up meditation. “I just do it to relax,” Betiku said. “When I was a freshman/sophomore, I used to feel added pressure to perform. I started playing the ball late in high school, so coming into college, I felt like I was being overwhelmed. So when I got injured, I started meditating. A lot,” Betiku said. “I’ll put on my music and just get into my zone and try to just relax my mind and remind myself that everything is ok. I’m where I’m supposed to be. Today is today, tomorrow’s going to be fine and forget about the past. I feel like every athlete should try it.” It’s only been two games into the season for Illini Football, and Betiku has his eyes set on helping the Illini get to their first bowl game under head coach Lovie Smith. He doesn’t feel like he’s entirely in his groove again, but he believes it’s coming soon. “I want to wear a bowl game ring with pride. I want to feel like I contributed to that, and the whole team is happy. Us climbing the stage and seeing the confetti fall down, that’s my dream.”

Illini shoot for 3-0

solid team with a knack for pulling off upsets over Big Ten opponents recently. In 2018, the Eagles knocked off Purdue, 20-19, en route to a 7-6 record that included an appearance in the Raycom Media Camellia Bowl. Mike Glass III leads the Eastern Michigan offense as quarterback. Through just two games, Glass has picked up more than half of his season total for passing yards in 2018. The Eagles are coached by Chris Creighton, who is arguably the most successful head coach in program history, being the only coach to lead the team to multiple bowl games. Under Creighton last season, the Eastern Michigan defense was third-best in the country in terms of passing, holding opposing quarterbacks to just 150.2 yards per game. “This will be the toughest team on our schedule to date,” Rod said. “That’s not coach-talk. That’s not laying anything down. This team is legit. They beat Purdue last year. They’ve been in multiple bowl games. Just watch the film, (and) watch how hard they play and how sound they are fundamentally.” Since fall camp, Lovie has consistently preached focusing on one game at a time. While there are bigger opponents on the horizon, Illinois will need to handle its business against Eastern Michigan before conference play opens up.

Thus far in Lovie’s tenure, the Illini have yet to leave conference play with an undefeated record but have an opportunity to do so Saturday. The win won’t be handed to them, howev- @MilesP_H er, as Eastern Michigan is a milesp2@dailyillini.com

“This will be the toughest team on our schedule to date. That’s not coach-talk. That’s not laying anything down. This team is legit.” ROD SMITH OFFENSIVE COORDINATOR

@meghan_rest merest2@dailyillini.com

before entering conference play. Tamas said the Redbird Classic gives the team another opportunity to mesh and grow together. Illinois will start tournament play on Friday against Illinois State before facing Central Florida and Mar-

quette on Saturday. No. 7 Marquette will be Illinois’ biggest challenge after they climbed the rankings following a road win at Wisconsin last Thursday. @gabby_h11 ghajduk2@dailyillini.com


4B Thursday, September 12, 2019

THE DAILY ILLINI  |  WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

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Thursday, September 12, 2019

5B

buzz calendar

Post Malone’s new album falls short BECCA BERTRAM STAFF WRITER

BY LIAM DWYER

buzz factor: Over a year after the release of his famous album “Beerbongs & Bentley’s,” American singer-songwriter and self-proclaimed rockstar Post Malone has released his newest album “Hollywood’s Bleeding” by Republic Records on Friday. The album features guest appearances from DaBaby, Future, Halsey, Meek Mill, Lil Baby, Ozzy Osbourne, Travis Scott, SZA, Swae Lee and Young Thug. Post Malone’s music takes on a “tortured soul” and “heartbreak” theme and is occasionally influenced by R&B and hip-hop. As he’s stated in many interviews, Post Malone based his music and desire for fame from being voted “Most Likely to be Famous” in high school, eventually making his debut as an artist in August 2015. The album itself has a total of 23 tracks, four of them being singles Post Malone has already released, including “Circles”, “Sunflower”, “Goodbyes” and “Wow.”. The sad boy “tortured soul” tones are very consistent within the album and are exactly what is expected from Post Malone. On a general level, almost every song on the album sounds the same, and it is a struggle to tell the songs apart from each other. The only songs that differ are “Wow,” “Sunflower”, and “Take What You Want.” However, after that the album’s sounds, beats and lyrics are all monotonous. I would go out on a limb and say the song “Take What You Want” is the best song off the album that hadn’t already been released. The song features Travis Scott and an odd addition, Ozzy Osbourne, taking a twist on Post Malone’s sound and making it more rock-forward with a little Travis Scott flair. There was a long guitar solo in the middle of the song, which was a much needed break from the eight songs before it that eventu-

BUZZ CALENDAR EDITOR

The buzz calendar is a compilation of events happening in the Champaign-Urbana area. Follow our top picks in Monday’s and Thursday’s papers for ideas on what to do on any night of the week, from where to eat to what to watch. Want to submit an event? Email calendar@readbuzz.com.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 12

QUENTIN SHAW THE DAILY ILLINI

Post Malone performs songs from his debut album “Stoney” during the Spring Jam concert on the Main Quad on April 23, 2017.

ally blended into the same song by the time the album was over. It was refreshing to hear Ozzy Osbourne’s clear and powerful voice, making it the most promising song from the album. Another standout song “Staring at the Sun” featuring SZA. It sounds better and different from the majority of the album; however, the back beat is extremely similar to his song “Sunflower” from “Spider-man: Into The Spiderverse.” SZA adds a nice vocal range to the song, creating a harmony with Post Malone’s distinct voice that is very hard to describe. SZA’s songs are always calming, and her R&B style leaked into the song, making it a refreshing twist to listen to as opposed to the rest of the album. Despite this, there are multiple times where the album got boring to listen to. The beats tend to get repetitive, with no diversity in the lyrics besides frequently discussing betrayal, women, drug abuse and feeling alone in Hollywood. Three songs in particular, “Hollywood’s Bleeding,” “Saint-Tropez” and “Energies,” all sound like slightly modified versions of other songs on the album. Honestly, I think they all might be the same song because the lyrics just repeat, and there seems to be no meaning besides how Post Malone can’t trust anyone. They are all generally two to three-minute songs that exude the same vocal cues and repetition of the prechorus lines. I wouldn’t nec-

to miss this night of experimental music.

Mike Ingram at Barrelhouse 34

 7-9 p.m.  Barrelhouse, 34 E. Main St., Champaign  No cover Mike Ingram rounds out our summer concert series on the patio in the best way possible - with a loop pedal and acoustic guitar.

essarily say any of the songs are catchy, it’s just that 23 songs that all sound the same is a lot for the listener to take in. All of the songs could easily climb the Billboard’s Hottest 100 hits since there is an overwhelming trend that Post Malone can drop any song or sound and people will still listen to it. Overall, the album wasn’t terrible, but it is disappointing that Post Malone doesn’t stray from the hip-hop “sad boy” genre, despite describing his music as “genreless” in an interview with GQ Magazine. The “Hollywood’s Bleeding” album has an interesting name that could have been used to speak up about what goes on in Hollywood. As expected, the songs reach a superficial surface, but this doesn’t mean the album is bad or good; It just isn’t for someone with my music taste. If you’ve been a fan of Post Malone for years, then you’re probably going to like the album, especially if you really like his style. I think it’s important to note that creating an album is probably stressful when you’re as big as Post Malone. He doesn’t frequently release albums; therefore, it seems Post Malone’s talents lie in creating singles and having multiple break Billboard top 100 instead of making an album. “Hollywood’s Bleeding” isn’t a standout album, but hopefully Post Malone uses his talent to create more in the future.

Thursday Night Trivia at Pour Bros

 7-9:30 p.m  Pour Bros. Craft Taproom Champaign, 40 E. University Ave., Champaign  No cover Come out to Pour Bros. Craft Taproom Champaign every Thursday night for free pub trivia. We have weekly general trivia on Thursdays starting at 7 pm, with special monthly themed trivia nights on the last Thursday of the month. Specials include $4 Founders drinks, gift cards for the top teams and some swag giveaways.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 13

Yoga Nidra

 5:30-6:45 p.m  Living Yoga Center, 212 S. First St., Champaign  Regular class fees apply Yoga Nidra, or yogic sleep, is a state of consciousness between wakefulness and sleep. Join Sharon as she leads a guided meditation designed to help bring deep stillness and clarity. This is a great opportunity to slow down, turn inward and make space for self-care.

Ryosuke Kiyasu, Forebeat, Fr. Circumstances

 7-11 p.m  Urbana-Champaign Independent Media Center, 202 S. Broadway Ave. Ste. 1, Urbana  $6 The king of experimental percussion, Ryosuke Kiyasu, is on tour all the way from Japan and will grace C-U with his presence and mighty snare drum. You do not want

SATURDAY, SEPT. 14

Sock Dance

 6-7 p.m  Defy Gravity - Pole Fitness and Aerial Arts Studio, Lincoln Square Mall, Urbana  Free Slide and glide in this feel-good cozy workshop. Learn principles of momentum with low friction and variations on static spins with your feet not so firmly on the floor. All levels welcome. Socks required, pants optional.

Sasha Velour’s Smoke & Mirrors

 7:30-9:30 p.m  Krannert Center for the Performing Arts., 500 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana  Free Drag queen Sasha Velour burst onto the national scene as the stunning season nine champion of the Emmy Award-winning program “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” Success followed as celebs swarmed her hit drag show “Nightgowns,” and her producer and director credentials, popular publications, and social media following continued to grow. But before all that, she was already beloved right here in Champaign-Urbana where her father teaches at the university and a young Sasha made her drag debut at C-Street. Velour’s first one-queen show is an effortless blend of drag, visual art and magic. Velour introduces audiences to a whole new side of her artistry through 13 dazzling and genre-busting lip-synch performances, all directed and choreographed by the queen herself.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 15

CU Food and Goods Swap

 3 p.m  The Art Theater, 126 W. Church St., Champaign  Free CU Food and Goods Swap is a monthly meetup for our community to get together and swap homemade, homegrown or foraged food and goods with each other.

rlb4@readbuzz.com

DAVID Roussève/REALITY: Halfway to Dawn

FR SEP 13 10AM 2:30PM 7:30PM

Masterclass with Ian Hobson // School of Music Masterclass with Ian Hobson // School of Music David Roussève/REALITY: Halfway to Dawn

TU SEP 17 7:30PM

Jupiter String Quartet with Jon Nakamatsu, piano // Marquee

// Marquee

SA SEP 14 7:30PM 7:30PM 8:00PM

Chris Botti // Marquee Stefan Milenkovich Performs Bruch // Sinfonia da Camera Sasha Velour’s Smoke & Mirrors // Marquee

ACCESS FOR ALL TWO-SEASON CHALLENGE Everyone deserves a chance to experience the life-affirming power of the performing arts. In celebration of Krannert Center’s 50th anniversary, make a gift today at KrannertCenter.com/Give to ensure access to the arts for all. Every dollar given will be matched by generous sponsors.

KR ANNERTCENTER.COM • 50 0 S. GOODWIN AVE., URBANA • 217.333.6280 /80 0.KCPATIX


6B

THURSDAY

September 12, 2019 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

buzz

buzz staff talks top picks for fall releases BY BUZZ STAFF

Although it still might feel like summer outside, the semester is in full swing and fall is almost here, which means midterms and chilly weather are on the horizon. It’s always a bummer to leave summer behind, but a change in seasons means there’s plenty of new music, film and television to look forward to. To get over those end-of-summer blues, check out the buzz staff’s most anticipated fall releases.

Kayla Brown:

Because fall and Halloween are almost upon us, I’m really looking forward to the new season of “American Horror Story” coming out this month. Season nine, titled “1984,” is said to be inspired by 1980s slasher films, AKA my favorite movie genre. I’m really hoping the scare factor is high because past seasons have let me down. Details of the upcoming season are still pretty unclear with no one really knowing if it takes place in the ’80s or not, or if it’s connected to past seasons, so all this secrecy is really making me ready. I’m still upset about Evan Peters and Sarah Paulson not returning, but still really excited about the kickoff of spooky television and movies.

Katie Thoele:

The third season of “The Crown” premieres on Nov. 17, and I am so ready. I have been pumped since that dumb teaser trailer came out a month ago. Was I angry that a 20-second clip of the new Queen Elizabeth the II doing literally nothing got me so excited? Maybe. But did that ruin my excitement? Nope! While I am disappointed I will no longer get to see Vanessa Kirby’s Princess Margaret antics, the new cast replacements are dope. Helena Bonham Carter reportedly spoke to Princess Margaret’s ghost before taking on the role, so we know how inspired that performance is about to be. I recently saw Olivia Colman in “The Favourite”, so I can’t wait to see her take on Queen Elizabeth the II instead of Queen Anne. “The Crown” is a show that I love to watch in two days and completely forget about after, so half the fun is the rewatch I have to do in preparation.

Carolina Garibay:

I am really looking forward to “IT: Chapter Two.” I loved the first movie so much, and I’ve seen it so many times, so I am ready to watch the rest of the story unfold. The new cast is absolutely fire, and I’m really excited to see all of the child actors back in action. I’m usually not the biggest fan of scary movies, and I didn’t think I would love the first “IT” movie as much as I did,

BRIAN NGUYEN THE DAILY ILLINI

but it really surprised and impressed me. I remember seeing it with my younger sister in the theater for the first time, and we thought it was so good that we saw it again. Then when my brother came home from college we watched it again, and since then, watching “IT” has oddly become a bonding activity for all of us. Unfortunately, we won’t be able to see “IT: Chapter Two” together in theaters because of how our schedules line up, but I know the moment it comes out on DVD, my siblings and I will be some of the first people to watch it.

Liam Dwyer:

This fall I am most excited for “Terminator: Dark Fate.” After such failures of sequels like Genisys and Salvation, this newest installment brings with it new and old blood and most importantly, hope. The story removes the last three films from canon and means that only the first and second “Terminator” occurred, a move that really drives home

the idea they want to set the record straight and get it right this time. The original movies have always been nostalgic for me, of time spent staying up late and watching the unstoppable T-100 save the day. The movies are pure fun, and that’s what makes them great. Too many movies try to emulate the witty style of the marvel movies, and there just isn’t enough grit to action anymore.

he’s made two; “High Flying Bird” and this. “The Laundromat” seems, from the premise, to be Soderbergh’s attempt at Oscar bait, following the efforts to uncover the Panama Papers scandal, which implicated many companies and millionaires in tax evasion and much worse crimes. But Soderbergh, in all his wisdom, has instead made it a wacky comedy, which remains his best mode as a director. His 1996

It’s always a bummer to leave summer behind, but a change in season means there’s plenty of new music, film and television to look forward to. Bill Taylor:

I am looking forward to “The Laundromat,” the new film from Steven Soderbergh. Soderbergh has been working at a steady clip of a film a year since his unretirement in 2017, but this year

Ballroom Dance Classes Fall 2019 - Classes Start Sept. 16th

At the University YMCA • 1001 S. Wright St., Champaign (217)337-1500 Mondays 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Tuesdays 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Sept. 16, 23, 30 & Oct. 7, 14

Sept. 17, 24 & Oct. 1, 8, 15

Beginning Ballroom 1

Beginning Ballroom 2

Waltz, Foxtrot, Swing, Polka, Cha-Cha and Dance Etiquette

Continuation of Beginning 1 + Rumba

• Only $45 per person for five lessons. • All classes are open to the community. • Fill out a registration form at the University YMCA front desk and leave form with your check, or come ten minutes early the first day and register before the class. • You don’t need a partner to join, unless otherwise specified. • Free parking is available by the fence in the lot behind the YMCA.

facebook.com/groups/theballroomdanceclub

absurdist comedy “Schizopolis” is his masterpiece, and this looks to crib from both that and “The Informant!”, which tells a real-life whistleblower story in the silliest way possible. Soderbergh has never made a bad movChampaign-Urbana’s premiere venue for independent, foreignlanguage, cult classic, experimental film, and special events

ie in his 30-film-long filmography career, and even though this is getting mixed reviews, I doubt this breaks his winning streak, especially with actors as strong as Meryl Streep, Antonio Banderas and Gary Oldman as the leads. It premieres on Netflix this fall, along with another highly-anticipated film, Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story”, which tells the story of a divorce with Baumbach’s typically scorched-earth comedy. It stars Adam Driver, who’s proven to be the best actor alive, and Scarlett Johansson as the central couple, with supporting parts for the wonderful Laura Dern and Alan Alda. I’m no fan of Netflix’s release strategies (or lack thereof), but they’re looking to have a monopoly on my best-of list this year.

Casey Daly:

week), and I pretend to hate pop music at social events, but Charli is the largerthan-life, glossy-cheeked Bratz Doll I aspire to become one day. Not to mention she has been popping off on the Twitter-verse lately. There is no doubt Charli loves herself these days, and I think that’s why I’m so drawn to her energy. I remember when she was just the pouty British girl behind “Boom Clap”, and she’s silently crawled her way up the musical ladder in the makeup vanities of teenage girls and convertible radios. Charli has about six or seven good songs, most of which gravitate toward the top of her list on Spotify. She’s so pop, and it’s not really her music that makes her an artist as much at it is her fashion, her presence and the love she has for herself. I just know this new album will make people want to drink Sangria in the shower and rub their arms and legs with golden body glitter.

Charli XCX is releasing her third album, “Charli” on Sept. 13, and I just know it’s gonna be glittery. I hate to admit this because I have a nose piercing (as of last buzz@readbuzz.com

126 W Church St., Champaign www.thearttheater.org

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The Daily Illini: Volume 149 Issue 6  

The Daily Illini: Volume 149 Issue 6  

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