The Daily Illini: Volume 148 Issue 1

Page 1

WELCOME BACK, ILLINI!

THE DAILY ILLINI

MONDAY August 27, 2018

The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871

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Vol. 148 Issue 1

KENYON EDMOND THE DAILY ILLINI

Campus bars The Clybourne and Firehaus, both located on Sixth Street, are scheduled to close on Sept. 4. Owner Scott Cochrane plans to bring the popular deals from the two locations to KAM’s, another campus bar that he and three other buyers recently purchased.

KAM’s to take over ‘best’ of Firehaus, The Clybourne on Champaign to approve the liquor license. Cochrane applied for the liquor license Aug. 20, so the bar is expected to be open by the end of the month. He’s hoping to have the bar open before Cly’s and Firehaus close on Sept. 4. “The opportunity fell into place,” he said. Cochrane was close to buying KAM’s 10 years ago — and even ran it one Greek Reunion Weekend. But the deal fell through. His connection, though, comes from his time working there as a freshman at the University. There’s no major remodeling planned for now, he said. “I hope to carry the tradition and make it even better,” Cochrane said. Jason Reda, bar manager, agrees. “If anything, we’re adding to the location,” he said.

BY JESSICA BURSZTYNSKY SENIOR REPORTER

As Champaign-Urbana bar tycoon Scott Cochrane closes his two Sixth Street bars, Firehaus and The Clybourne, he plans to keep the “best” of the businesses alive at KAM’s. KAM’s, located just a block over on Daniel Street, will bring back Cly’s Tuesday night Wine Night and Firehaus’s Wednesday night karaoke and Sharkbowls. “We want to take the best of Haus and Cly’s and bring it here,” Cochrane said. Cochrane, along with three other buyers, acquired KAM’s in August from longtime owner Eric Meyer and closed the property for “major clean-up.” His team grouted the floors, replaced the ceilings and filled six different dumpsters in the process so far. Even the infamous KAM’s smell — which nor- ‘It has to change.’ mally radiates down Daniel Cochrane confirmed the Street — is gone. sale of Firehaus (operating Now they’re just waiting under different names in the

Dockless bicycles present new campus transportation option BY ERIC RZESZUTKO STAFF WRITER

The company VeoRide is hoping to introduce its dockless bike sharing service to campus in the fall, said Linda Jackson, communications director for the company. “(Students) will have access to healthy, sustainable transportation that builds community. The campus and community’s bike-friendly infrastructure definitely helps make a bike-share a viable option,” Jackson said. Students and people in the surrounding community who do not have access

to their own bikes or other modes of transportation will be able to use the VeoRide bikes, said Ben Leroy, associate planner for the City of Champaign. Though not approved yet, Leroy said licenses should be approved from the cities of Champaign and Urbana within the next few weeks. Students around the Champaign-Urbana area can find the dockless bikes on campus using an app. The dockless bikes can be located anywhere on campus. However, users are expected to RED LION

SEE BIKES | 3A

INSIDE LEGENDS

ILLINI INN

Looking to expand on a Sweet 16 run

Despite closings, bar scene remains strong

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DAILYILLINI, DAILYILLINISPORTS

INSIDE

Police

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past) and Cly’s, which have been in his name for almost two decades, on Aug. 10. But rumors of the sale have been circulating since April of this year, as the Champaign City Council voted to approve the acquisition of the public alley north of Cly’s to CORE, a Chicago-based development firm.

“I hope to carry the tradition, and make it even better.” SCOTT COCHRANE BAR OWNER

“We’re typically not going to stand in the way of somebody that wants to bring businesses and bring economic development to our community, so usually we’re going to go for that,” said City Council member Greg Stock at April’s meeting.

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business is business and the “opportunity came” to sell to CORE. Tom Harrington, CORE’s director of acquisitions, declined to comment, but said the group will be releasing much more information this week.

City Council documents indicate the 17-story highrise will take over 300,000 square feet, leaving the first floor for commercial area and the upper floors residential. While Cochrane remained tight-lipped about what’s next in store for him, he did confirm he has been looking at properties and has been in meetings to discuss reopening Firehaus and Cly’s, but possibly under different names. He’s planning to open next year. Cochrane knows his two bars are campus staples and closing them will affect the campus bar culture. “It has to change,” he said, since he knows there are two less bars for students to go to.

now empty space, just a few doors down, which would allow him to sell or revamp both properties on the same block. That’ll be some time, though, since business is still good, said Reda. The business of turning bars into luxury residential spaces isn’t new to campus. In 2016, the Champaign County Zoning Board approved a developer’s request to increase the size of the lot where the Illini Inn was located. But even then, plans were made to reopen the Inn and add housing on the upstairs levels. The city approved a special-use permit in 2017 to allow for renovations on both the Illini Inn and the residential area, since it was only zoned for residential use. The Illini Inn — which has been serving alcohol since the 1960s — was demolished last summer.

Continuing traditions: From KAM’s to Illini Inn

Cochrane wouldn’t rule out the closing of KAM’s for the construction of a commercial-residential property in the future. He also owns C.O. Daniels, a former bar and

SEE BARS | 3A

UGL hours change for fall semester

New UGL hours

BY KAREN LIU NEWS EDITOR

Students will no longer be able to study overnight at the Undergraduate Library, given the changes in library hours starting this semester. Previously open 24 hours for four days a week, the UGL is going to be open from 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. from Monday to Thursday, while Friday hour is from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. The Saturday hours will be from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., while the Sunday hours will be expanded to from 10 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. According to David Ward, head of the UGL, analysis of the late-night hours showed that very few students are in the UGL building after 2:30 a.m. The number drops down to a couple dozen or even single digits during KAM’S some hours. “In consultation with the Grainger Engineering Library, we determined sometimes until as late as that they had enough space 3 a.m. and capacity to accommoBorbely said in an email date any students wanting he notices many students BROTHERS to study in a library space stay late on a regular basis during the 24-hour over- and he has friends who do night period,” Ward said MURPHY’S in the same. an email. “2:30 a.m. sounds fine for The Grainger Engineer- weekdays, as I don’t stay ing Library Information much longer than that usuCenter will remain open 24 ally, but 9:00 p.m. on weekhours for five days a week ends is a bit frustrating,” he starting Sept. 10. said. “I know people go out Andrew Borbely, sopho- to bars and parties on weekmore in ACES, often stud- ends, but I’ll occasionally ies at the UGL late at night, have a test or project due

@THEDAILYILLINI, @DI_OPINION, @DI_SPORTS Opinions

“I don’t think it’s our place to say, ‘Well, you can’t sell your business because we know that some people like it,’ so, you know, we’re kind of stuck on that one,” Stock said. “If the business owner is willing to sell to someone, that is between the business owner and the buyer.” For Cochrane, he knows

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Monday - Thursday

7:30 a.m. - 2:30 a.m.

Friday

7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Saturday

10 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Sunday

10 a.m. - 2:30 a.m.

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TONI PANTONE THE DAILY ILLINI

Monday and I like to study late nights on the weekends in those cases.” Ward said the shift to an earlier closing time allows the library to shift staff and resources back toward the 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. time period, when the library sees high levels of usage of technology and library-specific services. “We plan to keep our new schedule for at least a few years, during which time we will continue to moni-

@THEDAILYILLINI Culture

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tor use of the building and services, and stay in consultation with other libraries to make sure there is adequate 24-hour study space for students,” he said. Ward said the UGL is also steadily increasing access to technology for media production over the past several years to meet the high demand from students. The loanable technology collection expanded to include SEE UGL | 3A

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buzz

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2A Monday, August 27, 2018

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Theft over $500 and criminal damage to property were reported on the 300 block of Elmwood Drive around 1 p.m. on Aug. 10. According to the report, the victim reported the lessee of her rental property removed appliances and damaged property during the time she was a tenant. Retail theft was reported at Meijer, 2401 N. Prospect Ave., around 1 p.m. Tuesday. According to the report, a male concealed three liquor bottles inside his backpack and left the

store without making any attempt to pay for the items. He has not yet been located. Residential burglary was reported on the 100 block of Chalmers Street around 9:30 a.m. Tuesday. According to the report, the victims returned to their apartment after an extended absence and discovered it was burglarized.

battery on the 500 block of Crystal Lake Drive around 1 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, the offender came to the victim’s residence seeking money for their children. When the victim refused, the arrestee damaged the residence and hit the victim with a chair. An arrest was made on the charges of electronic communication and drivUniversity ing under a revoked license Nothing to report. near Broadway Avenue and Water Street. According Urbana to the report, the arrestAn arrest was made on ee was manipulating his the charges of domestic cellphone while operating

a motor vehicle on a public roadway. After the traffic stop, it was discovered that he had a revoked driver’s license. The arrestee was taken into custody and transported to the Champaign County jail. Burglary from a motor vehicle was reported on the 1300 block of East Green Street around 3:30 p.m. Thursday. According to the report, an unknown offender entered the victim’s vehicle and removed property belonging to the victim’s business. news@dailyillini.com

Grad student tracks storm damage in Illinois forest BY THERESE POKORNEY ASSISTANT DAYTIME EDITOR

It only takes one unforgiving windstorm to destroy thousands of century-old trees. Although it may seem like forests can regrow quickly, one University graduate student discovered the progress isn't always positive in southern Illinois forests. “When a forest is hit by a windstorm, it can cause gaps in the forest canopy called blowdowns,” said Melissa Daniels, graduate student in ACES. “Certain invasive plants can establish in the understory and prevent regrowth of the tree canopy.” Daniels studied the impact of three wind disturbances on plants at Shawnee National Forest, Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge and Giant City State Park. For each site disturbed by the derecho, or a strong windstorm, in 2009 and tornadoes in 2006 and 2017, she surveyed a control site in an area of unaffected forest. Although she has not done any formal data analysis, Daniels said one trend she’s seen so far is most of the windstormdisturbed sites had more invasive plants than their

unaffected matched site. “In Shawnee National Forest, the 2017 sites seem to be more heavily invaded than the 2006 and 2009 sites, indicating that these sites are recovering along the ideal pathway in which tree canopy regrowth shades out invasive plants,” she said. “But the other sites seem to be fairly different.” The graduate student found the sites at Crab Orchard and Giant City, which were both hit by the 2009 derecho and were much more heavily invaded than the control sites in Shawnee National Forest. Daniels said there may be a difference because Crab Orchard and Giant City planted invasive species for the purpose of building hedges and wildlife forage in the mid-1900s, although she hasn’t confirmed it yet. “If that’s true, it could be one explanation for why those areas are so heavily invaded,” she said. “Collecting this data is important for making informed decisions about forest management.” Daniels said it’s important for land managers to identify invasive plants so they can effectively treat the site of the windstorm.

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Graduate student Melissa Daniels and her technician Amanda Neibuhr survey a forest site hit by the 2017 tornado in southern Illinois.

If shade tolerant invasive plants establish in the understory, they can spread into the surrounding forest and persist after canopy regrowth, she said. “Southern Illinois is a bit of an unforgiving place, but it is incredibly beautiful, and there’s

nothing else like it,” she said. “The presence of invasive plants after canopy regrowth would highlight the importance of monitoring invasive plants in blowdown areas to prevent spread to other areas.” tpokor3@dailyillini.com

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Corrections When we make a mistake, we will correct it in this place. We strive for accuracy, so if you see an error in the paper, please contact Editor-inChief Abby Paeth at (217)-337-8365.

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August 27, 2018 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

NEWS

FROM 1A

BIKES leave the bike in a responsibly placed location for the next rider when using the service. Lily Wilcock, visiting active transportation coordinator of University Facilities and Services, said the campus has been working toward implementing bike sharing for over a decade. Dockless bikes work by downloading the VeoRide app, adding a payment method on the app and finding a bike on the map, which is then used and billed dependent on the time of usage on the bike. “Many students may be hesitant to purchase a bicycle for college, but bikes can help reduce commute time across campus or to downtown Urbana or Champaign,” Wilcock said. “I hope that students see this as an opportunity to have the convenience of a bicycle but at a very low cost.” Anyone can use the service by signing into the VeoRide app and payment is automatic after using the bike. “(Dockless bike) operators are required to submit a $600 application fee, two $1,000 security deposits (held by the City of Champaign and the City of Urbana), and $5 per bicycle to the University of Illinois as a registration fee,” Leroy said. Operators will need to decide what to do with their services during the winter months, but their licenses are valid throughout the calendar year. “The City of Champaign is excited to add to the wealth of transportation choices available in our city. Biking is a safe, sustainable, and convenient mode of transportation, and dockless bike share brings cycling to a broad swath of our population,” said Leroy. epr2@dailyillini.com

FROM 1A

UGL additional camera and recording equipments, and the pre-existing video and audio studio had the equipment updated. “As we continue to introduce new programs, our revised staffing plan will ensure that we can provide a consistent and high level of service to students.” karenl3@dailyillini.com

Memorial built for Yingying Zhang

KENYON EDMOND THE DAILY ILLINI

A memorial was set up for Yingying Zhang on the corner of Goodwin Avenue and Clark Street on Friday. Chinese visiting scholar Zhang was kidnapped on June 9, 2017, by Brent Christensen and has been presumed dead by the FBI. The trial is ongoing and is set to begin on April 9, 2019. The memorial was set up at Zhang’s last known location.

UI student recycles ocean waste for prosthetics BY THERESE POKORNEY ASSISTANT DAYTIME NEWS EDITOR

While some people take measures to reduce plastic waste, one Washingtonbased couple is taking recycling to a higher level by figuring out a way to minimize ocean plastic while providing prosthetic limbs to those in need. “We started with a goal of helping just one kid and now the company has taken a life of its own,” said Chris Moriarity, online University graduate student and co-owner of the Million Waves Project. While experiencing life on the West Coast, Moriarity said he was always aware of the amount of plastic waste that ends up on the shore. One night, after reading about how nearly 40,000 people in the world were in need of prosthetic limbs, Moriarity woke his wife, Laura, up and pitched the

idea of the Million Waves Project. “I asked my wife, Laura, who runs her own marketing agency, if she could put together a basic website and her marketing team just loved it,” he said. “It was about two weeks later when we launched the company on Earth Day.” The couple began collecting plastic water bottles and processing them into a crosscut paper shredder in their garage. Moriarity said the shredded granules are then shipped to the Vermontbased company Filabot, where they’re turned into filament and shipped back to the Moriarity's. Afer the filament is returned to them, the plastic is fed into a 3D printer and shaped into either hands or arms for the recipients. It takes about $45 and 30 plastic bottles to make one hand,

Moriarity said. “We focus on mostly water bottles since there are so many of them that need to be recycled,” he said. “That type of plastic is the easiest to repurpose. We basically just sit in the garage with scissors. The Million Waves Project is 100 percent volunteer-run.” Moriarity said the plastic from water bottles isn’t strong enough to support the weight of a leg or foot being walked on. Since April, the project has given away 18 prosthetic arms and hands to children and adults around the world. Moriarity said they can’t keep up with the demand as the company gains more traction, so the couple hosted a fundraiser to help purchase a commercial-sized shredder to increase their prosthetic output. “Our current set-up can

“We started with a goal of helping just one kid and now the company has taken a life of its own.” CHRIS MORIARITY CO-OWNER OF THE MILLION WAVES PROJECT

produce one school of filament paper per hour, which can make two hands,” he said. “With the commercial shredder, it can make 10 schools of filament per hour. Our ability to help more people is increasing exponentially.” Moriarity said he and his wife currently work full-time jobs while raising their three kids and simultaneously devoting countless hours to the Million Waves Project. Moriarity

is also attending an online master of business administration from the University to learn more about entrepreneurship. “We have high ambitions, so we’ve partnered with the Washington Coast Savers,” he said. “They have warehouses full of plastic from the ocean that we can access for the project. We feel extremely lucky to be able to do this.” tpokor3@dailyillini.com

FROM 1A

BARS The new building opened Aug. 22, along with a revamped version of the old tavern. “It’s going to be a lot more versatile than the old spot. Students are going to be able to use (the bar) a lot more than they did before,” bar and property owner Chris Saunders told The Daily Illini last September. Saunders brought over the legendary mug club tradition, which requires someone to chug a beer, remember a number, drink a second beer and recite that number. If a person does it correctly, they get a card and are guaranteed the use of a mug anytime they come in. The llini Inn now has three floors — a basement with a bar, a main floor and a mezzanine — and is selling both local craft beer and cheaper beer (for chugging in order to join the mug club). The new Inn was designed to mimic the bar’s old aesthetic and carry over traditions, but also appeal to a modern crowd. “We think it will be a popular spot. A ‘take two’ while still carrying over the traditions from the past,” Saunders said. KENYON EDMOND THE DAILY ILLINI

Campustown bar KAM’s under construction since changing owners in August. The owne, Scott Cochrane, said the bar is to be opened by the end of the month.

burszty2@dailyillini.com


4A Monday, August 27, 2018

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University Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod A Congregat ion of St udents in the Hear t of Campus Life

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Monday, August 27, 2018

5A

BEFORE

AFTER The new feature blocks the start/stop area of the person’s excercise route as an increased safety measure.

SCREENSHOTS COURTESY OF STRAVA

Researchers at the University helped fitness-tracking apps update their privacy features to protect the users by making it harder to locate the end and start points.

Researchers, police caution sharing exercise routes online BY HEATHER SCHLITZ ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

People who regularly post their workout routes online through fitness apps may be putting their privacy and safety at risk, according to recently published research about privacy features on fitness-tracking apps. Tens of millions of users post their running, walking or biking routes online through Strava, a fitnesstracking app, while using a privacy feature they believe would hide their home address. However, their locations could be revealed by a geometry problem so simple a high school freshman could solve it, said Adam Bates, professor in Engineering. In a recently published

paper, Bates and his team found privacy features on fitness-tracking apps like Strava and Garmin Connect that allow users to map and share their workout routes on social media weren’t able to effectively protect user privacy. The previous privacy features the apps used, called endpoint privacy zones, placed a circle centered around the user’s home address, blotting out activity occurring inside the circle to prevent others from immediately identifying a sensitive address like a home or workplace. However, because the home address exists at the center of the circle, and radius and points on the boundary of the circle can

be seen by other users, Bates said it could be relatively simple to calculate where the hidden starting point was. The attack algorithm Bates and his team developed and deployed on 21 million public posts on Strava guessed the home addresses of 95 percent of regular users who used the privacy zone feature. “The start and end points are usually close to where you live or work, and someone with bad intentions can use that information to track your whereabouts,” said Pat Wade, communications director for the University of Illinois Police Department. “I can’t think of any theft or injury specifically related to these

apps, but certainly stalking or harassment can be a concern. Stalkers commonly use social media to track the whereabouts of victims.” Bates said all of the apps his team reached out to ended up implementing his team’s recommendations in some form. Strava and Garmin Connect now offer a feature where users can generate a circle that’s not centered around the house, so the user’s home address is equally likely to fall anywhere within the privacy circle, making it substantially more difficult to guess where the user’s home is located. Bates said the attack algorithm his team designed to

guess home addresses with the updated privacy feature was successful only 30 to 45 percent of the time. Bates emphasized the inherent risk in posting personal information online and said users should hesitate to post routes online until they consider the safety concerns that might be associated with it. When Bates uses an app to track his exercise routes, he sets up multiple privacy zones around his home, instead of just one, a practice the Garmin webstie also recommends. Bates said other countermeasures could include users making their profiles private so only their friends can see where the user is exercising or avoid-

ing broadcasting location altogether when exercising alone or in a dangerous location. Wade said he cautions students not to post their exercise routes online. “I personally use these apps to track my running, but I always make sure all the information I log is set to private. I would also go a step further and implore students to take a look at all of their social media and think carefully about the information they are sharing,” Wade said. “Sometimes you may be surprised by what you’re putting out there. Not everything needs to be shared with the world.” schlitz2@dailyillini.com

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August 27, 2018 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

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THE DAILY ILLINI EDITORIAL

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ith The Clybourne and Firehaus closing Sept. 4, the number of University bars is dwindling. But don’t worry, we still have plenty of spots that can make up for the loss. Campustown is in the midst of a possible cultural shift, the likes of which the University has not seen in years. At the moment, four campus bars are either closing, reopening or going through changes in management. Some of these bars attract hundreds of students with weekly specials. Others are staples for alumni and lo-

Don’t wine about it cals. Wednesday Night Karaoke and Tuesday Night half-priced Sharkbowls were Firehaus’ main points of attraction, while Cly’s had Tuesday Wine Night. All of these events saw good turnout, especially with Karaoke and Wine Night — so much that these turnouts rivaled The Red Lion in some instances. But at the same time, these events were the only times Cly’s and Firehaus were more or less packed. Every other day for these bars just didn’t compare to the other party bars on campus. Campustown consists of

three party bars, not including Cly’s: Joe’s Brewery, The Red Lion and KAM’s. Brothers is really in its own category, and the three sports bars — Legends, Murphy’s and the newly remodeled Illini Inn — round the total count to seven bars, all within walking distance here on campus. Students at the University are fortunate to have an above average bar scene, so we shouldn’t be too disappointed about the upcoming changes. Along with the handful of options and atmospheres, campus bar age policies help make going out even better for students who

KAM’S

are 19 and older. Neighboring schools such as Purdue University, Illinois State University and Indiana University have dealt with 21 and up policies for years. The University of Iowa has a good selection of bars that students can enter at 18, but those under 21 have to leave by 10 p.m. But for us, the bar policy is actually an oddity among other schools. We are one of the only campuses that allow 19-year-olds to get in and stay until closing. Being able to experience the bar scene by the second half of your freshman year here seems normal, because

it is. But when you put this in perspective, most undergraduates elsewhere won’t get that experience until they’re well into their junior year. This changes the culture so much between us and other universities. While other schools resort to apartment and house parties for those under 21, we have the option to decide between them at the age of 19. It’s disappointing to see two more bars join the graveyard that is White Horse and C.O. Daniels, but we need to be grateful for the unique bar scene that remains.

FirehausBROTHERS and Cly’s will be names of the past Changing bar scene a port, it’s a respectable one nonetheless. JAIME WATTS More news broke about COLUMNIST the other Cochrane-owned bars. It was announced that both Firehaus and he bar scene here at Cly’s will be closing in the University makes early September, turning up a good amount of into student apartments campus culture. Because with the possibility of havstudents only need to be 19 ing one or both of the bars to enter, and there are few return. restrictions for drinking This is a loss for the stuunderage in most of them, dent body. Firehaus was a bars have been an essengreat restaurant and bar tial place for undergraduto go to with friends or ates to hang out. That is, visiting family, and Cly’s until now. hosted the classic Tuesday The first change that Wine Night. With these broke news was when Scott two closing, there are realCochrane, owner of The ly only three bars left that Red Lion, Firehaus and most undergraduates will The Clybourne, bought go to: KAM’s, The Red Lion KAM’s from Eric Meyand Joe’s Brewery. They er. Meyer grew KAM’s to become overly crowded be the historic bar it is: especially on the weekpuddles of spilled drinks end; however, this does everywhere, the Alma open up opportunities for Mater painting on the wall those bars to take over and its iconic KAM’s smell events like Wine Night and let undergraduates feel become better businesses. like they were in a bar that Even though I’m sadactually has some history. dened by the loss of these Ever since Cochrane bars because I loved to bought KAM’s, there has hang out at them, I underbeen discussion about stand that losing only whether it will be torn two places to party at an down and redone or turned already huge party school into luxury apartments. is not the end of the world. These high rise apartBut I am concerned and ments — ones like 309 Green, HERE. and Skyline Tower — are popping up all over campus at a rapid rate. They are lucrative for the owners because most are marketed as luxury student living and have a high rent compared with the average student apartment. Student apartments are where the money is at, and it seems Cochrane is following the path of a businessman. While this might not be the path alumni and current students sup-

student’s rite of passage

MURPHY’S

T

NDS

JAMIE LINTON ASSISTANT OPINIONS EDITOR

W BERCHAM KAMBER THE DAILY ILLINI

RED LION

interested in what the future bar scene is going to become at the University. It may die out and more students turn to apartment parties, possibly even parties in the new high rises. Looking at the future, it has come to light that the new business move is building student apartments with a bar underneath it. The new Illini Inn has just opened and it follows that same format of having apartments on top and the bar on the first level. The new Illini Inn looks beautiful and put together, but it looks out of place on Fourth and Daniel streets and almost feels like it has lost its character. It is clear these chang-

es are based on profit and accommodating the increasing enrollment. I am curious to see in the future how the new high rises are maintained, whether there will be new bars opened, or if enough students fill all these luxury spaces. Sometimes change for a community is good, and to be honest, we’ll adjust to the changes and still party at bars as we always have been. Most of the incoming freshmen this year will not even know what they missed with The Clybourne and Firehaus, and by the time they’re seniors, those names will just be something of the past. Jaime is a junior in LAS. jaimelw2@dailyillini.com

ILLINI INN

BERCHAM KAMBER THE DAILY ILLINI

ho would’ve thought news that broke three weeks ago could create such a divisive campus debate? On Aug. 10 it was announced that two of the main student bars, The Clybourne and Firehaus, would close their doors after Labor Day weekend. This news came as especially disheartening because it broke just days after KAM’s, a family-run bar that built its reputation over 30 years, was being bought out by none other than Scott Cochrane. For many, including those who worked for these establishments, this came as a huge shock. Although some may argue another Cochrane bar, The Red Lion, is considered the most popular bar on campus, there’s no denying The Clybourne — endearingly nicknamed Cly’s by its fanbase — hosts bar battles and Wine Nights whose attendance challenges other bars’. The glory of campus nightlife is held in bars whose entrance age is 19. Although you’d expect there to be little to no difference in personality within them, each is unique in ways other than drink deals. People have their favorite, whether it’s because of the DJs hired, friends who work there, themed nights or lack of stench. Because of these personalities, seasoned bar-goers know exact-

ly who they’ll run into and the tone of the night before they leave their homes. Although there’s a real fear of the University transitioning from a bar school to a house party school, the brunt of student discontent with this closure stems from insecurity around change. Are we equipped to make this transition? Where will all our friends work after they’re displaced? These are all important questions, but I urge you to remember why these bars are successful in the first place. Yes, they have a 19 entrance age and hopefully always will, but, no matter how our social environment changes, our strong Greek life and longstanding reputation to master rigorous academics with a party hard attitude is what really makes this University. Cochrane has given us plenty of opportunities to have a good time for years now, and we can only hope he has our best interest at heart as he decides what to do with this space. And while I’d like to reassure you that I know he’ll make the right choice, I have more confidence in our student body. Although inconvenient for us, generations of students before have had to adapt to abrupt transitions. Ever hear an alumni talk about C.O. Daniel’s? This paradigm shift is simply a University rite of passage, and it’s up to us to uphold our balanced reputation.

BROTHERS

Jamie is a junior in Media. jlinton2@dailyillini.com

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS | opinions@dailyillini.com with the subject “Letter to the Editor.” The Daily Illini reserves the right to edit for length, libel, grammar and spelling errors, and Daily Illini style or to reject any contributions. Letters must be limited to 300 words. Contributions must be typed and include the author’s name, address and phone number. University students must include their year in school and college.


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Monday, August 27, 2018

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9A

Monday, August 27, 2018

Students react to changing bar culture on campus BY CAMILLE BAER AND EMMA PLATNIK FEATURES EDITOR AND STAFF WRITER

With the upcoming closing of Firehaus and The Clybourne, bar culture in Champaign could change. Right now, there are nine bars on campus: Murphy’s Pub, Brothers, Legends, KAM’s, Joe’s Brewery, The Clybourne, Firehaus, The Red Lion and the newly renovated Illini Inn. When Cly’s and Firehaus close Sept. 4, Champaign will lose two major bars. The buzz among students like Colette Jaslowski, junior in AHS and former Firehaus employee, is what that might do to bar life. Jaslowski was surprised to find out Firehaus was closing when she received an email notifying them of the closures. “We really only heard rumors about it, and I don’t think anyone thought it was really going to happen,” Jaslowski said. “They did tell us that it wasn’t going to during the summer. So we knew it was going to be fine this summer, and I think we all just assumed it was going to be fine in the fall.” Shelby Kosa nov ich, senior in Media and former Cly’s employee, had only heard rumors too. When she found out about the official closing, she said she was shocked and didn’t want to believe it.

“I was really hopeful that it would be a joke or just a s---- rumor ... or a prank that someone was trying to play on me,” Kosanovich said. “I did not want to believe it with all of my heart.” Bella Lindquist, junior in AHS and former Cly’s employee, learned about the closing through other people. She said there was no direct contact between the employees, owner and managers until later. “With social media, I feel like everything uproared,” Lindquist said. “It was like KAM’s is closing, Cly’s is taking over and all these things with all the high rises being put up. So I’d say for like a week and a half it was kind of blurry (over the summer).” Without Cly’s and Firehaus, Jaslowski thinks more students will go to the Red Lion. She said apartment parties might become more popular as well, with people pregaming there before going out. Jaslowski said people sometimes start their nights at Firehaus or Cly’s before heading to Red Lion. But now that those will be gone, she said people will go directly from apartment pregames to Red Lion. “I’m sure people will go to KAM’s, but I really think Lion will be the main bar,” Jaslowski said.

Caroline Graham, junior in LAS and Cly’s employee, isn’t sure what’s going to happen to the bar social scene. She said she’s interested to see what happens with cover, drink deals and bar crowdedness after the two bars close. Kosanovich agrees with Jaslowski that pregames will become more prominent. She thinks they will be longer and people will put more effort into planning them, which might be more fun and a change of pace. The Illini Inn re-opened Aug. 22, and Kosanovich thinks that will become a popular destination. “It will be kind of hilarious. I just think it would be fun to have bar pull there more than anything,” Kosanovich said. Kosanovich said she wonders if daytime parties or other fraternity parties will become more popular with the fewer bar options. “Since so many people are losing their bar pull ... everyone’s going to want to stay at the fraternities or senior houses because the liquor is cheap and you’re able to do that, and no one wants like a $50 tab,” Kosanovich said. Another aspect of bar life that could change is bar crawls. Bar crawls are really big on campus, Jaslowski said. Everyone goes to Cly’s on a

bar crawl and some do go to Firehaus. But now, Jaslowski said bar crawls might not be as mcuh of a thing. “It’s not like people are going to go to KAM’s and then Lion. That’s not a bar crawl,” Jaslowski said. Firehaus is one of the only bars that serves food. There are others, but Jaslowski said Firehaus is one a lot of people went to, so its closing has a big effect. She thinks a lot of people will miss it. The main bars, according to Kosanovich, are Cly’s, Firehaus, KAM’s, Joe’s and Red Lion. Joe’s is the only bar in that group not owned by Scott Cochrane. “I honestly feel like it’s becoming Cochrane University at this point,” Kosanovich said. Even though Cochrane owns four of the five “main” bars, Kosanovich thinks he will keep the bars’ best interests in mind. While she worked at Cly’s, Cochrane involved Kosanovich and other employees in aspects of the bar like creating drink deals. She hopes he does the same at KAM’s. Kosanovich said had she known Cly’s would close, she still would have worked there. “Overall, I honestly feel like it was such a critical piece of my time at U of I,” Kosanovich said. “Without Cly’s, I honestly feel like I would be a very

KENYON EDMOND THE DAILY ILLINI

Students standing outside of The Clybourne on Oct. 17. Both The Clybourne and Firehaus will close Sept. 4.

different person. I met some of my favorite people on campus and honestly some of my best friends there.” Jaslowski said working at Firehaus also felt like a family. She didn’t think she would form the close relationships she did with the staff. Lindquist isn’t too wor-

ried about the changes to bars. “Overall, I think it’s going to be great,” Lindquist said. “Nothing really is going to change, everyone’s still going to be happy. Cochrane employees know how to run a bar.” features@dailyillini.com

ARC group fitness class provides mixed martial arts, exercise BY ELIZABETH SAYASANE STAFF WRITER

“Hello, ninjas,” is how Blanka Janicek, instructor for the group fitness class BODYCOMBAT likes to greet her class. The class begins to practice routines involving round house kicks and upper cut punches. Janicek encourages her members as they work through the 55-minute class period. Janicek is studying for her doctorate in the Department of Material Science and Engineering. She teaches the group fitness classes BODYCOMBAT and BODYATTACK on the side. BODYCOMBAT is organized through the company Les Mills. The company, based in New Zealand, releases routines and soundtracks every three months to keep

TONI PANTONE THE DAILY ILLINI

things fresh. The combat routines are designed by a number of mixed martial artists and are choreographed for groups and individuals alike. For Janicek, those routines are an important part of her day.

“It’s just an hour to be free and be you and just forget it all,” Janicek said. “Think about something so simple as. ‘Wow that hurts and I’m sweating, and I feel great.’” A group fitness class such as this one can have many benefits, said Kenneth

Wilund, professor in AHS. “The best type of exercise is the type that somebody’s willing to do, and the worst type is the type that they’re not willing to,” Wilund said. The social component of the class is a large benefit that could encourage participants, Wilund said. It also is a class with high intensity and incorporates a wide variety of activity in one session. Wilund explained that in the case of training for something or working to improve performance in a specific sport, this fitness class would be of little help. On the other end, jumping right into a new, intense workout routine is also a concern. Wilund said this is the greatest risk someone has with a class like BODYCOMBAT. Neha Pravin Gothe, assis-

tant professor in AHS, describes martial arts as “non-traditional activities,” along with yoga, tai chi, mindful meditation and certain types of dance. That is primarily because of how old many of these forms of exercise and fitness are. She said yoga has been mentioned in philosophy and the scriptures for centuries. Tai chi and some martial arts have also been around for hundreds of years. “Some of these non-traditional forms ... it’s not just exercise for your body, but it’s also exercise for your brain or your mind,” Gothe said. She also mentioned the mind-body connection. Gothe said exercise has helped with depression, anxiety, stress and mood disorders. She also said research into these non-traditional

activities is growing. Janicek said she enjoys working with the Les Mills program because it allows her to focus on her delivery when she is teaching the class. This class in particular is a favorite of hers because “you feel very tough, almost like a warrior.” Irene Andsager, who graduated last December, still attends this class. She said punching is her favorite. Janicek tries to make the class accessible to people regardless of fitness level. Throughout the class, she will give options for how to make a maneuver or combination more difficult. “In the end, I just want them to feel awesome, to feel like they’ve kicked butt,” Janicek said. eis3@dailyillini.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

Across

1 Host with a microphone 6 Egyptian goddess with a repetitive name 10 Three blind creatures, in a children’s rhyme 14 West Coast N.F.L. player 15 Smeller 16 Black, to poets 17 Unplanned 20 Suffix with count 21 California/Nevada border lake 22 Chutzpah 23 Singer with the multiplatinum albums “19,” “21” and “25” 25 “That’s all ___ got” 27 Suffix with cash or cloth 28 Parliamentary agenda 32 Hold on property 33 Pitching stat 34 Memo-heading inits. 35 “___ fool!” 37 Yang’s partner 39 Writer ___ Rice Burroughs 43 Chest protector 45 San Francisco’s ___ Hill 47 Fish in some salads 48 Literary club feature 52 Preceder of Alamos or Angeles 53 She’s a sheep 54 “I Still Believe ___” (#1 Vince Gill country song) 55 Pen name 57 Door fastener 59 Dallas sch. with a presidential library 62 Annual Time issue

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puzzle by todd gross

65 “CHiPs” actor Estrada 66 First chip in the pot 67 Previously aired show 68 Profit’s opposite 69 Old Russian ruler 70 Place for camels to rest

Down

1 Otherwise 2 GPS graphics 3 One leading a fight for change 4 Good listener? 5 Displayer of one’s feelings 6 Possibly, but unlikely 7 Artsy Manhattan neighborhood 8 “Yeah, that seems plausible”

9 College term: Abbr. 10 Idea that spreads popularly and widely 11 Barcelona’s peninsula 12 Pass along 13 Go through the door 18 Not true 19 Cyclops feature 24 “Raging Bull” star Robert 26 TV broadcast band 28 Rock-___ (jukebox brand) 29 Fabric tear 30 Like a sound that can barely be heard 31 Playground retort 36 This way 38 Pitcher’s tour de force 40 N.R.A. members

41 Insect in a colony 42 Quaint college cheer 44 Ship’s front 46 Park furniture 48 Orchestral work by Ravel 49 Egyptian god who’s a brother of 6-Across 50 Criminals 51 “You saved me!” 52 Place to put an American flag pin 56 Poses a question 58 Skin conditioner brand 60 Island ESE of Oahu 61 Large coffee holders 63 Turner who led a slave rebellion 64 Vote in favor

The crossword solution is in the Classified section.


10A

MONDAY

August 27, 2018 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

LIFE & CULTURE

KENYON EDMOND THE DAILY ILLINI

Christine Ahn and Ryne Thiel, 19 and 23 years old and co-owners of Hammerhead Coffee, pose for a photo holding freshly prepared drinks. The entreprenurial couple just purchased Hammerhead Coffee this summer.

UI junior purchases Champaign coffee house BY CAMILLE BAER FEATURES EDITOR

Christine Ahn is a junior in ACES. She also co-owns Hammerhead Coffee, located at 608 E. University Ave. in Champaign, with her fiance, Ryne Thiel. At 19 and 23 years old respectively, they reached out to Hammerhead’s previous owner over the summer. The deal went through to purchase the coffee shop and they have been running it on their own since mid-July. Ahn said that when her fiance visited her over the summer, she was showing him around Champaign when they stopped for coffee at Hammerhead. Ahn told him it was her favorite place to study when, suddenly, he proposed the idea of buying the establishment. “He was just like, ‘What if we just buy it out and then you can be the owner of Hammerhead?’ So that same day we contacted the owner and we worked out a deal,” Ahn said. Ahn wanted to be an entrepreneur from an early age, and the moment this opportunity presented itself, she said it was everything she wanted. She also said that when she was younger, she ran her own sterling silver business, so taking this next step to a brick-and-mortar business seemed natural to her. “I ended up taking out a loan on top of all my student loans because my parents

aren’t helping me through school at all, so I thought that I would need some sort of way to pay back all my student loans on top of everything,” Ahn said. Thiel has been an entrepreneur for the past five years, so he felt comfortable making this next step in his professional life as well. He said he had an epiphany, so-tospeak, about a dream of owning a coffee shop. After seeing Hammerhead, he wasted no time making this dream come true. Thiel said he was looking for a place to run close to where his fiancee was living, and he thought Hammerhead was by far the most aesthetically pleasing. He also loved that it used high-quality beans to make coffee. “I saw a lot of potential, so I pretty much cold-called the owner, Todd, and I’m like, ‘Dude, let me cut you a deal,’ and 30 minutes later we made a deal,” Thiel said. “It was pretty spontaneous — I wanted to buy the place, so I did.” When Thiel was 17, he started his first company called Cavetech LLC, which developed websites for clients who didn’t know how to write code. He spent much of his childhood behind a computer and has always enjoyed writing code, whether it was for pleasure or for business. Thiel, with previous knowledge of running a company, found Hammerhead’s foun-

dation perfect to build off of and to continue to grow over time. He said the previous owner had not anticipated the amount of work cultivating a coffee business would be, especially because he was also busy with other side businesses. “His execution didn’t quite work out, but what his plans were, it was going in the right direction,” Thiel said. “I just wanted to buy it so that I could make it into what it is that I see it being in the future.” Nathan Kim, Ahn’s friend and an employee at Hammerhead, wanted to help Ahn, and he found Hammerhead to be a great place to work. He said he and Ahn had experience in the service industry together, as they used to work at a sushi restaurant. Kim said that for anyone working at a new company or business, it’s important to remain open to changes and to be patient with new management. When an establishment is growing, it’s hard to perfect things right away. Ahn and Thiel have already implemented several changes to Hammerhead that have made significant improvements to their success, like extending the shop's hours to 12 a.m. each night and bringing Taiyaki, a popular dessert in Japan that is hard to find in America, to Hammerhead. They also changed how they make their pastries, which are now made in-house. With a history of baking

“He was just like, ‘What if we just buy it out and then you can be the owner of Hammerhead?’” CHRISTINE AHN CO-OWNER OF HAMMERHEAD COFFEE

and plenty of family recipes, Ahn started from scratch and began making all of their baked goods. Her favorite: the butter cake — a delicious, decadent and sweet pastry that pairs perfectly with Hammerhead’s coffee. Now, the only thing not made in-house is the Taiyaki. After a few months of new ownership, Ahn said their profits have almost doubled since the turnover. “I have a student’s perspective, so I know exactly what I wanted when I came here to study, and then now I can implement those changes into the actual business,” Ahn said. “I’ve always loved baking and cooking ... Now that I’m doing what I love, it doesn’t feel like I’m going to work.” cabaer2@dailyillini.com

KENYON EDMOND THE DAILY ILLINI

Christine Ahn, co-owner of Hammerhead Coffee and junior at the University, prepares a drink on Thursday.


1B

MONDAY

August 27, 2018 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

SPORTS

SOCCER

COLUMN

Big Ten teams as NFL QBs ELI SCHUSTER SPORTS EDITOR

S

oon enough, our noses will be tickled with the sweet smell of pigskin in the morning. Saturdays and Sundays will be loaded with greasy snacks, minimal movement and plenty of mixed emotions. With all of this at the center of my mind, I decided to write a column full of wild accusations to connect both the professional and college football world. Like many of us, I’ve thought plenty of times about how the personality of an NFL quarterback compares to the play of an entire Big Ten team. You know, standard thought. Let’s get into it.

Ohio State - Dak Prescott

PHOTO COURTESY OF ILLINI ATHLETICS

Illinois celebrates after a goal in its game against North Carolina on Aug. 16. The early season performance against North Carolina could be a sign of things to come for the Illini.

Illini land big early season upset BY MILES POWERS-HUANG ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

After finishing last season 5-14 the Illinois soccer team is already showing signs of improvement as the 2018 campaign kicks off. To open the regular season, the Illini headed to North Carolina for matches with the Tar Heels and the Duke Blue Devils. Against North Carolina, Illinois took an early lead through a 16th-minute goal from Kelly Maday, and kept the 1-0 lead heading into half-time. However, they were unable to withstand the Tar Heel attack in the second half, conceding three goals within a 23-minute stretch, dropping the match 3-1. In the following contest against No. 3 Duke, the Illini would grab an upset victory from the Blue Devils. After Duke opened the scoring in the 16th minute, Illinois freshman Makena Silber responded immediately with an 18th-minute goal. Katie Le put the go-ahead goal into the back of the net just before half-time, and the Illini dug in defensively to hold on for a 2-1 triumph. Head coach Janet Rayfield felt her team responded well to high-quality competition. “Over the weekend, our team just continued to grow,” Rayfield said. “Obviously you need to create chances to score goals against good

teams, and we want to continue that. There was never a moment in either of those games where we weren’t fighting for each other.” The Illini next traveled up to Chicago to take on DePaul, but lost 3-1. Rayfield appreciates the obstacles that the nonconference season presents. “The nonconference schedule is put together to present challenges to our team,” Rayfield said. “We went out to North Carolina, played two top teams, we go play an in-state rivalry on an artificial surface in an urban environment, so we’re looking for our team to be resilient.” Beating a team with the prestige of Duke is already a bigger accomplishment than anything the Illinois achieved a season ago. Rayfield often preached about building a culture last season, and feels that the early success is a sign of a culture within the team that is changing for the better. “I think the culture has continued to evolve, and I think the ‘whatever it takes’ mentality has been established,” Rayfield said. “They’ve preached that culture and are encouraging that in each other, and that makes a difference.” Rayfield has multiple players that embody that mentality, and having them back for

The Buckeyes are a quick-moving team that year after year rides the coattails of a breakout player who heads to the draft. Then, the QB holds down the fort for his college years. In this case, Prescott is literally riding the wave of former Ohio State player Eziekel Elliot. When it comes down to it, Prescott is good enough to run his team. He can go on the run if need be and then sling it down the field, one or two times, accurately during the game for a massive score. Prescott has what it takes to lead a team into the playoffs, but when push comes to shove and it’s all up to him, he just can’t get the job done.

Minnesota - Matt Cassel

PHOTO COURTESY OF ILLINI ATHLETICS

True freshman Makena Silber attacks with the ball as the Illini battle North Carolina on Aug. 16. Silber marked the beginning of her freshman year with a game-tying goal at No. 3 Duke on Aug. 19.

another year will continue the team’s development. Jaelyn Cunningham led the conference in saves and finished second in school history for single-season saves with 106. While critics may argue she only saved that many shots because the Illini defense allowed more attacking pressure than most others, Cunningham continued to come up with stop after stop, keep-

ing her team in games they would have been long out of otherwise. Katie Le went into last season as a true freshman from the east coast buried on the depth chart, but she worked her way up the pecking order and was often trusted by Rayfield to use her pace as an energetic spark plug for Illinois as the season went on. Although she did not find the back of the net last sea-

son, the Virginia native made sure to get on the scoring sheet early on in her sophomore campaign, scoring the critical goal at Duke. While Illinois may not yet be ready to seriously contend in the Big Ten, performances like the one against Duke lay the foundation for better things to come. @MilesP_H milesp2@dailyillini.com

The potential to put together a winning team has been present for the Golden Gophers for quite some time. As they try to figure out the P.J. Fleck era, the team continues to rely on players they hope to be diamonds in the rough. Matt Cassel is the human embodiments of the phrase “one of these days.” In college, the man had a total of 20 completions for the USC Trojans as he sat behind the likes of Carson Palmer and Matt Leinart. Yet, NFL team’s looked his way for success and still do. Cassel has continued to fool NFL general managers in almost the same way that the Gophers have fooled their fans.

Nebraska - Lamar Jackson We have no idea what to expect with Nebras-

SEE BIG TEN | 5B

FOOTBALL

Rod Smith brings energy to team as new offensive coordinator BY GAVIN GOOD STAFF WRITER

It’s been widely reported by now — new offensive coordinator Rod Smith is bringing an up-tempo, spread offense to Memorial Stadium this season. As a result, Illinois is expected to pass the ball more and move quickly, and it remains to be seen what that means for the running game. Right now, it means the Illini running backs are doing everything. They’re taking handoffs up the middle, outside, working on blocks and even lining up in the slot to catch passes. The Illini’s most successful 2017 rusher, sophomore Mike Epstein (346 yards, three touchdowns), is thrilled with the diversity of the offense’s demands and what it allows him to do

with the ball in his hands. “It’s something I’d only wish for,” Epstein said. “I feel like it was meant to be. We all have a really good skill set and not only myself, but all the backs here can really catch the ball. It makes things really tough for the defense, even harder than just keying in on the running back.” Illinois certainly wants to be harder to defend on the ground — the team finished with pitiful rushing totals in 2017 under Garrick McGee as offensive coordinator, only gaining 1,267 yards all year on the ground (No. 122 in the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision, 105.6 yards per game). The rushing struggles combined with an inability from the quarterbacks to complete passes resulted in an offense that

failed to get much going all season, averaging 280.4 yards per game overall (No. 126 in FBS). Junior running back Dre Brown has seen three offensive coordinators ahead of his fourth season at Illinois, and though he was unable to play in 2015 and 2016 due to serious knee injuries, the Dekalb, Illinois, native is impressed with Smith and his plan. “You have to be an allaround back to play in this offense,” Brown said. “We’ve been learning that we’re trying to get better each and every day.” Brown described Smith’s approach to coaching as one that is reflective of what needs to be done in life to be successful. You get assigned a job, you get it done. “(There is) almost like a

level of maturity, of professionalism in that you have a job and you’re expected to do it every time,” Brown said. “If you don’t, there are going to be consequences. Which is awesome because that’s life. Later on in life, I’ll have a job. I won’t be playing football anymore; I’ll be asked to do stuff and I’ll have to do it.” Brown has yet to feature for the Illini for a complete season (he carried 31 times for 138 yards before getting injured in 2017), but Smith has tended to rely on a variety of backs in his offenses. That bodes well for not only Brown but also for freshmen tailbacks Jakari Norwood and Kenyon Sims, who are looking to carve GAVIN GOOD THE DAILY ILLINI out roles for themselves Sophomore running back Mike Epstein grabs the handoff this season. during practice drills at Illinois football training camp on Aug. 10. Offensive coordinator Rod Smith is looking to use the

SEE SMITH | 5B team’s running back depth as the season approaches.


2B Monday, August 27, 2018

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VOLLEYBALL

Volleyball adds talent, refines skills heading into new season BY MEGHAN REST ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

Head coach Chris Tamas and the Illinois volleyball team began their 2018 season with a sweep at the Colorado State Tournament. The Illini posted a 3-0 performance against North Carolina Wilmington, a 3-2 victory over No. 25 Colorado State and a dramatic 3-2 win over Northern Colorado to close out the tourney. The squad returns to the court after a loss to Michigan State in the Sweet 16 of the 2017 NCA A tournament. The women went 23-11 and finished fifth in the Big Ten under first-year head coach Chris Tamas. Illinois returns 12 members from last year’s team and is one of seven Big Ten schools ranked in the top25 of the AVCA preseason poll, including last year’s NCA A Champion No. 2 Nebraska, No. 4 Minnesota and No. 6 Penn State. While the Illini bid farewell to lone senior libero Brandi Donnelly after last season, the team welcomes in three new members, freshmen Diana Brown and Taylor Kuper, and junior transfer Ashlyn Fleming. Brown joins the Illini from St. Francis DeSales high school in Columbus,

Ohio. In addition to Brown’s accolades as a high school setter, including four AllCentral District honors and four First-Team AllCentral Catholic League awards, she makes up one of three setters on the Illini roster. She joins senior setter and AVCA All-American Jordyn Poulter and sophomore Kylie Bruder. Kansas’ 2017-18 Gatorade Athlete Kuper hails from Olathe Northwest high school in Lenexa, Kansas, and helped lead her high school squad to consecutive state championships as a defensive specialist. Fleming transferred into the Illinois volleyball program after spending two years at the University of the Pacific as a middle blocker. During her time as a Powercat, Fleming started 229 sets and toted 285 kills with a .347 hitting percentage and 125 total blocks. While the team continues to add new talent, returning Illini had the opportunity to sharpen its skills across the country this summer. Poulter spent the summer leading the U.S. Women’s Volleyball National Team at the Pan American cup to a gold medal as the only active

collegiate athlete on the roster. Tamas said her success on the court this summer comes from her drive as an athlete. “She’s always been (driven),” Tamas said. “That’s the reason she’s been with USA Volleyball because she is the way she is. But that’s all I ask of her — to work hard every day.” According to Tamas, the summer months established a solid foundation for his second season at the helm of the Illini. “Summer was good, we had a lot of good workouts,” Tamas said. “They came back and looked good for our first handful of practices.” During the summer, the Illini coaching staff is allowed limited contact, but the players take part in individual strength and conditioning workouts. This fall the Illini’s schedule is slightly harder than last seasons, according to Tamas. Illinois is slated to square off against conference championship contenders including No. 17 Washington and No. 13 Creighton. @Meghan_Rest mrest2@dailyillini.com

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3B

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Illinois wide receiver Carmoni Green eyes a defensive back during the game against Rutgers on Oct. 24, 2017. The Illini lost 35-24. Green wants to make an instant impact to start the year.

Green’s offseason persistence shows great potential BY ELI SCHUSTER SPORTS EDITOR

Half of sophomore wide receiver Carmoni Green’s receptions in 2017 came in one game. It was a season where head coach Lovie Smith played more true freshmen than any other team in college football, yet the four-star (Rivals) recruit out of Miami didn’t find his breakout performance. On Nov. 7, 2017, Green caught four receptions for 28 yards against Iowa, the best game he would have all season. Take a step back and look at his season numbers, and he only got his hands on the ball eight

times for a total of 75 yards. Now, Green is surpassing his freshman season total in yardage almost on a daily basis at Illinois football training camp. A year has made all the difference for the 6-foot-1 wideout and, no matter who is up at quarterback, Green is making plays. “My offseason, it was very intense,” Green said. “When I went back home to Miami, I put in a lot of work every day to try and get better. I see the improvement when I come out here every day.” The improvement led to not only more reps for Green, but more looks on

the deep ball as well. No receiver has been targeted down the field more than Green during this Illini training camp run. Whether it be a 45-yard dime from freshman quarterback Matt Robinson or an extended grab that came off the hands of probable starter AJ Bush, Green is connecting with his quarterbacks. “All of our quarterbacks are great, they make smart decisions,” Green said. “These guys, they hit their targets and then they make smart decisions; they know when to throw it out of bounds. Last year, I didn’t see a lot of that, but now I

see that.” While Green has garnered growing attention from players and staff alike, he has been sure to notice his personal improvements as well. “My route running has got extremely better,” Green said. “I know how to set guys up quicker and know when to take it off and cut it back on and things like that.” wThe work Green has said to put in during the offseason continues to pay off and the receiver has no lack of confidence in his skills. Speed, route running and a knowledge of the game are the qualities Green will

“I put in a lot of work every day to try and get better. I see the improvement when I come out here every day.” CARMONI GREEN SOPHOMORE WIDE RECEIVER

use this season to describe what he brings to the team. As the kickoff against Kent State nears its Sept. 1 deadline, Green wants to do all he can to prove his worth. And while many of his receptions have come down the field, he wants to assure his teammates he can make plays anywhere.

“I want to be able to stretch the field,” Green said. “But also I want to be an all-around receiver, like a great route runner, just a guy that you can count on in tough situations. I want to be that guy.” @Schuster_Elias eeschus2@dailyillini.com

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FROM 1B

BIG TEN ka this season. New head coach Scott Frost has left his undefeated (national champion?) UCF team to enter the Big Ten lifestyle. The team has an incredible amount of potential to surprise some people right off the bat, but it also may take some time to get things right. Lamar Jackson comes to the NFL with plenty of expectations, but fans are ready to wait for his on-field production.

Monday, August 27, 2018

Not to mention, both Winston and Maryland are well known for their crab legs.

FROM 1B

Rutgers - Brian Hoyer

Running backs coach Thaddeus Ward has seen things he likes in each one of his guys after a week in camp. “Ra’Von (Bonner), Reggie (Corbin) and Mike, those guys have been pretty solid throughout camp,” Ward said. “Dre is making a big move, has been really, really good here in training camp. Seeing some good things out of Jakari, continuing to push him this week. And the youngster (Sims), he’s been here for a week, but he’s doing a good job as well.” As camp progresses though, Ward knows Smith will call more on the veteran members of the unit for reps. As reps become harder to come by and each one begins to count for more as the Sept. 1 season opener against Kent State approaches, Ward wants to see his guys ramp up the intensity and continue to make strides toward improvement. “You’ve got to be really on point with what you’re doing,” Ward said. “It’s really good for our guys to get in and be able to push the tempo to try and use that for our advantage. Rod does a great job of putting us in position, putting our guys in space, allowing our guys to go out and make plays in space.” Reggie Corbin and Ra’Von Bonner also provide the Illini with options at the position — Corbin has had some explosive moments in camp but seemed to regress last season under Garrick McGee (78 yards on 18 attempts). Bonner has been used in short yardage situations and around the goal line throughout his time at Illinois, and he could find himself in a similar role this season. Corbin is optimistic about he and his teammates and are progressing after about a week and a half of camp. For him, it’s not about becom-

SMITH

Hoyer came into the league with minimal expectations. Rutgers goes into every season with minimal expectations. Hey, maybe just like Hoyer’s trip to the playoffs in 2016, Rutgers can find a way to put together one season down the road.

Purdue - Nick Foles

The Boilermakers have some good players; however, not one of them will suprise you. How the team is going Iowa - Alex Smith to perform really depends The Hawkeyes are a team on the schedule it is dealt, full of ups and downs. Each but Jeff Brohm knows he season fans aren’t surprised can put together plenty of if Kirk Ferentz somehow watchable performances. pulls together nine wins. Nick Foles is almost the ideOften, the team just under- al backup quarterback. If he stands how to win football is dealt the right cards, can PHOTO COURTESY OF TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE games. It may not be flashy, put together one heck of a Quarterback Mitch Trubisky of the Chicago Bears competes it may not be a blowout, but fun game. in a game against the Minnesota Vikings in 2017. Trubisky is a Iowa will string together young NFL talent that, much like the Illini football team, looks win after win. Alex Smith Northwestern - Case Keenum for big improvement. has continued to be producI feel like part of this is tive each season of his NFL because he wore purple last finds themselves a relative- ated, but when the Badcareer, with some standseason, but I stand by the ly productive quarterback. gers play I’m definitely not out performances along comparison. Keenum came He can sit in the pocket and running to the TV to tune the way. Like Smith, Iowa into the league with no one make the necessary plays. in. The team is methodican push its way into the watching. He bounced back In some cases, the quarter- cal, slow-paced and simple. postseason but once it gets and forth from the Texans back can even lead the team Say what you will about there, it’ll be a sad show. and Rams before finally in clutch moments. Overall, Blake Bortles, but the man Alex Smith playoff record finding himself some sucthe Spartans fit with Kurt has, sofar, made a name (since 2005): 2-5 cess with the Vikings. It Cousins, both being consis- for himself in the NFL. He Iowa Bowl record (since took Northwestern quite a tent and productive. isn’t very exciting and he 2005): 4-7 while to find their place in I can’t help myself, YOU also isn’t your number one the Big Ten, but Pat Fitzger- LIKE THAT? choice. Although, he is a Indiana - Brock Osweiler ald has finally made somerelatively safe bet and you In the Hoosier state, it’s thing work. Keenum makes Michigan - Ryan Tannehill know what you’re going to all basketball all the time. the fans happy but brings Ryan Tannehill has plen- get. If the Hoosiers team needs the harsh realization that ty of physical talent and a some more help, the Idaa realistic championship lot of upsides. Although, Illinois - Mitch Trubisky ho-native inches 6-foot-7 run will always be just out injuries have plagued his Mind my metaphor, but with a mean inside game. of reach. career and once again he is Trubisky is a young flower The scholarship offer from trying to bounce back. Each that just hasn’t sprouted. Gonzaga shouldn’t go Penn State - Matt Ryan season leading up to his The Illini are in the midst of unnoticed. The Nittany Lion put up ACL injury in 2017, everya huge rebuild and the team big numbers with plenty one expected Tannehill and is relying on young players Maryland - Jameis Winston of highlight reel plays. The the Miami Dolphins to take to learn the game. Trubisky, Currently, plenty of conteam can dominate the that next step. In recent has potential to grow each troversies revolve around regular season, picking up Wolverine history, expecta- year but has a lot to improve the Maryland Terrapins wins over big opponents. tions have been high going on. It may take some time athletic program. For the Although, when the lights into the next season but Jim to get things right, but if all past couple of years, people shine bright the moment Harbaugh just hasn’t been goes according to plan the have expected the team becomes too big. Matt Ryan able to turn things around. making of a strong, reliable to take a step in the right wins you plenty of ball The roster is full of talent, QB could be in the works. direction and finally, after games and can even put but getting the most out of it Trubisky is an experiment last season it looked like it together an MVP season, has been a real problem. as is the Lovie Smith-built was going to happen. Howbut hoisting the final trophy Illini (and the coach's facial ever, just like Winston’s is no easy task for him. Wisconsin - Blake Bortles hair). 2016 season, the progress Wisconsin is boring. I was interrupted by continu- Michigan State- Kurt Cousins respect everything about @Schuster_Elias ous off -the -field problems. Michigan State always what Paul Cryst has creeeschus2@dailyillini.com

“You’ve got to be really on point with what you’re doing. It’s really good for our guys to get in and be able to push the tempo to try and use that for our advantage. Rod does a great job of putting us in position, putting our guys in space, allowing our guys to go out and making plays in space.” THADDEUS WARD RUNNING BACK COACH

ing noticeably better from practice to practice, but rather working hard each day and improving gradually as time passes. “You have to keep pushing,” Corbin said. “We’re not even focused on our first game right now. We’re taking it day-by-day, and as long as we are better tomorrow than we were today, we’ll be perfectly fine.” If the Illini can get it right, Epstein is confident the unit will have a much better year than it did while he was a freshman. Illinois can dictate the pace and in doing so, they can dictate the direction of the game, Epstein said. “It’s a whole new element when you’re playing fast,” Epstein said. “The (other) team’s getting exhausted, you can almost run anything and they won’t be able to do anything about it. If we’re in really good shape and we’re running fast and executing, getting first downs, the defense is going to be in trouble.” @itsallG_O_O_D gavinrg2@dailyillini.com

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Announcements

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

11. Jun 2008 DELIVERY TEAM MEMBER Panera is seeking Delivery Team Members (Drivers) to coordinate drop-off of our customer orders with 100% on-time delivery and a high level of customer service.

DINING ROOM COORDINATOR Do you enjoy using your creativity to enhance the dining experience for customers? Do you like working with seniors and with youth? Do you have front-of-house restaurant experience, a hospitality mindset and good with details? We have just the job for you! We are ClarkLindsey Village, and we are looking for a Dining Room Coordinator.

Highly Competitive Wages Flexible and Independent Schedule No Cash Handling Required Requirements WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FOR: Personal vehicle in good condition (We also deliver on scooters and bicycles which are provided) Valid driver’s license and clean driver’s record Proof of insurance Excellent customer service skills Maintain a professional appearance Please apply online today. Panera Bread is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Email brandon.leonard@ panerabread.com ark-lindsey.com/work-volunteer Email clvhr@clark-lindsey.com

FOR RENT

Rentals

2 BDR, non-smoking. Near Westside Park. Secured building w/ elevator. DW; laundry; C/A; parking; water; basic cable included. $675/month. 401 N. Prarie. (217) 202-2785

FRONT OF HOUSE STAFF CHAMPAIGN COUNTRY CLUB is Now recruiting full and part time Front of House Staff to join our TEAM. Our outstanding reputation is based on the Club’s commitment to excellence in our quality of services and the experiences we provide to our membership and guests. Each team member contributes to our success. If you are looking for an opportunity to join an awesome team that prioritizes working hard while having fun, Champaign Country Club is THE place. WE OFFER- Competitive wages, meaningful benefits, approachable managers who care about your development, opportunity for advancement, flexible scheduling, free staff meals during shifts, golf benefits, a great environment.

This is a full time position for someone who has experience with set up and service of a dining room meal service, including special functions. It includes responsibility for supervision of waitstaff and the desire to make the dining experience for seniors an enjoyable one. Previous fine dining and supervisory experience is preferred as well as experience with a point of sales system. We offer competitive wages and excellent benefits. Schedule includes every other weekend with two days off during the week when working weekends. Hours are 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Sundays. Apply online: www.cl

2 11. Jun 2008

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1 BDR - Living Room - Kitchen - Bath - Parking- Laundry Near Downtown Champaign. (217) 766-3008

1 BDR. Spacious remodeled apartment w/balcony. Close to downtown Champaign. C/A. $525/ month. 405 N. State. (217) 202-2785

illio

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5 PUTT ZONE FUN CENTER Putt Zone features two beautifully manicured, 18-Hole miniature golf courses, a 5-cage batting range with Baseball and Softball, and two Jump Shot basketball trampolines. Email nraed26@yahoo.com

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OFFICIAL YEARBOOK AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

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THE DAILY ILLINI  |  WWW.DAILYILLINI.COM

Monday, August 27, 2018

Playlist: Local jams for a new semester BY ELANI KAUFMAN AND KATIE POWERS BUZZ EDITORS

For students both old and new, the best way to get to class is accompanied by the perfect soundtrack. With summer coming to an end, it’s time to update your PAUSE

playlist for the fall season. What better way to do that than by embracing the talent that surrounds the University of Illinois campus? Champaign-Urbana is home to a diverse music scene, ensuring that everyone will find something

to love. The bands listed below are all in our backyards (and on Bandcamp). There is plenty more to discover, but this playlist is a good place to start. ekaufmn2@readbuzz.com

Created by: buzz • 14 songs, 54 min

FOLLOW

SONG

buzz calendar BY EMILY PEASE AND KAYLA BROWN BUZZ CALENDAR EDITORS

The buzz calendar is a compilation of events happening in the Champaign-Urbana area. Follow our top picks in Monday’s and Thursday’s papers for ideas on what to do on any night of the week, from where to eat to what to watch. Want to submit an event? Email calendar@readbuzz.com.

MONDAY, AUG. 27

Paleta Social

Follow buzz’s Spotify @buzzmagcu

 6:30-7 p.m.  La Casa Cultural Latina  Free, all ages Welcome back, everyone! La Casa invites you to kick off the school year by joining us for a Paleta Social. This year, we will be combining Paleta Social with ¿Que Pasa, La Casa? Enjoy free paletas while learning about the various registered student organizations that are affiliated with La Casa. This is also a great opportunity to meet new and returning students.

ARTIST

“Somewhere”

Nectar

“League of My Own”

CJ Run

“A Rocket to the Moon”

Bookmobile

Free Fitness Week Fall 2018 “Tiger’s Eye”

Spandrels

“Better than Yesterday”

Sun Stereo

“Deadbeat Boyfriend”

Ghoul Jr.

“Et tu, Larry?”

Jarring

“Hand in Mine”

The Bashful Youngens

“Say Her Name”

Mother Nature

“Came To”

Motes

 6 a.m.  Urbana Park District, 505 W. Stoughton St., Urbana  Free, all ages Try out any fitness classes at the Phillips Recreation Center, the Urbana Indoor Aquatic Center, the Anita Purves Nature Center or Brookens Gym for free this week. It’s one way we can say “Thanks!” to our continuing participants and “Welcome!” to our new participants. So come on by, try out a class and let us know what you think. Fitness class schedules can be found at urbanaparks.org/ programs/fitness-and-wellness/.

Annual YMCA Picnic

 Noon-1:30 p.m.  University YMCA, 1001 S. Wright St., Champaign  Free, all ages All the burgers, hot dogs and veggie burgers you can handle and, of course, the party flamingo.

“The Skeleton and the Process”

We the Animals

“Shades of Us”

Melvin Knight and the Amber Sky

“So You’ll Bloom”

ZXO

“An Augury”

Winder CINDY OM THE DAILY ILLINI

9B

TUESDAY, AUG. 28

Jazz Tuesdays at Boomerangs

 7-10 p.m.  Boomerangs Bar & Grill, 1309 E. Washington St., Urbana  Free, 18+ Every Tuesday we clear the Boom-Stage for the best jazz musicians in the region — cats like Donnie Heitler, Jeff Helgesen, Chip McNeil, Josh Quirk, Clark Gibson (on occasion) and many, many more.

“BlacKkKlansman”

 4 p.m.  The Art Theater, 126 W. Church St., Champaign  $10, Rated R Spike Lee recreates the incredible true story of an American hero. It’s the early 1970s, and Ron Stallworth (John David Washington) is the first African-American detective to serve in the Colorado Springs Police Department. Determined to make a name for himself, Stallworth bravely sets out on a dangerous mission: infiltrate and expose the Ku Klux Klan. The young detective recruits a more seasoned colleague, Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver), into the undercover investigation of a lifetime. Together, they team up to take down the extremist hate group as the organization aims to sanitize its violent rhetoric to appeal to the mainstream. Produced by the team behind the Academy-Award winning “Get Out.”

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29

Wednesday Night Trivia at Rafters

 7-9 p.m.  Rafters Draft and Dough, 1906 W. Bradley Ave., Champaign  Free, 19+ Grab your friends and join us for the best weekly trivia around. Each week we have seven rounds of trivia designed to challenge you and to ensure it’s your best night of the week.

Sipyard Live

 7-9 p.m.  Sipyard, 204 W. Main St., Urbana  Free, 19+ Every Wednesday, we have a local musician lineup jamming in the beer garden. This Wednesday, New Souls will be performing. Sponsored by First Federal Savings Bank of Champaign, Triptych Brewing and Riggs Beer Company are always on tap. No cover. If you like the sounds, put something in the tip jar for the musicians.


10B

MONDAY

August 27, 2018 The Daily Illini DailyIllini.com

buzz Back-to-school bar specials

BY ELANI KAUFMAN AND KATIE POWERS BUZZ EDITORS

The University arguably has one of the best bar scenes of any college campus. Even with the loss of Firehaus and Cly’s, Green Street still has a lot to offer. While we can’t help your craving for half-priced Sharkbowls, here are some other specials from on-campus bars that may bring comfort in this mourning period.

Wednesday: Whisky Wednesday

LEGENDS

Thursday: $2.50 Domestic bottles and drafts

Friday: Big cup Friday

Monday: $1 Burger/Bud Night! (5-9 p.m.)

Tuesday: Tower Tuesday $12 Towers of Bud, Bud Light and Rolling Rock

MURPHY’S

Wednesday: $7.50 Pitchers of Bud,

Bud Light, Coors Light, and Miller Lite

Saturday: Karaoke Night! (9 p.m.-

604 E. Green St.

Tuesday/Thursday/Saturday: Half-

Monday: $1 Wells, $2 Hot Shots, $3 LIT

Wednesday: $1 Ice Picks, $1

Tuesday: $3 Mug Club, $1 PBR Drafts,

BROS

522 E. Green St.

JOE’S

1 a.m.) $3 22-ounce Stadium Cups of Bud, Bud Light, Coors Light, and Miller Lite

priced burgers

Smirnoff Cherry Bombs, $2 Corona

Thursday: $1 Baja Blast, $1 Jager Bombs, $2.50 Kona Big Wave

706 S. Fifth St.

Saturday: $1 Crown & Crown

Flavors, $1 Crown Vegas Bombs, $2 Bud Light

pitchers

$1.50 Domestic Wells, $2 Domestic drafts, $3 Craft/Import Drafts, $3 Select Drafts

Wednesday: 25-cent wings — 8 p.m.

until they’re gone, $1.50 High Life Bottles, $2 Wells, $3 Vegas Bombs, $5 LIT Pitchers

Thursday: DJ night, $1 Wells, $2

O-Bombs, $3 Bud Light bottles, $3 all drafts, $6 LIT pitchers

613 E. Green St.

Saturday: DJ NIGHT, $4 Choose Your

Own, Three Olives Vodka: Naked, Raspberry or Orange and Red Bull: Original, Sugar Free, Yellow or Orange, $3 Wells, $3 Cuervo Shots, $4 Modelo Bottles, $6 LIT Pitcher

RED LION

Monday: $1 Wells, $2 Bud Light Aluminum

Thursday: $4 SeXXX buckets, $3 Bud Light aluminums

Tuesday: Wine Night

KAM’S

Wednesday: Half-priced

Sharkbowls and Karaoke

Friday: $1 Jager Bombs, $2 Bud

211 E. Green St.

Light, Coors Light

All day $4 Monster Vodka, $4 Jack Daniels

618 E. Daniel St.

Saturday: Block: $1 Wells, $1 Mimosas

All Day: $2 Dirty Shirleys, $3 Coors Light

ILLUSTRATIONS BY CINDY OM THE DAILY ILLINI

THE DAILY ILLINI buzz Monday, February 12, 2018

THE DAILY ILLINI

buzz

buzz Music Guide

BEST OF CU

THE DAILY ILLINI

Monday, March 12, 2018

THE DATING GUIDE Monday, September 25, 2017

NOVEMBER 3, 2017

Dining Guide

Best of CU

Sex & Dating Guide

Music Guide

Monday, October 1, 2018

Friday, November 2, 2018

Monday, February 11, 2019

Monday, April 22, 2019

entertainment • music • arts • movies • food • culture • community

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