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Active Life

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Saturday, October 19, 2019 C1

For love of the game For Fern Anderson, baseball remains a lifelong passion By Ryan McGaughey rmcgaughey@dglobe.com

School south of Madison. She went on to study at a teachWORTHINGTON — Though er’s college in Madison before Fern Anderson hasn’t been to moving on to Bethel College in a Major League Baseball game St. Paul for one year. After that, for the past couple of years, her she arrived in Worthington as love of the game is as fervent as a sixth-grade teacher. It was 1955. always. Walk into the apartment that Fern and her husband, Lee, Midway through the game While Fern is unable to share at Worthington’s Ecumen Meadows, and it’s impos- remember the precise year she sible to miss the voluminous retired from teaching, she’s amounts of baseball memora- quick to note how long she has bilia. She admits to the place been married to Lee — 45 years. being a mess, yet she’s eager to Lee and Fern were wed some show as many of her collectibles time after Lee’s first wife passed to which she has easy access. away; Lee already had four chilAnd, she’ll talk baseball — and dren, with the last one a senior the Minnesota Twins — with in high school at the time. It’s safe to say that baseball the knowledge of someone who has been a huge component of takes mere occasional glances at their marriage. standings and box scores. “We were both interested in baseball, so we went to almost The early innings Fern is 87 now, and her pas- all the ballparks (while we sion for baseball goes way back could),” Fern said. “We missed to her youth, when she grew two or three of them. We were up on a farm approximately 25 able to go to the World Series when the Twins won both times miles south of Madison, S.D. “My dad played baseball — he (1987 and 1991).” So, considering all the bigwasn’t a professional at all, but he loved to play,” Fern recalled. league stadiums she has visited, “He took us to watch the Madi- does she have a favorite? “We thought the Twins’ new son Broncos (an amateur baseball team) in the summertime park (Target Field) was a nice — he’d take my four brothers park,” Fern stated. “We went to all the old parks, but not some and myself.” There were no varsity high of the new ones. school sports for girls during “I retired early so we could Fern’s teens, but she still loved taking to the diamond and the travel,” continued Fern, adding that she had worked as a teacher basketball court. “I was always encouraged to while Lee farmed their property be in sports,” Fern said. “Girls south of Rushmore. “We went to couldn’t do this and couldn’t a lot of games on weekends; we do that, but we’d always do took one bus tour out east and sports as a family. You could went to eight ball games in the play intramurals … and even time out there. And we went to did that when I went to college. spring training for many years It wasn’t too long after college in Florida.” Fern also remembers going that I came to Worthington, and I could listen to the Iowa girls to the old Metropolitan Stadiplay basketball on the radio — um, the Twins’ old Bloomington even though it was that screwy home, back in the day. She said three-on-three. she went to a game by herself “We could never afford go “while waiting for a friend to to a (professional) game when get off a plane from Europe,” we were younger — it was the and liked the fact that the staDepression — but my brother dium was easy to get to. Tom, who was a year and a half “I went to that ballpark more older than me, and I loved to go times than the Mall of Ameriout and play ball and play catch ca,” she asserted, referencing until it was time to come in what currently sits on the forand do the dishes and milk the mer Met property. cows,” she added. Fern attended a country Seventh-inning stretch Considering Fern’s love of school that she remembered usually having about 15 stu- baseball and the hundreds of dents, then ended up graduating games she has attended, it from Arland Consolidated High shouldn’t be surprising that a

Ryan McGaughey / The Globe

Anderson holds a baseball signed by Minnesota Twins great Tony Oliva.

Ryan McGaughey / The Globe

Fern Anderson stands in the den of her Ecumen Meadows apartment in Worthington with a small portion of her collection of baseball memorabilia. good-sized array of memorabilia has been amassed. Plus, Fern admits not to not being very good at throwing things out; she’s a saver. The habit dates way back to growing up on the farm during the Depression, when Fern began an unusual collection that’s now on display outside the door to her Ecumen Mead-

ows apartment. “When I was in fifth grade in country school, we’d go to town in Madison ... and that year and probably the next year I collected gum wrappers you can’t find anywhere now,” she said. “I suppose it was because it was cheap — I couldn’t afford to buy anything else, really. I liked to buy books, but I couldn’t buy a book very often because it was

the Depression. We lived on the farm, and things were pretty rough for a few years.” Fern said she found her collection of wrappers not long ago and thought it would be fun to share it with others. That spirit of sharing dates back to her teaching days, too. “If they did something good,

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Ryan McGaughey / The Globe

Anderson, now 87 years old, began collecting these candy wrappers and boxes when she was in the fifth grade.


Active Life

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The Globe

Busy Berger gives back The arts, hospital and church all benefit from Worthington resident Jane Turpin Moore The Globe

WORTHINGTON — If you’re searching for a cando, glass-half-full type of gal, look no further than Julia Berger. The 73-year-old Worthington resident, who moved here from the Lake Wilson area as a teenager with her parents decades ago, admits she is a “pretty optimistic” person. “I tend to look at the good side of everything,” she smiled. That positive attitude has stuck with Berger throughout her life. The adaptable mother of three children (Jeffrey of Worthington, Joan of Sioux Falls, S.D., and James of Aurora, Colo.) entered the workplace after her youngest started school. “I worked at Sather’s in Round Lake for six years, then at Kmart in Worthington for 27 years,” she said. “I drove to and from Sioux Falls to work at a Kmart there for four years, and then I was at the Wells Fargo Bank here for six years.” Berger capped her primary employment record as a part-time paraprofessional within District 518; she officially retired in 2007. But retirement for Berger doesn’t mean inactivity; she has made it a habit to spend time supporting causes and organizations in which she believes, and most of them happen to be centered within a short distance of her home. For instance, Berger regularly gives of herself at her church, First Lutheran. “I’ve been a member there since 1960,” she said. “I was on the worship and music committee for 15 years until recently; I thought it was about time for me to get off,” Berger chuckled. Whether serving as a lector or a kitchen worker for post-funeral gatherings, Berger is always willing to lend a hand with, as she phrases it, “all the things it takes to keep the church

going.” Another beneficiary of Berger’s time and interest lies a few blocks northwest of her church. “I’m on the Sanford Hospital Auxiliary,” mentioned Berger. “I work in the gift shop — oh, maybe one day a month or more often depending on my schedule — and I knit baby hats for the newborns at the hospital.” In past years, pink and blue were the traditional choices for knitters of baby hats, but Berger has changed it up a bit. “I went to the greens and yellows some time ago,” she said. “And I like to put flowers on the little girl hats — they’re all different, really.” Proceeds from sales in the auxiliary’s gift shop, which is conveniently located in the hospital’s main lobby, are returned to the hospital for extras that contribute to its comfort and attractiveness. “People come into the shop looking for gifts for friends or loved ones who are hospitalized,” she said, adding that anyone is welcome to shop there. “We have baby presents and seasonal items; it’s a nice place to find anniversary or birthday gifts, with a variety of things offered.” About two blocks from the hospital sits Memorial Auditorium Performing Arts Center (MAPAC). That’s another organization to which Berger donates a significant portion of her time and talents. “Just over six years ago I joined the Friends of the Auditorium board,” said Berger. When FOTA decided to operate a concession stand to accommodate guests attending the auditorium’s numerous events, Berger knew she’d found a task that was well within her wheelhouse. “I helped coordinate it, and I buy the product for the concession stand and help maintain it,” she said. She and other FOTA

Ryan McGaughey / The Globe

Julia Berger stands behind the concession stand at Memorial Auditorium Performing Arts Center, one of several organizations to which she donates a significant portion of her time and talents.

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members felt having available concessions would contribute to the overall event experience at the site. “When people come to shows, they like having the option of getting something to eat,” said Berger. “We always have candy, popcorn, water, iced tea and pop on hand, and all the profits from concession sales go right back into bringing future acts to

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PASSION From Page C1

they got a Twins plastic cup that I’d give them,” she remembered. “The youth thought it was a really nice reward.” While Fern also has an array of items pertaining to penguins, baseball dominates her collecting. There are autographed baseballs, books, photos, ticket stubs, old game programs and scorecards, saved newspapers, T-shirts and Twins Homer Hankies signed by the members of the 1987 and 1991 World Series championship teams.

In the ninth

Fern and Lee may not get to baseball games much anymore, but their love of the game remains intact. “We’ve been here for about three years, since my husband had a fall and hurt his head,”

BUSY From Page C2

the auditorium.” Berger also appreciates that the MAPAC concession stand plays a role in rewarding local students and senior volunteers. “When the middle school kids get their Renaissance awards [for academic achievement], they get a slip to attend a movie for free and receive complimentary concession items. “And the ACE volunteers got the same thing as a thank-you for their service.” But the ACE volunteers aren’t the only ones who deserve thanks; MAPAC’s managing director, Tammy Makram, gives Berger much credit for her dedication to the facility. “Julia puts in an incredible amount of volunteer time at Memorial Auditorium, and she is a great asset to the FOTA board as well,” endorsed Makram. Although Berger says her personal taste leans toward country music, she

Saturday, October 19, 2019 C3

Fern said. “We do keep busy — we’re not involved in too many activities but we keep out of mischief, I guess. We do watch games, though none of our teams have been winners this year for the World Series.” The Andersons do get visitors once in a while. Lee’s children, and their children, are part of their lives, and Fern said she has several nieces and nephews, most of whom live in South Dakota. She’s also happy to welcome others who remember her from a time long ago. “Worthington had a lot of good students,” she said of her teaching days. “I wouldn’t say there’s a favorite, because I had so many good students.There here have been so many who have come by and visited since we’ve been here, both girls and Ryan McGaughey / The Globe boys. To think — they were 12 years old at the time I was their Anderson holds a baggie containing a baseball signed by former Minnesota Twins pitcher Eric Milton, who hurled a no-hitter for the team on Sept. 11, 1999. teacher.”

isn’t particularly partial to one type of MAPAC event over another. “I enjoy all the arts,” Berger confirmed, noting that she and her entire family are musically inclined. “I love the Worthington High School musicals, piano and dance recitals, professional performances, you name it.” Mostly, Berger wishes an even broader swath of the area’s population would discover the magic that lies within the doors of the circa-1931, city-maintained facility. “When entertainers come, they are amazed at what a wonderful venue it is,” attested Berger. “The sound is good, the stage is great, and I’m always surprised at how many people walk in and say, ‘Man, this is nice.’ “I wish even more people would attend movies or events at MAPAC and take advantage of this facility, because whenever they do come here, they enjoy themselves and compli-

ment the shows — and that makes us feel like people are getting something out of it.” Berger urges anyone and everyone to offer their input about the types of performers, shows or movies they’d like to see at MAPAC. They may contact her, other board members or Makram. “If you have suggestions, we want to hear them,” affirmed Berger. “We want to program things so that all the people in town want to come on in.” It isn’t only local organizations that consume Berger’s time and attention; with eight grandchildren (four boys and four girls), one great-grandson and a second great-grandchild due to arrive in the spring of 2020, Berger’s family keeps her on the go, too. “I also do embroidery and crochet, and I make dish towels as wedding gifts,” she revealed. “And with a new great-grandbaby coming, I’ll be making a quilt for the baby’s

bed.” Whether at church, the hospital, the auditorium or at home, Berger has found plenty to do in the years since retiring from paid employment. “Get involved in something you like to do because it keeps you active and keeps you going,” advised Berger. “Sometimes we kind of think, ‘I’m retired now, I shouldn’t have to do anything,’ but if you find something you enjoy doing, it’s not hard — it’s easy.” that she and her entire family are musically inclined. “I love the Worthington High School musicals, piano and dance recitals, professional performances, you name it.” Mostly, Berger wishes an even broader swath of the area’s population would discover the magic that lies within the doors of the circa-1931, city-maintained facility. “When entertainers

come, they are amazed at what a wonderful venue it is,” attested Berger. “The sound is good, the stage is great, and I’m always surprised at how many people walk in and say, ‘Man, this is nice.’ “I wish even more people would attend movies or events at MAPAC and take advantage of this facility, because whenever they do come here, they enjoy themselves and compliment the shows — and that makes us feel like people are getting something out of it.” Berger urges anyone and everyone to offer their input about the types of performers, shows or movies they’d like to see at MAPAC. They may contact her, other board members or Makram. “If you have suggestions, we want to hear them,” affirmed Berger. “We want to program things so that all the people in town want to come on in.” It isn’t only local organizations that consume

Berger’s time and attention; with eight grandchildren (four boys and four girls), one great-grandson and a second great-grandchild due to arrive in the spring of 2020, Berger’s family keeps her on the go, too. “I also do embroidery and crochet, and I make dish towels as wedding gifts,” she revealed. “And with a new great-grandbaby coming, I’ll be making a quilt for the baby’s bed.” Whether at church, the hospital, the auditorium or at home, Berger has found plenty to do in the years since retiring from paid employment. “Get involved in something you like to do because it keeps you active and keeps you going,” advised Berger. “Sometimes we kind of think, ‘I’m retired now, I shouldn’t have to do anything,’ but if you find something you enjoy doing, it’s not hard — it’s easy.”

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Saturday, October 19, 2019 C5

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Some exercise programs, like Tai Chi and EnhanceFitness, have been shown to improve balance and strength and reduce falls. Contact your local senior center or Area Agency on Aging for more information. By being proactive, you can reduce your risk of falling and maintain your independence now and in the future. Learn more at www.ncoa.org/FallsTips.

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QUESTIONS: Page C6

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SAVINGS From Page C4

should seek professional advice to build a plan and cultivate the skills needed to deal with adverse events or circumstances. A financial planner has important insight that can help you determine the best plan for reaching your goals. In fact,

QUESTIONS From Page C5

yearly health and wellness visit to the convenience and privacy of home, at no additional cost. A HouseCalls licensed practitioner can conduct a memory screening and refer you to additional care, if needed. What are some common symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease? One of the most noticeable symptoms is the inability to retain newly learned information, as Alzheimer’s generally impacts the part of the brain that affects

those who rely on a financial adviser express more confidence in their ability to always be financially secure, never run out of money and maintain their lifestyle in retirement than those who do not rely on one. Everyone’s situation is different, so it’s important to work with someone you trust to provide a personalized plan and unbiased guidance. A financial professional will help to ensure

learning. That said, it is important to distinguish Alzheimer’s from normal, fleeting memory loss, sometimes associated with aging — Alzheimer’s is marked by serious memory loss and confusion. Examples of serious memory loss might be having to ask for the same information repeatedly or requiring memory aids, such as notes, to remember basic information. If you feel like you or a loved one is suffering from serious memory loss, contact your health care provider. Is there anything that can be done to help prevent or delay the poten-

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Memory screenings can be performed during your annual wellness visit, which is free to anyone on Medicare.

Find relief from menopause symptoms Metro Creative Menopause is a natural part of the female aging process. During menopause, a woman’s body, which was once primed for reproduction, is no longer able to produce children. Part of menopause is the cessation of menstruation. However, changes to one’s period is not the only signal that menopause has begun. Menopause is a hormonal process that is different for just about every woman. The health and wellness resource Very-

well Health advises that there are no hard and fast rules to menopause, and its start, duration and ending vary from woman to woman. For many, the transition will take around four years. The symptoms women will experience are unique, but there are some that are relatively common. Addressing symptoms for comfort becomes a joint venture between women and their doctors. Hot flashes. Hot flashes are known as vasomotor symptoms. They are often

described as a sudden sensation of heat in the chest, face and head followed by flushing, perspiration and sometimes chills, advises Harvard Medical School. Up to 80 percent of women experience hot flashes during menopause. The Mayo Clinic says that hormonal replacement therapy is an effective way to alleviate hot flashes. For those who can’t take hormones or prefer not to, low-dose antidepressants also may decrease menopausal hot flashes. Gabapentin for seizures and

clonidine for high blood pressure are other drugs that may be used off-label for hot flashes. Osteoporosis. Doctors may recommend medication or supplements to prevent or treat osteoporosis. A reduction in estrogen, which occurs during menopause, is directly related to a decrease in bone density. Hormone replacement may be effective, and vitamin D supplements may help as well. Women whose bone mass was less than ideal before menopause may find that

they are at a greater risk for osteoporosis than those who had good bone mass. Weight gain. Women who are in perimenopause or menopause may find that excess body fat develops, especially around the waist. Healthline advises that women may have to cut more calories and increase physical activity in order to combat weight gain. A diet rich in fruits and vegetables helps a person feel full and is low in calories. Vaginal dryness. The Mayo Clinic says that

estrogen can be administered directly to the vagina using a cream, tablet or ring. This can help relieve vaginal dryness. For those who prefer nonhormonal avenues, lubricants also can add moisture to make intercourse more comfortable. It is important for women to be honest with their doctors about menopause symptoms. Together they can work out a plan of action that can include natural and medicinal remedies for common symptoms.

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Active Life Fall 2019  

Stay active! Community members age gracefully with hobbies, sports and activities. Plus - tips on improving your life every day!

Active Life Fall 2019  

Stay active! Community members age gracefully with hobbies, sports and activities. Plus - tips on improving your life every day!

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