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Gamecocks defeat Volunteers 27-24 PG 7

dailygamecock.com MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2018

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

VOL. 111, NO. 12 l SINCE 1908

Faculty looks to inspire students to vote HANNAH DEAR @HannahCDear

YOUR VOTE YOUR FUTURE YOUR HANDS Political organizations encourage student vote MEGHAN CRUM @megcrum24

E

lection day for the midterm elections on Nov. 6 is rapidly approaching, and students from different political groups on campus are encouraging their fellow students to get out and vote for what they believe in. According to Logan Martin, a third-year psychology student and president of the College Democrats, the College Democrats, College Libertarians and the College Republicans teamed up with the Leadership and Service Student and registered over 500 students in their respective states. He emphasized the power that students have in the upcoming elections. “We as college students, we can be one of the biggest voting blocks in elections, but campaigns don’t really consider that because we don’t go out and vote,” Martin said. “But

really, if we were all to vote, we could decide an election.” He emphasized the strong influence students could potentially have on the outcome of the elections. “I think that it’s important for college students especially to get out and vote because that’s really where our power is. It’s not in money, and it’s not really in volunteer time,” Martin said. “If we vote, then people really have to pay attention to us.” Jacob Vining, a third-year biology student and president of the College Republicans, goes out and helps campaign for the candidates and politicians he feels most represents his values. He hopes that he and the members of his organization will have an impact on the elections. “Politics are local, and we feel like we can get involved with local campaigns and help, especially at the state level,” Vining said. “I think it’s the most patriotic thing you could

SEE ELECTION PAGE 1

PUBLIC DOMAIN // PHOTO

GRAPHIC BY BRANDI SANICHAR// THE GAMECOCK

College student turnout for past elections According to Democracy Counts: A Report on U.S. College and University Student Voting

W it h t he Nov. 6 m idter m ele c t ion s lo om i ng over t he countr y, some professors are approaching t he vot ing issue by educating students on how voting is what keeps democracy alive. “I use the classroom as a forum to discuss the importance of the vote,” said Todd Shaw, head of the political science department. “Definitely do not tell them who to vote for, but I encourage them to exercise that right.” Shaw is not the only professor at USC teach i ng st udent s about the importance of voting in a u nique way. Law school professor Derek Black spoke at t he TEDxUofSC event on Oct. 9 to raise awareness to the problem of students not being educated to vote responsibly due to a decline in the public education system. “We need to invest in ou r public education systems and to make sure they’re teaching the skills that folks need to be effective citizens so that when they go to the ballot box they can exercise that ballot intelligently,” Black said. T he c he c k s a nd b a l a nc e s keeping each branch of local, state and national government are at risk, according to Black. The congressional races will determine which party has the majorit y for the remainder of President Trump’s term which t h e n a f f e c t s t h e e a s e w it h wh ich leg islat ion is pa s sed. The outcome of the midterm elections could also ref lect the 2020 presidential campaign. “There’s a tremendous amount on the line in terms of checks and balances,” Black said. “Will congress be a co-equal branch of government or will the executive branch be given carte blanche to do whatever it wants?” Com i ng f rom a u n iversit y professor perspective, both Black and Shaw vote with the issue of education at the forefront. Black believes the officials voted into office will dictate how affordable college is to students through how much they are required to pay in student loans. “ I do b e l ie v e t h at p ubl ic education is the foundation of our democracy,” Black said. “I believe that ... the ability to get a decent higher education at a price you can afford is also key to the American Dream.” S h a w ’s p o l i t i c a l s c i e n c e students often discuss voting and elections throughout the semesters, regardless of whether it is an election year. He chose t o e duc at e s t ude nt s on t he mechan ics of vot ing so t hey had a greater appreciation for their constitutional right. This included discussions on how to register, what the process is in South Carolina and the current and historical barriers to voting. SEE TEDX PAGE 1

GRAPHIC BY ELLIE LARSON // THE GAMECOCK


2 IN BRIEF

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2018

THE GAMECOCK WWW.DAILYGAMECOCK.COM SINCE 1908 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mary Ramsey MANAGING EDITORS Erin Metcalf, Victoria Richman DESIGN DIRECTOR Erin Slowey COPY DESK CHIEF Maria Jutton ASSISTANT COPY DESK CHIEF Rita Naidu SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Gillian Munoz PHOTO EDITOR Sara Yang, Shreyas Saboo ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITORS Zach McKinley NEWS EDITORS Meghan Crum, Hannah Dear SENIOR NEWS WRITER Arunmani Phravorachith ARTS & CULTURE EDITORS Genna Contino, Taylor Washington OPINION EDITORS Jared Bailey, Dan Nelson SPORTS EDITOR Shelby Beckler ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS Nick Papadimas SENIOR DESIGNER Taylor Sharkey DESIGNERS Brandi Sanichar, States Beall SENIOR COPY EDITORS Claudia Crowe COPY EDITORS Matthew Edwards, Meredith Edwards, Makayla Hansen, Hannah Harper, Joe McLean, Kiana Miller, Anna Mock, Melanie Pierre, Katie Smith, Kaylen Tomlin, Hannah Wade, Whitney Westbrook FACULTY ADVISOR Doug Fisher

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PUBLIC DOMAIN

“We simply cannot accept this violence as a normal part of American life ...These senseless acts of violence are not who we are as Pennsylvanians and are not who we are as Americans.” — Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf on the mass shooting at a Pittsburgh Synagogue that left 11 dead

USC students overload emergency room, strain emergency services During a recent USC home game, at least 15 students were treated at Palmetto Baptist for excessive drinking. The students were brought to emergency departments before, during and after the football game and put a strain on emergency services and nurses in the hospital. Some intoxicated students do not cooperate fully with staff, The State reported. — Compiled by Arunmani Phravorachith, senior news writer

EDITOR’S OFFICE: 777-3914

COURTESY OF KIM TRUETT Derek Black, a USC law professor, gave a presentation at the TEDxUofSC event about the midterm elections and voter turnout.

FROM TEDX PAGE 1

“ We g et i nto deb at e s a nd controversies around ‘Is it vote suppression or is it voter fraud?’ So I think insights about that, let them make up their own minds, but you sor t of have sor t of healthy discussions about that,” Shaw said.

Even though students often do not relate to issues concerning propert y taxes, social securit y and healthcare, Black believes s t udent s a re k nowle dg e able ab out is s ue s t h at a re f ac i ng mo der n so c iet y a nd i nvolve legislation. However, he hopes to take students, and society, deeper so they can make more informed decisions at the polling places. “One of the things that I focus on is not sort of whether people

keep the issues but whether they u nderst a nd t he issues wh ich is different. To what extent is one bei ng c r it ica l about t he information that one is getting?” Black said. “We’ve got to spend a lot more time looking for sources and reports and information that we can trust, not just stories that we like.” Regardless of polit ical v iews, t he r ight to vote is a constitutional right for American

cit izens t hat t hese universit y professors hope st udents will exercise through absentee voting or taking the university holiday to cast their ballots. “I know it sounds like a broken record from us old people ... but there is no more important right in a democracy for citizens than to vote,” Shaw said. “Being able to decide who will be those in government representing you is critically important.”


NEWS 3

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2018

Voter participation in different areas of study According to Democracy Counts: A Report on U.S. College and University Student Voting

Student turnout increased in all areas in the 2016 election

GRAPHICS BY ELLIE LARSON // THE GAMECOCK

Student voter turnout based on ethnicity

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4 NEWS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2018

FROM ELECTION PAGE 1

do, is go vote.” Bryce Wilson, the president of the College Libertarians and a third-year history and political science student, wants to see st udent s educate t hemselves about candidates before heading to the polls. “I t hink it’s important for educated students and educated p eople i n gener a l to vote ,” Wilson said. “You don’t have to be a political savvy guy, but at least you kind of know what you’re voting for.” Wilson hopes t hat by educating themselves, students

w ill be able to vote for candidates whose policies best represent their interests, instead of just voting by what party the candidates represent to ensure t he b e st repre sent at ion for upcoming legislation. “ T h i s c a n det er m i ne t he leg islat ion for t he nex t 2 to 4 y e a r s de p e nd i n g o n how t hese go, so ju st ma ke su re that you recognize that this is important,” Wilson said. T h e Yo u n g D e m o c r a t i c Socialists could not be reached for comment.

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2018

Film

The new “Halloween” has big shoes to fill. Does it live up to the hype? SEE ONLINE

ARTS & CULTURE 5 The voting Culture demographics

from the 2016 presidential election could predict the midterms. PG 5

how protest Music Read songs have

evolved throughout our nation’s history. PG 6

CAROLINA CULTURE TV SHOW OF THE WEEK: “The Haunting of Hill House” This new Netflix series, based on the book “The Haunting of Hill House,” does a spectacular job of terrifying the viewer. The show is based around Hill House, a dark, mysterious and creepy old mansion that is (of course) haunted. It follows the Crain family through their past and present, delving into the effects of the house on the characters. The show is filled with jump scares and plot twists that keeps you on your toes and excited for each new turn.

ALBUM OF THE WEEK: “Bohemian Rhapsody (The Originial Soundtrack)” This album comes from the new movie “Bohemian Rhapsody.” It combines some of Queen’s greatest hit songs, new mixes from the movie and live versions of the songs. Just about everyone knows the classics “We Will Rock You” or “Bohemian Rhapsody” that are featured on the album. Freddie Mercury’s soothing voice combined with the creative use of guitar and drums make for an unforgettable soundtrack.

SONG OF THE WEEK: “Sunflower (Spiderman: Into the Spider-Verse)” by Post Malone and Swae Lee “Su nf lower” is a song t hat ’s perfect for studying or hanging out. Its music has a chill vibe to it that is catchy and is matched with Post Malone and Swae Lee’s relaxed rap st yle. This song will have music lovers singing along after a few listens. The chorus of “Sunflower” is simple, but memorable.

TWEET OF THE WEEK: “how d id chuck y m a nage to murder so many people??? just pick him up and yeet him in the bin. he’s a doll.” --@thholyghost

GRAPHIC BY LAUREN GIBEAUT // THE GAMECOCK

2016 election highlights key demographics in midterm NICK SULLIVAN @tdg_arts The year is 2016. Donald Trump has defied all odds in becoming the Republican nominee, but political analysts are in near agreement that his luck has run out. Hillary Clinton is projected to become the 45th president of the United States, so why bother making a trip to the polls? This was the thinking that characterized the 2016 presidential election. CNN estimated that only 55.4 percent of eligible voters cast ballots in 2016. While there is no telling how the election may have played out had more Americans participated, there is much to be learned from analyzing the demographics of those who did vote, especially in regard to the upcoming midterm. First, the most likely group to control the outcome of the election are white individuals 45 years or older according to data. The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research reported that white people accounted for 70 percent of the vote in 2016, and people 45 or older accounted for a combined total of 56 percent. Interestingly, all of these demographics leaned more strongly in favor of Trump than of Clinton. In contrast, those aged 18 to 29 tended to vote for

Column: Artists want you to vote EMILY CHAVEZ @emilyjchavez

EVENTS OF THE WEEK: Monster Monday - Pumpkin Carving When: Oct. 29, 5 to 8 p.m. Where: Greene Street Monster Monday - Haunted House When: Oct. 29, 6 to 10 p.m. Where: Russell House Ballroom The Rocky Horror Picture Show When: Oct. 31, 9 p.m. Where: Russell House Theatre Love, Simon Screening When: Nov. 2, 6 p.m. Where: Russell House Theatre

Clinton but accounted for only 19 percent of the vote. Despite this low statistic, NPR reports that they represent nearly one-third of eligible voters. What’s more, the United States Census Bureau found that only 46.1 percent of those in this age range cast votes as opposed to 66.6 percent of ages 45 to 64 and 70.9 percent of ages 65 and older. In other words, college students could have a major voice in this year’s election should they choose to vote. Individuals of Hispanic origin represent a second key demographic. Representing only 11 percent of the vote in 2016, they had a notably low voting rate of 47.6 percent. Like other demographics with low turnout, they favored Clinton with an overwhelming 66 percent to Trump’s 28 percent. A third point of notoriety is that although black voters accounted for only 12 percent of the vote with a turnout of 59.6 percent (which is close to the white voter turnout of 65.3 percent), their decision was a nearly unanimous 89 percent in support of Clinton. Perhaps the biggest takeaway for both sides of the 2016 election, though, is that every vote has an impact. The Trump demographic made its presence known by showing up to the polls when it mattered, and the Clinton demographic learned the danger in complacency. Should this lesson carry over into this year’s midterms, the previously quiet demographics could have a huge impact on the results.

With the upcoming midterm elect ions, voter pa r t icipat ion h a s b e e n a m aj o r s o u r c e o f conversat ion over t he last few weeks. Some of the music and film industry’s most inf luential stars have decided to speak out about their political beliefs in order to encourage A mericans to get to the polls on Nov. 6. This could potentially play a big role in voter turnout next week. Some celebrities advocated for specific parties and candidates. Musicians A ndrew Bird, Kurt Vile and Warpaint, among many others, came together to compile “Songs for Swing Left”, a free album to encourage Democratic voting in swing states. All of the songs are preceded with a message from the artist about the Nov. 6 midterm election. Katy Perry, Bon Iver and Justin Bieber, among others, took to social media to encourage Americans to register in their respective state and to go to the polls in November. Most famously, countr y pop star Taylor Swift recently broke her silence on politics by sharing

a leng t hy post on I nstagram o ut l i n i n g he r reasons for supporting Te n n e s s e e D e mo c r at s i n t he up com i ng m i d t e r m elections. According to Vote.org, there was a large increase in voter registration after the singer’s COURTESY OF TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE post. With over 1 0 0 m i l l i o n Daley’s Dogs has been in business for 50 years. The state fair followers on followers about t he upcoming Instagram, it is obvious that Swift election and the importance of has a large plat for m t h rough every vote. which she is able to encourage I n prev ious elect ions, some and influence political and social stars have been hesitant to take a engagement. public political stance. There can W h i l e Sw i f t t o o k a c l e a r be repercussions in terms of ticket political stance by sharing the sales and fan backlash. So why is specific Democratic candidates this election so different? Why is t hat she would be support ing, 2018 the year to speak out? other stars have simply used their status to encourage their fans to get out and vote, regardless of SEE ONLINE party preference. Singers including dailygamecock.com Kelly Clarkson, Maggie Rogers and Ariana Grande have taken to Twitter and Instagram to remind


6 ARTS & CULTURE

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2018

Column: Vote with your radio

IGGY SHULER @tdg_arts K ava naugh. Pipe bombs. A lt-right. Fake news. Presidential tweets. In this time of chaotic partisanship and overwhelming media coverage, alienation is inevitable. The political establishment acts without our interests in mind, making promises on which it can’t or won’t deliver. It c a n s e e m l i k e no m at t e r how m a ny representatives we call, how many rallies we attend or how many hot takes we retweet, our best efforts have somehow lost the power to effect change. With midterm elections on the horizon, you might be asking yourself: Does my vote matter? And the simple answer is overwhelmingly yes, it does. It’s your opportunity to literally cast a ballot for how you want the future to look. But the better question is: Is voting enough? Of course it isn’t. We have a civic responsibility to respond to injustice not only by demanding change at the highest levels of government, but by effecting change first in the hearts and minds of the people, that we might be empowered to push for justice from the ground up. It is t h is r ad ic a l at t it ude of g r a s sroot s empowerment t hat has made protest music so revolutionary. Some of the most successfully organized protest movements in American history have been set to music, leaving our country with a sweeping soundtrack that raises the voices of the oppressed, bears witness to injustice and, perhaps most importantly, calls the listener to action. Just here in the South, a plethora of musical traditions armed musicians and their audiences against oppression. From the voices of the enslaved came AfricanAmerican spirituals, a genre of Christian worship music used by enslaved people to celebrate the joys of their belief system and mourn the sorrows of their oppression. This was enough that white slaveholders often prevented and punished this inherently radical kind of worship, condemning it as pagan or idolatrous. W hat ’s more, ma ny spi r it u a ls l i ke “G o Down, Moses,” held coded narratives about, and instructions for, escaping to freedom, a type of memorable oral record for a largely illiterate population. The Civil Rights movement saw the use of more explicit songs of protest by and for the AfricanAmerican community, employing culturally unique and significant forms of music like jazz, blues

and gospel to protest the inhumane treatment of blacks living in segregated America. Examples include Billie Holiday’s haunting “Strange Fruit,” which bore witness to the horrors of lynching and would eventually be named the song of the century by Time magazine to the anthem “We Shall Overcome.” In fact, this song is exemplary of the enduring, folkloric nature of American songs of protest. They are inherited. As they change hands, their meanings are adapted to the unique purposes of the time. “We Shall Overcome” was an universally known anthem of the Civil Rights movement, heard at the seminal 1963 March on Washington, where it was performed by folk icon Joan Baez and sung in streets by protesters. It was heard again at the Women’s March on Washington in January of last year. While the song was copyrighted by mid century folk revival icon Pete Seeger, it actually has its origins right here in the South. The song derives from an early gospel hymn, but as it exists now probably has its roots in South Carolina. In 1946, Charleston tobacco workers on strike sang the song in solidarity with worker Lucille Simmons adapting the hymn from its original format, which used “I” to refer to a collective “We,” transforming it from a solely spiritual narrative to one of collective empowerment. This is the magic of protest music. It’s adaptable. It’s empowering. Most importantly, though, it’s by and for the people. In the South, a lot of protest music has been tied to labor movements. This is no coincidence; historically, the working poor and oppressed have had restricted access to the traditional forms of education required to take part in the highly literate, elite discourse of establishment politics. So by discarding traditional forms of political elitism in favor of song, music can put the power back in the hands of the people. In this way, music has the ability to become a sort of universal language of revolution. Protest music has the power to convey higher level sociopolitical complaints, even instructions for rebellion, in a cultural transmission that is easily accessible to the working class. More than any campaign speech or think piece, it invites everyone to understand the issues that affect them and to speak out. So, in the spirit of American protest music, stand up for your rights and those of your peers. Understand the stances of your local candidates. When Nov. 6 rolls around, turn up at the polls and cast your vote. But don’t stop there. Organize. Rally. Act. And, if all else fails, sing.

Counseling & Psychiatry

How Can

“VOTE WITH YOUR RADIO: POLITICAL SONGS THEN AND NOW” 1) “Go Down Moses” by Louis Armstrong (feat. The All Stars and Sy Oliver Choir) 2) “Strange Fruit” by Billie Holiday 3) “We Shall Overcome” by Joan Baez 4) “Tear the Fascists Down” by Woody Guthrie 5) “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” by Gil Scott-Heron 6) “Freedom Is Free” by Chicano Batman 7) “Know Your Rights” by The Clash 8) “This is America” by Childish Gambino 9) “I Hate the Capitalist System” by Barbara Dane 10) “Solidarity Forever” by Pete Seeger 11) “Pa’lante” by Hurray For The Riff Raff 12) “Never Cross a Picket Line” by Billy Bragg 13) “You are the Problem Here” by First Aid Kit 14) “Danny Nedelko” by IDLES 15) “Mississippi Goddam” by Nina Simone 16) “Sixteen Tons” by Johnny Cash 17) “Bored in the USA” by Father John Misty 18) “The Times They Are A-Changin’” by Bob Dylan 19) “Bread and Roses” by Judy Collins 20) “Alright” by Kendrick Lamar

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SPORTS 7

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2018

VICTORIA RICHMAN // THE GAMECOCK Senior Bryson Allen-Williams tackled the Tennessee quarterback Saturday night at Williams-Brice Stadium.

SARA YANG // THE GAMECOCK Junior Rico Dowdle racked up 140 yards on 14 carries against the Volunteers.

BACK IN BLACK VICTORIA RICHMAN // THE GAMECOCK

VICTORIA RICHMAN // THE GAMECOCK The Gamecocks had 70 total tackles against the Volunteers. South Carolina defensive end D.J. Wonnum secured the win after sacking Tennessee’s quaterback in the final quarter.

VICTORIA RICHMAN // THE GAMECOCK Junior Bryan Edwards goes in for a touchdown against Tennessee. SARA YANG // THE GAMECOCK


8 SPORTS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2018

South Carolina students reflect on politics in sports Whitney Westbrook @whit_westbrook

With the midterm elections coming up on Nov. 6, students at the University of South Carolina are bracing to exercise their Constitutional right to vote for their preferred candidate of choice. With a more technological society, students come in contact with politics on social media through their phones, laptops, etc. Many athletes, artists and other celebrities have a history of voicing their opinion, especially since the 2016 presidential election. It is only fair to wonder if the political opinions of these certain individuals influence the choice that citizens make at the polls. On the professional level of several sports, especially in the NFL, athletes have recently been more vocal on political issues. Spectators at NFL games and those watching the games on television and through their phones have seen players kneeling during the National Anthem to promote social justice and advocate for better race relations in the U.S. St udent s at Sout h Ca rol i na a re part icularly exposed to Gamecock student-athletes on social media. A poll was conducted on The Daily Gamecock’s Twitter page on Oct. 24, asking students if they feel that Gamecock athletes have an influence on how they vote in elections. Out of 298 votes, 94 percent said Gamecock athletes do not influence their vote in elections. Only 6 percent of students said Gamecock athletes do influence their vote. After looking at Twitter accounts of various Gamecock athletes, one could infer that if these athletes used their platform to voice their political opinion,

it would reach a lot of people. Deebo Samuel alone has over 14,300 followers on Twitter. Former Gamecock women’s basketball star and current W NBA player A’ja Wilson has over 37,500 followers on her Twitter account. If these athletes have thousands of followers, why don’t they influence many students at South Carolina? Many student-athletes may be wary of posting their political preference due to fear of backlash. Students who said athletes do not influence their voting decision may refuse to change their opinion based on what a Gamecock athlete says. Students come from different backgrounds across the country and internationally. Therefore, how they were raised or where they grew up might influence their decision more than just simply what a South Carolina athlete posts on social media. Students also most likely follow Gamecock athletes for sports-related posts only, so they might prefer for athletes not to post their political stances. They may feel that sports is a refuge to get away from politics and the divide that the United States is experiencing. Despite the fact that the United States is experiencing a political divide, sports will always bring people together. W hether it is cheering for the Gamecocks with 80,000 other people at WilliamsBrice or 18,000 others at Colonial Life Arena, sports always finds a way to break down barriers and bring people together.

Twitter Poll: Do you feel that South Carolina athletes have an influence on how you vote in elections?

6% yes

94% no

GRAPHIC BY TAYLOR SHARKEY // THE GAMECOCK

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Column: Gamecock athletes have the potential to influence student voting Matthew Edwards @MatthewTEdwards Unt i l r e c e nt l y, t h e m aj o r it y o f professiona l at h letes have st uck to their day jobs: playing sports. But with the recent polarization of the political atmosphere, some athletes are beginning to take public stances on politics as well, using their status to promote particular political opinions. W h ile at hletes are cer tainly i n f luent ia l, some Un iver sit y of South Carolina students believe that professional sports organizations should not be politicized. Second-yea r sp or t s m a n agement st udent Sa m Sheu si sa id he ag rees with the concept of freedom of speech, but is wary about the power an entire organization like the NFL can have on public political opinion. “With the whole standing up for the National Anthem and stuff, I think they should be able to have their freedom of speech and do whatever they want, if they want to kneel or not,” Sheusi said. “But when I see the NFL as a whole trying to influence their views, I don’t know if that’s the right decision.” Millions of people tune in to watch big sports events like the NFL every week. And because of that, some polling experts say it is very likely that voters will not only see, but also be influenced by, star athletes mak ing ver y public political statements. Some instances have g rabbed headlines for extended periods of time. In 2016, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick began kneeling for the National Anthem, starting a long

series of silent protests against inequality and social injustice in the United States. In response, the country erupted into mixed reactions. Some people praised t he protest s as br i ng i ng awareness to political issues facing the country. Ot hers called t hem unpat riot ic and disrespectful to the National Anthem and the country itself. Whether athletes should be involved in politics has since made its way onto the ever-growing list of political disputes. I n t he end, t hough, regardless of w he t her or not t he c ou nt r y l i k e s it, athletes are finding ways to insert themselves into the political arena, using their status to promote certain ideas. Some students believe athletes should be doing even more with politics, given their elevated status as important and influential people in society. “You have a platform that’s there. You should be able to use it. Not everyone else has that platform,” said first-year jou r na l ism st udent Jacob G a mble. “People that are being shot in the streets or in their churches or in synagogues don’t have that kind of platform. So, you have it, you have a captive audience watching. Use it.” As seen with Kaepernick, when an at hlete takes a stand, t hey have t he ability to get the entire nation talking. On the other hand, some students would like to see sports and politics re-establish the relationship they once had most of the time, where they didn’t intersect. “I think they can (get involved with politics), but not in an athletic setting. I think that’s not really the appropriate place for politics,” stated first-year global studies student Sidney Mullican.

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VETERAN’S DAY MOVIE NIGHT: TOP GUN DAVIS FIELD 7:30 PM FEEL THE NEED... FOR AN OUTDOOR MOVIE?

FRIDAY, NOV. 9 COCKY’S QUEST RUSSELL HOUSE 8PM-12AM

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TUESDAY, NOV. 13 BOWLING NIGHT AMF PARK LANES 10PM-2AM

FREE SHUTTLES, FOOD, AND BOWLING!

FRIDAY, NOV. 16

FRIDA FRIDAY RUSSELL HOUSE BALLROOM 9PM-11PM A PAINT PARTY AT THE RUSSELL HOUSE!

TUESDAY, NOV. 27

LOVE ACTUALLY RUSSELL HOUSE THEATER 9PM GO AHEAD, QUOTE THE WHOLE MOVIE!

FRIDAY, DEC. 7

INDOOR ICE SKATING RUSSELL HOUSE BALLROOM 9PM-12AM END THE SEMESTER WITH SOME WINTER FUN!

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SPORTS 9


10 OPINION

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2018

EDITORIAL BOARD MARY RAMSEY Editor-in-chief

ERIN SLOWEY Design director

TAYLOR WASHINGTON Co-Arts & Culture editor SHELBY BECKLER Sports editor

RITA NAIDU Assistant copy desk chief ERIN METCALF Managing editor

GENNA CONTINO Co-Arts & Culture editor

TAYLOR SHARKEY Senior designer

CLAUDIA CROWE Senior copy editor

DAN NELSON Opinion editor

ZACH MCKINLEY Assitant photo editor

SHREYAS SABOO Co-photo editor

VICTORIA RICHMAN Managing editor

JAYSON JEFFERS Graphic designer

The Daily Gamecock endorses Smith-Norrell for governor Upon careful consideration of the merits of both tickets, The Daily Gamecock endorses James Smith and Mandy Powers Norrell for governor and lieutenant governor, respectively. We believe that Smith adequately addressed many of the issues that we, as students and young adults, care about deeply and offered policy positions that we can stand behind. Sm it h’s sta nce on educat ion is strong, and we particularly appreciate his intentions to lower tuition costs i n S out h Ca rol i n a col lege s a nd tech n ical schools a nd to f u r t her invest in education infrastructure in the “corridor of shame” (a group of schools which have been routinely

disenfranchised). A nd , i n l i g ht of r e c e nt m a s s shootings (especially those carried out i n schools), we bel ieve t hat Smith’s support for common sense gun control, including legislation to close the “Charleston loophole” and requiring background checks for private gun sales, are both a timely and appropriate solution to this delicate issue. Fu r t her more , we b el ie ve t h at c or r upt ion i n S out h C a rol i n a’s government is a significant problem, and Sm it h’s plans to address t he issue, especially his plan to eliminate the retrograde and unjust practice of gerr ymandering, is superior to

any comparable proposal from his opponent, incumbent Gov. Henr y McMaster. W h ile we feel comfor table endorsing the Smith-Norrell ticket, we would like to add an addendum to our decision. Bot h Sm it h and McMaster are incredibly vague about issue positions on their websites. We w e r e n o t a b l e t o m a k e compar isons bet ween t he t wo c a nd id at e s o n v it a l i s s u e s l i k e immigrat ion and sanct uar y cit ies because (in this specific instance) Smith does not advertise an official position. Furthermore, even on the issue positions we support Smith on, we were not always able to determine

how he would translate these positions into actual policy. While this vagueness problem did not impact our ultimate decision to endorse Smith-Norrell, we believe it is important to consider on principle. Having an informed electorate is the bedrock of any democratic system. G o v e r n me nt of f ic i a l s c a n not properly represent their constituents if their constituents are left in the dark. If candidates are unable or unwilling to provide the public with specific a nd substa nt ive issue a nd polic y information, then the political system as a whole will continue to suffer.

EDITORIAL BOARD MARY RAMSEY Editor-in-chief

ERIN SLOWEY Design director

TAYLOR WASHINGTON Arts & Culture editor SHELBY BECKLER Sports editor

GENNA CONTINO Arts & Culture editor SHREYAS SABOO Co-photo editor

RITA NAIDU Assistant copy desk chief ERIN METCALF Managing editor

TAYLOR SHARKEY Senior designer DAN NELSON Opinion editor

ZACH MCKINLEY Assitant photo editor

JAYSON JEFFERS Graphic esigner

VICTORIA RICHMAN Managing editor CLAUDIA CROWE Senior copy editor MARIA JUTTON Copy desk chief

JARED BAILEY Opinion editor

The Daily Gamecock endorses candidates for U.S. House of Representatives The Da ily G a mecock ed itor ia l board has decided to run endorsements for the following candidates based on a discussion surrounding the issues each candidate ran on. Multiple senior staff members (paid staff members that appear on our masthead) voted on each candidate based on the particular issues each candidate listed on their campaign website, their congressional website and through their official vote records (if they were an incumbent).

District 4: None

In this process, candidates were anonymized and only their discernible issues, platforms and policy positions were included. To further remove bias, senior staff members were allowed to vote anonymously as well. Following this, candidates names were revealed and senior staff members were given the chance to refine their selections with this new information in mind. The opinions represented here are those of The Daily Gamecock Editorial Board.

District 5: None

District 7: None

District 3: Mary Geren (D)

District 2: Sean Carrigan (D)

District 6: James E. “Jim” Clyburn (D) I

District 1: Joe Cunningham (D) GRAPHIC BY JAYSON JEFFERS // THE GAMECOCK


CLASSIFIEDS 11

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2018

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A stroke of genius reveals new opt ion s. C hoose private over public social engagements. Imaginative team strategies get results. Av o i d e x p e n s e s a n d trouble by keeping things simple.

Leave nothing to chance. Show your partner your gratitude and appreciation. Use imag i nat ion, a nd consider somet h ing delightful. Share resources and special treats. Raise a toast.

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Handle practical domestic matters first. C lea n a nd org a n i z e. Communication breakdow ns could d isr upt. Listen a nd learn. Work things out t o g row a nd e x p a nd family harmony.

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Pisces

10/29/18

1 2 3 4

Solutions to today’s puzzle

© 2018 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Autos 5 Cutlass automaker 9 Stick-on design 14 Fever with chills 15 Hide, as a bone 16 100 bucks 17 Breadbasket item 18 Read bar codes on 19 “Wizard of __ Park”: Edison 20 Protective net above a cradle 23 __ Paulo, Brazil 24 Some tech sch. grads 25 Type of energy or reactor 29 ‘60s-’70s quarterback Tarkenton 31 Content cat sound 33 Spanish gold 34 Government prosecutor 37 Philip of “Kung Fu” 38 Live and breathe 39 “Ich bin __ Berliner”: JFK 40 Reduced responsiveness to medication 45 “Casablanca” pianist 46 She sheep 47 Blues singer James 48 At first, second or third 50 Long __ of the law 51 Airline to Stockholm 54 Unexpected classroom announcement ... and, initially, one hiding in each set of puzzle circles 58 Gorge 61 Aesop’s also-ran 62 “East of Eden” director Kazan 63 Blender button 64 Barely makes, with “out”

10/29/2018

65 A short distance away 66 Accumulate 67 “Wild” frontier place 68 IRS form IDs DOWN 1 King and queen 2 Greek marketplace 3 Hitchhiker’s principle? 4 Actress Ward 5 Lewd 6 “Star Wars” mastermind 7 “Dang!” 8 Lip-__: mouth the words 9 U.S. capital transit system 10 First month of el año 11 Pro’s opposite 12 Braves, on scoreboards 13 DiCaprio, in fan mags 21 Potatoes partner 22 “B.C.” cartoonist Johnny 26 Tennis great with nine Grand Slam singles titles 27 Goodnight woman of song 28 Coquettish

30 Tolled like Big Ben 31 Romeo’s rival 32 Salt Lake City team 34 Leftovers wrap 35 Postage-paid enc. 36 Cost of living? 40 Brit. military award 41 Job applicants’ preparations 42 Pretty pitcher 43 Most concise 44 “Don’t look __ like that!” 49 Beasts of burden 50 Buenos __ 52 From China, say

53 Popular performers 55 “That was close!” 56 Leaves gatherer 57 Addition column 58 Auditing pro 59 Run smoothly 60 Altar in the sky


12

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