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dailygamecock.com UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2018

VOL. 110, NO. 26 ● SINCE 1908

Clothesline Project spurs dialogue Arunmani Phravorachith @THEGAMECOCK

Jordan Warren / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

USC’s Give 4 Garnet event reserved a day for students and alumni to give back to the university on April 18.

Give 4 Garnet festivities raise money for USC Meghan Crum @MEGCRUM24

C on fet t i wa s sc at tered a l l arou nd Greene St reet on T hu r sd ay a s G ive 4 G a r net took over the area in front of Russell House. The event had tables from all different walks of USC student life raising money and giving out prizes to students walking by. “It’s turned into like a festival,” said USC’s f irst lady Pat ricia Moore-Pastides. “I’m happy to be out here.”

This is Give 4 Garnet’s first year holding a day reserved for giv ing back to t he universit y and it has a goal of reaching $3 million. A nyone who donates online can specify what part of the universit y they want their money to go to, from the Alumni A ssociation to the Universit y Libraries. “A lot of the money is coming from alumni, as well as students,” sa id Sa r a C ha n , a f i r st-yea r business student. In the midst of the celebrations, t he homecoming commission

announced its theme for the fall: Sweet Home Carolina. For the first time, the theme was voted on by students. The announcement was greeted by a pep band and confetti. “This is our f irst event and we had a really great turnout,” said Delaney Ruth, a third-year r e t a i l m a n a g e m e nt s t u d e nt a nd ho m e c o m i n g e x e c u t i v e com m is sioner. “ I ’m glad we really encaptured exactly what the students want.” SEEGIVEPAGE4

Cosmo editor inspires women Hannah Dear @HANNAHCDEAR

Surrounded by balloons, photo stations, cupcakes and students at the journalism school, journalist Amy Odell shared her experiences redefining women’s media in a Q&A on Tuesday. Odell is a graduate of NYU and worked for many publications including New York Magazine, The Cut, Buzzfeed and, the most prestigious organization on her resume, Cosmopolitan as editor and designer of a new website. She spoke at the final Ed2010 Q&A with fourth-year journalism student Lexi Hill, who organized the event. “Ed2010 is new to campus, it’s also a national organization, and our goal has always been provide an environment that was laid back and transparent so students could learn what they needed to learn before graduation so they were able to succeed in their career,” Hill said.

Ed2010 is a series of talks and networking events brought to the university by the McNair Center for Entrepreneurship. The crowd at Odell’s Q&A was made up of young women, primarily journalism students, looking to learn how to make a career out of journalism or be an entrepreneur in other fields. “I thought it was really, really cool that you guys were bringing in this amazing national editor to campus and the opportunity to, at a student level and at a professional level, to just be able to listen to what she has to say, what’s her advice, how she got there and how can we learn from her tips,” USC graduate Ashley Cady said. Freelance journalism is Odell’s current focus and may be for other students because of the changing face of media. Odell’s advice is to experiment and travel to wherever an event is or if something interesting happens. “I think if you’re willing to go to events … and like rallies and going on the road, that’s really grueling, and

The Clothesline Project event at USC has a goal to spark a conversation about sexual assault. Every year, a variety of events are put on to amplify the voices of survivors and get people involved in having conversations around consent and healthy relationships. The events are also designed to support the survivors of relationship violence, sexual assault, stalking and harassment. Jennifer Taylor is a program coordinator and victims advocate with the Sexual Assault and Violence Intervention and Prevention (SAVIP) office. Her role involves putting on events that students on campus would want to engage in. “Any time we do an event ... we’re trying to draw people into the event by having them do something with their hands or doing something creative, but the real goal is to have those dialogues and facilitate that conversation,” Taylor said. Taylor’s hope was that having something lighthearted where anyone can come to craft in a safe environment would give the Carolina community the chance to have serious dialogue. “I’ve watched a lot of students walk by, and even if they don’t want to come up and have a conversation about what we’re doing or they don’t want to participate, I can hear snippets of conversation, and they’re speaking about what they’re seeing out here,” Taylor said. SAVIP worked with the Changing Carolina Peer Leaders, an organization out of the student health services that works to promote healthy campus initiatives. The peers provided feedback to SAVIP on how to better relate the event to students. The Clothesline Project has taken place on USC’s campus in years past. Previously, shirts had simply been submitted and displayed. This year, the event was revised to make it more interactive. Students can decorate a shirt which would then be hung on a clothesline for display each day. The display serves to honor survivors and act as a memorial for victims. SEESAVIPPAGE3

Lily Bardol / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Students colored t-shirts to hang up in honor sexual assault and violence victims on April 18.

SEECOSMOPAGE4

Brief: Awards Day celebrates USC seniors Hannah Dear @HANNAHCDEAR

T he a n nua l Un iver sit y Awards Day is a way to celebrate the achievements seniors with mult iple prest igious awards. The ceremony will be held on Thursday, April 19 from 2 to 4 p.m. on the Horseshoe. The winners of the Algernon Syd ney Su l l iva n Awa rd a nd the Steven N. Swanger Award along with the new members of Phi Beta Kappa, the selective honors soc iet y for st udent s i n l iberal a r t s a nd sciences, will be honored at the event.

Ever y st udent recognized by t hese awa rds has made a n impact at USC through service, leadership, achievements and character. The h igh academ ic a nd involvement standard is high for students hoping to receive a sen ior awa rd. O n ly t hose named Outstanding Seniors are eligible for the Algernon Sydney Sullivan and Steven N. Swanger Awa rds. A fema le a nd ma le student will each receive the Sullivan Award while only one student will receive the Swanger Award.

Thursday, April 19, 2 to 4 P.M.

INSIDE

File Photo: Daniel Hou / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Ethan Lam / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

A&C

SPORTS

SPORTS

French language students put on Voltaire performance.

Chris Silva and Brian Bowen declare for NBA Draft, eligible to come back. Page 7

Women’s tennis prepares for postseason after successful regular season.

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Sara Yang / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Sara Yang / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

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“She projected an air of calm and confidence and relatability. If Barbara Bush can do these things, you can do these things.” — Lisa Kathleen Gaddy, curator of the National Museum of American History’s “The First Ladies at the Smithsonian” exhibit

Woman climbs on top of school bus with children inside Richland County deputies say a woman climbed onto a school bus Wednesday morning — literally on top of it — while the driver and several Caughman Road Elementary School students were on board. The incident occurred along Bitternut Drive around 6:40 a.m., WIS TV reports. Police say the woman removed the bus’s tags and stood in front of it before climbing on top of the hood. Deputies came to remove the unnamed woman and, according to investigators, she was taken in for a mental evaluation. No charges have been filed, and no one on the bus was hurt.

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The University of South Carolina is an equal opportunity institution.

—Compiled by T. Michael Boddie, news editor


Thursday, April 19, 2018

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Lily Bardol / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

SAVIPPAGE1 Emily Milz, a second-year pre-med student, is a member of the Changing Carolina Peer Leaders and helped to put this event together. “We have the table where people are actively painting shirts, which I think also sends a really cool message that it’s something that everybody can be involved with,” Milz said. “I think just the diversity of people that we’ve seen lined up to participate today is a testament to that.” A clothesline of colorful t-shirts hangs from tree to tree on Davis Field for passersby to see. “I think that the whole clothesline of shirts just shows that people are in agreement that sexual assault is an issue. It shows a sort of solidarity not only for survivors but for those who know people who have been sexually assaulted and those whose friends may have problematic views,” Milz said. “It shows that there is a movement on campus, it’s not just individual opinions.” The project’s interactive nature makes it hard for anyone to ignore the magnitude of the issue. Milz made the point that information cards could be

handed out all day about what sexual assault means, but seeing these personal testaments is something that doesn’t go away. “You know that sexual assault is a problem and it’s sort of like this outthere concept, but when you see it broken down and see that it’s happening to the women and men around you, it makes it hard to ignore,” Milz said. The setting of a college campus allows for more conversation and discussion about serious topics such as this. “Campuses are places where we have a lot of great discussion and we really encourage open-minded dialogue and all of these different things,” Taylor said. “This needs to be a part of that too, talking about consent, making sure that we’re calling one another out, we’re calling our friends out, when they’re engaging in behavior that’s unhealthy or inappropriate and not just hoping that somebody else will take care of that because you are that somebody else.” The Clothesline Project began on April 16 and will continue until April 19, and the event will run from 11:30 to 1:30 p.m each of those days.

Abbey Road Live - Beatles Tribute April 20

Corey Smith April 27

A Boogie May 3

Nevermind— Nirvana Tribute May 4


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Thursday, April 19, 2018

COSMOPAGE1 that’s the sort of political journalism work that people don’t want to do past a certain age,” Odell said. “So when you’re young, get on the bus and hang out with a candidate.” Social media helps publicat ions brand t hemselves and share t heir content. Because Odell worked with both Buzzfeed and Cosmopolitan, she understands the importance of social marketing and the platform social media can develop. “I think if you don’t want to do Twitter and Instagram and Snapchat, pick a thing that you can do just kind of lean into that thing,” Odell said. Odell has left her job at Cosmo and is getting ready to have a baby after finishing her first book. This book is entitled “Tales from the Back Row: An Outsider’s View from Inside the Fashion Industry” and tells stories from her life as a journalist. “I did write the book when I first started at Cosmo, which was super hard. I basically wrote it on the weekends so I didn’t make any plans and I didn’t have a social life,” Odell said. “I would stay home on the weekend and I wrote my book.” Men’s and women’s magazines are very different in appearance and content. One of these differences is in the way stories are written and the picture they give of a person or the world, but according to Odell, one of the similarities is the quality of work they will start requiring in the near future. “More places are really going to be

Ethan Lam / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Amy Odell was featured in a Q&A session on April 17 sharing her experiences as a female journalist at various publications. investing in and reporting on high quality journalism because more places are trying to erect paywalls,” Odell said. “That’s the kind of content you need if you’re going to have a successful paywall.” Hill hopes that students will take advantage of talks like ED2010 and the skills it gives new journalists. Journalism is a field that can scare students because of its low-pay, high-stress reputation, but Hill hopes that centering the talk around

GIVEPAGE1 The Gamecock Pantry and Carolina Closet both had tables out on the street for students to donate to throughout the day. Sara Chan was out helping the table for the Gamecock Pantry. “It’s just a good way for us to get the Carolina community together, to just come together for a common cause,” Chan said. As of 7 p.m., the university has raised $2,121,628 of its $3 million goal. The money being raised will go to programs that will help the students during their time at USC. “There are so many needs that mainly our students have, but also our programs. And we get very little money from the state of South Carolina, so we end up spending a lot of our time in the President’s realm raising money,” MoorePastides said. “So this is one day when people who maybe couldn’t give us millions of dollars, but

social media and empowering women. “I think that media is changing and that is an awesome opportunity for all students because they have so much more opportunity when they go after graduation so I think learning from Amy’s freelance career and Amy’s book career is a really good opportunity,” Hill said. “Plus they can learn a little more about the social media side of running a women’s interest internet site.” Odell and Hill ended the Q&A on a

positive note telling students that they do have opportunities to go into media, regardless about what they want to cover or where they want to work. “You guys are going to do great ... Hard work really will pay off, and you guys are all going to be fine. And don’t be afraid to go into journalism,” Odell said. “I feel like so many people are so afraid to pursue careers in media and journalism and it’s like, it’s so much fun. It’s the best.”

could give us 10 dollars will.” V i ncent Su a rez , t he sen ior development director for the College of Arts and Sciences, emphasized the benefits students with fi nancial need would receive from the money raised during Give 4 Garnet in programs such as study abroad, student internships and undergraduate research. “The focus will be for students interested in those activities that might not otherwise be able to afford it,” said Suarez. Second-year accounting student Hannah Smith was excited about the event on Greene Street. “I just came from class, so I thought I would come out and see what’s going on,” said Smith. “I’m gon na go home and get some clot hes, actually, and donate for the clothes drive ... I feel like we should all donate because Carolina’s such a great community, I don’t see why you wouldn’t do it.”

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Jordan Warren / THE DAILY GAMECOCK


Thursday, April 19, 2018

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French students perform Voltaire, improve foreign language skills Genna Contino @TDG_ARTS

We read about Voltaire in our European history classes, but very rarely do we see the 18th century plays by the French Enlightenment writer performed in 21st century America. However, that’s what professor Jeff Persels’ French 330 class focused on all semester, working on the play “Candide, ou l’optimisme!” French 330, The French Theatre Experience, is a class composed of 14 undergraduate students and is unique to USC in that it has been taught since the 1970s and produces a play entirely in French every spring. The students performed Wednesday night in Gambrell auditorium and will have another show on Friday. “Candide, ou l’optimisme!” is a play about Candide, a young and innocent man who is traveling around the world and undergoes all sorts of misfortunes. Nevertheless, Candide perseveres, thanks to his mentor Pangloss who thinks “everything is for the best” even though terrible things keep happening to him. Voltaire thinks this theory of optimism is outrageous, so “Candide, ou l’optimisme!” is a satire that critiques Ethan Lam / THE DAILY GAMECOCK this theory. “His whole point is that, rather than speculate By memorizing their French lines, the performers become more comfortable with the sounds of the language. metaphysically about whether there’s good and evil in the world, ... we should just work to make language. However, they did have a native speaking performing in the play was the pronunciation and it better,” Persels said. “So the whole theme is the assistant sitting in the front row of the auditorium rhythm. These two aspects of a language are not to act as a prompter in case any lines were forgotten. always included in foreign language classes, but catchphrase ... ‘we’ve got to cultivate our garden.’” Aside from language, Persels touched on the fact is often a vital aspect of communication when The star of the show,was portrayed by Sophie Curry, a first-year civil engineering student. Curry that a majority of the students had no theatrical communicat ing wit h nat ive speakers. Persels believes that by memorizing their lines, his students spent the first few years of her life in Paris. She loves training. “It’s not like working in the theater department were able to pick up on these more elusive patterns the culture, but says her current French is “rusty.” Curry, along with other students in the class, faced where you’ve got people who want to be actors … in the language. “My theory has always been that ... you can learn the challenge of performing a play entirely in a half the time this is the only time they’ll ever be on stage in their lives,” Persels said. “They want to vocabulary ... you can interact with people, but the foreign language. “It also made me more comfortable speaking do it, but they don’t come with any background, so rhythm of the language is very difficult to pick up,” Persels said. French ... at first every time I would have to speak that’s a challenge.” Fourth-year international business and finance Elayne Bauer , a fourth-year international business French to someone I was like ‘Oh, no I’m probably speaking badly, I should just stop,’” Curry said. “But and marketing management student, played “La student Andrew Schindler portrayed Pangloss in now, since every day I have to speak French in front Vieille,” which means “the old lady.” Bauer had taken the show. Schindler struggled with some of the of people, it helps make it more comfortable with it, a French fi lm course previously, so she thought a pronunciation and said that some of his outside French theater course would be a good, relatively sessions with Persels and another French department which is important.” assistant helped him out a lot. Another challenge Persels also discussed the challenges of performing similar academic experience. “At first I thought we were going to be studying he faced was that due to the play’s satirical nature, a play in a different language. According to Persels, it is more difficult to recover from forgetting a line about French theater. I didn’t realize we were putting metaphorical language is used which can be difficult than it would be if the text was in the students’ native on a play,” Bauer said. “But when I found that out I to comprehend at first in a different language. Schindler mentioned that the use of action-based thought, ‘Even better.’” Bauer discussed how their adaptation communication was defi nitely helpful for audience of “Candide, ou l’optimisme!” focused members who might not be French speakers. Even the audience members who did not speak on the comedic aspects of the text and looked forward to her friends coming out French were able to enjoy the show due to multimedia used throughout as well as an English synopsis in the to see their adaptation. Part of the adaptation is that the play is program. Schindler described how seeing the play significantly condensed, but they also took had a positive cultural impact on viewers. “We’re doing Voltaire ... How wild is that, right?” some creative liberty with certain scenes. One element of the story Persels’ class Schindler said. “I did not expect to be doing Voltaire altered was the El Dorado scene. Voltaire when I came to South Carolina.” A nd Persels agrees, explaining how they’re crafts El Dorado as kind of paradise on earth. The class’ interpretation gave El “bringing an important text” with an “important Dorado a “hippie” theme, with the queen message” to the audience. “You really see that there’s a whole cultural life even smoking a JUUL on stage. The main thing Persels wanted his in another language that sort of legitimizes it as a st udents to gain f rom his class and means of expression.” Ethan Lam / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Art exhibition connects superheroes, violence Kena Coe @KENNA_COE

C h a d Pe n n e r ’s M FA t h e s i s ex hibit ion, “Superpower,” depicts superheroes differently than what we see in a typical comic book. This week, the McMaster Gallery is showcasing ten larger-than-life charcoal drawings created by Penner, a master of fine arts student at USC. The physical size of Penner’s work exceeds human height, showing the power and authority of the superheroes. T he st a rk cont r a st b et ween t he superheroes’ bright costumes and the mysterious dark backgrounds creates an ominous mood. One of Penner’s favorite pieces in this exhibition, titled “Hung,” is an example of this contrast, w it h t he moon l ight h igh l ight i ng Superman’s iconic logo and cape. Each work in the gallery took about three weeks to complete. The largest piece in the gallery took the most time, both because of its size and because he decided to redraw the piece in blue and red instead of the dark colors seen in the other pieces. Ot her t ha n si mply bei ng a fa n of s up erhero e s , Pe n ner s aw t he opport unit y to use superheroes to explain current issues in America. The growing familiarity with superheroes in popular culture — such as Superman and Captain America — has helped his

message become more relatable to fans of the movies or comics. “There’s this sort of contemporary renaissance of superheroes with a movie coming out every other month ... it’s a language that people understand,” Penner said. “But it has these really obvious ties to American culture.” He used the recent popularit y of superheroes to share a message about violence in America. Superheroes are recognized for their commitment to “truth” and “justice” and are an iconic symbol of American identity. The clash of nationalism and violence is a theme he evokes through this collection. “I’m using superheroes as a symbol for that sort of idealized notion of violence in this country,” Penner said. Penner hopes that people who walk through the galler y will grasp the reality of violence and put themselves in the shoes of the victims. According to Penner, even though violence is a problem in America, there is a majority of people who do not experience it; oftentimes, it’s easy for people who do not come face to face with violence to ignore the issue. “The idea of the scale of all of this is that these figures are bigger than you and they’re more powerful than you and you are sort of the victim,” Penner said. “I want people to sort of think about violence against other people, and from that context.”

Kenna Coe / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Penner’s large works of art are meant to convey a sense of power to the viewer.


6

Thursday, April 19, 2018


Thursday, April 19, 2018

7

Pair of Gamecocks declare for NBA Draft Shelby Beckler

in the NBA,” Martin sa id i n a st atement . “With the opportunity Within 24 hours, a pair to declare, he will be of South Carolina men’s able to g at her more basketball players shocked information and get a Gamecock Nation, as Chris feel for what the NBA’s Si lva a nd Br ia n Bowen opinions of him are. We annou nced t hey have are excited for Chris declared for the NBA Draft. and that the rules allow Silva made the him the opportunity to announcement on Tuesday test the waters.” reg a rd i ng h is potent ia l Sim ilar to Silva, return to South Carolina i nc o m i n g f r e s h m a n next season. He now has for wa rd Bowen a lso a major choice to make declared for the NBA regarding whether or not Draft but did not hire he will continue to be a a n a g e nt . B owe n i s Gamecock for his senior waiting to be cleared year. by the NCA A to play Silva announced Tuesday at South Carolina this t hat he w i l l subm it h is upcoming season after name for t he 2018 N BA bei ng i nel ig ible due D r a f t , but he w i l l not to prev ious issues at hire an agent. This gives Louisville. Gamecock Nat ion some Bowen still plans to Maggie Neal / THE DAILY GAMECOCK hope, but they’re still facing play college basketball, the potential loss of this Neither Chris Silva nor Brian Bowen hired an agent, meaning they could return to South Carolina next year. but told ESPN that he explosive forward. Silva has “felt as though it makes doubt that this Gamecock has made an impact at a small window to decide whether to return to South South Carolina. He led his team in points with 14.3 sense to cover my bases.” Carolina or remain in the draft. I n a statement released by t he program on per game and rebounds with 8.0 per game during his He has a 10 day period to decide that starts after junior season. The accolades he’s received gives Silva Wednesday, Bowen said he’s still working with the NBA Draft Combine, which will run May 16 his attorney, the NCAA and the University on his a reason to consider this new opportunity. through May 20 in Chicago. By May 30, the decision Silva was honored on the SEC All-Defensive eligibility to be cleared to play. will have to be made. “Everyone at the University of South Carolina, Team, as well as named the SEC Co-Defensive “I want to thank my family, my teammates, my Player of the Year. He reached a team high of 26 from my teammates and coaches to the great fans, coaches and all of our amazing fans at the University double-figure scoring games this season. In addition, have welcomed me from the very beginning and I of South Carolina for all of the support I’ve received Silva scored a career high with 27 points in the want to thank everyone for that support,” Bowen said. so far during my time as a Gamecock,” Silva said “My family and I are thankful to everyone at South Gamecocks win over Vanderbilt. in a statement. “After meeting with Coach Frank Martin respects Silva’s decision to look into Carolina for the opportunity to be a Gamecock. I’m [Martin], I’m excited about the opportunit y to excited to declare for the draft without hiring an declaring for the draft. declare for the draft, without hiring an agent. I’m “Chris’ work on the court has earned him the agent and look forward to the process and continuing looking forward to going through the process.” respect of everyone in the SEC, and also of people to work hard on my game.” No matter what decision Silva makes, there is no @SBECKLER13

Thornwell wraps up rookie season with Clippers

Haley Salvador / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Harrison Belk @HARRISONBELK

Last year, Sindarius Thornwell was drafted in the second round of the 2017 NBA draft by the Milwaukee Bucks, but his draft rights were immediately traded to Los Angeles, leading him to play his rookie season for the Clippers. Fans have seen the grind and upside he can provide now that his first NBA season is complete. Thornwell started 16 games and had minutes in a total of 73 games. He made his NBA debut on Oct. 19 at the Lakers where he played the final 3:24 of the fourth quarter and tallied three points. Much of the grind that Thornwell faced this year was transitioning from his heavily involved role at South Carolina to being a NBA rookie working hard to earn minutes. Thornwell accredits the coaching of Frank Martin for preparing him for the hard times he went through this season. “It helped me through the tough times that I’m going to go through this season,” Thornwell said. “For him being tough on me, hard on me, it prepared me mentally for these tough times when things aren’t going my way or I’m not playing as much as I want to.” The rookie grind was rewarded on Nov. 10 as Thornwell made his first career start due to an injured Patrick Beverly. He dropped 10 points, his first double digit scoring effort of the season, and had a season-high two blocks. Thornwell made his NBA homecoming on Nov. 18 when the Clippers came to Charlotte to face t he Hor net s. The Lancaster, South Carolina, native was happy to see some familiar faces in the crowd and noticed a lot of Gamecock fans that made the trip up to the Queen City. He notched another start, going for five p oi nt s a nd t h r e e a s s i s t s . Courtesy of Tribune News Service After the final buzzer rang, Thornwell took off his jersey and gave it to his former AAU coach who he accredited for discovering him. Thornwell faced LeBron James twice this season, with an impeccable performance in his March 9 game in Los Angeles. The rookie started at forward and spent significant time guarding James. In the first half, Thornwell showed off his defensive skills and James was contained to just eight points. Thornwell ended the night with 11 points and three rebounds as the Clippers won 116-102. The rookie also showed fans what he was made of on April 9 against the Pelicans. Thornwell logged three career-highs: 20 points, seven assists and nine made field goals. The game ended in a three point loss for the Clippers, however the game will hardly be remembered for it. Late in the fourth quarter, Thornwell went coast to coast delivering a posterizing dunk over Pelicans guard DeAndre Liggins that made waves throughout social media. Thornwell only averaged 3.9 points and 1.9 rebounds per game in his rookie year, however he has shown fans glimpses of the greatness that he is capable of through the season. The Clippers went 42-40 on the year and did not make the NBA playoffs, ending Thornwell’s rookie year, but he’s ready to go back out there for another season in just a few months.

Freshmen pitchers struggle in loss to Presbyterian Claudia Chakamian @C_CHAKAMIAN

South Carolina baseball dropped another midweek game on Tuesday as its pitching struggled in a 7-4 loss to Presbyterian before hosting yet another strong SEC opponent this weekend. Four freshmen pitchers went to the mound for South Carolina on Tuesday, and each of them didn’t have the best of nights. Carmen Mlodzinski got the start after a solid outing last week in the win against The Citadel. Mlodzinski looked off right away, starting with a leadoff walk that would result in two runs scoring in the first inning for Presbyterian. He finished the night giving up four earned runs off of six hits over five innings of work. Mlodzinski walked only that fi rst batter and struck out four, while notching his fourth loss of the season. TJ Shook, John Gilreath and Parker Coyne all came on in relief looking to hold the Blue Hose but couldn’t get the job done. Shook gave up two runs, neither earned, while Coyne gave up one, and the three pitchers combined to walk three batters. Head coach Mark Kingston was disappointed with his pitching staff after the game, especially after the gem Mlodzinski threw the week before, and said these are guys that need to come in and keep the game close. “They battled, but when you give up seven runs, that’s not good enough. Bottom line,” Kingston said. “Last week, Carmen pitched better and we gave up one run on the road. Tonight, we gave up seven r uns. Wasn’t good enough. I don’t care if it’s freshmen,

sophomores, juniors, seniors, if we put you on the mound, we expect the job to get done.” At the plate, the Gamecocks couldn’t find the spark they needed to compete with the Blue Hose. South Carolina had some good swings but couldn’t hit it to the right spot to get the hits it needed. The Gamecocks scored three runs in the third, thanks to a big two-RBI triple from LT Tolbert to tie things up. The Blue Hose scored one in the fifth and two in the sixth to get the lead they needed to secure just their thirteenth win of the season. South Carolina is now 5-6 against in-state schools, 2-3 in those during the week. Kingston said after the game that these are games that they are capable of winning, and should win. “We need to be better,” K ingston said. “Period ... We should not lose these games.” Sout h Carolina (20-17, 6 -9 SEC) faces another tough opponent this weekend, hosting No. 19 LSU for a three game series. Despite their struggles, the Gamecocks have found a little success against ranked opponents over the past few weeks. They took the series opener against No. 3 Arkansas last weekend and the second game in blowout fashion against No. 9 Kentucky the week before. They’ll look for similar success against this top-20 opponent. The first game against LSU is Friday at 7 p.m. Adam Hill and Cody Morris are projected to start on their respective days, but Sunday’s starter has not been named yet. The Gamecocks will need a strong start from their pitchers and for their offense to stay healthy to compete against the Tigers.


8

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Sara Yang / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

The South Carolina softball team entered Wednesday’s game undefeated against Campbell, winning the previous 12 meetings with the last one coming in 2014.

Softball drops fourth straight in loss to Campbell Brandon Alter @BRANDON__ALTER

After suffering a frustrating sweep at the hands of Florida this weekend, the South Carolina softball team was ready to regroup against a struggling Campbell team on Wednesday. But the Camels jumped out to an early lead to upset No. 12 South Carolina 3-2. South Carolina came into this game with a 12-0 record over Campbell but was unable to continue that perfect streak. The Camels offense all came via the long ball Wednesday night. Pitcher Dixie Raley gave up a fi rst-pitch solo home run to Rachel McCollum to jump out to an early 1-0 lead. Then in the fourth, the Camels hit another homer, this time a two-run shot off the bat of Lizabeth McCurry to make the score 3-0 and get all of the offense they needed to secure the win. McCurry’s home run was worsened by a Jordyn Augustus’ error on a routine popup in

THE

front of the plate one batter prior. The Gamecocks would make an effort to come back like they have nine other times this season, but ultimately came up just short. The Gamecocks had a two-run home run of their own from Cayla Drotar in the bottom half of the inning but couldn’t get anything else going. The entire team felt frustrated following the loss, and Drotar said that she knows this team is better than how it played on Wednesday night. “We [came] out here complacent,” Drotar said. “We definitely didn’t show who we are tonight and it’s very frustrating.” Not being able to finish the comeback was a rare occurrence for the Gamecocks, and it was even rarer for them to lose at home. This was just the Gamecocks second loss at home all season, both have been a one-run difference. “I’m disappointed,” head coach Beverley Smith said. “Obviously we didn’t play our best game.” Despite the Gamecocks coming back so often this

year, Smith just didn’t see the fight from her team that she usually does. “I thought we were a little flat today, truthfully,” Smith said. “I don’t think there was doubt from our team, but I think they’re a little flat.” With this game, the Gamecocks fall to 34-11 (8-7 SEC) and have officially lost four straight with just three runs in those four games. The Gamecocks open a weekend series against Missouri which is 26-13 (6-11 SEC) but coming off a two-game series sweep over, at the time, No. 8 Auburn. With this losing streak, the Gamecocks need to refocus to get back on track. “I think its really important,” Smith said of the upcoming series. “You’ve got a Missouri team that’s coming in, that’s playing well right now ... They’re fighting, they’re scratching, just like everybody does.” South Carolina hosts Missouri for the three-game series, with the first game coming Friday at 5:30 p.m.

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Thursday, April 19, 2018

9

Tennis prepares for postseason after historic season Shelby Beckler @SBECKLER13

The Sout h Carolina women’s tennis team concluded a solid regular season this weekend, securing a No. 3 seed in the 2018 SEC Tournament with a conference record of 11-2. This past Saturday, head coach Kevin Epley and his team shut down Kentucky with a 4-0 sweep. The Gamecocks’ current SEC record is their best in conference play in program history, and fi nished third in the SEC for the fi rst time since the 1996 season. “Today was a great way to close out the season and set the stage for the SEC Tournament,” Epley said. “I was really happy with how we competed and handled ourselves mentally today. After today, it’s clear this team is ready for the tournament, and we are fired up for next week.” However, South Carolina still has much to prove in the postseason starting on Friday, in hopes to play in the SEC Championship. They will continue to look to senior Hadley Berg for leadership and direction on the court, as well as to Paige Cline, Megan Davies and Kennedy Wicker for their continued strong performances in doubles. Cline is a player to rely on and draw strength from during her single matches. She was able to lead South Carolina 2-0 against Kentucky to win in straight sets, her seventh straight win in SEC play. The Gamecocks record-breaking season has helped to build the team’s national profile. In addition to leading the team to a record number of SEC wins, Epley and associate coach Jeff Nevolo have earned the second-longest win streak in program history, which ran from Feb. 24 to March 31. Not on ly is t he prog ra m it self hav i ng a memorable season, but so is Berg. She will look to become the fourth player in school history to notch 100 wins. Berg is just three wins away from the milestone and boasts a winning percentage of .746. W it h bot h personal a nd team goals, t he Gamecocks will start their postseason run against the winner of match four in the quarterfinals starting at 12 p.m. South Carolina has the potential of then playing in the semifinals on Saturday and then the SEC Championship match at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday.

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Thursday, April 19, 2018 10

U.S. strike on Syria not escalation of war In his recent column on the U.S. airst rikes in Sy ria, Joseph Will suggested that the best course of action would be to limit involvement to avoid another Iraq. While his sentiment is understandable – Iraq was, after all, a quagmire – it simplifies a situation far more complex than we were faced Dan Nelson with in 2003, assumes that the U.S. Third-year public strategic goal for Syria, at this point, is health student regime change and incorrectly assess the likelihood that airstrikes will spiral into a ground war. Finally, his argument also ignores the well-established but underutilized, responsibility of the international community to combat atrocities and human rights violations whenever possible. The current situation in Syria is far removed from that of Iraq in 2003. For one, Syria is currently divided between a plethora of different state and non-state actors. In the west, particularly along the coast, the Assad regime holds steady, slowly whittling away pockets of rebel resistance. In the north, along the border with Turkey, a combination of Kurdish, rebel and Turkish forces hold positions, denying them to the regime. In the relatively uninhabited but oil-rich interior of the country, Kurdish, regime and the I.S. fighters duke it out. Iraq, on the other hand, was, at the time of the U.S. invasion, a relatively cohesive country. The uprisings that followed Saddam’s defeat in the First Gulf War had put down and his regime held a monopoly on violence throughout the entire nation. In other words, the situation was far less complex as there was one primary actor to deal with – Saddam and his Ba’athist party. This alone invalidates many of the similarities that have been drawn between the two situations. Quite possibly the biggest takeaway, however, is that attacking a unified nation fielding conventional forces is far less complex than dealing with a gutted regime and its supporting militia members that have been engaged in nearly seven years of guerrilla-style warfare. This last point is of particular importance, as guerrilla warfare, despite its unorganized and low-intensity nature, can tie down and bloody even most powerful conventional forces. In Iraq, its army collapsed in less than a month, and it was only when the combat turned to guerrilla warfare did the U.S. face any serious issues. This complexity is not lost on the Department of Defense. While many often criticize the military for its tendency to “fight the last war,” the public

statements of U.S military planners, including Secretary of Defense Mattis, seem to ref lect the opposite. Mattis and others have consistently warned of the risks that greater involvement in Syria would entail and frequently draw parallels to our failure in Iraq as justification for their caution. It should be noted that this caution stems not from superficial similarities in the lead up to the invasion of Iraq but, rather, in the occupation of the country. In fact, military goals have shifted since the beginning of the civil war. No more are we seeking regime change, but as Mattis says “we’re going to make sure we set the conditions for a diplomatic solution.” Even beyond statements and strategic goals, the very limited nature of the airstrikes on Syria further reinforces the idea that the military is well aware of the risks of increased involvement. This bring us to another problem with Will’s assessment, the airstrikes themselves. As noted, these airstrikes were highly limited, specifically targeting the chemical weapons capabilities of the Assad regime. In fact, much like the airstrikes in 2017, efforts were made to avoid accidentally engaging Russian personnel on the ground in Syria and sparking a wider conflict. These facts make it difficult to argue the point that these airstrikes “[have] the potential to develop into a full-blown international military crisis.” Particularly as there far more likely reasons for this to occur, namely Russian and Iranian meddling. The total number of Russian and Iranian troops on the ground is unknown, but many of the reckless and provocative actions they’ve taken are not. For example, in February, Russian mercenaries working for a K remlin-linked private military company attacked U.S. backed groups in Syria. Their attack was unsuccessful, however, and “a couple hundred” of them were killed by a combination of U.S. airpower and artillery. This escalation was bad enough on its own, but U.S. intelligence reports that the Russian oligarch who owns the company “was in close touch with Kremlin and Syrian officials in the days and weeks before and after the assault.” This senseless and direct aggression towards U.S. backed forces does far more to inflame tensions than limited U.S. airstrikes. The Iranians haven’t stayed out of the melee either. For their part, they’ve been arming groups hostile to Israel and have been building up their own military capabilities along the contentious Syrian-Israeli border, a move certain to viewed as aggression towards Israel. Iran is, much like Russia, an ally of the Assad regime; however, they’ve used this opportunity to help an ally to further a belligerent agenda that could put them

into direct conflict with Israel. Israel, for their part, have been engaging Iranian convoys attempting to bring munitions to Hezbollah and an Iranian drone base in central Syria. The tit-for-tat escalation against one another in Syria risks coming to a head in a war that could drag in Israel’s ally, the U.S. Aside from overexaggerated fears of an escalation stemming from the U.S. airstrikes in Syria, Will’s article echoes the rhetoric of many in the U.S. and overseas that simultaneously condemns war crimes – like gassing civilians – and any action taken to prevent them – like airstrikes. While proponents of this line of logic believe that these two perspectives are morally in line with one another, they do not take into account the responsibility of the international community to prevent such action from occurring or, failing that, to bring about justice for such heinous crimes. This responsibility is not a new idea or one without precedent. Following the failure of the international community, the U.N. in particular, to stop the genocide of Bosnian Muslims by Serbs in 1995, NATO took decisive action to combat Serbian aggression. The they did so again in 1999 when the Serbs committed further aggressive action and war crimes in Kosovo. In both situations, NATO forces did what the U.N. and its needless moralizing and deadlock could not, it brought an end to the atrocities. If anything, this type of “holier than thou” thinking does more harm than good, condemning and limiting legitimate uses of force that seek to stop atrocities. Frankly, it brings to mind the concept of the “limousine liberal,” forever speaking out against injustices, but never willing to do what it takes to stop them. Force can sometimes be used for good and painting Assad as just someone we “deem … sufficiently evil” does Will’s argument no favors. At the end of the day, it would be difficult for anyone to deny the seriousness of the crimes committed by the Assad regime and the explicit need for an end to this devastating war. I disagree with the argument, however, that this war and the atrocities in it can be brought to an end by staying out of it. Of course, expanded airstrikes or ground involvement could further escalate the conflict, but targeted airstrikes against prohibited and illegal weapons, in of themselves, are not that and, in many ways, are necessary in limiting Assad’s ability to further decimate his own people. We are not the world’s police, but we should not stand idly by while petty tyrants massacre their own for the sake of order and stability.

H.B. 4956 would expand campus carry at the university — students should fight back Guns seem to be such a hot- but t o n t opic t hese days. A f ter t he Parkland shooting and the subsequent backlash against the NRA, state legislatures are practically falling over themselves to Hayden pass legislation to keep Blakeney their constituents happy. Third-year South Carolina, always journalism t he for ward-t hink ing student state that it is, did things a little differently with a new amendment to current legislation that would allow anyone with a concealed carry permit to carry a weapon on any college campus in the state. House Bill 4956, proposed by Rep. Michael Pitts of District 14, is an amendment to current legislation that prevents civilians from carrying firearms on campus. The law previously made an exception to this ban in the case that someone licensed to carry a concealed firearm had their firearm “inside an

attended or locked motor vehicle and is secured in a closed glove compartment, closed console, closed trunk, or in a closed container secured by an integral fastener and transported in the luggage compartment of the vehicle.” However, the new amendment strikes that last requirement, which would apparently allow licensed concealed carriers to have their guns anywhere on campus. Of cou rse, t he bill has not gone unchallenged. A Change.org petition was made last week by USC students who felt the new amendment was a threat to their community. As of now, it sits at slightly above 100 supporters. As it stands, South Carolina is one of only 16 states that bans concealed carry on campus, with a number of others leaving the choice up to the individual colleges. Research done by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows that the use of guns in self defense is so rare that it may as well not be a factor. The report also cites demographic reasons for not allowing

students to carry guns on campus, specifically the penchant for young adults to engage in risky behavior and the increased risk of suicide. Overall, I think the numbers show that allowing wider spread of concealed carry on campus would lead to more violent crime, not less, and would create an atmosphere more similar to a Clint Eastwood spaghetti western. For those too young to remember, an active shooter situation actually did occur at USC in February of 2015. Considering that the incident was a domestic situation rather than a person looking to shoot as many people as possible, would that situation have been helped by dozens of USC students emerging from the woodwork, pistols drawn like FBI agents on this week’s crime drama? I don’t think so. To be clear, I am not anti-gun. Some would even call me pro-gun in that I think fi rearm ownership is something responsible adults should enjoy. But I also believe that being pro-gun also

means being for the responsible use of guns so we can retain this right and keep everyone safe. I just cannot accept the idea that allowing guns all over campus is safe and responsible. USC is a relatively safe place. Violent crime in the United States has been steadily decreasing, and Columbia is following that trend to a T. So why do we need to allow anyone but the police to carry guns on campus? USC has its own police force and is marked every 50 feet or so with call boxes linking you directly to the police. Sure, there are shootings that grab the headlines, and freshman at USC are told about various dangers for their own benefit, but does that mean we need everyone to have a gun on campus to be safe? By all means, protect your own home and go shooting on the weekend for fun, but don’t make the rest of us bite the bullet for your Rambo fantasy. If you are so worried about mass shootings, buy a Kevlar backpack.


Thursday, April 19, 2018

11

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PHD • JORGE CHAM

Aries

This month has profit p o t e nt i a l u nd e r t he Ta u r u s S u n . F i n d creative ways to increase income. Don’t f und a f limsy scheme. Avoid risk or speculation.

Taurus

St a nd u p f o r t r u t h , j u s t i c e a n d b e a u t y. Yo u ’ r e e s p e c i a l l y powerf ul t his mont h, wit h t he Sun in your sign. You’re in your own element with a natural advantage.

Gemini

Finish old business over the next month under the Taurus Sun. Keep a low profile. Seek out p e a c e f u l h id e aw a y s . Get productive behind closed doors.

Cancer

You’re especially popular this month. Contribute to a g roup ef for t or community project, with the Sun in Taurus. Keep everyone on track and on target

THE SCENE

Leo

Career matters move to t he f ront burner. Advance your p r of e s s io n a l a g e nd a this month under the Taurus Sun. Dress for success, and smile for the camera.

Virgo

Expand your boundaries through travel, research or higher education over t he next mont h. The Tau r u s Su n i n spi re s your curiosity. Explore new frontiers.

Libra

Pla n a nd i nvest to grow shared accounts under the Taurus Sun t h is mont h. Avoid unnecessar y expense. Ha nd le paper work , filing and taxes. Discover new profits.

Scorpio

Strengthen the bonds of partnership. Reconnect with each other over the next mont h, wit h t he Sun in Taurus. Share delicious flavors, sounds and experiences.

Sagittarius

You r phy s ic a l performance is on the rise this month under the Taurus Sun. Regular pract ices energ ize. Hea lt hy food, rest and exercise rout ines strengthen your heart.

Capricorn

You’re especially lucky i n lo v e t h i s m o nt h . Get light-hearted with someone attractive. The Tau r u s Su n i n spi re s romance, f un and laughter. Sha re you r passion.

@thegamecock

Aquarius

Fi l l you r home w it h love. Take on domestic renovation projects, with the Sun in Taurus for a month. Invest time, money and energ y for your family.

Pisces

St ick to pract ical o b j e c t i v e s . Communication projects come together over the next month. Write and get the word out under the Taurus Sun. Make valuable connections.

4/19/18

1 2 3 4

Solutions to today’s puzzle

© 2018 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Space station wear 7 “Walk Like __”: Four Seasons hit 11 Sharp-tack link 14 Stage of intensity 15 Pitch a fit 16 Happened upon 17 *Look for a specific passage in, as a book ,W·VQHDUWKH midpoint of the Miss. River 20 Rap sheet data 21 Place Sundance liked to see 22 “Gotcha!” 26 *About 22% of an average 18-hole golf course 28 Every time 30 Key 31 Salt formula 32 Sprain application 37 *Point where it starts to hurt 42 Watch creepily 43 Corn syrup brand 45 Chimney plumes 49 Largest cat in the genus Leopardus 51 *Like baklava layers 56 Change as needed 57 Musical meter maid 58 Exposes, in a way 60 Gender-neutral possessive 61 Explorers ... and ones who can determine what the answers to starred clues have in common? 66 Numeric prefix 67 Tête output 68 Canadian dollar coin 69 Buddhist school 70 Give up 71 Con target

DOWN 1 Macroeconomics abbr. 2 Bering, for one 3 Footwear brand 4 Wrath 5 Easily peeved 6 Very, to Schumann 7 Candle emanation 8 Catcher Joe with a trio of consecutive Gold Glove Awards (2008·

9 Fretful feeling 10 Indefinite ordinal 11 Heineken brand 12 Parlor piece 13 Finally 18 Material flaw 21 LPN workplaces 22 __ for gold 23 Open-handed hit 24 Fem. advocacy group 25 City WSW of Bogotá 27 Expensive :KHUHLW·VDW 33 2008 biopic starring Benicio del Toro 34 Blow it

35 Arthur with two Emmys and a Tony 36 Concerning 38 Met or Nat 39 Signed off on 40 Refrain syllables 41 Stop talking about 44 Legendary Giant 45 Quick squirt BBG·K{WHO 47 Decides to join 48 Mauna __ 50 “All the Light We __ See”: 2015 Pulitzer novel 52 Woodworking, e.g. 53 Despised

4/19/2018

54 “With this ring, __ ... “ 55 Bad check letters 59 Lubricates 61 Photo 62 __-wop 63 Roxy Music co-founder 64 Fix badly? 65 Observe


Thursday, April 19, 2018

A SANDSTORM IS COMING ...

be ready To pay! F SOUTH CARO

LINA

SHOW YOUR LOVE FOR THE GAMECOCKS EVERYWHERE YOU GO WITH YOUR UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA DEBIT CARD!

UNIVERSITY O

12

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THRU

DEBIT

12/18

B.A. MEMBER

If you are a student, faculty or staff member, you are eligible to join Founders Federal Credit Union! Visit RelaxJoinFounders.com to complete the application process and see what Founders membership can do for you!

BULLSTREET OFFICE

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA OFFICE

BullStreet Neighborhood

Russell House University Union

2166 Boyce Street

1400 Greene Street, Room 227 U

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foundersfcu.com • 1-800-845-1614

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KILLIAN ROAD OFFICE (NOW OPEN) 80 Tulip Oak Drive

04_19_2018  
04_19_2018  
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