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UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2018

VOL. 110, NO. 25 ● SINCE 1908

Thunderstorm reaches Cola following US devastation

Courtesy of Tribune News Service

Larissa Johnson @LALARISSAJ

Ethan Lam / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Rose Steptoe (left) and Susan Swavely (second from left) won awards for their written work on Friday.

INK! conference recognizes work of English students outside of class. “It feels so much like they’re ... doing their thing,” Forter said. “It’s like the thing that you know Undergraduate English society they can do and that you usually INK! held a campus-wide literary only see them do in class, and here festival April 13, featuring many they are doing it in public, sharing critical essays and original creative their work with each other, having pieces by Universit y of Sout h a collective conversation, it’s great.” Carolina students. Awards were The keynote speaker for the given in two categories — literary INK! conference was Columbia’s analysis and creative writing — Poet Laureate Ed Madden, who with four students receiving prizes is also an English professor and for their work. director of the women and gender Su sa n Swavely, a f i rst-yea r studies department. Through his English and theater student and Poet Laureate experience over the social events coordinator of INK! past four years, he has new insight , won first place in the creative in sharing literature with the public. writing category for her short story, “I’m t a l k i ng about get t i ng “The Birth of Arta Javier-Alvarez.” literary arts into public forums so Swavely said she greatly appreciated the conference is English majors the recognition from professors presenting their work, both creative who evaluated her work and is and critical,” Madden said. “And excited for her future with INK!. my presentation is very “I think obviously, much about how can just being selected for we incorporate literary the conference was an arts into daily life.” incredible thing in itself Public expression and that’s def initely of literat ure is one encouraged me to keep of the driving forces writing,” Swavely said. behind INK!. English Three other students students write often for — Kathleen Blackwood, class, but many essays Rose Steptoe and don’t make it past a Hannah Quire — took professor’s desk. INK! first, second and third pushes for students to in the literary analysis share their work not d i v i s io n . Ev e r y o ne only their professors involved with INK! has been looking forward Ethan Lam / THE DAILY GAMECOCK but their friends and to this year’s conference 20 students participated in the conference, competing the community. “English can kind a n d t h e c h a n c e t o in two categories: creative writing and literary analysis. of be a subject you recognize the work of do by yourself like gifted writers. this awesome from the beginning reading and writing are things “It’s the thing we’ve had on really helped me with that transition you do completely on your own, our minds since we fi rst sat down and find my place and be happy.” most of the time,” Swavely said. toget her as just a few people English professor Greg Forter “So I think this is such a wonderful who didn’t know what INK! was serves as the faculty advisor of opportunity for people who are going to be this year,” said Mikki INK!. His favorite part of the usually doing their own craft to Antonio, third-year English and literary conference and INK! as a come together and share their craft studio art student and president of whole is the interest the students with each other.” INK!. “We knew that if anything, have in sharing their original work

Hannah Dear

@THEGAMECOCK

if all else failed, this conference was going to happen because it’s the one thing INK! does every single year. So I’m looking forward for it to be a celebration of everything we’ve done together this year.” The main purpose of INK! is to provide writers and lovers of literature with a community in which they can share their passions. A ll year long, I N K! has been hosting events such as Piranha Parlor for creative writing and panels for professional and academic development. These events have helped to foster a community that extends outside of INK!. “INK! was the first group that I joined and stuck with this year,” Swavely said. “It’s really hard to transition from high school into college and finding a group of people who is this supportive and

A storm that has caused damage across the South reached Columbia on Sunday, bringing gusts up to 74 miles per hour, according to the National Weather Service. As small branches and debris filled the roads, thousands of houses in Lexington and Richland counties lost power — at around 2:30 p.m., as many as 50,000 were in the dark. SCE&G reported 354 outage-causing incidents, mainly falling tree branches, in the two counties. Columbia was among the most severely impacted areas of South Carolina. The storm began with a simple lake wind advisory at 12 p.m. Afterward, AccuWeather reported an area f lood advisory ending at 2:23 p.m., a tornado watch ending at 7 p.m. and a severe thunderstorm warning ending at 4:30 p.m. While no tornado touched down in the Carolinas, storm damage from wind and branches was widespread across the Midlands. No major damage occurred on USC’s campus, although wind and driving rain brought down branches around the Horseshoe and Thomas Cooper fountain. During the worst of the storm around 2:30 p.m., the university recommended on Twitter that everyone “seek safe shelter immediately.” Lexington County called in the Red Cross to help with the destruction, although no injuries were reported. The county Twitter shared photos of fallen trees, ruined farm structures and damaged houses. Three deaths has been reported as a result of the storm. A two-year-old girl was killed by a falling tree in Louisiana, and two died in a storm-related car crashes in Nebraska and Wisconsin. Injuries were reported throughout the Midwest, although none have happened in South Carolina.

Screenshot by Larissa Johnson / The Daily Gamecock

Twelve homes were damaged in the Midlands, including several in Lexington.


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“You will see that Russian sanctions will be coming down ... And they will go directly to any sort of companies that were dealing with equipment related to [Syrian President Bashar al-Assad] and chemical weapons use.” — Nikki Haley, U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. on CBS News’s Face the Nation

Columbia mall shooting injures 2 Richland County deputies are investigating a Saturday afternoon shooting at Columbia Place mall on Two Notch Road that left two people injured. A statement from the sheriff’s department said that two groups of people were in the mall parking lot when shots were fired. One of the injured men then walked into the mall and collapsed, The State Newspaper reports. An eyewitness said that people first ran away from the injured man who left a trail of blood from the door to the food court where he collapsed, but mall employees and security rushed to the victim’s aid. According to police, one victim sustained life-threatening injuries. —Compiled by T. Michael Boddie, news editor

Congratulations to the 2018 Leadership and Service Awards Recipients Advisor of the Year Britt Hogg Outstanding Student Volunteer Award Tristan Mackey Outstanding Student Organization Service Award Waverly After School Program Student Organization of the Year Methodist Student Network Jessica Horton Outstanding New Student Leader Award Quadri Bell

PCPP Graduates

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Taylor Clarke Elena Gibson Rebecca Gillman Johnathan Johnson Brittany Lewis Caroline Pascal Madison Pease Laura Ryan Kate Samuel Megan Stoltenberg Erin Velloff Stephanie Woronko

Analis Bailey Rebecca-Marie Kaze Caitlin Donovan Jax Boucher Adam Donovan Stephen Pollock Yamaisi Errasti Abrianna Means Reaghan Murphy Ross Lordo Emily Barber Ellen Jones

Rev. O. Woody Hammett Scholarship Nicholas Frye Rosemary Broadway Memorial Scholarship Veronica Dishart Wilson-Kibler Bicentennial Award Matthew Mancini Strom Thurmond-Steve Cannon Carolina Cares Scholarship Jaclyn Altizio

Carolinian Creed Champion Award Mandy Null Emma Boswell Jo Sperry

Caroliniana Awards Ashley Barnhart Natalie Hungate Himabindu Vinnakota Brooke Wellington PVSA Awards Shivali Desai Veronica Dishart Emily Fisher Anne Gittman Praniti Kudre Rachel Lunsford Tristan Mackey Elizabeth Poche

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College of Education Department of Physical Education University of South Carolina

Physical Activity Program Stay active while earning academic credit. Register now for a Physical Activity course. Did you know that USC offers about 50 different physical activity courses each semester? These one credit hour classes include: • • • • • •

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• Martial Arts • Rock Climbing • Self-Defense for Women • Archery • Volleyball • Weight Training • Strength Training for Women • Yoga • Pilates • Dance A full list of courses can be found in Self Service Carolina, search for PEDU. Questions? Call us at 803.777.3239 or find us online at https://bit.ly/2vdnGtR

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Ethan Lam / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Haley Salvador / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Ethan Lam / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Two Cities explores North Columbia community Darby Hallman

@DARBYHALLMAN1

Indie Grits kicked off Thursday night with the opening of an art gallery for Two Cities, the on-going projec t f rom I nd ie Gr it s Labs made to shine a light on the North Columbia community. The pieces created for the project will remain on display through Sunday at the Indie Grits Labs headquarters at 1013 Duke Avenue. Two Cit ies is a collaborat ive ar t project desig ned to st ar t a conversation about the racial and socioeconomic tensions experienced by North Columbia communities. The project consists of everything from photography to film to comic b o ok s a nd e ven a n aqu ap on ic g a rden. T h rough a va r iet y of creative expressions, the artists collectively shared a piece of the culture that resides off of North Main and Monticello Road. “Because of t he ... h istorical realities of racism and under-served communities, there is a story that

needs to be told,” Pedro Lopez De Victoria, Indie Grits Labs Programming Coordinator, said. One of the artists is Tahirah Span n who is responsible for t he Grow Lab, a class designed to teach children how to grow their own food hydroponically with the goal of addressing nutritional problems Spann sees in North Columbia. “It add resses food equ it y especially in this community where there is so many food-related or nutrition-related health concerns,” Spann said. “There’s a high rate of diabetes, diabetic amputees — just a lot of preventable diseases.” Spann has a history in teaching c h i ld ren ab out ag r ic u lt u re at schools in California and South Carolina, and she believes t hat by teaching a younger generation about food equity and being health conscious, she is helping improve the community at large. “My part icular programming focuses on children because I feel

Indie Grits brings local music talent Genna Contino @TDG_ARTS

Haley Salvador/ THE DAILY GAMECOCK

like once they learn they are more likely to sustain it,” Spann said. “Adults, we’re kind of set in our ways sometimes and we’ll try to do better but I think a lot of times we are often motivated by our children.” Another creator named Benjamin Moore, who prefers to go by Fart. PDF, has multiple projects being featured at Indie Grits including a short fi lm, an exhibit at Tapps Art Center that shows what a North Columbia living room is like and a mixed media collage book that he was handing out at the Indie Grits Labs house. With his book, Fart. PDF wanted to capture the feeling of driving down North Main and SEEONLINE

Southern Scenes writes love letter to American South

Taylor Washington @TDG_ARTS

For those who live here, and even for those who don’t, it isn’t hard to tell that the American South is a la nd of loom i ng cont radict ions. I of ten wonder how such a v iole nt h i s t o r y c ou ld possibly birth a culture so rich with beauty. This weekend, filmgoers were given an answer as they were granted full access into the mysterious world of Southern life by way of the Indie Grits Film

Festival. Sout her n Scenes, a collection of eight short f i l m s , approac he s t he A mer ica n Sout h a nd its inhabitants through diverse perspect ives. Whether it is two drifters in search of a family, a father dealing with loss or three children mastering the art of levitation, each stor y evokes a sense of intrigue. With locations ranging f rom A labama to Texas to r ight here at home i n Colu mbia, viewers were spoiled with a va r iet y of t a les t hat

shared a similar theme of escapism. For a nyone who has e v e r h ad t o e nd u r e a Sout her n su m mer, t he opening scene of Shannon Silva’s short film “Baby Oil” would have felt all t o o f a m i l i a r. D u r i n g t he summer of 1978 in r u ral Nor t h Carol i na, a you ng mot her a nd h e r t w o c h i ld r e n a r e lounging in the backyard with absolutely nothing to do. That is, u nt il a s udde n t hu nde r s t or m forces t hem into t heir t railer and k nock s out

their power. While their par t ic u lar sit uat ion seems fairly common, the circumstances have bigger implications. Although the young family manages to escape from the storm, it’s revealed that their mother is u nable to escape a n offscreen abusive husband. For Silva, “Baby Oil” is a f lashback t hat t a kes inspiration from a rocky time during her childhood and takes on a meaning much larger than herself. SEEONLINE

Columbia music lovers walked down the stairs of the Tapps Art Center for a night of Indie Grits music and were greeted with an abundance of sound. The death metal bass of Bathe could be heard from the Space Hall to their left while the quirky folk harmonicas brought by Paleface were heard in the Fountain Room to their right. Just a block down Main at the Main Street Public House, blue,girl was performing distinctive and passionate tunes. A nd these were just the first three artists that performed Friday night. A total of nine played throughout the night, giving attendees diverse options for their listening experience. Other artists included Sequoyah Murray, Boulevards, WVRM, Black Tusk, King Vulture and Dear Blanca. Justin Shafer, a fourth-year international business and entrepreneurship student, was most excited to see Black Tusk perform the finale in the Space Hall Friday night. “I don’t get too many fantastic metal shows in Columbia,” Shafer said. “So it’ll be fun to get in there and mosh a little bit.” Besides the variety of local music being performed, guests were able to enjoy dinner and drinks at the Main Street Public House while listening to the soulful sounds being performed. Guests could stroll through the upstairs art gallery of Tapps Art Center, or try out some of the video games set up on computers downstairs between the music venues. The video games were created by Indie Bits, a local “arts and education organization that aims to design and promote inclusive gaming experiences for all.” Ellen Jones, a fourth-year comparative SEEONLINE

Jordan Warren / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Review: ‘Sense and Sensibility’ lively, engaging Jackson Stanton @TDG_ARTS

The USC Department of Theatre and Dance’s presentation of “Sense and Sensibility” is a refreshing and witty take on the classic novel by Jane Austen. Directed by Lindsay Rae Taylor and set in early 19th century England, the play follows sisters Marianne and Elinor Dashwood in their journey through love. After their father dies, the Dashwoods are forced to relocate to the countryside, where they meet a plethora of colorful characters. The two sisters represent the two sides of the

title. Marianne Dashwood (Kimberly Braun), a spontaneous, excitable and romantic young woman, represents sensibility. Elinor Dashwood (Libby Hawkins), an affectionate, composed and rational character, represents sense. Because these characters are so different from one another, it’s easy as an audience member to personally identify with one or the other. One thing that stands out in this production of “Sense in Sensibility” is the quick and smooth transitions between scenes. The play is consistently fast-paced, which allows the audience to stay engaged the entire time.

Bet ween scenes, t here were orchest ral arrangements of famous pop songs playing to fi ll the silence. These modern songs in the style of early 19th century added a modern flare to the play that is set in a traditional time. At first, I was a little confused as to why I was hearing a string orchestra play Beyonce’s “Crazy in Love.” Yet, the infusion of modern music into a pre-Victorian England style is what makes this theatrical adaption of Jane Austen’s play so great. By playing more modern music, we are able to see SEESENSEPAGE5


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FROMSENSEPAGE4 how to connect problems and issues of today with Austen’s themes from the past. Although the music and set changes were phenomenal, the true highlight of the play comes from the cast’s impressive and witty performance as 19th century English men and women. The cast’s conv incing and lav ish portrayal of these characters shows both the talent and immense training of USC’s theater program. Third-year theater major R iley Lucas illustrated this talent through h is por t r aya l of M r s. Jen n i ng s. Through his act ing and comedic approach to the character, Lucas is

able to bring the traditional and boring Mrs. Jennings to life. As the leads, Braun and Hawkins also create special moments during the production. While on stage, the two actress’s interactions with each ot her are bot h lively and caring. Together, Braun and Hawkins are able to create the type of caring and loving relationship that the Dashwood sisters share. Altogether, “Sense and Sensibility” is a soph ist ic ated, c u n n i ng a nd comedic adaption on Jane Austen’s classic novel and is a production that truly showcases the talent that the University of South Carolina has to offer.

Ethan Lam/ THE DAILY GAMECOCK

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Monday, April 16, 2018

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US should not increase military involvement in Syria Joseph Will third-year economics student On Thursday morning, Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis admitted that, so far, there is not a shred of evidence that the Syrian government under Assad is responsible for the recent chemical attacks in Syria that have left 42 people dead. Despite this startling admission, the U.S. (along with France and England) began bombing Syria the very next day. The whole situation reminds one of the disastrous Iraq war, where the U.S. jumped headfirst into an ill-fated conf lict under dubious pretenses of Iraqi WMDs. Despite having no obvious upsides and plenty of potentially catastrophic downsides, Trump seems intent on going ahead with military intervention. Such a decision on the U.S’s part would likely lead to only more chaos and suffering. The whole idea of waging war in Syria seems to fly in the face of Trump’s campaign rhetoric. Seeing the Trump of the campaign trail rail against the Iraq war and the politicians who caused it was a genuinely c at ha r t ic moment , w it h t he G OP f ront r u n ner repudiating not only that one particular debacle, but the entire neoconservative doctrine that led to such a war in the first place. Trump was supposed bring about a new era in American foreign policy, one that abandoned t he absurd regime change policies of previous presidents and gave primacy to American interests rat her t han some malformed not ion of “mak ing the world safe for democracy”. Instead, Trump now wants America to take the role of global police force, attacking any regime that we deem as sufficiently evil. While there may be genuinely good intentions behind such a notion, there are enormous risks involved and the whole effort may bring about disastrous results. The situation in Syria is an extremely complex and sensitive one, with nearly every major world power having interests in the region. Russia has already affi rmed their support of the Assad government, and has warned the U.S. that any military action will be met with a severe response from Moscow. Iran too is fully behind the Syrian government, and the Iranian government has already condemned the attacks as a military crime. China has also condemned the attack, and the Chinese government sees itself as having legitimate interests in supporting the Assad regime, even militarily. Confl ict with Syria is thus not merely a matter of opposing a single rogue Middle Eastern regime, but instead has the potential to develop into a full-blown international military crisis. Trump’s statement on the decision to bomb Syria repeated many of the tired canards associated with neoconservative interventionist foreign policy. Assad is not a head of state or even a man, but is rather a “monster” t hat t he U.S. must va nqu ish. Th is incendiary rhetoric is very worrisome, as the history of U.S. regime change in the Middle East is one riddled with fatal errors and militar y action resulting in unintended and catastrophic consequences. In light of Mattis’ admission that there is so far no evidence that conclusively shows that Assad is even responsible, the statement is even more of a cause for concern. We may be getting ready to engage in confl ict with a man who didn’t even commit the crimes he’s been accused of. Military action in Syria is something that must be opposed. Merely disposing of Assad is not going to be an easy task when he’s backed by powerful allies like Russia and China. Directly attacking Assad could very well result in a full-blown confl ict between numerous countries that the U.S. does not need. Even if we were to get rid of Assad, that opens up the possibility to a power vacuum similar to the one left after the disposal of Saddam Hussein in Iraq, leaving the region open to extreme Jihadi groups who would only prolong the suffering of Syrian citizens. W hile t he sit uat ion in Sy ria is a terrible one, cavalierly leaping into war is a risky move that puts everyone involved in danger, both in Syria and in the U.S. Hopefully the U.S. will come to its senses.

Water crisis in Flint could happen anywhere, shouldn’t be forgotten We’ve all been hearing of the Flint water crisis for years now, but like many things in the media, after awhile it has been swept to the side. But not for the residents of Flint, Michigan. A fter 1,000 plus days, these A merican citizens still don’t Lori Elliott have the simple necessit y of Third-year clean water. Yet, just last week, English Student the governor of Michigan Rick Snyder said he will no longer provide free bottled water to the citizens of Flint, as he believes the water is well within regulations. But before we get into that, I think it’s important we all know how Flint got to this point in the f irst place. Flint, like many American cities, was once a thriving industrial center in America. It was home to the largest General Motors plant — that is until the 1980s, when the plant downsized and moved many jobs overseas. With no jobs, the city began to suffer, and by 2011, Flint was in such bad shape that the state of Michigan took over its finances. As a cost cutting measure, the state decided to switch its sewer and water systems from that of Detroit to the Karegnondi Water Authorit y from Lake Huron. But these systems were not ready, so the state made the decision in April 2014 to use the Flint River. The state decided not to use an anticorrosive agent, which is against federal law. This is where our horror story begins. The Flint River is 19 times more corrosive than Lake Huron, so as it flowed through the lead and galvanized pipes, the toxins from these pipes leaked into the water. But the government kept denying that the water was toxic, reassuring Flint citizens it was safe for them and their children to drink and use. That was until studies found area children had twice the amount of lead in their blood systems after the switch and twelve individuals actually died from Legionnaires’ Disease, a disease that often comes from exposure to non-potable water systems. People began complaining about

rashes and their hair falling out. The water system was slowly poisoning them. Lead can have detrimental effects on your health, especially in young children. The EPA lists kidney issues and cardiovascular effects. But it’s even worse for children. Exposure to lead can cause behav ioral and learning problems, lower IQ, anemia and growth problems. Indeed, the list of complications goes on and on. In January 2016, the state of Michigan declared a state of emergency, but the damage had already been done. It is no longer just the water supply that is the issue, it’s the corroded pipes that it has flowed through, all because the state chose not to use a federally mandated agent in the water. Fifty percent of the homes in Flint have these outdated pipes, but with 40 percent of citizens under the poverty line and a price tag of roughly $10,000 a home to repair and replace, they can’t fi x it on their own. And they shouldn’t have to as it was not their doing. The water itself may be passing the test as Snyder claims, but there are still 12,000 homes that need their pipes replaced. In the meantime, these people’s lives depend on water bottle distribution centers. It seems to me that the government made a mistake trying to save a dollar, and as a result has cost us millions, and, more importantly, the health of the citizens of Flint. It’s been nearly four years and the problem is still not solved. This could have easily been any county in South Carolina. As a matter of fact, two dozen counties in South Carolina in the last seven years have tested over the federal regulation for lead, although they were much smaller areas outside of Rock Hill and Columbia. The levels have since dropped when Richland County took over private water systems, but we too could have faced a similar story. I understand that we have a capitalist e c onom ic s y s t e m , but w he n d id ou r government become the same? When did a dollar matter more than a life? I urge you not to forget those suffering in Flint, They still need your help.

Studying abroad valuable, not waste of money I like to think studying abroad is a microcosm for the college experience in the United States as a whole. While both can be expensive, strenuous, and even dangerous at times, they offer excellent opportunities to meet new people and explore new places. A nd like college, studying abroad Hayden is also cloaked in a thin veneer of Blakeney mysticism, like some rite of passage Third-year journalism for students to take, and as such has student many myths and rumors surrounding it. First of all, studying abroad is as expensive as you make it. Of course, to say something is “expensive” is entirely relative to the person footing the bill, and the vast amount of study abroad programs makes it even more difficult to nail down how much money “expensive” is. This is completely ignoring the scores of scholarships for study abroad, which are offered by both USC and third part y organizations. The program I studied abroad with last fall in Ireland gave all st udents from USC an immediate $2000

discount, thanks to a partnership between the University and ASA, the program provider. Even including my plane ticket, my semester abroad was less expensive than a semester at USC which allowed me to travel to several illustrious places in Europe, like Amsterdam and Barcelona. A nother great study abroad myth is that it “messes up your classes.” While this may be true if you are getting a degree with a specific tract in mind, classes offered abroad are usually tailored to your major and is a great way to get electives out of the way. I also fi nd it extremely indicative of the American college environment that more concern is placed on whether or not classes are “messed up” than an actual education. You know, that thing you’re spending your inheritance on to attend an accredited 4-year university? If you only care about coasting through classes to get a fancy piece of paper with your name on it, I might suggest a local trade school or community college. A recent study has found that nearly 40% of Americans have never left the country, and 76% want to travel more but lack the means to. This is why studying abroad is pushed so hard on college

students. These brief years are the only time when we are not tied to an income, a family, or a mortgage. Regardless of how interconnected the world is now, there are things anyone can learn from being in a foreign country, some more tangible than others. Being a minority in a place where you do not speak the language and have little understanding of how anything works is an experience nobody can teach in a classroom. And to be frank, the steryotypical obnoxious American tourists is, in my opinion, created when people do not live abroad for a long term and go simply as tourists. If anything, study abroad programs reduce the overall level of gawking, fanny packladen tourists, not the other way around. To be fair, studying abroad is not for everyone. Some majors simply do not offer good study abroad experiences, and some students may not be comfortable leaving the United States. But to say studying abroad is irrelevant and useless is a misstep in my opinion, as it offers great lifechanging experiences to those who do go.


Monday, April 16, 2018

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HOROSCOPES

PHD • JORGE CHAM

Aries Cash flow rises today and tomorrow. Care for something you’ve been neglec t i ng. St ic k to basics. Act on previously l a id g r ou nd work . A lucky break can unfold.

Leo Prov ide leadership. Ta k e o n m o r e responsibility over the ne x t fe w d ay s. Meet professional deadlines a nd goa ls. Grab a n opportunity when it falls in your lap.

Taurus Yo u ’r e e s p e c i a l l y confident and powerful. Check your course, and then full speed ahead. A spiritual advisor helps you stay on the right path.

Virgo Long-distance t ravel a nd long-ter m possibilities beckon for a few days. You can solve a puzzle. Use something y o u’v e b e e n s a v i n g. Study and learn.

Gemini Benef it f rom t he foundations you’ve built. Don’t spend what you don’t have. The action is beh ind t he scenes. Clarify your direction. Set i ntent ions a nd schedule them.

Cancer Reach out. Connect and check in with your p e o p l e . Te a m w o r k prov ides sat isf y i ng results. Share nostalgic moments with friends. Ref lect on past glories and future possibilities.

Libra Ha ndle pract ical f i n a nc i a l pr ior it ie s . Work out project details and update the budget. Fr i e n d s o f f e r g o o d advice and connections. Sha re re sou rce s a nd opportunities.

Scorpio Make a special connection. An at t ract ion is mut ual. Collaborate on a shared passion, and profit from the fruits of your labors. You’re in sync.

Sagittarius Take a step back to advance. Nurture your heart. Build your health, fitness and work upon previous foundations. Strengthen sk ills and practices. You’re making a good impression.

Capricorn Relax, and play for a few days. Prioritize fam ily a nd roma nce. Beaut y a nd st rong emotion inspire. Enjoy b e lo v e d p e o p le a n d activities. Appreciate those who went before.

Aquarius Domest ic comforts draw you in. Provide s upp or t to s omeone you love. Persuade with grace. You have what ot hers wa nt. Show apprec iat ion for t he effort of others.

Pisces

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ON NEWSSTANDS APRIL 30 4/16/18

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ACROSS 1 Sounds showing revelation 4 Actress Winger 9 Beer, casually 13 Speedy shark 15 Bars between wheels 16 Travel aimlessly 17 Angling method using hand-tied lures 19 Bar orders 20 City recaptured from ISIL by Iraq in 2017 21 Sincerely 23 Hunk of concrete 25 Tic-tac-toe diagram 26 Memorization technique 29 One doing the Electric Slide, e.g. 34 Brian of ambient music ''(·V::,, command 5HQWHU·V document 37 Stinging comment 39 Complains 42 Like the Magi 43 What the beverage cart blocks 45 Sellout letters %ULWSLORWV·VTXDG 47 Hamburger meat 50 Beach or Backstreet follower, in music 51 At any point 52 Subway charge 54 Mark McGwire rival 58 IHOP handouts 62 Furthermore %HDWOHV·6KHD Stadium performance, e.g. 65 Casino card game 66 Steinbeck migrants -HN\OO·VDOWHUHJR 68 Little League airer 69 Nervous

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70 One of an LQQLQJ¡VWKUHH which can follow the first word of 17-, 29-, 47- and 63-Across DOWN 1 Bedside toggle switch $QJHO¡VRYHUKHDG circle 3 “The __ the limit!â€? 4 Prosecutors: Abbr. 3URVHFXWRU¡V first piece of evidence 6 Russian pancake 7 Back out 8 Home of primary 30-Down gods 9 Fresh from the factory 10 Part in a play 11 Nights before 12 __ Virginia 14 Handy 18 Down with the flu 22 Yemeni money 24 Knighted Guinness 26 Pack again, as groceries ´:H¡UHOLYHÂľ studio sign 28 Human trunk

30 Like Odin and Thor (J\SW¡VFDSLWDO 32 Op-ed piece, say 33 Often submerged shipping dangers 38 Lunar symbol for a very long time %RRNV¡RSHQLQJ sections 41 Couch 44 Green-eyed monster 48 Absolute ruler 49 Actress Shields

50 Tree that sounds like a summer vacation spot 53 Pres. pardoned by Ford 54 Jewelry protector 55 “Sadly ... “ 56 Car sticker fig. 57 Whirl around 59 “So Sick� R&B artist 60 Pakistani language 61 “Cancel that deletion� 64 Sugar suffix


Monday, April 16, 2018

Claudia Chakamian

Allisha Gray’s journey from the WNBA back to the classroom behind the camera and it’s been fun to watch.” Her profe s sor s h ave e ven not ic e d t h at her determination spreads to both in the newsroom and on the court. Journalism professor Rick Peterson was pleased to see t hat the hard work she plays w it h t ranslate into t he classroom. “She has such a st rong work ethic that she must be so highly disciplined to be so good [in] her own f ield, she’s just kind of brought that same k ind of work et h ic to wh at we do,” Peterson said. “ You ca n k ind of see what ma kes her so good on the ba sketba l l cou r t . She ju st h a s t h is strong, strong work ethic.” Gray used t hat work ethic to get selected fou r t h overall by t he Dallas W ings in the 2017 W NBA Draft. The 2017 draft was a busy o ne f or f or mer G amecock s, as A laina Coates was t a ken second by t he C h ic ago Sk y and K aela Dav is was selected tent h by Dallas, giving her and Gray another chance to be teammates. Gray said having Davis to go through her rook ie season with was a huge advantage to the

@C_CHAKAMIAN

A year ago A llisha Gray had a choice to ma ke. She had just a few hou rs to make a dec ision t h at would change her life and her career: was she going to enter t h e WNBA Draft or was she was going to stay in Columbia and finish her classes? Just a few hours before the draft deadline, Gray made that choice, but not without first making a promise. “Before I declared for t he draft, I made a promise to my parents that I would come back and get my d e g r e e f ol lo w i n g the season,” Gray said. “A nd here I am now, fulfilling that promise.” No w, j u s t a few mont hs af ter complet ing her f i r st se a son i n t he W N BA and w in n ing the league’s Rookie of the Year award, Gray is back in Columbia completing her degree in broadcast journalism. To g r a d u a t e , G r a y h a s t o complete the School of Journalism and Mass Communications’ senior semester program, which involves working in a newsroom environment from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ever y day, rotating through different newsroom jobs each day. Coming back to school after taking time off can be tough, and jumping into what is basically a full-time job was a big adjustment. Still, Gray said she’s enjoyed being back. “Senior semester has been a lot of f u n. I was def in itely ner vous coming in here, about the class and about the timing and stuff, but my classmates, they definitely made the class a lot [more] fun and easier for me to adjust,” Gray said. “I definitely feel a lot calmer and at home within t he cla s sroom. But over a l l, it ’s taken some of my shyness away also because I’m a ver y shy person ... I don’t mind being in front of the camera anymore.” During the few short months of this spring semester, Gray has felt herself growing in all aspects of the newsroom, helping her improve in the field she wants to enter into after her career in the W NBA is over. Her senior semester professors have

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Photo by Layne Murdoch/NBAE via Getty Images

Courtesy of Allisha Gray

witnessed the same improvements that Gray has seen in herself. “ She’s d o ne e v e r y t h i n g t h at we’ve asked her to do, even things t h at s he’s b e e n u nc om f or t able with,” journalism professor Greg Brannon said. “She takes coaching, or crit iqu ing, ver y well and she understands it’s meant to make her better. She’s gotten better in front of the camera, she’s gotten better

Sara Yang / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Gray works in the senior semester newsroom from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day.

adjustment process. And getting to play r ight dow n t he road f rom where she and the Gamecocks won a national championship means a lot to Gray. “ I t ’s k i n d o f c o o l because you’re in Dallas, a nd you’re d r iv i ng by t he buildings like ‘t wo weeks ago, I was just in there winning the national championship,’” Gray said. “Every time I drive by that building, I always remember that, remember winning the national championship, so it’s great.” Now, Gray is even more ready to get back to Dallas and really start preparing for another go-around. The guard is getting ready for her second season with the Wings and is eyeing an even more successful season. Gray wakes up at 5 a.m. every day to go workout and practice before class. She sometimes trains after class as well. After the rookie season she put together, she’s ready to show off what she’s been working on to improve and hopes to earn All-Star honors this season.

File photo: Yangxing Ding / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

But b e f or e s he g o e s b ac k t o Dallas, Gray is f illed wit h all of the memories she made here at the University of South Carolina just one year ago. After helping the Gamecocks win their first national championship, Gr ay h ad a ver y sm a l l w i ndow to de c ide wh at to do w it h her professional and academic careers. She leaned heavily on others for advice on the situation. “I’m talk ing to my parents, all this stuff, and then my go was when I talked to my academic advisor, I found out that if I stayed or left I was still going to graduate in May, so that kind of gave me the go-ahead to go ahead and leave for the draft and follow my dreams,” Gray said. T h i s M ay i s a bu s y t i me for Gray. The W NBA season tips off May 18, and just si x days prior, Gray w ill complete t he prom ise she made: She’ll graduate from the University of South Carolina. While she’s excited to get back with her teammates, she’s even more excited to be back in Colonial Life Arena, dressed in much different attire than what she’s used to. “I’m not m issi ng graduat ion for not hing,” Gray said. “It just shows that all the hard work I did, and even ... in the season, I was doing online courses so school never stopped for me. So just to get that degree and just to walk across that stage a nd hear my name called; I may run across the stage, I’m so excited.” Even t hough she on ly played one season in garnet and black, Gray feels right at home at South Carolina, and that’s what made her so excited to come back to finish her degree. From t he moment she f irst decided to transfer away from North Carolina to the day she brought a national championship to Columbia, Gray knew that this place would always hold a special place in her heart. “Coming into South Carolina, it definitely felt like home to me and that played a big part of me choosing to come here and transferring from U NC,” Gray said. “The fans are great, Gamecock Nation, best fan base in the nation ... So I felt real at home here.”

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04_16_2018  
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