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Did winning the SEC Tournament do enough to put the Gamecocks in a good position for the big dance? See page 8.

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THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2018

VOL. 110, NO. 16 ● SINCE 1908

‘SHOT GIRL’ INSIDER BY ANONYMOUS

The first time I ever stepped foot in a strip club, I applied for a job. The three o’clock sunshine vanished with the shutting door, and I entered a self-sufficient little world, sealed totally from the outside. All at once it was dark and loud, and I felt the particular way club music jars the body. A man in a three-piece suit led me over garish hotel carpeting to an office just big enough for two standing adults. “Does your significant other know about this?” he asked me. “Yes,” I said. “Your parents?” “No.” He checked the appropriate boxes on my papers. “You’ll start this Friday at 10. At night.” He smiled at me kindly. For three months during my senior year of college, I drove to work at 9:30 p.m., toting a duffel bag that held, variably, black miniskirts, booty shorts, fishnet stockings, garters, and, always, a white corset and a set of patent black heels. At the club, I would skirt invisibly through a packed nightclub to the locker rooms, where naked women smoked cigarettes and trimmed tampon strings. There I stashed my thrift store jeans and Doc Martens, and picked up a fluorescent serving tray for the night. I told everyone I was cocktail waitressing at a strip club for the money, which was not totally true, although I suppose I believed it then. My moneymakers were rare anyways, the older men who were from out-of-town and came alone and sat quietly. These were the ones who left me business cards wrapped in hundred dollar bills. Besides those, it was hit-or-miss most nights — the other girls who had been there for years told me business these days was not like it used to be. Pick up a copy of Garnet and Black or check out their website to read the full story.

Zachary McKinley / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

VP-elect Hayes driven by passion for people, family T. Michael Boddie @THEHUMANBODDIE

Extroverted. Caffeinated. Wearing red. These are some of the things one might see in or about student body vice president Mills Hayes when interacting with her. When Hayes was growing up in Lexington, SC, she was not even sure that she would set foot on USC’s campus as a student. As her town is so close to the university, many people around her would end up attending, but she wanted to stand out. But af ter she d iscovered St udent Med ia a nd t he S c ho ol of Jou r n a l i s m a nd M a s s Communications, it was a “no-brainer.” The third-year broadcast journalism student describes herself as curious about people. She

aligns this curiosity and passion with her drive to be a journalist. “I get my energy from other people. When I’m around positive, fun-loving people I just—it makes me feel so much better about my life and about myself,” Hayes says. “That’s kind of what I want to also be like toward other people, is I want them to feel good after leaving an interaction with me.” The same passion for people that drive Hayes to a career in reporting is what led her to consider trying her hand in Student Government. She was senior class president in high school, and she felt that it was only natural to apply for freshman council once she got to USC. Hayes did not end up on the council, though. She focused her attention on journalism with SEEMILLSPAGE3

Treasurer-elect Odagis finds his voice, hopes to influence others Larissa Johnson

high school. At Owen J. Roberts High School outside Philadelphia, that meant being student treasurer. Emerson Odagis’s four-year At USC, it’s meant being treasurer plan when he first stepped onto of Preston Hall freshman year and USC’s campus had getting elected now chair of the student senate student body treasurer scheduled finance committee. for senior year. When he got to “What draws me to the fi nance know treasurer Stinson Rogers, aspect is ever ything,” he said. he put a Post-It on the treasurer’s “Everything f lows through the computer that said, “I’ll be here in money.” three years.” As a double major in finance and “He just sent me a text saying, global supply chain operations and ‘You’re here in two,’” Odagis said. management, Odagis wants to be a “I guess I have to reevaluate what consultant and help businesses else I want to put in my plan.” improve their efficiency. He’s His path to treasurer was already got experience with anything but certain, though. the hands-on aspect of business In the Feb. 28 election, he came working as a landscaper at his in second place to Wilfredo uncle’s business over three A nderson, who was only .45 summers. percent away from a win. He mowed and weed-wacked “I sat down on the phone with from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the my mom for an hour that night summer heat. But at night, he and I was like, ‘I don’t know stayed with his grandma. She what else we can do,’” Odagis had the same positive and said. “She told me, ‘You never supportive attitude as his Zachary McKinley / THE DAILY GAMECOCK know what you can do until you mom, and before she passed do it.’” Emer son Odagis wins t he r un - of f SG in August, he talked to her Jackie Odagis is a fi rst grade treasurer race on Wednesday, March 7. multiple times a week. teacher and the daughter of “That ability to influence Dutch immigrants. She’s also her the performance. others around you in such a positive While the rigors of campaigning son’s best friend. They talk every way is something that hopefully I day and she’s his biggest role model, for an executive position might can take forward in the treasurer’s have been new to Odagis, being a he said. office,” he said. “Being able to have “Her ability to stay calm at all treasurer certainly won’t be. Odagis those memories is something you times is something I look up to,” has aimed to become the treasurer can always look back on fondly.” Odagis said. “She’s someone that is of every group he’s a part of since

@LALARISSAJ

always pushing forward.” During the campaign, Odagis had to push to f ind his voice, especially for class and organization visits. He also said that he felt he didn’t perform his best at the debate. “I mumble and I don’t talk loud,” he said. Odagis practiced giving his speeches over and over, especially where to get louder and emphasize cer t a i n words. H is campa ig n manager Colin Hungerpiller was the guinea pig and helped perfect

Sara Yang / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster holds a town hall at USC on Tuesday, March 6.

SC governor holds open town hall Larissa Johnson @LALARISSAJ

Gov. Henry McMaster managed to connect an anecdote about his bulldog to Samsung’s expansion in South Carolina, all in response to a question about improving higher education. He met casually with a group of about 50 students, mainly members of the College Republicans, in Russell House Tuesday night to talk about his career and answer questions on major state and local issues. “College students are at the perfect age to get involved in ... public policy and government,” McMaster said. “It’s a great opportunity for me to encourage people to get take an interest in it.

INSIDE

SEEGOVPAGE3

Ethan Lamb / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

A&C

SPORTS

Columbia City Ballet premiers new show

Junior Chris Silva picked up his first postseason SEC honors.

Page 5

Victoria Richman / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Page 10

SPORTS

Sara Yang / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Junior Adam Hill threw two strong games to earn national recognition. Page 10


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Thursday, March 8, 2018

About The Daily About The Daily Gamecock

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“We’re writing today to say: we stand with you in taking tough action to keep America safe and our economy strong. At the same time, we’re urging the President to tailor these tariffs so American businesses can continue to trade fairly with our partners, sell American-made products to customers all over the world, and hire more workers here at home.” — Rep. Kevin Brady and other GOP lawmakers ask President Trump to reconsider tariffs on steel and aluminum

SC legislators propose end to daylight savings SC legislators propose end to daylight savings The South Carolina senate voted Wednesday to take a bill proposing that the Palmetto State ignore daylight savings time to the House, The State reports. In considering the “feasibility and possible economic consequences” of the change, several senators were on board with the idea. Sen. Harvey Peeler says the switch would only make sense if neighbor states also adopted it, so his proposal includes contacting other state governments about the idea. Daylight savings time begins on Sunday, March 11. —Compiled by T. Michael Boddie, news editor

USC student protests animal cruelty Because of her success with EcoReps and her obv ious passion, Murphy Sophia Johnson, a firsta nd t he rest of t he year biology student, began RHA executive board prot e st i ng t he R i ngl i ng endorsed her for the Circ us when she was 10. next chief off icer of She’s now t he pre s ident s u st a i n abi l it y. T he of t he only animal rights R H A senate passed organization on campus. t h is endorsement “ T here wa sn’t a not her unanimously. animal rights club around “ C u r r e n t l y, I ’ m campus so I just decided to rea l ly i nterested i n create CARE-olina Animal food waste. So, I’ve Advocates,” Johnson said. been doing some After being invited to the research mostly about circus as a child, Johnson the United States but was shown footage of animal also just in general,” cr uelt y t hat called her to Johnson said. “With ac t ion. She i m med iately that general topic, I g at hered her f a m i ly to would really like to protest the Ringling Circus f ind ways to reduce a nd bega n spea k i ng at food waste on local churches and schools campus. I’m not sure t o b r i n g a w a r e ne s s a nd how R H A would be organize her own protests. involved with that — “I think compassionate is m a y b e p u b l ic i z i n g a good adjective for myself something I decide to b e c au s e I c a r e s o mu c h work on.” about other people, other Murphy appreciates animals especially, beings t he way Joh nson t hat ca n not spea k up for works with the other themselves or need help,” new E coReps a nd Johnson said. Courtesy of Stacy Shepanek believes this will help Through protesting the her as chief officer of circus, Johnson connected USC student Sophia Johnson tables on Greene Street to promote sustainability and protest animal cruelty. sustainability. wit h ot her animal rights for new EcoReps. One of the questions on the “She’s been a really positive force in EcoReps groups such as People for the Ethical Treatment application was “W hat is your favorite green just inspiring some of the other newbies to kind of Animals, for whom she now works as a youth thing?” of get out there and do what they’re passionate representative. “Her answer was the address of Green Quad about,” Murphy said. “With PETA, they ask me to do eight events and nothing else,” Murphy said. “None of us Johnson couldn’t speak enough to her love for per semester,” she said. “These events ... often realized it at fi rst, and then one of our other lead the experiences EcoReps gave her. She says the have something free like free vegan samples.” team members started to think and put it into organization has allowed her to grow as a person. Johnson isn’t just protesting animal cruelty on google and Green Quad came up. We were all like “It’s not overwhelming ... It’s fun all around campus; she is also involved with the EcoReps ‘this girl has to be an EcoRep!’” and you know you’re making a difference in the who teach about sustainable living in residence As a vegan interested in animal rights and world,” Johnson said. halls. sustainability, Johnson is always on the lookout Johnson isn’t completely sure what she wants “She’s done a ton of work in East Quad,” said for sharing her passions with USC students. to do with her life after college. She is currently Reaghan Murphy, a third-year environmental Just one of the ways she has done this recently considering veterinary school or something in science and global studies student Murphy is is through the Vegan/Vegetarian ThanksLiving the public health field. Regardless, Johnson’s EcoRep team leader and the chief off icer of Celebration. goal is “to learn more about myself, about my sustainability for Residence Hall Association. “I bega n to see t he impor t a nce of l iv i ng community, and the world. I want to gain a lot of “The EcoReps in general put on three events sustainably when I was young, but having the experiences to help me grow as a person.” every fall and four events every spring. She’s opportunities at USC — it’s so exciting to me,” probably done more than that.” Johnson said. “It’s something that’s so important Murphy said she was fi rst amazed by Johnson’s for more students to learn about — how they can passion when she was reviewing applications impact.”

Hannah Dear

@THEGAMECOCK


Thursday, March 8, 2018

3

MILLSPAGE1

Sara Yang / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster exchanges dialogue with USC students at Russell House. GOVPAGE1 It’s your state, it’s your country, and you need to know what’s going on.” His campaign requested that the event be small and informal and during the College Republicans’ normal meeting time. McMaster sat in the audience for the beginning of the meeting. The organization’s chairwoman, Lauren Boals, said that she liked the intimate town hall format. “National news takes a lot of the attention of people, and the state and local politics get lost in the mix,” she said. “So to have him come in and be able to actually answer questions that are relevant to people’s hometowns and where they live or our school directly, it’s nice to hear a real, personal answer.” McMaster, who’s running for re-election, ended up answering about 10 questions, ranging from a question about a local highway in Horry County from CR member Robbie Anderson to a question on SCANA and the nuclear debacle from Student Government Attorney General Frank Halloran. “W hen I heard Governor McMaster was coming, I knew I had to clear time out of my schedule,” Halloran said. He currently supports McMaster in the GOP primary. “He has a really, really clean record.” In addition to Halloran’s energy question, one student raised the fact that South Carolinians pay $400 more annually in electric bills than the average American. Especially for fi nancially unstable students, she said, a few hundred dollars make a big difference. “We have an opportunity,” McMaster said. “It’s wrapped inside of a disaster, but we do have an opportunity.” Privatizing SCANA through a sale, he said, would help introduce competition and bring down costs. The S.C. Legislature is currently

considering an offer for the public utilit y company from Dominion Energy, and several other companies are likely to make bids. That emphasis on private business as a solution was a common thread throughout McMaster’s responses. Before and throughout his time as governor, McMaster’s platform has included decreasing taxes and regulation to draw more companies to South Carolina. Mac Lindsay, a fi rst-year marketing student, heard about the event through his fraternity and came to see McMaster for the first time. “Great first impression,” he said. College Republicans frequently provides a source for local and state campaign interns, but Boals said McMaster was the first candidate whose campaign reached out about a visit. A number of attendees signed up to volunteer for McMaster, including first-year business student Robert Cathcart. He’s also considering an internship program with the campaign. T he publ ic event d rew more t ha n ju st McMaster supporters. Jay Selesky, the director of the campus Legislative Action Network, attended the event “trying to broaden my horizons.” With any political event, it seems inevitable that President Donald Trump will come up. McMaster was the f irst elected off icial to endorse Trump, drawing a question about their relationship. “He’s quite a man,” McMaster said. He added that people always line up to get face time with Trump, but he and his wife always get a good reception. McMaster visited the White House two weeks ago. With USC next door to his workplace, though, he said he still pays attention to what’s going on around campus. “My me mo r ie s a r e j u s t wo nd e r f u l of undergraduate school and law school,” McMaster said. “I’ll be back a lot.”

Student Media and became station manager for Student Gamecock Television (SGTV). She says that she grew as a leader and was able to hone her skills in this area. Once Hayes had these leadership and communication sk ills u nder her belt, she didn’t come to St udent Government. They came to her. Someone approached her and said they wanted to “pick her brain” about SGTV, this person asked if she’d considered running for a position with SG and introduced her to her would-be running mate, student body president Taylor Wright. What Hayes holds close to her heart, perhaps before any of her ambition and curiosity of the population, is her family. “My dad is my favorite person in this entire world,” Hayes said. “He is the person I call when anything good or bad happens.” Hayes describes her dad as a person who is fun, a good public speaker and makes others feel comfortable because he loves people. She says she wants to imitate these qualities. Hayes’ step-mother, her dad’s wife of about ten years, died when Hayes was 15. She says the hardest part of this was watching her little siblings grow up without their mom, and she says that her older sister is almost like a mom to her now. One of the happiest moments in her life, Hayes said, was on her 21st birthday. Her friends were all gone—they were in Athens, GA for the USC football game against the UGA. Her dad didn’t let her go. When she got to the family dinner, she was surprised to see that her parents surprised her by flying her sister in to see her. “I do feel like ... family matters a little bit more now than anything. And my family has been so supportive of me, and they know me more than anything in this world,” Hayes says. “Even when I’m not my best self they forgive me.” On the campaign trail, Hayes had her self-doubts. Her running mate won his race, but she ended up in a runoff election. The student newspaper’s editorial board endorsed her opponent over her. “I don’t want to let people down,” Hayes says. “I want to prove people wrong who didn’t believe in me, and I want to prove people right who did believe in me.” As for her hobbies and interests, she loves to work out. It’s a stress reliever, she says. She also enjoys watching clips from Saturday Night Live, especially while she’s working out. Some of her favorite stars of the show include comedians and actors Amy Poehler and Pete Davidson. W hen Hayes walks into a room, t he v ibe is not necessarily political or humorous, but it is powerful. Her voice is a strong, southern one. She is likely to be wearing red somewhere on her person and holding a cup of coffee to keep herself on her toes. “Coffee and red lipstick ... When I put on my red lipstick, I put on my red dress, my red whatever, I automatically feel so much more confident in myself,” Hayes says. “I’m ready to go, I can take over the world, I’ve got this, I’m Mills Hayes, let’s do this.”

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Thursday, March 8, 2018

Pioneers, users weigh in on direction of cryptocurrencies Christopher Lorensen @THEGAMECOCK

Pursu ing her interests in blockchains, Jane Lippencott, fourthyea r i nter n at ion a l bu si ne s s a nd finance major, co-founded ZenCash with fi nance Ph.D. candidate Robert Viglione in May 2017. ZenCash is an evolution of Zcash Technology, creating a messaging, media and transaction platform that focuses on privacy and anonymity. It’s this privacy and anonymity that makes blockchain technology so attractive and makes cryptocurrency possible. After recently undergoing a huge surge in value, the cryptocurrency Bitcoin has become a hot topic in

t he econom ic world a nd, r isi ng in popularity with it, is blockchain technology. Cryptocurrency is a form of digital money designed to be independent of a centralized banking system. Existing entirely online makes blockchains a place where wealth can be stored and then subsequently accessed from anywhere in the world. Considering their recent growth, will systems such as ZenCash be able to entrench themselves into the market? “I think the biggest hold up right now ac t ua l ly l ies out side of t he indust r y,” Lippencott says. “The onboarding process to buying crypto and then figuring out how you can spend it, figuring out how to hold

John Kadlecik Bank March 13

Banff Film Festival March 20 & 21

Ugly God March 29

Villanova & Superbob March 30

Courtesy of Tribune News Service

it securely is just ridiculously time consuming.” G e t t i n g i nt o c r y p t o c u r r e nc y can be a scary prospect, especially if you’re a college student shopping in the Ramen aisle thinking about the cost of textbooks. That in mind, Lippencot t bel ieve s joi n i ng t he Carolina Crypto Club is a way to get your feet wet without actually making an investment. “It’s built to be a really open space to discuss and debate about all the nuances of the blockchain space and dif ferent ways to v iew and value cryptocurrencies,” says Lippencott. Campus experts such as Lippencott and Colin Jones, an assistant professor of fi nance at the Darla Moore School of Business, advocate the benefits of cryptocurrency while discouraging the idea of coins as a quick profit. Jones says that one way of using cryptocurrency is as another path to a diverse fi nancial portfolio separate from the global economy. The true benefits of blockchains, then, may not be clear to the average American. For those that live in a more volatile c o u nt r y, Jo ne s s a y s t he u s e of cryptocurrencies is more immediate. “Imagine living in Venezuela, where right now t hey’re bartering w it h eggs as their currency because the government is so indebted they’ve had to hyper inf late the currency,” Jones said. “All of the citizens who’ve been working their whole lives, just diligent people, have built up a small nest egg, maybe a bit of savings, and then overnight it just goes to nothing.” Although there are benefits that

t he e ver yd ay A mer ic a n c a n get from blockchain technolog y, it is these people that pioneers such as Lippencott create their platforms for. “ We h a v e t e a m m e m b e r s i n over 20 countries now and a large number of our users are actually from Venezuela and other countries where the currency and/or government is prett y unstable,” Lippencott says. “Where people need to worry about having security over their assets so that they can feed their families, we are certainly seeing a pretty, pretty broad usage of ZenCash.” A s Bit coi n h a s g row n , so h a s blockchain technology. It’s moving beyond protecting just financial assets to being used by major companies to protect personal information as well. In a world where cyber-attacks are becoming more common, many believe people need a better way to safeg uard t heir informat ion, and blockchains are a way to do that. Jones described that what makes blockchain so secure is that it functions as a “distributed ledger” — to hack it, he says, one has to hack thousands of computers simultaneously. “ Ver y reputable businesses are invest ing heav ily, your IBM’s, in blockchain technology and helping businesses become more eff icient a nd more produc t ive u si ng t h is n e w t e c h n o l o g y, w h i c h i s t h e sa me tec h nolog y t h at u nderl ie s Bitcoin,” Jones said. “That was the f irst application of it but it’s now revolutionizing all walks of life and we’ll be using it in our daily lives and not even know it.”


Monday, August 22, 2016

5

Columbia City Ballet turns to contemporary choreography Carroline Stringfellow @SILLY_STRING

For most of Columbia City Ballet’s performances, the story of the piece drives the choreography. But on March 9 and March 10, the company is exploring movement in a less concrete way. “Body and Movement Explored” is a unique piece in that its choreography is not determined by a preconceived story arc. Instead, the story derives from the choreographers and dancers themselves. “Body & Movement Explored” is performed by 20 professional dancers, each of whom use their personal experiences to give the choreography meaning. For veteran dancer Regina Willoughby, this show is both a farewell and a welcome. Willoughby is retiring after this dance season, but her daughter is just starting her career with Columbia City Ballet. “[My daughter] is in the company my last season and it’s such a rarity,” Willoughby said. “And I said we absolutely have to do a piece together for this ... that would give us a chance to dance together that we haven’t had elsewhere.” While she was inspired by her daughter, Willoughby herself also serves as inspiration. Phillip Ingrassia, a choreographer with Cit y Columbia Ballet, distinctly remembers seeing a newspaper clipping of Willoughby performing Sand

Ethan Lam/ THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Dance during his freshman year. Using his past and his present, Ingrassia has taken his choreography beyond his own experiences. “We’re exploring movement, we’re exploring the psyche, and maybe socioeconomic norms so we get to be a little bit more creative,” he said. “It’s about relationships.” Even his casting process reflects his process. Ingrassa draws on the experiences of his dancers when casting to ensure they move naturally and have an emotional connection to the piece. “I did cast it according to what I wanted the roles to be. It was a little bit natural for where they are in their own lives as well,” Ingress said. “It fits them.” Building a show from more abstract concepts is new

territory for those behind the scenes as well. No one knows that better than the ballet mistress. In charge of running rehearsals, editing the music and so much more, Miranda Bailey knows first hand the effort that goes into a show as fluid as this one. “Without the structure of the plot, it’s all separate pieces and you have to figure out how they’re going to go in an order that’s going to be entertaining for the audience,” Bailey said. But Bailey, like the choreographers, knows the outcome will be something special. “The shows we’re doing are so, so different from each other,” she said. “You spend most of your time embodying somebody else’s artistic vision, and this is the time to embody their own artistic vision.”

Love of music on display at faculty fundraising show Brad Dountz

@BRAD_DOUNTZ

Logan Zahner THE DAILY GAMECOCK

The city of Columbia has music venues for smaller, local bands as well as national headliners.

Column: Columbia’s art scene continues to grow, flourish Genna Contino @GENNAC07

Columbia is a “famously hot” city filled w it h t rains, palmet to t rees, Sout her n t r ad it ion a nd mo st i mp or t a nt l y, t he Gamecocks. When people think of Soda City, however, the words “arts and culture” don’t typically come to mind. This is pretty mind-boggling to me. In the two years I’ve lived here, I’ve experienced some amazing art. Columbia doesn’t identify as a city with a strong arts scene, but with the resources that are already available to us, I think it’s possible to establish this identity. The collection at the Columbia Museum of Art is simply breathtaking. The permanent collection features a vast range of styles and time periods of art. There is even a Monet, which still gives me a warm and fuzzy feeling in my stomach every time I see it. The traveling exhibitions the museum hosts also offers Columbia residents and visitors alike the opportunity to witness legendary art. In the time I’ve been here, I’ve seen the works Salvador Dalí and Henri Matisse. Currently it features the beautiful and thought-provoking works of Renée Cox. Visual art is not even close to where Columbia stops in its extensive arts scene. Performing arts are also widely available for those in Cola. We have three professional ballet companies: Columbia Classical Ballet, Ann Brodie’s Carolina Ballet and Columbia City Ballet which offer multiple full-length productions as well as diverse forms of dance to the city of Columbia every year.

And we can’t forget about theater. Trustus T he at re , Tow n T he at re , C olu mbia’s Marionette Theatre, Columbia Children’s Theat re a nd The Sout h Carol i na Shakespeare Company all reside within our cit y. Tow n Theat re is t he “oldest community theatre building in continuous use in the United States” according to experiencecolumbiasc.com and is a great example of how Columbia’s rich history contributes to its arts scene. Last but not least is music venues. New Brookland Tavern and Music Farm are great intimate venues for local musicians, and Colonial Life Arena is able to host bands and artists with huge fan bases. So really, you have the opportunity to hear a pretty broad variety of live music in our capital city. So, with all of these artistic opportunities available, why is Columbia not considered an art hub?What makes Columbia different from Asheville, Austin or San Francisco? The answer is not hing. Columbia has the infrastructure and the culture to be a center for arts. What it really needs to grow culturally and artistically is an engaged audience. Columbia hosts events like Soda City, St. Pat’s in Five Points and Famously Hot New Year which promote local music and art. Columbia has all of the awesome arts venues and organizations I rambled on about above. It’s clear that the arts are growing steadily within our community. If we want Columbia to identify as an arts city, our main focus should be taking advantage of the quality art that already surrounds us.

For many, performing at the School of Music can be a daunting task. But for the school’s faculty, it’s just fun. On March 8, select members of the faculty will perform the music of American composer Burt Bacharach for the Musical Feast, a fundraiser to help raise scholarship money for music students. The School of Music has partnered with the Friends of the School of Music organization to put the event together. Jazz professor Bert Ligon was in charge of choosing the music as well as selecting the other faculty members who will join him on stage. Ligon had thought about doing a Bacharach tribute for a while, and after hearing a rumor that Bacharach himself was in town, he chose eight songs that he felt best summarized the composer’s legendary career. “I’ve done a couple of things like this before, where I go out there and try to fi nd that grey area in between, like I’ve done some things where we do a jazz performance but we’ve included the classical string quartet,” Ligon said. Even though Bacharach himself will not be attending, his daughter Raleigh, a student at USC, will be there. Ligon thinks the reason these kinds of performances work so well is because the faculty doesn’t feel pressure to perform or pressure from students who may be counting on the money they raise to attend or stay in school the thing. Indeed, he stresses that the faculty would be performing even there wasn’t a reason to. “If we were doing it because we thought it was important, that would be a terrible motive. We do it because we like to play and like to sing and like to perform,” Ligon said. One of the faculty singers performing alongside Ligon will be Janet Hopkins, a mezzo-soprano who has performed with The Met, at Carnegie Hall and at the opening ceremony during the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York. Hopkins, who is a classically trained singer, will be out of her comfort zone during the performance when she sings pop music, but she says singing differently is more liberating than her usual musical background. “In classical it feels like precision is so important and when you sing pop music, you can bend notes, you can be a lot freer with the rhythms, so there’s a lot more freedom that’s allotted to us as singers,” Hopkins said. “So it’s kind of fun to do it.” Hopkins says faculty usually does individual performances, so it’s special when they get the chance to be on stage together. Hopkins relishes the chance to work with someone like Ligon, who she doesn’t normally get to partner with. “It’s especially great to work with Bert because he’s jazz ... so it’s really cool to be able to cross that line,” Hopkins said. Hopkins says fundraisers like this almost act like a recruiting tool for people who are interested in attending the School of Music. The money raised for scholarships adds to the joy of performing and helps keep Hopkins’ faith in the future of the arts. “It also gives us validation that people believe in the arts and what we’re doing by them helping to support the next generation of artists,” Hopkins said. To Hopkins, performing with the School of Music doesn’t compare to the stress she felt while performing at The Met or Carnegie Hall, but that means she can just enjoy herself more. “This takes a lot of pressure off and it’s just fun ... Sometimes we forget that we chose this career because we love it, so it just puts the love back in it,” Hopkins said.


Monday, August 22, 2016

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points

*

242 rebounds

Shelby Beckler

*

@SBECKLER13

41

blocks Co-Defensive Player of the Year

*regular season stats

Sara Yang / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Hill developing into top pitcher Claudia Chakamian @C_CHAKAMIAN

When Adam Hill took the mound on Opening Night a few weeks ago, Gamecock fans expected a lot out of the junior who spent his first two years throwing the Sunday game. Hill didn’t have his best stuff which resulted in a loss, but he was determined to not let that game get him down. And for the past two weeks, he’s been able to get back to his ace status. During the second weekend s e r ie s , H i l l h a d w h at he described as “the best game I’ve ever t hrown.” Against Charleston Sout hern, H ill threw seven no-hit innings and did not walk a batter, while also setting a career-high 14 strikeouts. Those 14 strikeouts also set a Founders Park record, previously set by Sam Dyson in 2009 at 13 strikeouts. Hill followed that performance with one equally a s s t r o n g. A g a i n s t r i v a l Clemson, H il l once aga i n struck out 14 batters, while giving up two runs, two hits and allowed two walks, and got the only win for South Carolina on the weekend. Hill has walked just five batters and given up seven hits and leads the team with 34 strikeouts on the season. Hill said he’s worked since Opening Weekend to fix the problems he saw in his first game and really develop into the Friday night starter that head coach Mark Kingston and the rest of the coaching staff know he can be. “I know throwing on Friday nights, you gotta go deep into the game, gotta be efficient so that’s what I’ve been trying to

do,” Hill said. “I’ve made some tweaks in my mechanics, I’ve tried to be in the zone more ... no mentality changes, mentality stays the same, just trying to attack hitters and get ahead.” After Friday’s win against Clem son, K i ng ston cou ld notice the improvements that Hill has been making and that he is becoming one of the top collegiate pitchers. “A d a m H i l l a g a i n , w a s tremendous,” Kingston said. “Seven innings, 14 strikeouts, two hits, he’s developing into one of the top pitchers in the country.” Hill’s back-to-back dominate outings led him to pick up his first honors of the season. Hill was named SEC Pitcher of the Week after his performance against Charleston Southern, and was named a Nat ional Player of the Week by Collegiate Baseball. He was also named the Golden Spikes Award Top Performer of the Week. Those two strong outings have left a strong impression in t he minds of Gamecock fans and college baseball fans around the country. “[He did] same thing he did last week, plus fastball, plus fastball command, the slider, he was throwing it well for strikes down and away,” Kingston said. “Got ahead of hitters too, that’s the key. With his stuff, if he doesn’t fall behind and they can’t just sit on the fastball, then he’s lights out. So 28 strikeouts in 14 his last innings, it’s as good as it gets.” Hill will now look to continue the strong name he has created for himself and continue to develop his role as the Friday night guy. He takes the mound again this Friday for the first game against Princeton.

7

Chris Silva picks up three SEC honors

* 436

The South Carolina men’s basketball team has spent most of this season looking for a leader. As the season comes to an end, one player has continued to prove himself and will be back for one more go. Junior forward Chris Silva stepped up both on and off the court for South Carolina, and he’s racking up the postseason accolades to prove it. When PJ Dozier and Sindarius Thornwell left for the NBA, head coach Frank Martin needed someone that could lead the team. Silva has been able to do that and show Gamecock Nation and the rest of his country his true abilities, leading him to be named the 2018 SEC Co-Defensive Player of the Year. This recognition is a true testament to Silva’s strength on the defensive side of the ball, averaging 1.3 blocks per game. He was also honored on the All-SEC Defensive Team. Silva was ranked fourth for rebounds in the league. Not only was the forward recognized for his defensive skills but also his overall skills as a collegiate athlete. Silva was also named to the First Team All-SEC, the first time the junior has picked up this honor. These are the first honors Silva has picked up for his playing ability at South Carolina, but he has been recognized for his academics. He was previously named to the SEC First-Year Academic Honor Roll and SEC Winter Academic Honor Roll. He is one of three players from South Carolina to be recognized by the league’s coaches, along with Michael Carrera and Thornwell. As the Gamecocks season comes to a close and they prepare for the SEC Tournament and possible NIT apperance, Gamecock fans recognize that Silva earned these honors throughout the season by leading his team with 14.8 points and 7.8 rebounds. He also led himself to new heights by setting a career high of 27 points during a win over Vanderbilt at home. Capstone showed its support for Silva by glowing garnet Tuesday night to recognize his accomplishments along with the women’s tennis team win over No. 7 Ole Miss. With another year to come, Silva will lead the Gamecocks with his new titles and records to go into the SEC Tournament as the No. 11 seed.

ADAM HILL

CHRIS SILVA

Thursday, March 8, 2018

34 strikeouts 7 hits 5

walks National Player of the Week*

*named by Collegiate Baseball

Sara Yang / THE DAILY GAMECOCK


8

Thursday, March 8, 2018

Booker impacts South Carolina in short time Matthew Edwards @MATT_EDWARDS32

Sharpshooting guard Frank Booker’s career at Sout h Ca rol i na is coming to a close, but he made an impact on t he S o u t h C a r ol i n a men’s basketball team during his short time here. When Booker announced his decision last June to play his fi nal s e a s on of c ol leg i at e basketbal l u nder t he t utelage of 2017 Ji m Phelan National Coach o f t h e Ye a r F r a n k Martin, there was much anticipation from the G amecock nat ion on how much of an impact Booker would make. The former Florida A t la nt ic O wl (2016 17 ) a n d O k l a h o m a Sooner (2013-15) has carved out a significant r o le f o r h i m s e l f o n Martin’s team during his sole season in Columbia. Even after the Gamecocks’ spectacular Final Four run in the 2017 NCAA tournament, t he 23-year-old graduate transfer h a s g i ven G amecock fa ns somet hing to be excited about each t ime t heir tea m has t a ken the hardwood. B o o k e r , who was bor n in Reykjavik, Iceland, has drawn 18 starts and appeared i n 31 g a m e s during the

regular season for the Gamecocks. In the 13 games he did not start, Booker was usually the fi rst man off the bench and would immediately make an impact on the court. Reg a rd le s s of how large a lead t he team holds or the deficit it faces, fans at Colonial Life Arena have made it obv iou s t h at t he y feel more comfortable w it h No. 5 on t he court. Booker, in just one year w it h t he South Carolina men’s b a s k etb a l l prog r a m , not on ly e st abl ished a strong rapport with h is tea m mates a nd coaching staf f but has done so w it h t he thousands of fans who have watched him play. He cont i nuously fou nd a way to make an impact on t he court, as he shot 40.4 percent f rom beh i nd t he arc. Wit h an average of 12.5 points per game t hrough 31 games, Booker may not necessarily ju mp off the stat-sheet as an

elite playmaker, but he cer t a i n ly has been a key cont ributor. Due to t imely scores in big moments, Booker evolved i nto a ca n’tmiss player on Martin’s s q u ad a s t he s e a s o n progressed. A s Booker’s career started to close, he made some fi nal impressions on Gamecock fans. On sen ior n ight, Booker made himself known by contributing 25 points to lead the way to an overtime win over LSU. Even t hough t he LSU game marked the fi nal time Booker would t a ke t he home cou r t i n f ront of t he CL A crowd, it will not the last time he showcases h i s t remendou s g r it and ceaseless hustle for Gamecock fans. No w, a s S o u t h Carolina begins its run in the SEC Tournament and awaits its fate in the postseason, Booker will look to continue to make one fi nal mark in garnet and black.

Sara Yang / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Sara Yang / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Column: SEC title helps Gamecocks Brandon Alter @BRANDON__ALTER

The Sout h Carolina women’s basketball team pulled off the upset on Sunday in the SEC Tournament C h a mpio n s h ip, b e at i n g t he nundefeated Mississippi State 62-51. But many questions still remain for the Gamecocks as fans wait to see where the team will land in the NCAA Tournament bracket. T he biggest concer n for t he Gamecocks has been landing in the Albany region, where UConn will be the No. 1 seed after going 32-0 and winning the American Conference. South Carolina is currently ranked No. 7 in the AP and USA Today polls, putting them in position to be the third best No. 2 seed and be placed in either the Kansas City or Spokane region, headed up by Baylor who won the Big 12 Tournament. Avoiding the UConn Huskies, who defeated the Gamecocks 83-58 on Feb. 1, would result in the easiest route for the Gamecocks to reach a second straight Final Four trip. The Texas Longhorns, who lost to Baylor in the Big 12 championship game, are in a similar spot. Texas is ranked No. 8 in both the coaches and the AP polls, as both Texas and South

Carolina are 26-6. C o m p a r i n g t he G a m e c o c k s and Longhorns’s nonconference schedules, South Carolina had the upper hand getting some key wins. Texas lost two close games to top25 ranked Tennessee and UConn, dropped one to unranked TCU and lost all three contests against Baylor. South Carolina also had some big losses, like the huge one at home to UConn and a close one against Notre Dame. The difference is the Gamecocks picked up wins against top-25 Maryland and Duke, which gives them the advantage when it comes to the bracket being released. Comparing the schedules, South Carolina’s biggest conference loss was at Missouri, where A’ja Wilson fouled out while playing only 19 minutes. The Gamecocks beating the undefeated Bulldogs to claim their fourth straight SEC Tournament could also help their ranking. The selection committee is known to go by R PI, which has Sout h Carolina at 11 and Texas at 12. Based on all of the above, it is safe to say that South Carolina has done enough to avoid being in the Albany region, but that will remain unknown until Monday when the bracket is revealed on ESPN at 7 p.m.

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Thursday , March 8, 2019

9

Column: Gamecocks face tough task in St. Louis Harrison Belk

@HARRISONBELK

The 2018 SEC men’s basketball tournament gets underway on Wednesday just after the regular season came to a close this past weekend, which brings much anticipation for South Carolina and its fans. The Gamecocks are currently the No. 11 seed in the tournament, coming off a nine-point loss at Auburn on Saturday. This loss capped off an overall disappointing season for the 16-15 Gamecocks, especially after the run to the Final Four last season. Head coach Frank Martin reminded his team that it can be a difficult task to close out road games in the SEC. “It’s hard to win man,” Martin said. “This is a hard league, our guys, they fought.” For the Gamecocks to win in the SEC tournament, it is imperative that Chris Silva stay out of foul trouble as guards contest drives to the basket, which will hopefully prevent turnovers. Gamecock fans were able to witness how the accumulation of those factors led to the Auburn loss as Silva fouled out, Hassani Gravett was beat on the first

step many times and the Gamecocks allowed 12 steals. South Carolina will take on Ole Miss in the opening round at the Scottrade Center in St. Louis, Missouri, following the first game tipping at 7 p.m. The Gamecocks have been unsuccessful in their conference tournament recently, going one-and-done the past two seasons. South Carolina lost its only regular season matchup with Ole Miss, but Martin acknowledged that the Gamecocks have made unbelievable progress this season and that the SEC tournament can be very unpredictable. “It’s crazy, who knows what’s going to happen ... it should be a lot of fun,” Martin said. The Gamecocks will likely lose in the second round or quarterfi nals where they would play Arkansas or Florida respectively. Both of those teams would have full rest to rely on. There is much excitement from Martin and his team as they wait to prove themselves in the tournament and struggle to live up to the expectations fans set during the preseason. Getting back to the Final Four has been

a goal for the Gamecocks, but if they get out of the SEC tournament early, they may not even make the big dance at all. Even though they hoped for a different outcome, the Gamecocks still believe anything can happen. “Too many people judge basketball teams based on their records,” Martin expressed. South Carolina has shown glimpses of greatness through the season, even beating then No. 11 Auburn at home. The Gamecocks must play at their highest level to win five games in a row and take home the tournament title.

Tori Richman / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

South Carolina regains momentum against N.C. A&T Shelby Beckler @SBECKLER13

The South Carolina baseball team can say goodbye to its t wo-game losing skid as the Gamecock offense once again came alive to defeat North Carolina A&T Wednesday night, 12-2. “Today could have easily been a game that you come out flat after the excitement of the emotion of this past weekend,” head coach Mark Kingston said. “I thought we did a great job of trying to play a complete game and try and get some momentum back.” The Gamecocks entered Wednesday’s game with just one win against rival Clemson and a loss from midweek game against Furman. This created motivation for South Carolina to come out and compete. Despite t he slow start against the Bulldogs, the Gamecocks were quickly able to find their rhythm as a team. Senior Jonah Bride showed his leadership skills and playing abilities Wednesday while competing against a resilient North Carolina A&T team. Bride went 2-for-3 with 2 RBIs in the win and ultimately was the one to

start shifting the momentum of the game, allowing the Gamecocks to score a run in every inning after the third. “I just want to help this team win,” Bride said. “But I thought that after we got that one guy out, the approach became much better, really everybody was taking a good at bat up there, it really showed tonight.” It wasn’t just Bride who made a notable break in the game for South Carolina — TJ Shook, who pitched and relief and got his first win of the season, also made major contributions to the win. Kingston acknowledged Shook’s improvements on the field, especially the ones that were showed against the Bulldogs in their victory. “I’ve been ver y impressed with TJ,” Kingston said. “To me, he really commands the bottom of the zone, maybe as well as anybody that we have. His fast ball is up in that 91 range and he throws a lot of balls at the knees, and that makes you a valuable pitcher at this level.” For Shook, Wednesday was a chance for himself to focus on his location. The redshirt made a pledge to himself

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to work even harder this season, which was defiantly shown against the Bulldogs when it came to his pitching. One of his main goals was to get ahead and get outs from this game forward until the rest of the season. This win helped South Carolina get on the map again by plating 12 runs on 13 hits against North Carolina A&T, which will prepare the Gamecocks

for t he series against Princeton which begins on Friday. Despite their struggles coming into Wednesday’s game, Kingston feels confident this was a good rebound game and shift into the weekend. “I just think it’s what we needed,” Kingston said. “It is something that we need to build on and you hope that it builds in each of the hitters.”

Jayson Jeffers / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

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Thursday, March 8, 2018 10

SC zoos shouldn’t keep elephants T h e R iverbanks Z o o i n Columbia has been rated one of t he t o p 10 z o o s i n Laurryn the country, Thomas but for First-year journalism elepha nt s, student S o u t h Carolina is the last place they want to be. Though Riverbanks Zoo was named the fourthbest zoo in the country by TripAdv isor, Sout h Carolina as a whole has been rated by “In Defense o f A n i m a l s U S A” a s having two out of 10 of the worst zoos in America for elephants. The abundant information shows that at several zoos and wildlife parks, elephants in South Carolina have died unexpectedly and far too young. Starting with Riverbanks Zoo in recent h istor y, t wo elepha nt s died unexpectedly within six months of each other. First, Pet unia, 4 4, was eut ha n ized af ter zoo officials found her in her stall unable to stand in December of 2016. Her necropsy revealed severe arthritis in her knees and hip that would have been so painful Petunia could no longer stand on her own. In captivity, elephants tend to slowly deteriorate due to standing on artificial hard surfaces their whole l i ve s . S out h C a rol i n a zoos have concrete stalls, crushed gravel floors, and rock formations made of gunite. Unlike the natural soil that elephants are made to walk upon, zoo habitats

are simply not natural nor healthy for these creatures. Then, in May of 2017, Penny, 37, died with an inconclusive autopsy at the Riverbanks Zoo. For comparison, the lifespan of wild elephants is 60 years, but the average lifespan of an elephant in captivity is 4 0 yea rs, accord i ng to director of science, research and advocacy at PAWS, Catherine Doyle. The other zoo in South Carolina that was put on the worst list was Myrtle Beach Safari, wh ich has one elephant named Bubbles. Bubbles l ives among other species of animals and humans and has been subject to pictures and rides by humans every day since 1984. For all this time, Bubbles has not had the company of another e le p h a nt , t ho u g h t he Association of Zoos and Aquariums now requires that accredited zoos have at least three elephants living together. The fact is elephants’ most elementary needs are socialization and space to walk around. In the wild, elephants travel miles a day looking for food. In captivit y, elephants are often allotted no more than a few acres of space to roam around and do none of their own foraging. Additionally, the family herd that elephants crave is not satisfied by living with only a couple of other elephants. Lastly, at the Greenville Zoo in 2014, two elephants died from zoo conditions. Ladybird was 36 years old when she died of colic thought to be caused by a change in weather and was cited to have suffered from severe arthritis and joint

disease. Ladybird died in March, leaving one other elephant named Joy at the Greenville Zoo. In June of 2014, Joy was being moved to a Colorado Zoo in order to have the company of other elephants, when she died due to the extreme travel, in her forties. T he com mon t heme is that elephants are not meant to be in captivity and Sout h Carolina has been an example of t he many reasons why, includ ing small space, little socialization, hard landscapes, and general exploitation. Many zoos have realized that there is no good way to keep elephants and are phasing out their elephant exhibits. South Carolina needs to do the same. The next steps for zoo elephants would be to stop breeding them and release all existing elephants to sanct uaries where they can have room to roam about t he rest of t heir lives. As for educational purposes, Keith Lindsay of the Amboseli Elephant Research Project believes that the best way to educate people on elephants is to show videos of elephants acting naturally in their own A frican and A sian habitats, instead of the st u nted a nd st re s sed behaviors that elephants display in captivity. T h e r e a l it y i s t h a t elephants could be going extinct within the next decade at t he rate t hat people are killing them for their ivory. The best way to help them is to save the money that would be spent at a zoo and donate to one of t he ma ny prog rams focused on protecting wild elephants.

For college students, cats make better pets than dogs For some strange reason, dogs are often argued to be better pets than cats. Every time I have argued that cats are actually s u p e r io r t o d o g s , it i s ac c omp a n ie d Manny Mata b y s t r a n g e lo o k s , Second-year utter astonishment criminal justice and pure disbelief. and mass Howe ver, c at s a re communications student the better of the two w he n it c o m e s t o many factors, making the choice between the two simple. Perhaps the most resounding reason as to why cats are better than dogs is the low maintenance that they require, especially compared to their dog counterparts. Cats frequently clean themselves, or selfgroom, which demonstrates selfsufficiency as well as the bonus of reducing their odor. Dogs require their owners to give them baths far more often than cats, who rarely require their owners to take charge and bathe them. Similarly, cats maintain cleaner l i fe st y le s t h a n dog s do. I n a study conducted by researchers at P r i nc e t o n Un i v e r s it y a nd Massachuset t s I nst it ute of Technology in 2010, they discovered that cats are able to drink water more efficiently than dogs. The cats were shown to touch the surface of the water with their tongues and “pull” it up, subsequently closing their mouths over the water to trap it. They could drink the water using the tip of their tongues without penetrating the surface. On the other hand, dogs were shown to be sloppy, smashing through the water with a large section of their tongues. The inferior method that dogs use to drink water creates a lot of splashing and slobbering, creat i ng bigger messes wh ich further puts them at a disadvantage against cats. Cats are also more independent

than dogs, requiring less attention and time consumption. In research conduc ted by Da n iel M i l ls, professor of veterinary behavioral med ici ne at t he Un iversit y of Lincoln’s School of Life Sciences, it was found that the relationship bet ween cats and t heir owners differ from those with dogs. Dogs were shown to have a demanding and needy relationship with their owners, where the owner provided a familiar “base” and safety for the dogs. However, cats had a different relationship, in which they require le s s prot e c t ion a nd c on s t a nt attention from their owners. For this reason, cats take another win over dogs when it comes to the better pet. As college students, a big part of our time is consumed w it h classes, st udy i ng a nd socializing. Dogs require a level of attention and care that is difficult to adequately provide as a student with many responsibilities. Cats are more fitting to the lifestyle we live and suffer less from in the periods of time we are away. Finally, another instance in which students can heavily benefit from choosing cats over dogs is that they are cheaper to own and maintain t han dogs. Dogs are generally bigger than cats, which results in a need for more food, increasing the recurring cost of maintaining them as pets. Even small dogs often require more food than cats, who, if allowed outside, are fi ne hunters and relatively self-sufficient. Dogs also need additional items, such as leashes, that cats do not. On top of that dogs require more toys than cats do, as well as replacing them more since dogs frequently rip up their toys. As far as veterinary bills go, cats have also been found to be cheaper on average than dogs. For all these reasons, and many more, I firmly believe that cats are far better pets than smelly, expensive dogs.

Eradicate Bradford pear trees immediately D e s pit e w h at t he g r ou nd hog predicted last month, it seems that spring has come early. In a rise in temperat u res t hat cer t a i n ly has nothing to do with climate change, the past few weeks of February have felt more like May, allowing everyone t o s p e nd m o r e t i m e o u t d o o r s . Hayden However, the 70-degree days also Blakeney Third-year bring an old enemy: sticky, yellow journalism pollen discharged from the blooms student of the dread Bradford pear tree. Contrary to its name, the Bradford pear has absolutely no purpose as a tree. The invasive species originated in China, and was brought to t he U.S. by t he Depa r t ment of Agriculture in 1964. The fruit it produces from its white blooms are inedible to humans, and the tree is very successful in its ability to survive and reproduce. So successful that it has the potential to become an ecological disaster in the next few

decades. As an invasive species, the Bradford pear is notorious for outcompeting larger hardwood trees that take longer to reproduce, acting like a weed that takes up room and nutrients before other plants can. For those who don’t know, the largest old growth bottomland hardwood forest in the Southeastern United States exists just outside Columbia in Congaree National Park. The Bradford pear’s 20-year lifespan is mainly due to its weak branch structure, as it is resistant to many diseases, which is a feature that seems to be tailor-made to damage houses and down power lines. They can survive in a large variety of soil types and textures, and the recommended disposal of them is to literally grind them up and spray whatever is left with herbicide to prevent the tree from showing up again. A nd the absolute worst thing? They smell. Really bad. The stench of the cursed tree has been compared to a harsh chemical smell to dead meat and even semen. Isn’t that the smell you want to

wake up to in your bright suburban neighborhood, or maybe strolling through your college campus? The Bradford pear is the tree version of kudzu. It grows very quickly, chokes out local plants and is very hard to kill. So why don’t we treat the tree like the vine? Well, the Bradford pear is most commonly used as a decorative tree in neighborhoods and around cities, mainly due to its symmetry and brilliant white blooms. Its aesthetics have given it new life as a tree used in neighborhoods and parks for decoration. My solut ion is simple: cut t hem all dow n immediately. It is unacceptable to me that such an invasive species is allowed to exist openly in such close proximity to a rare type of hardwood forest. The pollen they create is irritating and messy, caking the whole of our state in its nefarious yellow tinge. I think it’s time we do something about it, for the sake of Congaree National Park and our own noses.


Thursday, March 8, 2018

EMPLOYMENT Nanny I have two 14 year old boys that need to be picked up at school at 2:50. Brought home and supervised while they do their homework. I also need the nanny to make them a light supper while they are doing their homework. They are by all accounts very easy boys that are pleasant to be around. Email billnettles@gmail.com

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PHD • JORGE CHAM

Aries

Avoid t raf f ic or roadblocks. Slow down for emotional cur ves. Take t ime to process recent event s and c h a n g e s . D ip i nt o a sidewalk cafe or roadside attraction.

Taurus

Te a m w o r k w i t h y o u r p a r t ne r m a k e s a d if ference to you r shared finances. Your collaboration directly affects your bottom line. Support each other and share resources.

Gemini

Listen to your partner generously. Invest time and effort in your shared goals. Postpone travel or nebulous pursuits. Stick to solid, attainable objectives.

Cancer

Your work and physical actions seem energized with high-prof it potent ia l. A r ra nge connect ions ahead of t i me. St udy a sec ret system. Small changes reap a large reward.

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THE SCENE

Leo

Consider all possibilities that include fun. Avoid impractical or expensive options. The next two days favor love, romance and passion. Share your thoughts and dreams.

Virgo

Home comforts draw you in. Beautif y your surroundings. You can f i nd wh at you need. Eva luate qua l it y a nd value. Use creativity and imagination.

Libra

Follow through on what you sa id. Re solut ion a nd solut ions a r ise in conversation. Communications r e v e a l u nc o n s ide r e d opportunities. Friends help you make a connection.

Scorpio

Watch the budget. A n idea that seems proďŹ table may cost more than it makes. Do the numbers b e f o r e c o m m i t t i n g. Avoid cont roversy or risky business.

Sagittarius

When you’re hot, you’re hot. Rela x a nd enjoy it. Invest in work you lo v e . M a k e c h a n g e s as necessary. Stick to a practical path.

Capricorn

Envision and plan for a n i n s pi r i ng f ut u re. Schedu le ac t ions for later. Find a quiet space for private meditation. A lovely moment enchants you. Pay attention.

Aquarius

Community connections make a difference. Share ne w s , re sou rce s a nd tricks. Inspire others by your example. Let your i mag i nat ion be you r guide.

Pisces

Craz y dreams seem possible. A career prize lies within sight. Prepare for inspection, and polish your presentation. Dress for success and smile for the camera.

3/08/18

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Solutions to today’s puzzle

Š 2018 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Vaccine pioneer Salk 6 Biblical verb 10 Sever, with “offâ€? 13 “The Good Wifeâ€? wife 15 Irrawaddy River locale 16 Hubbub 17 Grilled sandwich  +REE\LVW¡V broadcasting equipment 20 Checked out 21 Gather 23 Domestic sock eater? 24 Storied climber 26 Little limb 27 *Drama in the Nielsen top 10 four times during WKHÂśV 32 Special __ 35 Mets modifier of 1969 36 Noggin 37 Case in Lat. grammar 38 Twit 39 Cuts and pastes, say 41 Trellis climber 42 Corner PC key 43 Expert 44 Mysterious girl on “Stranger Thingsâ€? 46 “Zip it!â€? 47 *Ball of fire 49 “No __!â€?: “Sure!â€? /RVHRQH¡VFRDW 52 Moves to the melody 54 “__ Encounterâ€?: SeaWorld show 56 Shakespearean “You as well?â€?  Âľ2KER\LW¡V starting!â€? 62 First words 64 Muffin grain 65 Believe 66 Wind farm blades 67 Like some grins 68 People 69 Liquid whose chemical formula is a homophonic hint to the answers to starred clues

DOWN 1 Zinger 2 Body wash brand 3 Largest singledigit square 4 Genre incorporating elements of funk and hip-hop 5 Transgression 6 “LOLâ€? 7 “Right away!â€? 8 Dickens boy 9 Taxing and successful 10 Coventry rider 11 Dog that licks Garfield 12 Low-quality 14 Where many missed connections occur 0/%¡V'EDFNV 22 2003 holiday film 25 IV lead? 26 Bouffant feature 27 Flame-haired YLOODLQLQ'LVQH\¡V “Herculesâ€? 28 Mennonite sect 29 Super Bowl gathering, e.g. 30 Mediterranean vacation island 31 Zoo doc 33 “The Hunger Gamesâ€? land

34 __ pad 40 Barely lit 41 Blood feud 43 List of notables 45 Soap chemical 48 Defense advisory gp. 50 __ whiskey 52 Thing to put on 53 Put on 54 Look bad? 55 Slender cylinders 57 Budweiser &O\GHVGDOHV¡ pace 58 Shredded 59 TASS country 61 Many years 63 “Spring the trap!â€?

3/08/2018


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Thursday, March 8, 2018

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