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dailygamecock.com UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

VOL. 116, NO. 34 • SINCE 1908

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2014

Strutting their stuff

Students take the stage, dazzle audience in this year’s USC’s Got Talent Katie Cole

@KATIECOLE19

Sarah Stone / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Several students showed their stuff Wednesday night at this year’s USC’s Got Talent competition, where the performances ranged from singers to acrobats. Russell House ballroom packed in tight for Carolina Production’s USC’s Got Talent Thursday, eagerly anticipating the winner of this year’s showcase. Mat Franco, hosted the evening’s festivities, and rightly so — the man knows a thing or two about what it takes to win a talent show. He’s the

winner of THIS year’s America’s Got Talent and host of USC’s Got Talent 2013, And for Franco, it’s all about the performance and presentation. “You gotta fi nd a certain theme or motif or concept that makes people care about what you’re doing in the fi rst place,” he said. “Whether you’re

dancing, whet her you’re singing, whatever it is, juggling — it doesn’t matter. There should be some sort of underlying message you want to get across to the audience.” Franco clearly follows h is ow n advice. After opening the show with a few magic tricks, Franco proved himself not only a talented magician

but also quite the comedian. Wa r med up a nd laugh i ng, t he audience was ready for t he main event. T h is yea r’s showc a se feat u red much more than the typical song and dance routine. Ed Wheeler opened TALENT • 7

USCPD, SG Ron White talks comedy unveil campus safety app for crime reports Rave Guardian lets students report crime with text, pictures Collyn Taylor

@COLLYNPTAYLOR

Student Government and USCPD plan to unveil a new campus safety app after initial concerns of crime were brought to the forefront early this semester. Rave Guardian, currently in the app store, is now in beta-testing and will officially launch later this week or early next week. “[USCPD is] ready to support the launch,” Student Body Vice President Donnie Iorio said. “When you have an app like this, it’s not just an app. You’re saying it’s an efficient and reliable tool to use in an emergency. Just like a 911 Center can’t shut down, this app had to be ready, and it’s ready now.” In the app, you can call the police department or report crimes that includes health risks to help police when they arrive on scene. Users can also set timers that shows what time they should arrive home and when the timer goes off, it alerts the close friends of that user. Students can set up their own “guardians” APP • 2

Courtesy of Ron White

Since his days of touring with the Blue Collar Tour, Ron White has shifted his focus to his own brand of comedy.

Blue Collar Comedy veteran shares wisdom, alcohol stories Belvin Olasov

@BELVINOLASOV

Ron White is one of comedy’s straightest shooters, a scotch-soaked comic as wry as he is funny. You may know him as a charter member of the Blue Collar Comedy Tour, or as his criminal alias “Tater Salad.” Before his Oct. 10 show at the Township Auditorium, White talked with The Daily Gamecock about his favorite comedians, the most inappropriate place he’s been drunk and his advice to aspiring comedians.

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Thursday, October 9, 2014

Patient with first US case Same-sex marriage of Ebola dies applications accepted in SC The first person diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S. died Wednesday, WIS reported. Thomas Eric Duncan, 42, was admitted to the hospital Sept. 28 in Dallas, Texas after he was turned away from the hospital a few days before. Duncan was traveling to the U.S. from Liberia with the disease. According to authorities, Duncan had come into contact between 12 and 18 people, five of which were children. The hospital first reported that Duncan never told staffers he was traveling from Liberia, but later admitted that a nurse was informed. An investigation is ongoing as to how the fact was not communicated better. Over the weekend, Duncan’s condition worsened, and he was downgraded from serious to critical condition before he died Wednesday. Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the CDC, said Ebola is still not a threat to the general public. —Collyn Taylor, Assistant News Editor

Richland County made history in South Carolina by taking some of the first same-sex marriage applications in the state’s histor y Wednesday, WLTX reported. Beginning Wednesday morning, the county’s probate court began taking applications, and as of mid-Wednesday, 13 same-sex couples filed for their marriage licenses. While Richland County has only been accepting applications, the court in Charleston County has been issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Couples receiving licenses will have to wait the standard 24 hours for their marriage licenses to be approved. Currently, the state is appealing the Supreme Court’s ruling about same-sex marriages and Attorney General Alan Wilson and Governor Nikki Haley are looking to uphold the state’s ban on samesex marriage. —Collyn Taylor, Assistant News Editor

2 men arrested for robbery of USC student Over the weekend, two men were arrested for their involvement in the robbery of a USC student off campus. Brandon Jordan, 20, and Bobby Dinkins, 19, are accused of robbing a current USC student on Southern Drive on the 1000 block around 3 a.m. last Friday. According to Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott, Jordan pointed a handgun at the victim, while the Dinkins searched through the victim’s pockets. Among the items stolen were a black iPhone 5S and a sum of cash. The two men were arrested Sunday when a patrol car spotted them on the 7200 block of Two Notch Road. Bot h men are facing nu merous charges, including unlawful carrying of a pistol, possession of a weapon during a violent crime and armed robbery. Jordan and Dinkins were transported to the Alvin S. Glenn Detention Center after they were arrested. Along with the Richland County Sheriff ’s Department, the Columbia Police Department assisted in the investigation. —Collyn Taylor, Assistant News Editor

United Way servicing Columbia homeless United Way of the Midlands is now responsible for coordinating services for the homeless in Columbia, The State reported. City Council and United Way signed a $130,000 contract for United Way to hire an affordable housing coordinator. A lso in t he cont ract, t he cit y and United Way will split the cost of the coordinator. The coordinator with be added to the organization that is already working to solve the homeless problem. United Way will coordinate homeless services; however will not be handling the winter shelter. With colder temperatures approaching, the city is still working on ways to solve the problem during the winter months. There was one proposal to turn city parks into shelters overnight, however that plan was rejected. No fi nal decision has been made for the state. —Collyn Taylor, Assistant News Editor

APP • Continued from 1 that the app will notify when users need to get in touch with them. Additionally, users can make emergency calls and text tips to authorities with pictures and descriptions of the crime taking place. “This gives them the option to communicate through text message and [through] pictures — it’s what our generation knows,” Iorio said. “It’s going to open up some options, and we will hopefully see a reduction in crime.” The idea for the app originated three years ago, and now, the app is ready to launch in the coming weeks. Last semester, the Student Senate passed a resolution to support the development of the app for the betterment of the student body. USCPD wanted to perfect t he technolog y going into the app, as well as making sure that the personnel trained in the technology knew how to use it all hours of the day. “USCPD wanted to make sure they did it right and in order for us to do that you have to integrate this technology into your 911 Call Center,” Iorio said. “That’s additional technology and support staff needed. Everyone had to be trained on it because you can’t have just one person staffi ng it from 3 a.m. to 9 a.m. who doesn’t know how to use it. Everyone had to be fluent in it, and we had to have some testing done.” USC isn’t t he on ly school t hat u ses t h is APP • 3

SHE SNORES MORE THAN I DO, BUT I STILL LOVE MY HUMAN. — BANDIT adopted 11-26-09


Thursday, October 9, 2014

App features Set a timed safety alert Set up a timer to notify those you trust if you are alone or in an unfamiliar place.

Manage and message your guardians

APP • Continued from 2 sof t ware; schools like A rkansas, M iddle Tennessee State and t he University of Louisiana also use the app. Students can transmit locations to police if they’re being followed, just like using the blue-light call boxes on campus. Iorio said that the app will function much like the call boxes, but in an easily portable manner.

“This is another way to prevent [crime]. It’s a way for you to have the safe tracking of the police being able to f i nd you,” Ior io sa id. “I feel safer seeing those call stations everywhere, and this is like having a call station in your pocket.”

DG

Quickly and easily connect with those you trust to help you out when you need them.

Make emergency calls and send text tips Call emergency officials for help if you are in trouble, and send text and photo tips if you see something suspicious.

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HANNAH JEFFREY

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Haley, Wilson’s attempt to stop gay marriage futile ISSUE Legislators fighting to keep same-sex marriage ban. OUR STANCE LGBT students cannot feel truly welcome with the ban. W hen we heard experts say t hat g ay ma r r iage was most likely going to be permit ted in South Carolina, we were as surprised as anyone. We always thought that our state would be one of the last to strike down provisions against it. But with the Supreme Court’s approval of a federal appeals court ruling to annul a Virginia same-sex marriage ban, it seems likely that South Carolina’s ban will also be stricken down. These are momentous changes. This is the closest the state has come to allowing gay couples equal marriage rights. But same-sex marriage isn’t legal yet. SC Attorney General A lan

Wilson and Gov. Nikki Haley h ave pledged to defend t he constitutionally-based same-sex marriage ban by resu m ing a lawsuit against a South Carolina gay couple that married in the District of Columbia. By pursuing the lawsuit after the Supreme Court’s decision, t he y a re cont i nu i ng a f ight t hat on ly ha s one outcome:

“This is the closest the state has come to allowing gay couples equal marrage rights.” judging South Carolina’s ban unconstitutional. Carl Tobias, a constitutional law professor at the University of Richmond, was quoted in The State newspaper as saying that the judge in the South Carolina case is bound by the Virginia’s court ruling. Nevertheless, he

predicts Haley and Wilson will be able to prolong the case as long as two months. This directly affects a large chunk of USC’s student body. LGBT students and activists at USC have been forced to accept the fact that we live in a state that has anti-gay provisions written directly into its constitution. The chance that a gay student would want to graduate and live in a state that effectively treats him or her as a second-class citizen is almost laughable. W h i le we h a v e a v ib r a nt L G B T c o m m u n i t y, g a y students on campus cannot feel completely welcome in a state willing to waste an unk nown amount of time, energy and cash to keep them from gaining equal rights. This is an unpardonable act of wasting taxpayer money. A nd, u nt i l ou r at tor ney general and governor recognize t hat fact, LGBT st udent s at USC cannot feel at home.

Terminally ill have right to die Euthanasia exerts control over death, suicide doesn’t Aside from perhaps abortion, there is no debate conducted with as much solemn purpose as the one surrounding euthanasia. The right to die, as this argument is sometimes framed, is one that presents itself to all of us at some time or another. One has to think about it. It is not uncommon for parents to tell their children whether or not to allow them to die, in the case that the parent is incapable of communication and is in constant pain. The hardest t hing a family has to face is the slow death of a loved one, especially if his or her parents are still living. Cancer is probably the most common cause of this phenomenon. Two of my grandparents died of that disease. I met neither. The case of Brittany Maynard is, perhaps, the most pitiful recent example of someone exercising his or her right to die. M a y n a r d , 2 9, h a s b e e n diagnosed with the form of brain cancer that you don’t recover from. She has only a few weeks left to live, and has explained her choice to die in a YouTube video that has received millions of views. There is no serious person who isn’t aware of the confl ict of rights and interests in this debate. Maynard is someone who, in the face of a long and painful death,

is choosing to opt out early. Her choice is heartrending, if simple. She exacts some form of control over the circumstances of her death, even if she can ’ t escape it in the long run. But, if that’s the argument, why shouldn’t anyone be able to choose death? Why do we spend resources on suicide hotlines and police suicide rescue personnel? There are a few sol id responses. Because euthanasia is so easily confused Ben with simple suicide, Crawford e n d o r s i n g t h e Second-year former of ten is English and compared w it h Russian student endorsing the latter. The d if ference is, i n my o pi n io n , t h at e ut h a n a s i a i s related to assert power over one ’ s situation. It is recognizing that death is coming, accepting that fact and doing what one can to take control of it. Suicide, on the other hand, is a turning away from life. It ’ s the emergency exit on the amusement ride. It ’ s often seen as some sort of escape. When Robin Williams died, there was a bunch of fatuous stuff like this flying around on the Internet. Disney itself put out a photo on Twitter implicitly comparing the suicide of a sad man dealing w it h a term inal illness to the freeing of Aladdin ’ s Genie from his lamp. This kind of idea is dangerous. It reinforces the belief that suicide

is freedom from the turbulences and responsibilities of life, instead of running away from them. (I would rather have Robin Williams still alive. Does that mean I would wish Genie to stay in his bottle?) It ’ s one reason why suicide rates jump when a celebrity kills his or herself. When Marilyn Monroe died of what is suspected to be a suicide, the national rate jumped up 12 percent. This is also why some people see what May nard is doing is similar. By trying to reinforce the idea of “ choosing death ” in some situations, she is — intentionally or not — encouraging ot hers to follow her lead in less dire situations. She i s n’t i n no cent i n romanticizing the notion to some extent: “ I will die upstairs in my bedroom that I share with my husband, with my mother and my husband by my side and pass peacefully with some music that I like in the background. But, these notions aside, I think that a person ’ s life should be put into his or her own hands if faced with a debilitating physical ill ness. However, promot i ng for others what is essentially a p er s o n a l c hoic e c ou ld h ave major consequences on those in dissimilar situations. Because, in t he end, it is a personal choice. None of us were born into t he world wit h our consent. It seems only fair that, when terminally ill, we be able to control the circumstances of our leaving it in our own chosen way.

California anti-rape law ineffective Well-intentioned “yes means yes” law remains ineffective Earlier this week, California’s governor signed into law the “yes means yes” bill. The bill mandates that colleges and universities receiving funding from the California state legislature to set an “affirmative consent standard in the determination of whether consent was given by both parties to sexual activity. ‘Affirmative consent’ means affirmative, conscious and voluntary agreement to engage in sexual activity. It is the responsibility of each person involved in the sexual activity to ensure that he or she has the affirmative consent of the other or others to engage in the sexual activity . . . [T]he standard used in determining whether the elements of the complaint against the accused have been demonstrated is the preponderance of the evidence.” While I absolutely agree that campus rape is a major issue across the country, this legislation (and any future legislation proposed here in South Carolina) goes too far in trampling the rights of students to try and combat them. W h e n d i d U S C (t h a t ’s t h e University of Southern California) become a court of law? Schools set up honor boards — or whatever they want to call their equivalents — to Ross allow students accused of plagiarism Abbott or other forms of cheating to have a Third-year business student forum to defend themselves against the charges. These bodies are often composed of resumebuilding students and overzealous faculty and rarely have any legitimate legal training. They were never intended to handle anything of greater seriousness than copying a friend’s term paper and are not equipped to do so. This brings me to the resolution’s biggest problem: the burden of proof placed on the accused by this bill, if introduced into a real courtroom, would be struck down immediately. The legal jargon of the legislation essentially means t hat anyone accused of v iolat ing t he affirmative consent policy would have to prove his or her innocence with at least 50 percent certainty. California students better start carrying their clipboards with them when they go downtown to get consent in writing (and maybe stop by a notary on the way back to their rooms); an accused student’s word, even against an accusation with no additional evidence behind it, isn’t going to be enough to successfully defend themselves. Here’s a scenario — a student who was slipped date rape drugs is taken back to the rapist’s apartment and sexually assaulted. Traumatized by the experience, the victim musters the courage to face down their attacker and files a complaint against them. The rapist responds with a counter suit. In this scenario, the victim has no more evidence to offer to prove their innocence (which the burden is now on them to do) than the rapist does; under this bill, both victim and perpetrator face the same punishment. Giving consent a more definite definition isn’t a problem in it of itself, but requiring schools to rule like criminal courts on the sex lives on their students in order to circumvent the innocent until proven guilty doctrine is. While the California congressmen and women who wrote this legislation certainly have their hearts in the right place, the negative effects of this particular statute outweigh its benefits.

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the author’s name, year in school and area of study. We also invite student leaders and USC faculty members to submit guest columns. Columnists should keep submissions to about 500 words in length and include the author’s name and position. The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions for length and clarity, or not publish at all. A ll subm issions become t he property of The Daily Gamecock and must conform to the legal standards of USC Student Media.

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Thursday, October 9, 2014

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WHITE • Continued from 1 The Daily Gamecock: When can we expect your next comedy album? Are you working on one? Ron White: You know, I don’t know if I’ll ever do another one. I think I’ll just tour — people like to watch me live. And records, it’s kind of silly to put them out, because there’s not a ton of money in them and television doesn’t want to pay what they’re worth. And I make all of my money touring anyway. So I doubt I would sell it to television again and probably won’t release another one. Some people never do. Like [Jay] Leno, he never released a comedy album. But as a result, he hasn’t changed his act much in the past 15 years. So you kind of paint yourself into a corner if you release them to keep writing, keep working. TDG: How often do you think a comedian should write new material? RW: Every day. Every day. And you should get on stage that day and perform it, not just write it. You just do that every day. Do I? No, I don’t. But I do it more than ... most comics that are in my position. TDG: Who are some of your favorite comedians working right now? RW: Well, you know, I love Louis C.K. I think he’s really funny, I’ve never seen him live. And Dave Attell really makes me laugh hard. I like all of the New York comics, I don’t know if they like me or not, but I do. I like … what’s her name, the Jewish girl from New York? TDG: Sarah Silverman? RW: Sarah Silverman, yeah. I think she’s twisted in a nice way. I still enjoy (Jeff) Foxworthy’s work. I don’t get to see him very much, but I think he is just such a prolific writer of Southern comedy. Not just Southern comedy — middle class, blue collar comedy, which is very easily spread throughout the planet. I was always a big fan of Carlin, and I like Joan Rivers’ stuff, too. They’re not touring right now, but they’re coming on tour. They’re starting a tour next year. They’re touring together. Everything’s going to sell out. T DG: Wou ld you descr ibe you rself as a n especially Southern comedian? RW: I don’t know. I guess, because I’m Southern, but I mean I’m from a little big town in Northwest Texas of 700 people. I’m that for sure, so that makes me Southern, but I don’t think many of my jokes have a Southern connation to them at all because they laugh at them just as hard in Maine. So, I think they’re just jokes. More than anything else, I’ve lived all over the place ... More than that, I’m just a comedy writer — it all comes through my eyes. So, if it’s Southern, it’s Southern. It certainly comes from that perspective, because, you know, that’s who I am. TDG: How do you think you fit in with the rest of the Blue Collar Comedy Group, comedically speaking? RW: I think that it was all a great match and I made a great counterbalance to ... Larry the Cable Guy, so in that respect it gave a balance. I know those guys don’t dress really nice or anything, but they’re really nice people and that’s … just the way it worked out, and I think it balanced nicely … I mean, the two biggest comedy albums of all time are Blue Collar 1 and 2. TDG: Would you prefer to be recognized for Blue Collar Comedy or from your solo work? RW: I don’t care. They’re both my work, and Blue Collar made me famous, and I’m certainly proud of those accomplishments that the four of us made together and that it’s continued on another twelve years after the end of Blue Collar, about twelve … That’s just a miracle. TDG: You’ve done some acting before — Horrible Bosses, for example. How interested are you in acting more? RW: Well, I turned down Horrible Bosses 2, so that’ll give you some idea how important it is. They wanted me to do a bigger role in Horrible Bosses 2, and I said no, because I’d have to cancel a date and I

Courtesy of Ron White

Ron White has made a long career of his witty, sardonic storytelling, and doesn’t pull any punches. don’t cancel a date — I work for my fans. That’s how I make my money. They don’t pay me any money to do movies. My fans get together and throw away quite a chunk of change, so I won’t chump them. TDG: What’s the weirdest encounter that you’ve had with a fan? RW: A couple of years ago in Oxnard, this big guy in his underwear came staggering out from behind the curtains. He was back there with my crackerjack staff, and he just came walking out on the stage. I wasn’t facing that way, I was looking the other way, and they just started laughing — they thought it was part of the show, and I’m like, “What the f---? What I said wasn’t that funny!” And I turn around and look and there’s this big galoot coming at my in his underwear, and he was harmless. He had novelty underwear that had four legs or something that he could rotate around, or the s---stain moves … I don’t

know what the f--- his deal was, but he did spend the night in jail. You really can’t f--- with me when I’m on stage without paying some sort of price. TDG: What are your favorite drinks that aren’t scotch? RW: Tequila. I own a tequila company, and I believe it to be the finest drink of liquor in the entire civilized world. It’s called Number Juan, and my brother in law and I run it, and it’s just fantastic. We win more medals than any other tequila company — every event we go to, we walk home with gold medals. So, we’re kicking, kicking, kicking. TDG: What’s the most inappropriate place you’ve been drunk? RW: I dunno, I can’t think of any ... Church? No, that’s not that bad … a wedding? Nah, that’s WHITE • 11

Gambino’s new experiment half works Belvin Olasov

@BELVINOLASOV

“STN MTN”

B-

“KUAUI”

A-

Artist: Childish Gambino Featuring: Fam, Christian Rich, Jaden Smith Si nce “Bec au se t he I nter net ,” Childish Gambino (the music alias of actor/comedian Donald Glover) has been experimenting with what hiphop can be. He’s not the fi rst rapper to sing a lot on his albums, and he’s not the first to use trippy, beach-psych beats, but he pushes the boundaries of the genre more than most. Now, he’s out with a mixtape and an EP, all at the same time: “STN MTN / Kauai.” They’re connected through a light narrative — “STN MTN” is his dream of being on top of the early 2000s Atlanta hip-hop scene,

while “Kauai” is set on the beaches of the Hawaiian island after he wakes up. Accordingly, “STN MTN” is all throwback and turn-of-the-century bravado, while “Kauai” showcases his soulful experimentalism. “Kauai” is the stronger of the two, the natural evolution of the unique blend of weird digression and poppy appeal of “Because the Internet.” The EP is “set” in Kauai, one of the main Hawaiian islands (the profits for the EP sales actually go to cleaning up the island), and its lush, peaceful songs reflect the island’s spirit well. It’s also not really a rap album. Single “Sober” leads off the album, and Gambino doesn’t rap once on the track. Instead, he croons with the best of them, laying down light R&B lyrics across an upbeat, spaced-out beat. “Oh honey now girl” isn’t lyrical wildfi re, but the way Gambino sings it, it’s like honey for the ears. “Late Night i n K aua i” is a c o n t e m p l a t i v e b e a u t y, m o r e a confessional than a song. The beat is nothing but minimalist drums, over which Gambino, close friend and collaborator Fam and Jaden Smith — yes, that Jaden Smith — lay down something in-between rap and beat

Courtesy of Childish Gambino

Mixtape “STN MTN” is throwback rap, while EP “Kauai” is soulful and catchy. GAMBINO • 11


Thursday, October 9, 2014

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TALENT • Continued from 1

Be part of a Healthy Carolina &

the show with a glove light show, bringing a miniature EDM concert to the Russell House ballroom. Runner up Hayden Childress — also known as Haydini — brought another magic act to the night. Half the act was choreographed to music, and even though he remained silent, he still managed to get the crowd cheering and clapping after ever y trick. Crowd favorite A lecz Yeager, a fi rst-year journalism student, covered Ed Sheeran’s “You Need Me, I Don’t Need You.” Yeager blew the audience away by complet i ng t he f u l l rap portion of the song, while hitting all of the song’s notes. Yeager packed a powerful vocal range for her tiny frame. Joking with the audience, she noted that she cut the song from ten minutes down to about four, so no one would fall asleep or get bored. After Franco’s witty quips and the vocal talent throughout the night, final contest Rachel Hipszer took the stage, with Franco. Hipszer’s i nt roduc t ion told t he crowd she TALENT • 11

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Elisabeth Noblet / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Every talent show has guitar, and USC’s Got Talent was no different.

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Thursday, October 9, 2014

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9

90.5 FM COLUMBIA

FALL FUNDRAISER

OCTOBER 18 -30 Donate online @ wusc.sc.edu

PHD • JORGE CHAM

KENKEN

HOROSCOPES

Aries

Leo

Sagittarius

Get cooking today and tomorrow. It’s a good time to ask for money. Send invoices, pitches and claims. Check orders for changes or errors. A disagreement about priorities slows t he act ion. Let fait h guide you. Confer with allies.

Advance you r career today and tomorrow. Ask for way more than you ex pec t , w it hout at t ach ment . T here’s a test involved. Lay a quest ion to rest. Rec o m m it t o a d r e a m you share. Bless it with water.

The next two days form an intense work phase. A feisty argument could arise, if you let it. Focus on the job at hand. Give criticism privately, praise publicly. Join forces with someone who sha re s your spiritual view.

Taurus

Virgo

You’re gaining a distinct ad v a nt age , w it h t he Moon in your sign today and tomorrow. Finish an old project. Following through makes a good impression. Go ahead and be more assertive. Find out what you need.

Make t ime for an outing over the next few days. Travels, studies and investigation reveal mysterious adventures. Take video footage and record your notes. Work and put money away. Provide (and appreciate) excellent service.

Set long -t er m goa l s with your sweetheart, over the next few days. K e e p i n t ou c h w it h family. Get yourself a special treat. The next t wo days are luck y in love. Comprom ise is required. Listen to each other.

Gemini

Libra

R el a x i n hot t ub or sauna. Ignore a friend’s kidding. Peace and quiet soothe your psyche. Your dreams seem prophetic today and tomorrow. If com mu n icat ions break down, take f ive and clarif y upon considerat ion. Track shipping. Take it easy.

P ut away prov isions for the future. Imagine t hat you r w r it i ng is completed. Don’t miss a meet ing. Maintain family finances in order over the next couple of days. You can transform a situation that’s been troubling.

Cancer

Scorpio

Pisces

Partnering is essential for the next two days. V iv id feel i ng s a nd ex pression of love occupy you. Let your actions do your talking. Co-workers understand t he s it u at ion . He e d critics. Put your heart into your efforts.

Devour your fascinating studies. Ignore dist ract ions. Deep foc u s comes easi ly... take advantage. Write, r e c or d o r p r e p a r e a p r e s e n t a t i o n . Yo u r muses sing to you. Find what you need nearby. Bury a treasure for later.

You work exceptionally well with others over t he nex t t wo days. Listen to intuition, body language and emotions. Let your team dig for the details. Clean up, and stash the surplus after portioning out.

Capricorn Courtesy of kenken.com

Fill in the grid with the numbers 1-8. A number cannot be repeated in any row or column. Numbers within the same heavily-outlined region must produce the number given in the top left corner of the region when combined with the operation symbol given.

10/09/14

Aquarius At tend to hou sehold mat ters today a nd t o m o r r o w. O t h e r s of fer inspirat ion and ent hu siasm. Listen c a r e f u l l y. R e a l i z e a home dream. Produce t hrilling results wit h color and organization. A celebratory meal may be in order.

@thegamecock

10/9/14

1 2 3 4

For solutions to today’s puzzle, go to dailygamecock.com

or download our app!

ACROSS 1 Award sewn on a sash 6 Froth in a mug 10 Frat party empties 14 Assumed name 15 Italian wine site 16 Hacker’s cry of success 17 Comfortable indoor setting 20 Adjust for pitch 21 Globetrotting reporter Nellie 22 Struggle 23 Links “Heads up!” 25 Out of __: discordant 26 “Wait, I’m not done ...” 33 Prepare for winter takeoff 34 Divisions of history 35 Actress Vardalos 36 Serenade accompaniment 37 “Need __?”: “Hop in!” 39 Pablo Neruda works 40 Drive up the wall, so to speak 41 Rental car option 42 Flavor enhancer 43 Corporate oversight group 47 Sotto __: softly 48 “Ah! Say no more” 49 Spiritualist Deepak 52 Agt.’s cut 53 Forest females 57 Guesthouse where one would enjoy the starts of the three longest answers 60 Persian Gulf prince 61 “House” actor Epps 62 Must, informally 63 Ice Follies venue 64 Virtual people, in a popular game series 65 William Jennings __, three-time presidential candidate DOWN 1 10-year-old Simpson

2 2000s Giants manager Felipe 3 Pop diva Celine 4 Competitive demeanor 5 Approx. figure 6 “Get thee to a nunnery” speaker 7 Catch a glimpse of 8 Broke bread 9 Epithet never actually used by Cagney 10 Lowbrow trinkets 11 Aussie hatchlings 12 Young lady 13 Dagger of yore 18 Iberian river 19 Family tree members 24 __-eyed jack 25 Medieval tenant farmer 26 Wing it, speechwise 27 Surgical opening? 28 “Iron Mike” of football 29 Crook’s caper 30 Non-studio flick 31 Family tree member 32 Neon and xenon, for two

For solutions to today’s puzzle, go to dailygamecock.com

or download our app!

37 Guacamole makings 38 Biographical span 39 Selected 41 Sew sequins on, say 42 Chicago-to-Miami dir. 44 KOA facility 45 Kitchen cutters 46 Netmen’s org. 49 Trucker’s “good buddy” 50 Half: Pref. 51 Norse god of war

52 Bristol baby buggy 54 Like some highfiber cereal 55 Señora’s “this” 56 Jazzman Getz 58 ASCAP counterpart 59 Cold War spy org.


10 Thursday, October 9, 2014

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Thursday, October 9, 2014

WHITE • Continued from 6 expected. Couldn’t be a bar. I don’t know, probably drunk over at my in-laws’ house when everybody else is not nearly as drunk as me. TDG: In your standup, you have a distinctly witty, sardonic delivery. How long did it take for you to develop that unique style? RW: I t hink some of it you’re kind of born with, but it certainly evolves. That’s always been who I am and why I was f unny to begin with, so it’s something that I think I’ve been for a long time. And I’ve also had really good timing with words for a long time, and I also used to listen to my uncle preach all the time. He was a brilliant ma n w it h a n amazi ng com ma nd of t he Engl ish language. TDG: W hat would your advice be to a college student that wants to be a comedian? R W: T here’s on ly one thing that you have to do TALENT • Continued from 7 performed in circus arts for t h ree yea rs, a nd w it hout f urt her ado, she took t he stage. H ipszer i ncor porated ballet, juggling and balancing, to tell the story of a young child bored with the world around her who falls asleep and enters a magical dream sequence. But really, the child was still in the same world and manages to find beauty within the ordinary. Her grace and ease as she t raveled across stage was u npa r a l leled, a nd it wa s clear from the beginning of Hipszer’s performance that a

Mondays

and that’s you have to be true to your nature. You have to be true to who you are, and not somebody else. That’s harder to do than it sounds, and that needs to be the goal because you are interesting — who you pretend to be is not interesting at all. A nd if you look for a common denom i nator i n a nyone who’s real successful in this bu si ness, t hat ’s t he on ly o ne . T he o n l y c o m m o n denominator from all the big comics is that they were true to who they were, and they were all different. It doesn’t matter who you are, it just matters that you are who you are. And so whether it was Cosby or Pryor or Kinison or Hicks or Foxworthy, that’s who those guys are. So, your comedy needs to come from that perspective, no matter what.

DG

clear winner had been found. Though H ipszer had wa nted to pa r t ic ipate i n USC’s Got Talent for years now, she said Russell House previously hadn’t allowed her to hang her silks from the ceiling for silk acrobatics. But this year she found her time to shine. “Just do it. Just go and do it,” she said. “You can make your own st uff — my dad and I made mine. Honestly, just get out there and do it.”

DG

GAMBINO • Continued from 6 poetry. Jaden Sm it h’s presence o n t he a lbu m m ay s e e m confusing, but according to Gambino, Smith perfectly fits his vision of “The Boy,” a metanarrat ive character representing youthful, urban en nu i t hat showed up i n Gambino’s script for “Because the Internet.” Smith fits in better than y o u ’d t h i n k — h e r a p s w it h a del ic ate f low a nd his perspective is nakedly, refreshingly immature, but never in an obnoxious way. As Fam says on “Late Night in Kauai”: “My n---a Jaden Smith dropping jewels and n- - -a s don’t bel ie ve h i m ‘cause he’s Jaden Smith, but it’s all about the packaging, right?” “K auai” is alternat ingly thoughtful and infectiously fun. It goes down smooth, but it’s no forgettable EP — this one should be on playlists for years to come.

“STN MTN” is clearly a passion project for Gambino, who grew up in the actual Stone Mountain suburb in Atlanta. If its goal is just to faithfully recreate the style and feeling of early 2000s At lantan hip-hop, t hen it succeeds, but it follows its concept at t he expense of quality. The ly rics defau lt back to old hip-hop standards: br agg ado c io, sex , d r ug s , ow ning t he game. It’s all perfectly fine — most hiphop fans have gotten used to listening to lackluster lyrics as long as the rest of the song is good enough, but Gambino can do better. It never hits the level of wish fulfillment t h at r ap’s mo s t out s i z ed storytellers like Rick Ross or Young Thug thrive in. The biggest issue is that Gambino’s just not great at getting dirty. Lots of gangsta rap songs serve as portals to an exaggerated version of the hood, and there’s a lot of fun to be had with their

11

transportive quality. “STN MTN,” however, feels like Gambino dressing up — it hits all the right beats, but it’s too academic to really hit home. T h a t b e i n g s a i d , i t ’s definitely possible that “STN MTN” hits your sweet spot. It harkens back to a ver y specific kind of hip-hop, and some of the songs, such as “All Yall,” really have a lot of fun with the format. However, as a Gambino project, it smacks of an inessential diversion. Though concepted as compa n ion pieces, “ST N MTN” and “Kauai” are two very different beasts. “Kauai” stands alone much better than t he somet imes g im m ick y “STN MTN” does.

DG

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Thursday, October 9, 2014 12

Volleyball heads to Alabama

Jeffrey Davis / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

The Gamecocks are looking for junior middle back Darian Dozier to continue to improve her power hitting for a tough SEC stretch, according to head coach Scott Swanson.

South Carolina aiming for SEC breakthrough Dalton Abel

@DALTONABEL_22

It’s been six years since the South Carolina volleyball team has posted a winning conference record. During that season, fourth-year head coach Scott Swanson was coaching at Minnesota, one year away from a national semifinals appearance. The next three games will tell us if this year’s team has the potential to take the next big step in Swanson’s rebuilding project. Sunday’s road test at Alabama (15-3, 3-1 SEC) marks the beginning of a three-game stretch that will also pit the Gamecocks (13-3, 3-1 SEC) against No. 9 Florida and No. 19 Texas A&M. Though Swanson won’t shy away f rom t he fact t hat his team is t he u nderdog for t he near f ut u re, he believes they has the capability to turn a few heads with a big win this weekend. “It’s not out of the question at all,” Swanson said. “I think we’re very good

when we’re playing consistently, and that’s what we’re striving for this week is to find that consistency with what we’re doing.” Inconsistency has popped up in Swanson’s references to his team’s play earlier in the season, but this sentiment is now more prevalent after South Carolina nearly blew a two-set lead Sunday at Auburn. T he G a mecock s held tough, however, delivering four blocks during a convincing 15-10 win in the deciding set. Moving forward, Swanson said his centers need to be riskier in an attempt to get power hitters such as sophomore middle back Jacqy Angermiller and junior middle back Darian Dozier going, as they head into the bulk of the conference schedule. “We have some talent out there,” Swanson said. “It’s just about doing it consistently and making sure that we execute that gameplan.” Despite South Carolina’s bundle of power hitters, its style of play has not showcased the weapons it has at its disposal. Entering this weekend, the

Gamecocks rank in the bottom half of the SEC in hitting percentage, assists, kills and service aces. If South Carolina is to separate it sel f f rom it s recent st retc h of mediocre seasons, improved offensive efficiency is a must. Swanson, who acknowledges that “silly errors” won’t slide against upcoming opponents, is exploring every avenue to speed up the transformation. “ We’re t r y i ng to d iversif y ou r offense more,” Swanson said. “Part of that is very much dependent on our ball control. As our ball control improves, we’ll be able to run our middles more.” Defensive intensity has carried the Gamecocks to their hottest SEC start since the 2008 team won six of its fi rst seven conference matches. South Carolina currently leads the SEC in opponent hitting percentage and blocks per set, while ranking second in digs per set. Swanson credited assistant coach R.J. Abella for his game planning against opponents to aid in his players’ positioning both at the net and the

back line. The underlying theme of the 2014 c a mpa ig n ha s been t he ongoi ng development of several young players in key positions. Freshman outside hitter Taylr McNeil and sophomore outside hitter KoKo Atoa-Williams continue to pace the team’s offensive attack, ranking 4th and 19th in the SEC respectively in kills. However, it’s the third and fourth options that Swanson is tr ying to i ncor p or ate to b o o st h i s tea m’s offensive output. Ten days from now, we’ll have a much better idea of where this year’s South Carolina team stands in relation to the rest of the SEC. Until then, Swanson can only hope that the hard work he and his team have been putting in will pay off when the Gamecocks take the court Sunday. “I am genuinely hoping that through hard work and focus this week that we are able to go out and execute a game plan,” Swanson said. “And play at a high enough level that we can upset them.” DG

Gamecocks hope to build on No.1 ranking Women’s golf heads to Chapel Hill for Tar Heel Invitational Claudia Chakamian @TDG_SPORTS

Courtesy of USC Media Relations

Senior Justine Dreher earned her first career tournament win last weekend after shooting 9-under.

The South Carolina women’s golf team hopes for another spectacular performance this weekend at the Tar Heel Invitational. The Gamecocks are currently ranked No. 1 in the nation after a great tournament last weekend at the ANNIKA Intercollegiate where they fi nished fi rst. Expectations are high, as the team plans to maintain the ranking. This weekend, Sout h Carolina w ill go up against n ine teams c u rrent ly in t he top-25 rankings, four of which are in the SEC. Including the Gamecocks, there are seven SEC teams in the Tar Heel Invitational. “We’re going to have to see the same thing,” head coach Kalen Harris said. “We have to be ready to go, be ready to win another tournament and prepare like we’ve been preparing.” Most teams would bask in t he glor y of its fi rst No. 1 ranking in program history, but the Gamecocks are staying away from getting too cocky. It’s still early in the season, and they will continue to look to outdo their last performance. Just because they get off to a strong start in the fall does not mean it will transfer to the spring. Harris plans to keep the lineup the same from last weekend. Sophomores Katelyn Dambaugh and Jia Xin Yang, senior Justine Dreher, junior Mary Fran Hillow, and freshman Nanna Madsen will start. The lineup worked well for Harris’ group last weekend, and she hopes the same players can bring them to a win again. Dreher actually won at ANNIKA last week and earned

Player of the Week honors, as well. “Just i ne was a key player a nd has been a significant part of our lineup all four years,” Harris said. “I couldn’t be happier wit h her success and getting her fi rst tournament win. She doesn’t leave anything out, from her mental game to ball strike, putting and short game. She’s very goal-orientated, and this is just the fi rst success of many for her this season.” Dreher won last week ’s tou r nament af ter shoot ing 9-u nder for t he weekend. Madsen fi nished tied for ninth in her first ever tournament with a 2-under fi nish. Hillow was not far behind, shooting even all three days for a tie for 14th place. W hile keeping t heir lineup t he same, t he Gamecocks plan to keep their strategies the same as well for the most part. Harris saw confidence, and she hopes they will continue to boast its strengths and keep up good technique as South Carolina heads to Chapel Hill, North Carolina. As the Gamecocks prepare for the Tar Heel Invitational, they know they have work to do and things to prove. Harris and her team will soon face some of the other top competition coming up, including No. 6 Duke, No. 12 Vanderbilt, and No. 2 Arkansas, the team hoping South Carolina slips. “Our goal is to get better every day and every tournament,” Harris added. “We got to look to play some really solid golf, make a lot of birdies, be smart and do our best. Hopefully we’ll add up our results at the end and end up on top.”

DG

Profile for The Daily Gamecock

TDG 10/09/2014  

The Daily Gamecock print edition for 10/09/2014

TDG 10/09/2014  

The Daily Gamecock print edition for 10/09/2014

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