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Wednesday, October 17, 2012 // Issue 30, Volume 78 /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

THE DAILY COUGAR

T H E

O F F I C I A L

S T U D E N T

N E W S P A P E R

O F T H E

U N I V E R S I T Y

O F

H O U S T O N

Professor awarded $2.1 million from NIH for cancer research

S I N C E

1 9 3 4

OPINION

Chrystal Grant Staff writer

A chemical and biomolecular engineering professor will research ways to modify human immune cells to fight against cancer with a $2.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Navin Varadarajan’s research concentrates on T cells, which recognize and attack disease cells — specifically chimeric antigen receptors. “The grant gives researchers the potential to study immunotherapy and opportunity to save people’s lives,” Varadarajan said. Varadarajan highlights the role of his Cullen College of Engineering graduate students. “I want to stress that these students spend an enormous amount of time researching. The students play an important role, and we could not accomplish this without them,” Varadajan said. Graduate student Ivan Liadi hopes that by graduation the project will be significant enough to make clinical trials. “I enjoy working to save people’s lives. The project requires lots of perseverance and hard work,” Liadi said. “A single experiment takes 14-17 hours a day and it’s a lot of trial and error.” CAR T cells have proven effective for fighting cancers that are normally more difficult to treat, Varadarajan

UH sails with pirate flag LIFE+ARTS

Students gush over Grammer A researcher works in assistant professor Navin Varadarajan’s lab. | Bethel Glumac/The Daily Cougar said. These cells can multiply in the body of the patient and survive within the host, increasing the chances of attacking the tumor. The combination of CAR T cells and other immunotherapy techniques have been effective in fighting B-cell lymphomas, such as leukemia, which are typically untreatable outside of stem cell transplantation. “We can’t tell if the treatment will completely get rid of cancer, but it will increase chances of fighting cancer. My goal is to continue to fix the loop holes and determine how likely the treatment will be effective to patients,” said Varadarajan.

Exhibit showcases efficiency in city

T

he Community Design Resource Center has searched through features in the Houston landscape that are usually considered single-use, like Metro depots, and come up with ways to make them multi-use. The exhibit “Thick Infrastructure” will be open from Oct. 4 to Nov. 21 in the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture — Esteban Portillo/The Daily Cougar

Varadarajan will use the nanowell array, a polymer slide holding thousands of individual chambers. He will expose CAR T cells to this array. This will allow him to study individual properties in relation to the ability to fight cancer, Varadarajan said. This will help determine what molecules the cells produce in order to communicate with other immune versions. Cells from the same collections will be infused into patients, allowing researchers to compare its properties with clinical outcomes over the course of months. This procedure will assist researchers in successfully

identifying which modified T cells are most effective at fighting cancer. About three to six months after infusion, blood will be taken from the patients and their CAR T cells will be isolated, he said. Varadarajan will study these cells, which will be several generations removed from those the patients initially received. He will then be able to determine how offspring cells sustain properties effective at fighting cancer. Liadi said he hopes the grant will improve the lab’s study of cancer.

SPORTS

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14

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THIS WEEK IN UH HISTORY Student Senate rejects censure of The Daily Cougar editor in chief The Daily Cougar reported on Oct. 16, 1968 that Jim Rice, the editor in chief of TDC, was admonished by two economics graduate students, David Ciscel and Gary French, after writing an editorial entitled “Color SDS Red?” In the editorial that was published Sept. 27 of that year, Rice declared the Students for a Democratic Society to be a violent, communist group after a riot by Columbia University’s chapter. However, he said that the UH chapter was “passion-pink.” “Unquestionably, some SDS chapters pledge allegiance to communist doctrines and practice the teachings of the hard-red Red. J. Edgar Hoover has charged SDS groups as being the ‘core group of subversive student forces committed to the use of violence for the destruction of the existing social order in the United State,’” Rice said in the editorial. “One could hardly consider UH’s chapter of SDS as being communist-inspired, communist-led or communist anything.” In the Senate meeting, the censure was defeated. “A roll call vote was requested by Ray Balch (Sr.-A&S). The vote was 12 to 12, requiring a vote of the president to break the tie. (President) Poston voted no. The resolution was defeated,” the October article said. -The Daily Cougar Staff

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ABOUT THE COUGAR The Daily Cougar is published Monday through Thursday during the fall and spring semesters, and Wednesdays during the summer and online at thedailycougar.com. The Daily Cougar is supported in part by Student Service Fees. The first copy is free. Additional copies cost 25 cents. SUBSCRIPTIONS Rates are $70 per year or $40 per semester. Mail subscription requests to: Mail Subscriptions, The Daily Cougar, University of Houston, Houston, TX, 77204-4015. NEWS TIPS Send tips and story ideas to the editors. Call (713) 743-5314, e-mail news@ thedailycougar.com. A “Submit news” form is available at thedailycougar.com. COPYRIGHT No part of the newspaper in print or online may be reproduced without the consent of the director of Student Publications.

Channler Hill Joshua Mann THE DAILY COUGAR IS A MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED COLLEGIATE PRESS.


Wednesday, October 17, 2012 // 3

The Daily Cougar

NEWS

EDITOR Julie Heffler EMAIL news@thedailycougar.com ONLINE thedailycougar.com/news

MAN ON THE STREET

Q: What is your opinion regarding online piracy? I think it’s good. You can get different resources that maybe you couldn’t afford — learning tools for children, if you do have children, or schoolbooks that are ridiculously priced.

:A

I think it’s good and bad. I do think that stuff is too expensive. I know that I do download music that’s free. I think that if music wasn’t so overpriced then people probably wouldn’t resort to piracy.

— Aubrey Hepler, geophysics junior

A:

PHOTOS AND QUOTES COMPILED BY JULIE HEFFLER

:A

— Jackie Jacquier, biology junior

I understand that things can get really expensive, like downloading textbooks and everything online, so I understand why some people do it, but I personally don’t. It gets really expensive. Maybe if things weren’t so overpriced, less people would do it. — Nicole Davis, biology senior

I think that it is a problem because you’re stealing someone’s work, but I think the fact that there are some policies — the policies the companies usually put on their software or anything that they own — that usually encourage piracy. For example, if you offer a promotion of some kind, I think it would prevent piracy, because people would see that promotion and want to get more of your material. But instead, you put all these restrictions, and it usually encourages piracy.

A:

— Mohamed Al-Ameri, biology sophomore

I think there’s a lot of gray area with it, but in my opinion, the people that produce the films or music or what not, that’s their work and they need to get paid for it. I understand why people do it, and I’m not going to say I’ve never done it. I don’t think people should be going to jail because of it. There needs to be some type of way they can control it a little better, but I don’t think people should be going like 20 years in prison for pirating a movie.

:A

— Nicholas Miller, petroleum engineering junior

I think it’s just a natural part of the way the web has developed this century ... The way that we’ve begun to share information, it’s very difficult to control without a sort of direct censorship of the web and the way we share media files. And I think rather than try to stifle that, the government should be trying to find a way in which both users and authors can benefit from the relationship. I don’t think necessarily it’s a bad thing where people are sharing software and using the videos in a way that isn’t making money, but I think they should find a way where it can be productive for both parties.”

:A

— Alexia Banos, education junior


The Daily Cougar

4 \\ Thursday, October 4, 2012

OPINION

EDITOR Lucas Sepulveda EMAIL opinion@thedailycougar.com ONLINE thedailycougar.com/opinion

UH ranked third in college torrent usage Lucas Sepulveda Opinion editor

T

orrentFreak.com ranked UH third in the nation, behind Rutgers and NYU, in universities whose students download the most torrent files. While it isn’t known whether the recorded torrents downloaded at UH were legal or illegal, the latter is almost certainly the case. There isn’t any obvious reason our university would be more likely to pirate files than another, and if TorrentFreak were to release another list next year, it wouldn’t be surprising to see different results. The piracy trend is by no means UH-specific, nor is it limited to college students. Piracy has spread globally and will soon be impossible to prevent, if it’s not already. Those who develop and release intellectual property — whether in the form of music, movies or software — deserve to be rewarded financially for their work, but times are changing and that’s becoming more difficult. The rewards will have to come from elsewhere. In the past, there were significantly greater profits from product sales than there are now, and the trend has worried a resilient entertainment industry. According to the Recording Industry Association of America in 1999, the amount of money from CDs sold was $14.6 billion; by 2009, the number had dropped to $6.3 billion. Piracy played a major role in reducing the music industry’s profits from album sales throughout the decade. But the Internet is vital to the success of the entertainment industry. It is an extremely effective medium for companies to promote and advertise. The growing number of Internet pirates doesn’t seem to be slowing down, and the entertainment industry is wasting its time trying to stop it.

Seeders Plaza Fountain by David Haydon Despite the decaying numbers, the industry isn’t necessarily hurting. According to TechDirt.com, the value of the global music industry was $168 billion in 2010, as opposed to $132 billion in 2005. The number of feature films produced in 1999 was 1,723. Ten years later, 7,193 films were produced. And according to a PricewaterhouseCoopers report, movie spending is predicted to rise 3.1 percent by 2016. The belief that the entertainment industry is in danger is a myth. While media conglomerates complain about the pirates who

THE DAILY COUGAR

they otherwise would not have been able to reach — listeners who show up to concerts and recommend the music to friends. And no matter how many films are being downloaded, movies have the luxury of the cinema. People will always show up to the theater for the experience. The movie industry has plenty of opportunities for profit; a pirated version filmed with a Sony Handycam is not particularly appealing in a world where video images are getting clearer every day. The entertainment industry has been and will be fine. Controlling

Internet piracy will only get harder as it grows in popularity. The small percentage of piracy incidents authorities catch is nothing compared to the percentage they miss. In a new age dominated by global connectivity, Internet piracy is here to stay. The media companies this phenomenon affects may be losing profit, but they’re benefiting in other ways. It’s a technological era that everyone — including the media industry — needs to adjust to. Lucas Sepulveda is a creative writing senior and may be reached at opinion@ thedailycougar.com.

STAFF EDITORIAL The Staff Editorial reflects the opinions of The Daily Cougar Editorial Board (the members of which are listed above the editorial). All other opinions, commentaries and cartoons reflect only the opinion of the author. Opinions expressed in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Houston or the students as a whole.

including the author’s full name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Anonymous letters will not be published. Deliver letters to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; send them via campus mail to STP 4015; or fax to (713) 743-5384. Letters are subject to editing.

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funnel their copyrighted material through the web, what these companies gain from the Internet will always outweigh the negative impact of pirates. Internet piracy isn’t all bad; media companies benefit more than they admit. If a person pirates an album or a movie, critics automatically assume it results in a direct loss of profit, but that isn’t always the case. The spread of ideas, especially at such a fast rate, results in widespread exposure. Illegal torrents and other prohibited outlets serve as a way for artists to gain listeners

& ARTS EDITOR

OPINION EDITOR

Joshua Mann Amanda Hilow Channler Hill Julie Heffler Andrew Pate Allen Le Lucas Sepulveda


Wednesday, October 17, 2012 // 5

The Daily Cougar

SPORTS

EDITOR Andrew Pate EMAIL sports@thedailycougar.com ONLINE thedailycougar.com/sports

GOLF

A comeback for the ages Down 12 strokes at Lone Star Invitational, UH storms back for its first outright team victory in two years

The UH golf team’s 12 stroke comeback victory in San Antonio was the program’s first outright team victory since Oct. 27, 2009. | Photo courtesy of UH Athletics Andrew Pate Sports editor

Trailing North Texas by 12 strokes entering the final round of play at the Lone Star Invitational in San Antonio, the UH golf team improbably shot a 13-under-par 275 for its first outright 54-hole tournament victory since winning the Kansas Invitational in 2007.

In what was a team effort, all five starting Cougars shot at least one under par Tuesday, including junior Jesse Droemer’s five-under — the lowest amongst all players and a career low for Droemer. Head coach Jonathan Dismuke has been waiting for this moment. “We’ve talked about having a breakout round and running away

with the rest of the field, and today was that round,” Dismuke said. “Anytime you can post the low score of the day by 13 shots in the final round, that’s a remarkable round of golf.” The Cougars trailed by two strokes with a few holes remaining when sophomore Roman Robledo birdied his fourth consecutive hole to put UH within a single stroke. Then, on his

final hole, junior Curtis Reed closed out his tournament with a birdie, putting UH in a tie with the Mean Green. “We pay close attention to our finishing and how we play the last two or three holes. Golf always seems to come down to those last few holes, especially when you are playing well,” Dismuke said. “Roman and

Curtis both came in with a strong finish. Everybody’s finish today was spectacular.” After North Texas’ last player to finish the course bogeyed the final two holes, the Cougars sealed the victory. Elsewhere for UH, junior Wesley McClain tied for 22nd with a total score of 222, and sophomore Kyle Pilgrim finished at 148 after competing in the first and third rounds. “We have come a long way in a short time, especially when you consider that we finished last by eight shots at this tournament in 2009,” Dismuke said. “We still have a long way to go, but we are making great strides as our guys buy in and stay committed. And we receive the support from our University, our former players and the entire golfing community in the city of Houston.” The Cougars will complete their fall-slate when they send individual golfers to compete at the Houston Baptist University Invitational on Oct. 22 to 23 at Quail Valley Golf Course in Missouri City. The site is also home to the last outright team championship in 2009. “This was a great way to cap the fall season,” Dismuke said. “I am ecstatic about getting some offseason work in and being better for the spring.” sports@thedailycougar.com

COMMENTARY

Dismuke intricate in rebirth of storied golf program In July 2009, Mack Rhoades made his first hire as athletics director by bringing in former Texas A&M assistant golf coach Jo n a t h a n D i s muke to be the new head coach at UH. Andrew “Jonathan is Pate regarded as a rising star in the business, a quality individual and will serve as a great role model for our student-athletes as he helps to prepare them to be champions for life,” Rhoades said. “He truly cares about the total wellbeing of his student-athletes and

demands excellence from them in all areas of their lives.” Dismuke was handed the task of developing a young squad and restoring a program two and a half decades removed from its 16th and last team NCAA national championship. “Much of what attracted me to the University of Houston is the past success of the golf program,” Dismuke said. “It is one of the most decorated programs in collegiate golf history, and I am excited to have the opportunity to be a part of this special program.” During his fourth tournament as head coach, Dismuke made the

first big splash with the Cougars by winning a rain-shortened Husky Invitational — UH’s first tournament victory since 2007. Since that time, Dismuke’s ability to develop young golfers has been instrumental in the team’s growth. At the core of that development has been sophomore Roman Robledo — a Harlingen native who won four straight District 31-5A individual championships in high school. “We have a job to do,” Robledo told The Daily Cougar in 2011. “Our job is to bring that NCAA championship back to UH to bring that legacy back.”

Dismuke is also credited with the recruiting of juniors Curtis Reed and Jesse Droemer who immediately began playing intricate roles in putting UH golf back on the map. During this week’s Lone Star Invitational, Droemer led all golfers with a third round 67. “Jesse just hit a lot of really good shots. He holed two wedge shots and hit so many quality shots throughout the day,” Dismuke said. “It was the best round I have seen him play in tournament action.” Throughout four fall DISMUKE continues on page 8

SCOREBOARD TEAM

RD. 1

Houston

298 293 275 866

North Texas

284 295

291

870

Denver

287 295

299

881

Central Arkansas

293 292

300

885

Arizona

297 300

289

886

Texas State

293 299

296

888

UTSA

290 299

300

889

Stephen F. Austin 306 303

295

904

RD. 2

RD. 3

TOTAL

Sacramento State 295 299

311

905

Rice Southern Miss

305 299 298 300

301 309

905 907

Utah Valley

303 303

304

910

Houston Baptist

302 314

297

913

Illinois State

313 305

297

915

New Mexico State 306 304

155

765*


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6 \\ Wednesday, October 17, 2012

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The Daily Cougar

LIFE +ARTS

EDITOR Allen Le EMAIL arts@thedailycougar.com ONLINE thedailycougar.com/arts

CONCERT REVIEW

Grammer delights students with campus concert Bryan Dupont-Gray Assistant life & arts editor

An enthusiastic audience sang along with pop artists South Jordan and Andy Grammer in a fantastic concert Friday at the E. Cullen Performance Hall. The Student Program Board deserves infinite praises for inviting the artists to perform at UH — both acts put on a show that was everything a concert should be. Fresh off his June 2011 self-titled debut album, released in, Grammer has been on a college tour, rocking out at various cities. His radio singles “Keep Your Head Up,” “Fine By Me” and the latest, “Miss Me,” have made him a respected pop artist. Before Grammer and his band stole the show, the audience was treated to a performance by South Jordan. The pop-rock act that recalled the style of a young Maroon 5. South Jordan sported tightly tailored suits, vests and button-up shirts, and songs “Love Like Suicide” and “Naked” emitted a bubbly sound that catered to the ladies in attendance. There were a few technical problems during the performance, but these small bugs

Pop singer Andy Grammer was honored with the “Most Innovative Video” award for “Keep Your Head Up” at the 2011 MTV O Music Awards. | Rebekah Stearns/The Daily Cougar didn’t take away the energy of the set. Grammer was in tip-top shape as he and his band jolted onto the stage. Clad in a graphic T-shirt, dark jacket and

blue jeans, the MTV O Music Awards winner wonderfully executed a feel-good presence on stage. The pop artist grabbed the audience on

a personal level as he talked about his street performances and joked about trying to understand the “Coog’s House!” chant. Grammer performed notable tracks from his debut, such as “Biggest Man in Los Angles” and “Ladies,” a song dedicated to his mother. He made sure that students got a whiff of the band’s talent with vocal harmonies and instrumental solos by the electric guitarist, drummer and pianist during “Lunatic.” Grammer got intimate with the crowd while performing “Slow.” This was the highlight of the evening as he walked out into the crowd, stood on seats and motivated the audience to sing along with their hands into the air. In the later half of the show, cover performances of Snow Patrol’s “Chasing Cars,” Rihanna’s “We Found Love” and Gym Class Heroes’ “Studio Hearts” were mixed in with Grammer’s radio hits. Because of Grammer’s charisma, the event was a giant step up compared to last year’s feature of Gym Class Heroes. South Jordan and Grammer provided a refreshing take on a college concert experience. arts@thedailycougar.com

CampusChic

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BLOCKS OF COLOR

DENIM ON DENIM

Photography and digital media sohopomore Asad Badat shined brightly. ƒ Shirt: JC Penney ƒ Pants: Haggar ƒ Bowtie: Handmade ƒ Belt: Tommy Hilfiger ƒ Shoes: Aldo

Painting sophomore Matthew Tabor kept it polished with a classic blue and brown combo. ƒ Shirt: Old Navy ƒ Pants: Vans ƒ Belt: Target ƒ Shoes: Thrifted — Compiled by Allen Le


The Daily Cougar

8 \\ Wednesday, October 17, 2012

SPORTS

DISMUKE

Sneak peak: Stop run game, beat SMU

continued from page 5

tournaments, the Cougars have finished no lower than third, and three times now have finished in first after completing a round — a feat that should be attributed to Dismuke. UH is still a long shot away from being on par with the fi eld of storied greats this program has produced, but with Dismuke at the helm and a talented squad in place to help mature, it may not take as long as some believe.

T

he Cougars defense stifled UAB’s running game allowing just 35 yards in last week’s 39-17 victory. This Thursday in Dallas, UH will be tested mightily against SMU’s senior running back Zach Line. Line has 18 career 100-yard games, three of which have come this season. Check out tomorrow’s issue for all of the UH vs. SMU gameday coverage. — Rebekah Stearns/The Daily Cougar

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The Center for Mexican American Studies 40TH ANNIVERSARY Fall Speaker Series

Thursday, October 18, 2012 11am - 1pm, UH Hilton Hotel Plaza Room

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“Return to Aztlán: Mexican Americans and the Immigration Debate” Nestor Rodriguez, Ph.D. Professor of Sociology, University of Texas

editor@thedailycougar.com Twitter @thedailycougar Facebook.com/thedailycougar

On the phone Call 713.743.5362 to speak to the Editor in Chief

In person Stop by our office Room 12, UC Satellite

“Gendered Migration from Mexico to the U.S. and Resultant Labor Patterns”

THE DAILY COUGAR

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, Ph.D. Professor of Sociology, University of Southern California

“No Undocumented Child Left Behind” Michael A. Olivas, J.D. Professor of Law University of Houston

For more information, contact: Room 323, Agnes Arnold Hall 713.743.3139 www.class.uh.edu/cmas

We misspell on purpose. Just to keep you alert. Your welcome.

Let us know when we mess up. e-mail editor@thedailycougar.com

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Volume 78, Issue 30