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In honor of the University’s endeavors toward becoming more environmentally friendly, UH will be holding an Earth Day Carnival from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on April 21 in Butler Plaza. The event will have plenty of games and giveaways to celebrate the sustainability efforts the campus has undertaken, like the installment of solar trash compactors and a halt on the use of Styrofoam take-home containers in the dining halls. Results from this year’s RecycleMania national competition will be revealed, and there will also be a presentation announcing the University’s partnership with the Green Mountain Energy Company, which includes a donation to UH’s first solar array and information about the new Green Mountain Energy Company Solar Internship Program. For more information, visit www.uh.edu/green. — Julian Jimenez/The Daily Cougar

Dodgeball event to benefit Japan The Student Program Board is hosting its “Dodgeball for Japan” charity event tonight to raise funds to help those in Japan who have lost their homes and families. The event will take place in the MAC room of the Campus Recreation and Wellness Center at 8 p.m. A series of earthquakes hit Japan with magnitudes ranging from 7.0 to 9.0 in March. A tsunami caused by the first earthquake also inflicted much damage. Food and water supplies have also been contaminated with radiation from damage done to the Fukushima Daiichi power plant. There will be free giveaways and prizes to the winning team. For more information, visit www.uh.edu/spb. — Moniqua Sexton/The Daily Cougar

CORRECTIONS Report errors to editor@thedailycougar.com. Corrections will appear in this space as needed.

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April 18, 2011 Read. Recycle. Repeat daily.

Panel takes on female prof ratio

CAMPUS EVENTS

Carnival to celebrate Earth Day, UH’s sustainability efforts

today

Monday

FACULTY

Got news? E-mail news@thedailycougar.com or call 713-743-5314

!!

Issue 133, Volume 76

FRI FR

89/72 89/ /72

EVENTS IT Training An intructor-led computer training class will be introducing Apple Workshop. The class is offered to students, alumni and facutly. The class will be from10 a.m. to noon in room 110L of the Social Work Building. Registration is required. Percussion Ensemble The Moores School of Music is presenting the Percussion Ensemble from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Moores Opera House. Tickets are $10, $5 for students.

FOR MORE EVENTS, CHECK OUT

thedailycougar.com/calendar

Anna Gallegos

THE DAILY COUGAR A diverse panel of female professors gathered Thursday to speak about the role of women in academia and the minority of female professors at UH. The event was hosted by UH’s University Commission on Women inside the M.D. Anderson Memorial Library. “It has to change … if we want to grow,” said panel participant Dr. Hanadi Rifai, an engineering professor and director of the environmental engineering graduate program. Her rhetoric focused on increasing the number of female professors at UH. “We want our student body to be as

impressive as we think of them now, and looking towards the future … we have to change,” Rafai said. “We have to make that step forward.” Currently, only 16 percent of full professors at UH are women. This is less than the national average of 26.5 percent, according to the US Department of Education. For assistant and associate professors, UH follows the national statistics, as women are the minority in these positions. “I’m so incredibly impressed with the young ladies coming from Asia,” said Rafai, who is originally from Lebanon, to an audience of largely female faculty members. “They have no barriers…they are here to be the best that they can be.

“I’d like to see our females have that attitude going though college, and that they really are as focused on making education the most important thing for them.” Rifai said the main responsibility for female students is to actively seek tenure and advancement in order to help make the necessary changes. The panel focused mainly on bridging the gap between the number of female and male tenured professors at UH. “For us women, the key is finding that right balance between work and family life,” said Dr. Saleha Khumawala, a professor in the C.T. Bauer College of Business. FACULTY continues on page 3

BAUER

Students flip for business lesson Miguel Cortina

THE DAILY COUGAR The Wolff Center for Entrepreneurship’s BurgerFest wasn’t just an event to sell burgers — it gave student teams the opportunity to work as a company in a real-world situation. Teams were composed of people who each held a position, ranking from CEO to COO. Team leaders were appointed as CEOs and decided how the team was going to operate its burger stand. For example, UH’s The Burger Queen Team partnered with Carl’s Jr., a California-based restaurant that has opened two branches in Houston. The team also had participation from Starbucks as they helped them distribute their new instant coffee. “We went to speak at the Carl’s Jr. location and asked to speak with the manager,” said Margarita Flores, chief financial officer of the Burger Queen Team. “Of course we had to offer something in return, and that is that BurgerFest is a great marketing aspect, and people are just finding out that Carl’s Jr. is in Houston.” The team gave small giveaways, such as a pen, a magnet or a car antenna from the restaurant. In return, people would get a dollar off their burgers. BURGERS continues on page 3

Neil deGrasse Tyson, the director of the Hayden Planetarium, packed UH’s Cullen Performance Hall as part of the 2011 Elizabeth D. Rockwell Lecture Series. | Christian Puente/The Daily Cougar

CAMPUS

Famed astrophysicist visits UH PBS Host laments US space program, lack of advances since end of Cold War Ashley Evans

THE DAILY COUGAR The Cullen Performance Hall was packed to capacity, and a line of fans waited to gain entrance into a lecture on America and space. As the guest of honor entered through a side entrance, the crowd erupted into cheers and applause — Famed astrophysicist Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of the Hayden Planetarium and host of the PBS series NOVA scienceNOW, was the guest speaker for the 2011 Elizabeth D. Rockwell Lecture Series. The night started on a somber note as the audience paid respects to the late Elizabeth D. Rockwell, founder of the lecture series and its financier up until her death earlier this year. This would be the first time in the history of

the lecture series that Rockwell would not be present. Bernard Harris, UH alumnus and the first African-American to walk in space, introduced Tyson and welcomed all the guests, including those from the international space conference. “There is no better place to talk about space than Houston,” Tyson said. “There is no better time to talk about space than during an international conference on space.” But, Tyson also warned that he was not planning on giving a lecture where he praised the space program. Noting that we are not advancing, he pointed out that America has a faulty memory of our involvement in space exploration because we think of ourselves as “pioneers of space.” After all, Tyson said, America was not the first in space — a monkey, a dog, guinea pigs, mice and Russians all flew in space before the nation did. LECTURE continues on page 3


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Monday, April 18, 2011

NEWS 101

SHOW YOUR U of H STUDENT ID & GET 10% OFF YOUR MEAL! D! O O F N S! A E LI IN RS! O! A W E TI IT T EAT BE PA S A RE GR XA OR G TE DO UT O

Mandola’s Deli

is now OPEN for LUNCH AND DINNER 4105 Leeland Across the Freeway on Cullen!! www.MandolasDeli.com

MUST SHOW UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON STUDENT ID & GET 10% OFF TOTAL FOOD PURCHASE after 3pm. LIMIT ONE ID per person, per order, per visit. GOOD ON FOOD ONLY - Valid after 3pm. Not valid on alcohol (sorry, it’s the law).

The Daily Cougar

Headlines from around the world, so you can sound like an informed person.

news 101 UNITED STATES

IDAHO

New rules for air traffic controllers

Search continues for missing miner

The Federal Aviation Administration announced Sunday that air traffic controllers would have to follow new regulations after recent investigations unveiled multiple cases in which air traffic controllers had fallen asleep on the job.

The effort to rescue a 53-year-old Idaho man from a collapsed mine continued Sunday. Rescue workers have already gotten through 6,000 feet of earth.

New rules require that controllers schedule their own shifts and that there be a nine-hour minimum between shifts.

SOUTHEAST

Tornadoes rip through southeast US; 40 dead According to the National Weather Service, more than 40 people were killed over the weekend after violent storms ripped through the Southeastern US and spawned hundreds of tornadoes. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s storm predictor reported more than 230 tornadoes touching down across the region. North Carolina was hit with the worst of the storm.

AFGHANISTAN

Five killed in suicide bombing A suicide bombing in eastern Afghanistan killed five troops over the weekend. According to authorities, the suicide bomber was wearing an Afgani military uniform. The five killed included Americans and troops from other nations.

Workers have been able to clear one-third of the debris that was blocking one of the exits.

JAPAN

Engineers map out solution for reactors The timetable for repairing the exposed nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant has been extended for six to nine months, plant owners said Sunday. For the first three months, engineers are focusing on decreasing the levels of radioactivity and on cooling the rods. The next step in the process is shutting down the reactors and building a new shell, which could take up to six months. During this period, the Japanese government said that it would focus on decontaminating the “widest possible area.”

HOUSTON

Police question father for son’s death The father of an 11-year-old with cerebral palsy is being questioned by Pasadena police after the boy’s decomposed body was found in a box in the back of the father’s car. Compiled by Christopher Losee

THE STUDENT PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE IS CURRENTLY ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE POSITION OF

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EDITOR IN CHIEF

of the 2011-12 Houstonian yearbook APPLICATION DEADLINE:

5 P.M. APRIL 21

ELECTION: 4 P.M. THURSDAY, APRIL 28 TO REQUEST AN APPLICATION, VISIT ROOM 12, UC SATELLITE OR CALL 713-743-5335. The SPC meets monthly during the school year to hear updates from the department’s units, to give a forum for public comment and to elect the editors in chief of The Daily Cougar and Houstonian yearbook. For more information, visit www.uh.edu/sp/committee

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ABOUT THE COUGAR The Daily Cougar is published Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and Tuesday and Thursday during the summer, at the University of Houston Printing Plant and online at http://www. thedailycougar.com. The University seeks to provide equal educational opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability or veteran status, or sexual orientation. The Daily Cougar is supported in part by Student Service Fees. The first copy of the Cougar is free; each additional copy is 25 cents. SUBSCRIPTIONS Rates are $70 per year or $40 per semester. Mail subscription requests to: Mail Subscriptions, The Daily Cougar, University of Houston, Houston, TX, 77204-4015. NEWS TIPS Direct news tips and story ideas to the News Desk. Call (713) 743-5314, e-mail news@thedailycougar. com or fax (713) 743-5384. A “Submit news item” form is also available online at thedailycougar.com. COPYRIGHT No part of the newspaper in print or online may be reproduced without the written consent of the director of the Student Publications Department.

ISSUE STAFF Copy editing

Julian Jimenez

Production

Ben Muths

Closing editor

Jack Wehman

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Monday, April 18, 2011

NEWS

The Daily Cougar

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3

LECTURE continued from page 1

Members of the Top Burger team grill up burgers and sell their product to students attending BurgerFest on the North Patio. | Paris Jomadiao/The Daily Cougar

BURGERS continued from page 1

“That worked really well. People from California have recognized the name and they are super exited to try it again,” Flores said. Lucia Ayala-Guerra, a political science and communication senior, remembered her childhood in Monterrey, Mexico, when she tried one of the restaurant’s burgers. “Not only is the burger good, but the marketing strategies that they used worked really great. Carl’s Jr. was my favorite restaurant during my childhood,” Ayala-Guerra said. The Burger Queen Team had been planning their participation in BurgerFest since last summer, when they began to have ideas about what to do and who to network with. The night before the event

FACULTY continued from page 1

“Men do not have that privilege of motherhood.” Many of the other panelists were in agreement with Khumawala, bringing up the point that children play a large role in explaining why women professors don’t progress as much in universities as men. “The average age of award for a Ph.D. nationally is 34, but if you’re delaying for family, you’ll get tenure around 40,” Director of Women’s Studies Dr. Elizabeth Gregory said of women that have to choose between motherhood and their

started, the team went to the restaurant to see how it operated to have the same concept in BurgerFest. “We saw how the restaurant operated and it really gave us an appreciation of what they do, and we learned about the business and the burger,” said Bejaye Ilegbodu, chief marketing officer for the team. According to Flores, the hardest part was networking and raising money. Her team raised about $5,000, $4,000 of which she raised herself. “I didn’t know where I was going to get all the money from,” Flores said. “It’s a lot of baby steps to create this big thing.” This year, 30 students participated in the event. They were all graded by their sales and the in-kind donations they received. news@thedailycougar.com

Tyson went further and argued that the “war driver” that spurred our endeavors in space is gone. “Everything we did was a reaction to Russia,” Tyson said. “When you’re at war, checks get written and money flows like a tapped keg. NASA doesn’t exist for science; it was created for geopolitical forces.” Once the Cold War was over, Tyson explained, Congress no longer had any reason to fund missions to outer space. America slowly faded off the world’s stage, Tyson said, and the nation went from being a leader to more of a follower, and is now barely a hitchhiker when compared to other nations and their space efforts. As for the world ending in 2012, Tyson said that notion is a hoax perpetuated by the scientifically illiterate. When we have a scientifically and technologically illiterate community, he said, bridges fall, trains collide, levees break and people die. “Here’s what I worry about,” Tyson said. “The act of going to space created this urge to build tomorrow and now nobody is inventing tomorrow-land. It’s about creating a scientifically literate community, not about who won American Idol last night.” Tyson ended the lecture by challenging the nation to unite on a new space mission to Mars, claiming it would bring together the best of what we have to offer in science and technology to create a more scientifically literate society. “You change the zeitgeist of the nation,” Tyson said. “Then you change the zeitgeist of the world.” news@thedailycougar.com

academic careers. “Having children can be distracting, but academics offers a lot more flexibility than most people in the world have.” In the end, Rifai said, what women really need are champions to lead the way. “You really need someone to be your advocate,” Rifai said. The panel also featured JéAnna Abbott, professor in the Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, professor Mamie Moy of the Department of Chemistry and Dr. Susan Scarrow of the Department of Political Science. news@thedailycougar.com

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson presented “America’s Past, Present and Future in Space” to a packed crowd at Cullen Performance Hall. | Christian Puente/The Daily Cougar

The line for first-come, first-served tickets for Neil deGrasse Tyson’s lecture stretched from the E. Cullen Building to Philip Guthrie Hoffman Hall. | Ashley Evans/The Daily Cougar

TAKE BACK THE

NIGHT

Program and Candlelight Vigil March on Campus For Sexual Assault Awareness Lynn Eusan Park April 20, 2011 @ 5pm

Please join us in creating a campus community free of violence! FREE T-SHIRTS FREE COUGAR CARDS Door Prize: Women’s Health Exam

There will be Campus Speakers, Special Musical Performances, & Information Tables

Organized by:

Clothesline Project Women’s Resource Center Health Center Counseling & Psychological Services Cougar Peer Educators UH Wellness UHPD


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Monday, April 18, 2011

The Daily Cougar

opinion THE DAILY COUGAR

EDITOR Andrew Taylor E-MAIL opinion@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/opinion

GUILTY! GUILTY! GUILTY! by Felipe Campos

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR IN CHIEF MANAGING EDITORS NEWS EDITORS SPORTS EDITORS LIFE

& ARTS EDITOR

OPINION EDITOR

Jack Wehman Newton Liu, Christopher Losee Jose Aguilar, Cristi Guerra John Brannen, Joshua Siegel Mary Baak Andrew Taylor

STAFF EDITORIAL

High schoolers storm out over teacher layoffs

T

eachers are losing jobs as school district budgets are cut, and students aren’t happy about it.

The cuts — which amount to billions of dollars in reductions to education at every level — have just now started to cause layoffs, and some Katy high school students decided enough is enough. According to the Houston Chronicle, hundreds of students walked out of Morton Ranch and Cinco Ranch high schools on Friday and held signs saying “Save Our Teachers” and “Honk For Teachers.” Other schools around the Katy area reported student protests as well. While skipping class may not be a suitable longterm form of opposition, it certainly helps make a point. Over 350 teachers in Katy ISD alone were laid off last week, and there are layoffs planned at numerous other Houston-area school districts. The message is clear — these cuts aren’t bearable. Public school districts are looking at $7.8 billion in reductions, and the consequences will be felt across the state. Although students, teachers and administrators are speaking up as loudly as possible, Gov. Rick Perry seems to think that everything is going to be fine. “There are better ways to send your message than walking out of the classroom,” Perry said Thursday to the Houston Chronicle. “The fact of the matter is, I feel quite confident that the Texas Legislature will fund our schools appropriately. At the end of the day, being in the classroom is a lot more important to them than protesting, particularly during school hours. If they want to come here on Saturdays and Sundays or after school, have at it.” Katy ISD officials see it differently. The district says the cuts are staggering, and it is already having a profound effect in numerous programs. “There are some very real reasons for why this is happening,” Katy ISD spokesman Steve Stanford said. “It is a direct impact of what is happening in Austin.” UH students should follow the path that Katy students are already traveling — the University needs to voice its opinion so loud that no one, including the Texas Legislature, can ignore it.

E D I TO R I A L P O L I C I E S STAFF EDITORIAL The Staff Editorial reflects the opinions of The Daily Cougar Editorial Board (the members of which are listed above the editorial). All other opinions, commentaries and cartoons reflect only the opinion of the author. Opinions expressed in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Houston or the students as a whole. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Daily Cougar welcomes letters to the editor from any member of the UH community. Letters should be no more than 250 words and signed, including the author’s full name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Anonymous letters will not be published. Deliver letters to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; send them via campus mail to STP 4015; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. Letters are subject to editing. ADVERTISEMENTS Advertisements published in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the University or the students as a whole. GUEST COMMENTARY Submissions are accepted from any member of the UH community and must be signed with the author’s name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Commentary should be kept to less than 500 words. Guest commentaries should not be written as replies to material already printed in the Cougar, but rather should present independent points of view. Rebuttals should be sent as letters. Deliver submissions to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. All submissions are subject to editing.

Not all cops deserve a bad rap, but these do

O

ne of the all-too-familiar parts of maturing from a sheltered life under the roof of your parents and going into the real world is dealing with the police. For the average person, such experiences never go further than the frustrating yet benign traffic stop and ticket. At worst, one may be hit with a misdemeanor involving illicit David substances. Haydon In this instance, it’s not so much the police who are to blame, but the law. But even if most people realized this, the sentiment would do little to stop cops from becoming the scapegoat of resentment. There’s nothing like being able to point a finger. However, when a situation occurs where police are actually liable, it ceases to be scapegoating. For example, take the recent convictions of two police officers in New Orleans. On April 13, officers Melvin Williams and Matthew Dean Moore were found guilty of obstructing justice by writing and submitting a false and inaccurate incident report. In 2005, Officer Williams beat civilian

Raymond Robair, causing fractured ribs and a ruptured spleen, according to witnesses who later testified in court. Afterwards, Officers Williams and Moore placed Robair, who was unconscious, into their police car and drove him to Charity Hospital, telling the hospital (and later investigators) that Robair was suffering from a drug overdose. The hospital treated Robair as such and was unaware of the blunt force trauma. Hours later, Robair was pronounced dead. Moore also garnered a second conviction: making false statements to FBI agents, a felony. Both officers will be sentenced in July, with Williams facing a life sentence and Moore facing 25 years or more. in all likelihood, the entire incident will become a reference and statistic for police brutality and corruption for years to come. The problem with this is that no one cares when the police don’t beat people unconscious. The media doesn’t get ratings for the cop who patrols late at night, and political activists don’t talk about the officers who have to act as marriage counselors every time there’s a domestic disturbance. Yes, these two officers were the textbook case of corrupt cops abusing their civil

responsibilities. In addition, the Justice Department announced in March that their federal investigation into the New Orleans Police Department revealed the organization had engaged in other violations of the Constitution and federal law, including racial and sexual profiling, skewed recruiting, poor training and supervision, the use excessive force, unconstitutional stops and illegal searches. Sufficed to say, New Orleans is not where you want to be stopped for a traffic violation. But that’s the good news. NOPD, corrupt as it is, doesn’t extend outside of New Orleans. It cannot be overstated that this situation is a travesty. But it’s important to remember that in reality, it’s not as though every police officer in the nation is a corrupt badge or beating people left and right. A badge and gun can be intimidating, and there’s always the question of how an officer uses or abuses authority. The ultimate irony of bureaucracy is that no one notices when you do your job until you do it wrong.

The board’s vague reference to the “Civil War anniversary” shows that it took no time to research prior to scribbling its nonsense. Word limits don’t allow for a full dissection of the historical inaccuracies, but a simple Google search of the words, “Reconstruction” and “Civil War Amendments” might educate the board on the Civil War’s aftermath. In addition, the Democratic Congress of 2006-2010 passed major progressive legislation while, in the latter two years, controlling the entirety of Congress and the Executive Branch. In fact, one could argue that the current budget fight is a direct result of

Democratic action in the prior legislative sessions! The Daily Cougar owes more to the student body, the history and political science departments and the university as a whole than what it offered today. I urge it to strive for higher journalistic integrity in the future.

David Haydon is a political science junior and may be reached at opinion@thedailycougar. com.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR In response to the staff editorial published last Monday titled ‘Civil War Anniversary a Historical Repeat’

T

he Daily Cougar Editorial Board’s April 13th, 2011 piece, “Civil War Anniversary a Historical Repeat,” is not only drastically below the journalistic standards of a tier one university’s newspaper, but is also dishonest, poorly written and historically inaccurate. For the editorial board to compare the current budget battle to the devastating civil war our country experienced is irresponsible and utterly offensive. First, Tuesday marked the 150 year anniversary of the Battle of Fort Sumter.

David P. Sawyer University of Houston Law Center ‘12 Please leave us your opinion in either the form of a guest commentary or letter to the editor at letters@thedailycougar.com.


Monday, April 18, 2011

The Daily Cougar

sports

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EDITORS John Brannen, Joshua Siegel E-MAIL sports@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/sports

overtime

JACK WEHMAN/THE DAILY COUGAR

SOFTBALL

Tulsa tops Cougars in series finale Tulsa pitcher Aimee Creger single-handedly took down UH in 11 innings as the Cougars suffered a 1-0 loss to the Golden Hurricane on Sunday at Cougar Softball Stadium. Creger threw 155 pitches and went all 11 innings, then drove in Samantha Cobb for the winning run off of Diedre Outon. Amanda Crabtree threw eight shutout innings for the Cougars, striking out 11 before being lifted for Outon. The Cougars (31-14, 13-5 Conference USA) committed three errors, one of which helped aid the Golden Hurricane’s decisive rally in the 11th. UH swept Saturday’s twin bill. Crabtree outdueled Creger in the first game, striking out 13 in seven shutout innings of work. That game also remained scoreless late until the bottom of the sixth inning, when Melissa Gregson gave the Cougars a decisive 2-0 advantage with a home run to left field off of Creger. The Cougars’ offense erupted during their 9-1 run-rule victory to close the doubleheader. It was UH’s fifth run-rule win in their last seven outings. Gregson and Holly Anderson each had multi-RBI games for the Cougars and Brooke Lathan hit her 11th home run of the season in the rout. Outon improved to 3-0 in just her third start of the season, throwing five innings, allowing one earned and striking out seven. The Cougars will next face Texas A&M at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Cougar Softball Stadium. — Cougar Sports Services

TENNIS

UH handles Louisville in regularseason finale UH continued its streak of success, closing out Louisville 6-1 in its final regular-season match. It was the Cougars’ ninth win in their last 10 matches, and they are 16-7 for the season. The Cougars took the opening doubles point with two unfamiliar doubles pairings. Celia Fraser and Maja Kazimieruk — playing together for the first time this season — blew past Gabrielle Duncan and Sarah Miller for an 8-3 victory. Giorgia Pozzan and Joanna Kacprzyk would clinch the opening point for UH with an 8-4 victory. It was just the second time they were matched together. Kazimieruk and Pozzan each earned their 16th individual victories of the season. Kazimieruk won in straight sets, while Pozzan earned a 6-4, 6-1 win. With the victory, UH finishes the regular season with a mark of 16 wins and seven losses. The bracket for the Conference USA Championship with be released Tuesday and play begins Thursday in Orlando, Fla. “We’re going to enjoy this win for a little while,” head coach John Severance said in a release. “The bracket for the conference tournament will come out on Tuesday, and we’ll shift our focus to our opponent at that point.” — Cougar Sports Services

Catcher John Cannon and the Cougars were able to escape Charleston, W. Va., with a 10-7 win Sunday to remain tied atop the Conference USA standings. The Cougars will host the East Carolina Pirates to continue C-USA play on Thursday at Cougar Field. | Aaron Cisneros/The Daily Cougar

BASEBALL

Late charge tops Marshall Bats explode for 10 runs, UH takes two out of three from Thundering Herd Gilbert Requena

THE DAILY COUGAR The Cougars won two of three games with a 10-7 win against Marshall on Sunday at Appalachian Power Park in Charleston, W. Va. After losing an early lead in the fourth inning, the Cougars’ bats gradually came alive to take the series-deciding win. “They never panicked when we got down,” head coach Todd Whitting said. “I told the team after the game that I thought that this was the best weekend we have had this year as far as our level of intensity from start to finish.” UH (19-19, 6-3 C-USA) tacked on a run in the fifth to make it a 4-3 game when Chase Jensen hit a single to shortstop, scoring Ryan Still. In the top of the

sixth, Matt Creel doubled in catcher John Cannon to tie the game. Creel made it home when Joel Ansley hit a double to right field as the Cougars took the lead back 5-4. In the seventh, with Caleb Ramsey on second and Jensen on first, M.P. Cokinos drilled a double to right center to bring in Ramsey. Cannon hit a sacrifice bunt on the next at-bat to bring in Jensen and make it 7-4. Marshall (14-20, 2-7 C-USA) kept persisting and closed the lead to 7-6 in the bottom of the seventh, after scoring on a throwing error and RBI single. Flurry of pitchers bailed out The Cougars’ offense came to the aid of an inconsistent pitching staff Sunday. UH used a combination of seven pitchers over the course of the game. “We just couldn’t throw strikes,” Whitting said. “I was rampant throughout our whole pitching staff.”

Houston 10, Marshall 7 SCORE BY INNING RHE Houston 0 2 0 0 1 2 2 3 0 – 10 11 2 Marshall 002 200 201–792 TOP HITTERS MARSHALL (14-20) PLAYER AB R H

RBI BB SO PO A

LOB

Ramos Stafford

1 1

0 0

4 3

1 2

2 3

HOUSTON (19-19) PLAYER AB R H

Appling Jensen

0 2

0 3

3 0

0 0

RBI BB SO PO A

LOB

1 2

2 3

0 3

0 0

WINNING IP H Dempsay 1.1 0

R

ER BB SO AB BF HBP

1

0

LOSING IP H Fernandez 0.0 0

R

ER BB SO AB BF HBP

2

2

5 5

0 0

2 2

4 3

3 2

PITCHERS

1

1

0

0

4

1

5

2

0

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Stadium: Appalachian Power Park Announced attendance: 307 Time: 3:19 Start: 11:01 a.m.

BASEBALL continues on page 8

PLAYER PROFILE

Lathan making big name for herself Edgar Veliz

THE DAILY COUGAR When opposing pitching staffs look at the Cougars’ lineup, sophomore shortstop Brooke Lathan is a name worth circling. Lathan is second on the team in hits, home runs and RBIs. She was last week’s Conference USA Player of the Week after hitting .700 with three home runs and 10 RBIs in four games. She said she is focusing on developing a balance between hitting and defense LATHAN continues on page 8

Sophomore shortstop Brooke Lathan has started all 45 games so far this season and is a team leader in several offensive categories. | File Photo/The Daily Cougar


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Monday, April 18, 2011

LIFE&ARTS

The Daily Cougar

THEATRE

Behind the curtain: Stage manager does it all Ellen Goodacre

THE DAILY COUGAR Stage Management freshman Ciara Ayala is the head stage manager of “Now This� in its world premiere at UH. Though she may be young, she’s had great success in running a major production with complex technical aspects. “I was so excited when I got the news (that I would be head stage manager),� Ayala said. “Then we got into it and we realized how queue-heavy it was going to be. “Then I was just like, I’ve done technical heavy shows before, but I’ve never really done the technical side because it was in high school and it was much much different. So I was really worried about being able to call those queues.� However, Ayala had no problem queuing tech or dealing with any of the other responsibilities of being stage manager. Aside from queuing lights, sound and projection technology, Ayala is also responsible for facilitating rehearsals, acting as a liaison between director and design departments and making sure that all aspects of the show go smoothly and stand up under the scrutiny of the director’s vision. It’s a big job, Ayala explained. “There’s no way I could communicate to you how many

things that I do,� Ayala said. “And for people who don’t know what a stage manager does or is, it’s really, really difficult to explain to them, especially if you’re not in the theatre world. “And even then, a lot of people who are in the theatre world still don’t know half of the things a stage manager does.� Despite the difficulty of her position, Ayala has enjoyed working with the cast and crew of the play. “Every cast is like a new family or every show is like a new family, and this cast was great,� she said. “I loved every single one of them. They were all really fun to work with and it was across the board — there were freshman and grad students, and it was just really, really fun.� But with several more showings of “Now This� remaining, Ayala’s work is not over yet. “Now This� will be showing on April 19, 20, 21, 22 and 23 at 8 p.m. and on April 23 and 24 at 2 p.m. Ayala hopes that audiences will enjoy the play and is excited to see how they will receive it. “I love the show,� Ayala said. “I read the script and I fell in love and now I’m just excited to see how everyone likes it with all of the projections and the lights and all of that.� arts@thedailycougar.com

Point. Click. Promote your event. Use the Campus Calendar at thedailycougar.com

Sashimi is a Japanese delicacy that consists of slices of raw fish served with dipping sauces. Strong-swimming fish like tuna are best served this way because there is very little fat content in the fish. | Photos.com

RESTAURANTS

Sushi done right at Japanese eatery Jorge Porras

THE DAILY COUGAR In this day and age, sushi is a food that has been reinvented, Americanized, Spanish-infused and over-done a million times and counting — so it goes without saying that it is difficult for a restaurant centered around sushi to thrive and surpass all others. Located in the Fountains shopping center in Stafford, Tao has been serving up some of the freshest lowcost sushi in the area combined with excellent service. For the sushi-holics, what makes the biggest impression is the low price and high quality of the seafood — something I always keep an eye out for. I chose this place because it only serves sushi, asI have never been a big fan of Hibachi-style dining. A chef flipping knives and lighting fires can only stay entertaining for so long, and I have yet to have

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sea urchin roe roll, consisting of poached sea urchin egg sacks over rice. For those with pallets that aren’t too adventurous, this is not the most friendly dish. Sea urchin roe has a light brown color, with a very light briny flavor and very soft texture, almost like a runny egg. This might not be my favorite roll of all time, but it’s certainly not the worst. To end any sushi massacre, there is only one dessert I can think of: a large scoop of deep fried green tea ice cream. I know it may seem childish, and for those trying to keep a diet it could mean breaking the bank, but I like it — nothing beats fried ice cream. Tao is definitely a place to visit often. Though it may not an everyday lunch spot, it’s perfect for a night out with a special someone when you want a reasonable price.

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food prepared at a hibachi where it doesn’t taste like takeout. For me, it’s an overpriced distraction at best. Tao prepares a mean Monk Fish liver, a dish that is considered to be the foie gras of the sea. I had never had it before and most places that serve it require a reservation, and are only found on the west coast. The liver’s high fat content gives the organ a soft cheese texture with a slight taste of the ocean. With a touch of light soy sauce, each bite is simply sublime. To follow the liver, I had a sashimi of white tuna. At first glance it looks like slivers of coconut flesh, but after the first bite there is no doubt that this is high quality fish. With strong-swimming fish like tuna, the less you cook it the more tender it will be because it has very little of the fat that would normally add moisture. Because of this, serving this type of fish raw is the best way to enjoy it. The last menu item was the

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COMICS & MORE

comics

Monday, April 18, 2011

ACROSS 1 Cellar, briefly 5 Deface 8 Galileo’s home 12 Out in front 14 Moolah 15 Cousteau’s middle name 16 Mantle teammate 17 “La — Bonita” (Madonna tune) 18 Ice palace 19 Presses onward 21 Boss, slangily 23 LII twice 24 Make — — double 25 Fix a seam 26 Pitched 30 Value greatly 32 Eggs on 33 Tremulous 37 Kinks’ tune 38 Montana city 39 Hit dead-center 40 Fatty deposits 42 Rural sight 43 Discharges 44 Diminish 45 Hindu honorific 48 Gal. parts 49 “Bien” opposite 50 Sweet singer 52 Comfy chair 57 Very funny person 58 Not odd 60 Wash out 61 Magnani of film 62 Flower garlands 63 Cilento or Keaton 64 Lavish 65 Urge 66 Food fish

Must Be Something in the Water by Brandon Alexander

sudoku How to play

Each row must contain the numbers 1 to 9; each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9; and each set of 3-by-3 boxes must also contain the numbers 1 to 9.

Previous puzzle solved

1

2

3

4

12

5 13

16 19

6

7

15

17

18

20

26

27

28

8

14

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23 29

38

47

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60 63 66 ©

8 Ceremonial fire 9 Leafy vines 10 Feel instinctively 11 Out of kilter 13 Waltz and tango 14 Ukraine city 20 Scotland Yard div. 22 Thin fog 24 Outraged 26 Chalky mineral 27 Orchestra member 28 Convince 29 Hackneyed 30 Tries for the hole 31 Marine birds 33 Gives notice 34 McKellen and Holm 35 Warm-hearted 36 Secluded valley 38 Cheerfully 41 Game officials

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DOWN 1 Ali who said “Open sesame!” 2 Outbuilding 3 Griffin of game shows 4 Rhett’s hangout 5 Physics calculation 6 Everybody 7 Not inert

42 44 45 46 47 49 51 52 53 54 55 56 59

Chopped down Shellac resin Watchband Jungle charger Soldering tools For the guys Bryce Canyon state Rider’s gear Lens opening Flood survivor — St. Vincent Millay Plant in a swamp Neckline type

2010 UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE INC.

Previous puzzle solved L A P P S

U B O A T

G MU L T E AMOU S T H A S T S H A U OU T E R SME A R B B B A L B E A L E C S I L S A L ON D I S H AMU S C P L OW P A R A L L E L AWA R E L O NO T E D S C G L A D HO

I R T E E N D R E A R P O E R L Y V E S E L L S P A S NGH E N E C U S

R E M A P P E D

S N I P

V O L E

P R E S

L E A F

A S T A

R E A R

O T T E R T A R E OR N S T E E S S T

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YOUR

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AprilMar 18 7-Mar - 24 13 3

PHOTO

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7

crossword

LIMBO by Paolo Aninag

YEARBOOK

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Monday, April 18, 2011

SPORTS

BASEBALL continued from page 5

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Offense prevails again in eighth UH finally established a comfortable distance between Marshall in the eighth when Ansley made it to first on a fielding error. Landon Appling then singled, bringing Jensen to bat with two runners on first and second. Jensen delivered with a triple to deep center field to score Ansley and Appling, giving the Cougars a 10-6 lead. The Herd would score again in the ninth when Gray Stafford made it home from an unearned run to make the final score 10-7. UH opens in dominant fashion With the threat of inclement weather Saturday, the Cougars played a doubleheader Friday. In the first game of the twin bill, the Cougars used an aggressive attack to cruise to a 12-1 victory. Starting pitcher Matt Creel had a strong outing going 6 2/3 innings, allowing one unearned run on three hits and striking out two batters. Cokinos and Landon Appling led the offensive charge for the Cougars who had 15 hits. Cokinos recorded four hits in six at-bats, four RBIs and one run. Appling had three hits in five at-bats, five RBI and scored two runs. After jumping out to a 1-0 lead after the first inning, Cokinos hit a two-run homer to left field to push the UH cushion to 3-0. The Cougars continued to

The Daily Cougar

dominate, scoring a run in the fourth and fifth innings and two in the seventh to take a 7-0 lead. The Herd were able to get on the board in the bottom of the seventh inning by scoring an unearned run — but it would be their only run. UH padded its lead even more by scoring four runs in the eighth and one run in the ninth to push the lead to the final score of 12-1.

LATHAN continued from page 5

Crowded at the top UH remains in a four-way tie for first place in Conference USA with Memphis, Rice and Southern Miss. The Cougars have an extended break this week, beginning a three-game series against C-USA foe East Carolina (24-12, 6-6) at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Cougar Field.

and avoiding streaky play. “I’d like to be more consistent of a hitter and a player instead of having ups and downs,” Lathan said. “Last year I focused more on defense because hitting just came to me. This year I’m focusing more on hitting, and I’ve struggled on defense because of it.” Lathan had a career high of six RBIs — one shy of the school record — against UTEP in the 15-0 win on April 10. Against Baylor, Lathan struggled and went 0-for7, striking out once and stranding three runners on base. Her coaches say performances like that can be treated as a learning experience. “Every player has those moments of doubt and they need to know that we believe in them by keep putting them out there,” head coach Kyla Holas said. “We wouldn’t put them on the field if we didn’t think they could do the job.” After receiving extensive playing time as a freshman, Lathan is a tested performer. As the season inches closer to the C-USA tournament, Lathan said she hopes her skills as a batter will come in handy in postseason play. “This year I feel that as a hitter I’m more of an asset to the team,” Lathan said. “I’ll try to focus on it more and reach a balance so that we can make a run in conference.”

sports@thedailycougar.com

sports@thedailycougar.com

Weekend not absent of letdowns In the second matchup, the Cougars lost in a 4-3 heartbreaker. In the top of the ninth, Creel gave UH a 3-2 lead when he drove in Cannon with a single. But the Herd capitalized on the bullpen’s mistakes. With two outs and the bases loaded, Marshall shortstop Kenny Socorro hit a line-drive single to center field, driving in two runs and winning it for the Thundering Herd. “The back end of our bullpen was not as successful as we wanted them to be,” Whitting said. “Marshall played hard and took advantage of the opportunities they had.”


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