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C-USA lead at stake against Marshall

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THE DAILY COUGAR thedailycougar.com

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Hamburger businesses continue sales on the north patio today The 2011 BurgerFest began Wednesday and continues from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. today in the north patio near the University Center. All students are welcome to enjoy the different kinds of burgers that will be sold by students in the Wolff Center for Entrepreneurship program, part of the C.T. Bauer College of Business. BurgerFest not only shows the student’s ability to make good burgers, but to apply the lessons learned in the classroom. “In the program they teach us how to establish our business, and to do this they want to put us to the test to actually run the business,” said Margarita Flores, chief financial officer for the Burger Queen team. Bauer students work as teams to decide things like what’s going to be on the burgers and what price to charge. Groups must organize themselves to have profitable sales. All of the proceeds from the event will go towards graduation or future World Center programs. — Miguel Cortina/The Daily Cougar

Panel to speak on current wave of revolt in Middle East The UH Muslim Students Association and the Clear Lake Islamic Center present “Revolution: What change in the Middle East means for the region and the world” from 4 to 7 p.m. today in the Houston Room of the University Center. Keynote speakers include Michael McMullen, UH-Clear Lake professor of “Egypt in Transition,” and Mohamed Shalaby, an expert on social and Islamic movements in the Middle East. Both speakers live in Houston but come from the Middle East, and can talk on the subject from both an American and Arab perspective.

CORRECTIONS Report errors to editor@thedailycougar.com. Corrections will appear in this space as needed.

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April 14, 2011 Read. Recycle. Repeat daily.

First step taken to raise tuition Khator says she has no plans to ask board for full amount; cost-saving measures noted Nick Ragan

THE DAILY COUGAR The UH System Board of Regents passed a proposal at a special meeting held Tuesday that will set the range tuition may be raised for Fall 2011, with the maximum at seven percent for undergraduate students and nine percent for graduate students. Once the Texas Legislature determines

how much state funding UH will receive, administrators will determine if a tuition increase is necessary. If administrators decide to raise tuition, they will need the Regent’s approval. “I have no intentions of coming to you and asking for seven percent,” UH President and System Chancellor Renu Khator told the board. Khator said she wants to minimize any rise in tuition because students can’t afford it, and a tuition hike wouldn’t make enough of a difference in the budget shortfall. The draft budget that passed through the Texas House earlier this month would cause the UH system to lose $975 in state

funding per student annually. Khator said if tuition were raised by the maximum seven percent, it would mean an increase of $440 per student annually, not enough to cover even half the discrepancy. Vice President for Governmental Relations Grover Campbell was in Austin Tuesday working with the Texas Senate to help revise the draft budget that would cause the UH system to lose millions in state funding over the next two years. Khator will also be in Austin this week in a bid to convince legislators that state funding is critical to the continued success BOARD continues on page 3

SEMINAR

Assault talk gives consent meaning Director states burden to verify falls on men Louis Casiano

THE DAILY COUGAR

For more information, visit http://uhmsa.com/.

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EVENTS BurgerFest 2011 TheWolff Center for Enrepreneuship is sponsoring the event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the University Center North Patio. The event features multiple burger stands run by the WCE graduating class that are in competition with one another to produce the most revenue. Pete Yorn, Ben Kweller The talented musician Pete Yorn is headlining at the House of Blues tonight. Doors open at 7 p.m., and tickets start at $22.

FOR MORE EVENTS, CHECK OUT thedailycougar.com/calendar

To observe sexual assault awareness month, the Women’s Resource Center on Wednesday presented “A Question of Consent,” a lecture on sexual consent and its impact on society. The lecture was sponsored by UH’s Veteran’s Service Office and featured WRC director Beverly McPhail. The presentation focused on the definition of sexual consent, the different types of consent and the role alcohol plays in sexual consent. McPhail’s lecture is mostly geared toward men who may not be aware of the consequences of their actions, but also spoke to women as well. “I’m concerned about men,” McPhail said. “I don’t want men to get themselves into a situation where they can become registered sex offenders, where they’re doing things they don’t realize are intrusive or non-consensual.” The issue of sexual assault on college campuses has emerged as a problem for universities, ASSAULT continues on page 10

Debating their way to the top

U

H’s Forensic Society is on its way to Illinois State University in Bloomington, Ill., today to take part in the national competition of the National Forensics Association. The team has already won a record 10 championships at other conferences this year and hopes to add a few more this weekend. | Jack Wehman/The Daily Cougar

STUDENTS

Unspoken solidarity Students, groups to show support for LGBT persons through wordless protest Daniel Renfrow

THE DAILY COUGAR Silence will come to the University on Friday as students participate in the National Day of Silence.

The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, an organization that promotes equality in public schools, has sponsored the NDS since 2001 to remember students who have been bullied because of their orientation, gender identity or gender expression. “The Day of Silence is a day to protest the bullying and harassment of students in the classroom,” junior education major SILENCE continues on page 12


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ONLINE / NEWS 101

Thursday, April 14, 2011

The Daily Cougar

University Speech, Language and Hearing Clinic: A United Way Facility

Cougar Communication Groups Summer 2011

June 6 to July 15 If your child has difficulty with…

Affordable tuition rates determined by a sliding scale based on household income.

Being understood Expressing thoughts Positive social interactions

Contact the clinic for enrollment information or further information by email (uslhc@uh.edu) or call 713-743-0915.

Engaging in conversation Reading

… join us on a colorful adventure!

“Over the Rainbow” theme Cougar Communication Groups offer speech and language therapy for preschool and elementary children. Our progressive program focuses on providing evidence-based and innovative therapy while acting as a training program for graduate clinicians in Speech-Language Pathology. Our program features:

University Speech, Language and Hearing Clinic Mailing Address: 100 Clinical Research Center Houston, TX 77204 Physical Address: 4505 Cullen Blvd. Houston, TX 77004 Phone: 713-743-0915 Fax: 713-743-2926 E-mail: uslhc@uh.edu

news 101

TOP READS

WASHINGTON

1. Texas: the fastest state in the US 2. Get your hands off my packed lunch! 3. Respect the right to free press, ideas 4. Middle East news isn’t fairly covered 5. Bioware: Job well done in latest Dragon Age installment 6. Syrian people protest for democracy

Obama plans to cut spending by $4 trillion

Graduate Student Clinicians Supervision p by Certified Speech-Language Pathologists Frequent Communication & Feedback Parent Observation Small Ratios of 2:1 (clients to clinician) Groups focusing on goals for each client’s needs Home Programs to carry over therapy progress Our speech and language groups build specific speech and language skills in an interactive environment with children who have similar goals.

Groups meet two times weekly for two hours each session. Mondays & Wednesdays 10 am-12 noon or 1-3 pm or Tuesdays & Thursdays 10 am-12 noon or 1-3 pm

Equitable Treatment Services at the USLHC are available to all people, regardless of race, creed, gender or national origin.

President Barack Obama outlined a plan Wednesday to cut deficits by $4 trillion.

FEATURED COMMENTS

Obama’s plan looks to cut $4 trillion in federal deficits over the course of 12 years. The plan does not impact Medicare or Medicaid.

Re: Civil War anniversary shows a historical repeat

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“$38 billion is peanuts compared to our debt and deficit, which is over $1.5 trillion. We need real cuts now. Not cuts that are mired in political BS but serious cuts.”

— user “InvaderZim” Re: Rising gas prices punish students “$38 billion is peanuts compared to our debt and deficit, which is over $1.5 trillion. We need real cuts now. Not cuts that are mired in political BS but serious cuts.”

— user “Finn” Re: Texas politicians take aim at wrong issues “Is this law worth the highly unlikely situation that a student will go on a rampage? It’s much more likely that students won’t be able to afford tuition, yet lawmakers are much more concerned about something that probably won’t occur.”

— user “Rosa” Re: Get your hands off my packed lunch! “I guarantee you that 9 times out of 10, my mom’s lunches would have been healthier, and the other time they would have been just as healthy and certainly not less.”

— user “Matthew House, J.D.”

Tragic ending for mother, 3 children A mother and three of her children drowned Wednesday morning after she drove into the Hudson River, police officials said. The fourth child, a 10-year-old boy, was able to escape through a window, swim ashore and run to a fire station. The police identified the mother as 25-year-old Lashanda Armstrong. Police said that were called to Armstrong’s residence after receiving a call of a domestic disturbance the day before the tragedy. The father of the three children who died has been identified as Jean Pierre, but the father of the 10-yearold boy has not been identified.

SOUTHWEST HOUSTON

11-year-old slain; suspect arrested An 11-year-old boy was killed in southwest Houston early Wednesday. Prosecutors have charged Gboweh Dickson George with first-degree murder. The shooting also wounded the cousin of the slain boy. Compiled by Christopher Losee

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ABOUT THE COUGAR The Daily Cougar is published Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and Tuesday and Thursday during the summer, at the University of Houston Printing Plant and online at http://www. thedailycougar.com. The University seeks to provide equal educational opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability or veteran status, or sexual orientation. The Daily Cougar is supported in part by Student Service Fees. The first copy of the Cougar is free; each additional copy is 25 cents. SUBSCRIPTIONS Rates are $70 per year or $40 per semester. Mail subscription requests to: Mail Subscriptions, The Daily Cougar, University of Houston, Houston, TX, 77204-4015. NEWS TIPS Direct news tips and story ideas to the News Desk. Call (713) 743-5314, e-mail news@thedailycougar. com or fax (713) 743-5384. A “Submit news item” form is also available online at thedailycougar.com. COPYRIGHT No part of the newspaper in print or online may be reproduced without the written consent of the director of the Student Publications Department.

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NEWS

The Daily Cougar

Thursday, April 14, 2011

WORKSHOP

Students offered tips on proper communication Taylor McGilvray

THE DAILY COUGAR “Language is so useful; language is so inspiring; language (can be) the bane of your existence,” said Deborah Bridges, course coordinator and instructional assistant professor in the School of Communication, during a communications workshop on Tuesday. Bridges used various communication techniques in order to connect with her audience and teach by example. The workshop began with a clip from “The Apprentice,” where one of the contestants caused his team to lose a challenge by poorly emceeing a runway event. The clip was used to show how important public speaking skills are to potential employers. “Communication is important in the workplace, and it’s important to the people who write checks,” Bridges said. “They want the best foot forward. Every word that comes out of that person’s mouth is representing that company.” Bridges went on to discuss how to build a good speech and the importance of the speaker’s

BOARD continued from page 1

of the University. “ Things are in flux,” V ice President for Administration and Finance Carl Carlucci said. “At this point, we don’t know where the budget is going to stand.” Khator said the UH system h a s a l re a d y s a v e d $ 2 1 m i l lion by improving operational efficiencies. The administration is aiming to enhance revenue, consolidate certain units and increase productivity in an attempt to reduce the system’s dependence on state funding as much as possible. Administration also is looking

connection to the audience and perspective. “It’s both (the speaker and the audience’s) job to move out from (their) own perspective around to the other side to look at what the other person is saying,” Bridges said. “That’s how we can cross cultural boundaries; that’s how we can understand each other better.” Bridges also discussed the importance of preparation with the use of a personal anecdote and showed how someone could go about researching a topic by creating example topics and encouraging audience participation for the brainstorming. Bridges concluded the workshop with a video of a speech she felt was a perfect example of how a speaker can connect with an audience, and gave a personal reassurance to attendees who were skeptical of their own speaking skills. “I do this because this is something I couldn’t do,” Bridges said. “When I was in junior high, high school, college, and I had to get up to give a speech, I died one thousand deaths.” news@thedailycougar.com

into what Khator called “workforce reshaping.” The UH system has eliminated 136 staff positions over the last three years, and will determine if more reductions are necessary after the Legislature acts on a budget. Khator said the administration is focused on maintaining the academic integrity of its programs to keep student trust. Khator also said following the Board’s plan is essential to the continued success of the University. Khator said there are currently more than 20,000 applications for 3,300 freshman spots. Applications to the Honors College also are up eight times the rate from previous years. news@thedailycougar.com

/ VAGINA

student feminist organization presents the

MONOLOGUES Friday, April 15 – 7pm m m Saturday, April 16 – 7pm Sunday, April 17 – 5pm m enter Pacific Room – University Center

Rice University School of Architecture is pleased to announce a new summer program: LAUNCH LAUNCH invites applications from undergraduate students in any institution and discipline who are curious about architectural design, building a portfolio for future professional or academic work, or who simply want to engage the city around them.

Tickets: $7.00 at door $5.00 in advance Advance purchase in Women’s Resource Center, 1-4pm 279A University Center

APPLICATION DEADLINE:

Friday, May 6, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS:

Go to arch.rice.edu. Navigate to Academic Programs and click on the LAUNCH tab.

June 6 - July 1, 2011 | arch.rice.edu

For more information: email: sfoatuh@gmail.com visit: www.vday.org All proceeds benefit Houston Rescue & Restore. www.houstonrr.org

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Thursay, March 14, 2011

The Daily Cougar

opinion THE DAILY COUGAR

EDITOR Andrew Taylor E-MAIL opinion@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/opinion

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LEAVE YOUR OPINION @ THE DAILYCOUGAR.COM

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR IN CHIEF MANAGING EDITORS NEWS EDITORS SPORTS EDITORS LIFE

& ARTS EDITOR

OPINION EDITOR

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Jack Wehman Newton Liu, Christopher Losee Jose Aguilar, Cristi Guerra John Brannen, Joshua Siegel Mary Baak Andrew Taylor

Have airport safety measures gone too far in protecting us?

STAFF EDITORIAL

Shuttle won’t call home to Houston much longer

O

n Tuesday, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced the destinations of the three retiring space shuttles, and Houston wasn’t picked to be home to any of them. Houston has been an integral part of NASA and the decision does seem to be a low blow to the Space City. Since 1961, Houston has been home to Johnson Space Center which was originally named the Manned Spacecraft Center. It was renamed the Johnson Space Center in 1973 in honor of President Lyndon B. Johnson. The importance of the JSC in relation to all of what NASA has accomplished is nothing sort of amazing. For more than five decades the JSC has been the center for mission control, as well as the training center for all American astronauts. Many of the most famous astronauts and NASA employees still call Houston home. For them, this decision will likely feel like a severe slight. The orbiter fleet of Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavor will end up in Washington D.C., Cape Canaveral, Fla. and Los Angeles. The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space museum in D.C. will receive the space shuttle Discovery. Endeavor will be displayed at the California Science Center and Atlantis will be displayed at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, home of the shuttle launches. As Discovery moves into the Smithsonian, the Enterprise, a glider that never flew in space and is currently on display, will be sent to New York City’s Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. The decisions on where the shuttles end up have upset some lawmakers so much that they are requesting reviews of the decision making process from the Government Accountability Office. Whether it was due to political favors or something else, Houston should have definitely been home to one of the orbiters. The JSC would have made a perfect resting place for part of our nation’s space history.

E D I TO R I A L P O L I C I E S STAFF EDITORIAL The Staff Editorial reflects the opinions of The Daily Cougar Editorial Board (the members of which are listed above the editorial). All other opinions, commentaries and cartoons reflect only the opinion of the author. Opinions expressed in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Houston or the students as a whole. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Daily Cougar welcomes letters to the editor from any member of the UH community. Letters should be no more than 250 words and signed, including the author’s full name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Anonymous letters will not be published. Deliver letters to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; send them via campus mail to STP 4015; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. Letters are subject to editing. ADVERTISEMENTS Advertisements published in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the University or the students as a whole. GUEST COMMENTARY Submissions are accepted from any member of the UH community and must be signed with the author’s name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Commentary should be kept to less than 500 words. Guest commentaries should not be written as replies to material already printed in the Cougar, but rather should present independent points of view. Rebuttals should be sent as letters. Deliver submissions to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. All submissions are subject to editing.

Pat the 6-year-old down and any other little kids who walk through airport security checkpoints. A possible solution would be to create a separate screening lane for children and parents. However, TSA’s screening process should not be a traumatizing event for a 6-year-old. Chris Losee Layout editor

FELIPE CAMPOS THE DAILY COUGAR

Even though so many Americans are enraged with the TSA and their current security measures, I can understand why they perform the patdown searches and screening procedures. It’s unfortunate that they patted down a 6-year-old, a highly unlikely subject, but they can’t simply eliminate one age group from questioning. Mary Baak

Necessary measures sometimes leave us feeling

violated, but we must do it E

with the procedures that are used. In order to reach a level of safety in today’s environment that protects the maximum number of people from the evil of others, we have to give up common freedoms. Andrew TSA should constantly be trying Taylor to implement faster, more effective procedures. Designing a separate line for children may not be a bad idea to consider. According to a Reuters news report, the Any policy that is redesigned must be given parents are outraged that their daughter, Anna a strict, scrutinizing test to ensure that safety Drexel, was subject to the physical security and efficiency are both improved. measure. This incident is a clear reminder that while In a video that can be seen on Youtube, some things may seem extreme or unneces6-year-old Anna seems clearly confused after sary, the freedoms we give up are for the receiving the pat-down procedure. benefit of our own safety. Commenting on the incident and his The days of flying on a plane without being daughter’s confusion, Todd Drexel said, “we asked to take off your shoes in addition to were struggling to explain it to her, because we being frisked may be gone forever. In today’s had really stressed to her that it’s not OK to be world you have to take all reasonable measures touched in certain places, and now she’s been possible in order to prevent disasters from pat down in a public setting.” happening at the hands of the worst among us. The situation seems to be an inevitable product of a one-size-fits-all system. Airport security measures are never going to be Andrew Taylor is an economics senior and may be reached at opinion@thedailycougar.com perfect, and someone will always be unhappy

arlier this month, a 6-year-old girl received a pat-down from a TSA employee while passing through security at the Louis Armstrong International airport.

Life & Arts editor

It was wrong that a 6-yearold girl was patted down at the Louis Armstrong International Airport, but given the social climate of society today, it was necessary. In order to maintain standards of political correctness, TSA officials must frisk everyone regardless of age or race no matter how uncomfortable it is. John Brannen Sports editor

While the TSA may say that it is simply doing its job, the fact that a 6-year-old is subject to a pat-down is unacceptable. Was a thorough wanding not enough? Where are the fullbody scanners? There needs to be some other scanning option for children. At some point security becomes too invasive; this search is a testament to that fact. Jack Wehman Editor in chief


The Daily Cougar

ADVERTISING

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Counseling & Psychological Services

THE NATIONAL RESEARCH CONSORTIUM OF COUNSELING CENTERS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

CALLING ALL COOGS! STRESS? You may have been selected to participate in an online survey about how you respond to

STRESSFUL SITUATIONS. Your participation will contribute to a national effort to understand how university students cope with stressful experiences. It will help COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES (CAPS) understand how to best bolster students’ ability to cope with stressful experiences. Your participation will help CAPS direct efforts toward developing and improving upon services that can contribute to your academic, emotional and interpersonal success. Please look for an email with a link to the survey from April 14-26, and take a few minutes to help your fellow students. Please remember to check your junk mail box too, in case the survey was sent there.

PARTICIPATING WILL MAKE YOU ELIGIBLE TO ENTER A DRAWING TO WIN AN:

Amazon.com gift card! For information about Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), please go to our website: www.caps.uh.edu or contact us directly at 713.743.5454

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Thursday, April 14, 2011

The Daily Cougar

sports

EDITORS John Brannen, Joshua Siegel E-MAIL sports@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/sports

overtime ACADEMICS

UH earns more recognition for classroom production Of the 140 student athletes who received recognition for the Conference USA Commissioner’s Honor Roll, 16 received an even higher honor Wednesday by earning the C-USA Commissioner’s Medals for achieving cumulative GPAs of 3.75 or better. Of the different sports, volleyball had the most on the list with five, including Ashley Applequist, Alex Edwards, Kacy Griffin, Stephanie Nwachukwu and Meredith Ware. Three swimmers who made the cut were Marissa Blumenthal, Reka Kovacs and Leah Sanchez. The honorees for baseball and softball were Matt Creel and Jennifer Klinkert, respectively. Soccer players Samantha Sackos and Fabiana Cirino, along with Roxana Button of the women’s basketball team, made the list. Track and field athletes John Fortune and Megan Frausto, along with Celia Fraser of the tennis team, also earned spots. For Button, achieving high marks in the classroom is a regular occurrence. The senior guard received the C-USA Spirit of Service Award on Tuesday. Along with participating in basketball, Button is active in the community by volunteering at camps, and has a 3.88 GPA. — Cougar Sports Services

Catcher M.P. Cokinos and the Cougars will try to remain in the four-way deadlock for first place in Conference USA with a three-game series against Marshall, the worst team in the conference. UH is 7-11 in tilts played away from Cougar Field. | Aaron Cisneros/The Daily Cougar

SWIMMING AND DIVING

BASEBALL

Truelove awarded for standout season

UH tries to silence Herd

Senior diver Lacey Truelove will not leave the University without another piece of hardware. Conference USA awarded her the C-USA Diver of the Year Wednesday. Truelove won the NCAA Zone D 3-meter diving championships, and placed ninth overall at the NCAA championships, earning her Honorable Mention. That was on the heels of the unexpected death of head swimming coach Mark Taylor. “Considering the conclusion of her season and the passing of Mark, we are very proud of her and very happy for the program,” head diving coach Jane Figueiredo said in a release. “This award means even more this year than it has in the past given everything that this team has gone through. Lacey is very deserving of this award.” It is the 10th straight time that a UH athlete has won the award. — Cougar Sports Services

BASEBALL

UH to host multiple youth camps Players of all ages are invited to play where the Cougars play this summer in any of the six summer baseball camp programs. The different camps will run from June 20 through Aug. 7 and will be open to players ages six through 18. The first camp for players ages 6-14 will focus on skills during the day and a game during the afternoon. It costs $250 for full-day attendants and $200 for half-day participants. A second session featuring the same setup will run from June 27-July 1. For those looking to improve their results in the batter’s box, the Junior Extreme Hitting Camp or the Senior Hitting Evaluation Camps will be available. The junior camp is for players ages six through 12 and the senior camp for 13 to 18-year-old players. Those camps will cost $125 for the two-day session of July 6 and 7. Players who want to completely immerse themselves in the camp can choose the four-day Overnight Camp July 10-14 for ages 6-14. The summer camps will conclude with the High School Evaluation Camp that will aim to give high school players a taste of the rigors of professional testing and drills. That camp will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Aug. 6 and 7 and costs $220. More information about the camps and registration can be found at www.cougarbaseballcamp.com. — Cougar Sports Services

Cougars still in the thick of Conference USA race; preps for last-place Marshall Gilbert Requena

THE DAILY COUGAR UH will rack up some frequent flyer miles this weekend when they take their longest trip of the season to challenge Marshall in Charleston, W. Va. After dropping a mid-week contest against Sam Houston State, the Cougars will get back into conference play this week with a three game series against Marshall. The team has its sights set on remaining on top of Conference USA. “Our expectations are really high,” head coach Todd Whitting said. “Right now we’re 4-2 in C-USA. We’re at the top of the standings and we just have to keep on doing well in league play. If we do well in league play, everything will take care of itself.” Change is good The Cougars’ coaching staff has been tinkering with the lineup and has

inserted players that have not received extensive playing time. In Sunday’s win against UAB, the lineup was altered and the team responded by scoring eight runs and recording nine hits. Whitting said that there still might be more adjustments to be made to the lineup. “We’ll talk about it as a coaching staff the rest of the week,” Whitting said. “With the depth issues that we have, there really are not a whole lot of options. We’ll see how we do in practice.” Despite the lack of recent offensive production, the Cougars (17-18, 4-2 C-USA) have players that rank among the top of the league for their offensive prowess. Chase Jensen is third in C-USA with 49 hits, only two behind the league leader, and is tied for second with 33 RBIs. Leading the conference in RBIs is M.P. Cokinos with 34. Cokinos is also fifth in C-USA with 11 doubles. Cellar dweller Marshall (11-18, 1-5 C-USA) has not fared well in conference play so far this season. The Thundering Herd are led offensively by second baseman Victor

Ramos and power-hitting catcher Rhett Stafford. Ramos leads the team with 35 hits, nine doubles and three triples. Stafford leads the team with 20 RBIs, four home runs and a .478 slugging percentage. This weekend’s games may not be the prettiest games to watch as both teams rank as the bottom two in C-USA for team pitching and team defense. The Cougars lead the conference with 55 errors. UH went 3-1 against Marshall last season. The Cougars hold the all-time series lead against Marshall 15-3. The series begins at 6 p.m. Thursday at Appalachian Power Park. Game two is at 6 p.m. Saturday and the series will end at 10 a.m. Sunday. sports@thedailycougar.com

GAMETIME UH at Marshall When: 6 p.m. Friday Where: Appalachian Power Park, Huntington W. Va Live coverage: www.uhcougars.com

ask the athletes What is the most difficult golf course you have played on?

Probably Bussings Golf Club in Fayetteville, Ark. Jesse Droemer Freshman

West Spring Pines in Trinity, Texas gave me the most trouble when I played there.

I had the toughest time at the Dalhousie Golf Club in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

Clark Mitzner Senior

Curtis Reed Freshman

Bethpage Black in Bethpage, N.Y., was by far the most difficult. The U.S. Open was hosted there in 2002 and 2009. Greg Schmaus Freshman


SPORTS

The Daily Cougar

FIGHTIN’ WORDS

Thursday, April 14, 2011

7

Talking smack and sports

Who do you think is the all-time greatest athlete to compete in a sport at UH? Keith Cordero Jr.: No. 34 takes the cake

Joshua Siegel: Hayes paved the way

John Brannen: Shifting sports

Judge Wehman: Gotta go with the track star

With all due respect to Andre Ware, Clyde Drexler, Case Keenum and Kevin Kolb, Hakeem Olajuwon is easily the greatest athlete the University of Houston has ever had.

Way to go Keith you took the low-hanging fruit, stated the obvious answer that most would have chose, but what about the Big E?

I can’t fault either of you guys for bringing up Hakeem and Elvin Hayes. Olajuwon was a soccer player before he was converted to one of the greatest players ever, and Hayes earned his bragging rights as one of the pioneers of the game. But the answer is clear here — long jumper, sprinter and former world-record holder Carl Lewis.

This wasn’t an easy verdict. Olajuwon, Hayes and Lewis are all greats. There’s no debating that.

Olajuwon was also known as “Akeem the Dream” in his college days and led the Cougars to NCAA Men’s basketball fame with three consecutive Final Four appearances from 1982-1984 (lost in title game in 1983 and 1984) despite not winning the title. Olajuwon’s No. 34 is also retired at Hofheinz Pavillion. The nickname “Phi Slama Jama” was coined during his tenure at UH as the Cougars were a college basketball powerhouse in the 1980’s under the direction of head coach Guy V. Lewis. A great center from Nigeria, Olajuwon became so polished as a center that he won the 1983 NCAA Tournament Player of the Year despite losing in the title game to NC State on the famous final tip-in at the buzzer. Olajuwon then went on to be the top pick in the 1984 NBA Draft two spots ahead of his airness himself, Michael Jordan. Dream eventually led the Rockets to back-to-back NBA Championships in 1994-1995. Hakeem the Dream is currently the best player in Houston sports history — regardless if it is UH red or Rockets red.

TALK BACK

We’re talking about the greatest athlete in the history of UH, are we not? NBA accomplishments are not relevant in this arena and Elvin can go toe-to-toe with Hakeem. First, how are we defining “greatness” in this argument? I would say that it should be a mixture of talent, achievements and impact. Talent-wise, both Hayes and Olajuwon were extremely gifted, but raw and in the early stages of their development. Achievements are a bit of a push as well. Hayes was an All-American twice, Hakeem once. Hakeem’s Phi Slama Jama squads made three Final Fours and lost, Hayes took two teams to the Final Four. Both also have jerseys hanging at the always empty Hofheinz Pavilion. It comes down to each’s impact to decide the “greater” player. The Big E takes this title and it’s not even close. Hayes and Don Chaney were the first African-American players for the Cougars’ program. Hayes’ Cougars took down UCLA and Lew Alcindor at the height of their powers to end their 47-game winning streak in the first nationally-televised college game. Television people didn’t think that people had an interest in watching college hoops before that game — now the public can’t get enough of it. Without Elvin Hayes, there is no Hakeem; there is no Phi Slama Jama.

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He won a total of six NCAA championships in sprint and field events while wearing red and white. That’s a staggering number when considering how few and far between other national championships are here. Don’t get me wrong, every sport is arduous, and track and field has no contact, but Lewis essentially juggled two sports. To compete at that level as a long jumper and sprinter is a hard juggling act to top. Meeting and then interviewing Lewis a little more than a year ago played no part in my selection, honest. If this was to choose who would win a national anthem singing contest, someone else would have earned my vote.

What do you think? Post comments at thedailycougar.com/sports

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Since Josh decreed that we’re judging solely off of accomplishments at UH we can totally ignore his 10 Olympic medals, nine of which were gold. We can also neglect the fact that only swimmer Michael Phelps has matched that effort (and will probably break it in 2012).

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What The Dream did was truly awesome — there’s a reason why he’s one of the best basketball players of all time. Unfortunately for you, Keith, The Dream didn’t bring in a title until he was in the NBA. Josh, good call on the indie pick — I’d expect nothing less from you. Unfortunately it’s a mainstream world, and Hayes is just too removed from true greatness to get the win. Only one player brought home the bacon time and time again — Lewis has 6 NCAA titles on his resume, and the other two have none. There’s only one winner in sports, and there can be only one winner in sports talk as well. Verdict John picked the best athlete, hands down. There’s just no other choice than Carl Lewis when it comes to the greatest UH player of all time. Facetime “It makes no difference, it don’t make any difference to me what a man does for a living, you understand. But your business is a little dangerous.” -Don Corleone


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Thursday, April 14, 2011

The Daily Cougar

life+arts

EDITOR Mary Baak E-MAIL arts@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/arts

HONORS COLLEGE

showtime

Poetry reading showcases UH’s finest University’s own literary magazine to have national premiere Terence Yung

THE DAILY COUGAR

To make your morning commute a breeze while getting as much sleep as you can, make sure you have enough gas to get here in the morning and shower the night before if you need to. It’s also good to organize your book bag before you go to bed to ensure preparedness in the morning. | Photos.com

something to eat during the commute. A couple of weeks ago I forgot to fill up my tank the night before, and I didn’t have the time to stop somewhere on the way to campus. I ended up driving on empty for about half of my commute, scared my car was going to run out of gas fumes and be turned into a pinball on Interstate 59. I made it to campus without this happening, but I’m not going to risk that again. If you are not particularly concerned about looking fresh in the morning, consider showering the night before. Showering the night before will enable you to hit your snooze button a couple more times without having to worry about going to campus without showering. It will likely be hard to tame your hair in the morning, but it would be better to go to class with clean, feral-looking hair instead of looking like you just went swimming in an oil spill. If you are really worried about your hair looking messy, just wear a hat or a jacket with a hood. Organize your backpack the night before. I have found that this is a great way to ensure that I won’t forget anything I need for that day at home. I fell asleep studying one night and

It’s not every day that you get to hear the great writers of tomorrow read their own work. Wednesday afternoon offered this opportunity as creative writers gathered in the Honors College Commons for the launch of the “Glass Mountain” premiere national issue. The launch included a poetry reading that featured UH’s finest creative writers, including Regina Vigil, David Toombs, Roxanne Terrell, Penny Montalvo, Miriah Kizer, Luke Patterson and Sessa Katz. “This is a very, very exciting night for us,” Lynn Voskuil, faculty advisor for “Glass Mountain” said. “Because ‘Glass Mountain,’ only just five years old, has now grown up. It is now a national journal. We are accepting submissions from all over the country.” Wyman Herendeen, chairman of the English department at UH, also offered his praise for the journal. “There is no undergraduate journal that has the professionalism, quality and excellence that ‘Glass Mountain’ brings,” said Herendeen. He added that “the journal distinguishes both the University and its creative writing program.” The journal is entirely studentrun and publishes poetry, fiction and non-fiction as well as artwork, and has no criteria regarding its submissions. The journal is special because it features the works of undergraduate students and uses not only editors, but readers for each category. “We try to have as many viewpoints as possible in the evaluation of literary content,” managing editor James Roberts said. “Our motto is

COMMUTING continues on page 9

POETRY continues on page 9

DANIEL’S DISH WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

SPORTS

Basketball star fined $100,000 for offensive language The NBA slapped Lakers player Kobe Bryant with a $100,000 fine on Wednesday because he mouthed a homophobic slur after receiving a foul on Tuesday night, TMZ reported. David Stern, the NBA Commissioner, decided to fine Bryant because the word term carries a negative connotation that is “inexcusable.” Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation President Jarrett Barrios said that the NBA needed to fine Bryant because homophobic slurs are simply unwarranted. “Slurs like this fuel tolerance,” Barrios told TMZ. “The NBA has a chance to show leadership by taking disciplinary measures and sending a message that words like this have no place in sports.” Bryant, however, insists that he meant no harm when he lashed out on Tuesday night, but he never officially apologized for using the homophobic language. “The words expressed do not reflect my feelings towards the gay and lesbian communities,” Bryant said in a statement. “(They) were not meant to offend anyone.” Bryant is planning to appeal the fine, according to TMZ. — Mary Baak

MUSIC

Coachella security measures amped up While Coachella may have sold out in six days flat, event organizers are increasing security across the board to stop counterfeiters and fence-cutters from sneaking into the festival grounds. At last year’s event, an estimated 15,000 people illegally entered the three-day festival. “We put a new fence in last year, and we saw all the chain-link cut all the way around the grounds,” said Paul Tollett, head of Goldenvoice, the company who puts on the festival, in a story with the Los Angeles Times. “Then we knew this was serious. We found bolt cutters. Not a couple holes. I mean, Swiss cheese. And we were like, ‘We need to fix this.’ We knew it was bad, but we didn’t know how bad.” This year, security increases include wristbands outfitted with microchips to avoid phony duplicates from entering. A mile-long fence has been erected, and police checkpoints are also being enforced. The 2011 show starts Friday and includes performances by headliners Kanye West and Arcade Fire.

Commuting doesn’t have to be a drag Tips on how to make your morning drive a walk in the park Daniel Renfrow

THE DAILY COUGAR Commuting to campus every day is extremely frustrating, especially for people like me who live about an hour away from UH and are not morning people. I can’t help but feel a little crabby when I finally get on campus after sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic for half an hour and then see other students stumble out of their dorm rooms in their pajamas as if they don’t have enough time to throw some clothes on in the morning. I would likely do the same thing if I lived on campus, but I like to think that I am a lot more disciplined. However, I have learned a couple of easy tricks to make sure I am on campus on time, and getting as much sleep as possible. Here are a few ways to save time getting ready in the morning and reduce the likelihood that you will run into traffic during your commute. Fill up your gas the night before. There is nothing more frustrating than sleeping through your alarm and then realizing after you have gotten into your car that it is almost on empty. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, so make sure your car has

THEATRE

Director speaks about world premiere at UH Ellen Goodacre

THE DAILY COUGAR The School of Theatre and Dance is hosting the world premiere of “Now This” written by Scott Kaiser. The show will open on Friday to a full audience, with nine other showings through April 24. Director Sarah Becker and students of the school are the first people to work on the show. She picked up “Now This” after her colleague finished writing it

and was given the opportunity to bring the script to life for the first time. “I first read this play because Scott was a colleague of mine at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival,” Becker said. “He handed me the script and said, ‘I wrote a play, what do you think?’ “About a year later, I didn’t know what play to do with my students at the University of Houston. We were looking for scripts and he said, ‘Why don’t you do the world premiere of my play?’ “I was really flattered that he would give us the rights to do that and let us

take part in its development in that way,” Becker said. The play borrows from Dylan Thomas’ radio play called “Under Milkwood” and is also influenced by Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town.” The play features 62 characters played by an ensemble cast of 19. This is the first time the play will ever be performed for an audience. “The most exciting part for me, which I think is the most exciting part DIRECTOR continues on page 9


LIFE&ARTS

The Daily Cougar

COMMUTING

POETRY

continued from page 8

continued from page 8

then had to get ready for class in a rush. I forgot to put my wallet in my bag and had to buy two meals from a certain taco restaurant with loose change I harvested from the floor of my car. My intestines have informed me that I am no longer allowed to do this. Try to pick out what clothes you will be wearing the night before. This will prevent you from being late to class because it took you forever to pick out your outfit, or going to class looking like you assembled an outfit out of clothing you found on the side of the road. These are obviously really basic tips, but if you follow them you can assure yourself that you will be on campus on time every morning. Or, you can use these tips to give yourself thirty minutes of extra shut-eye in the morning, and couple of extra hits to your snooze.

that a literary work will always speak for itself. If it’s good, it’s good.” He said that in terms of submissions, the journal accepts “anything and everything.” “This year, the pieces that we received were especially excellent,” Roberts said. “Of course, we had a huge surge of submissions because it is the first national issue.” Fiction editor Katy Newman agreed, saying that the number of submissions has skyrocketed. “I wish I had exact numbers, but while last year we might have read 30 fiction prose submissions total, this year the fiction readers have made it through around 200.”

arts@thedailycougar.com

DIRECTOR continued from page 8

for all of us, is that it’s never been done,” Becker said. “Developing new work is unlike anything else. There’s no researching how they did it before or seeing what reviewers said before or looking at pictures of it. It’s all virgin territory.” The plot of the play focuses on the struggles of teenager Joey Adderall living in the town of Purple Mountain. The play is about different coping mechanisms used in our society and how they get through the struggles of day-to-day living. “My big hope is that it provokes the same discussion for the audience that it has provoked us as a company,” she said. “It doesn’t judge any one coping mechanism over another. I hope that people will listen to get a perspective from their own, see another perspective — maybe it will help them clarify their own.” The play opens this Friday and is a collaborative effort between many different artists from across the country. Tickets for the show are $20 for general admission, $15 dollars for faculty and $10 for students. The play features music and comedy, and audiences will get to be a part of a very unique experience. “Because this show is a world premiere it will forever belong to the students who created for the first time,” Becker said. “So anyone who’s coming to see this play is seeing something that is handmade, unique and edgy.” arts@thedailycougar.com

Hey, what’s happening?

Check the Campus Calendar at thedailycougar.com

Five years ago, “Glass Mountain” was a humble proposal by a few enterprising undergraduate students. The idea was to start a literary journal that would showcase the original and creative work of undergraduate writers at UH. The decision to go national was made only recently. “We decided GM would go national, or begin accepting outside submissions about a year ago,” co-editor Vanessa Villareal said. “The founding editors, Maureen Sanchez and Regina Vigil, established the journal, and editors Tiffany Thor and Patrick Stockwell decided to go national. “Since then, I have been working with Tiffany Thor and we have seen it come through to fruition.” Tiffany Thor said that the

Thursday, April 14, 2011

response from the national community was “unbelievably supportive.” “We are in complete awe of how many submissions we received for this issue both from UH and outside, and just the overall support for what we’re doing,” she said. “Any time someone shares his or her work with you, it’s an absolute privilege. “We truly feel honored to be entrusted with so many people’s work.” The new voices certainly helped draw an enthusiastic crowd. “I was ecstatic we had the turnout we got today,” Roberts said. “It really speaks to how the journal has grown-up and the general enthusiasm for it.” David Toombs, a creative writing

9

major at UH, had his work featured in the current issue and read some of his own fiction works at the event. “‘Glass Mountain’ is outstanding,” said Toombs. “Every time I get involved, I’ve learned a lot as a writer and just working with the writing community — professional and student writers like myself — has been awesome with the feedback and experience.” Sessa Kratz, a poet, said that she admired the edition and artwork. “I think ‘Glass Mountain’ is really great,” Kratz said. “Because as an undergraduate, it’s highly unlikely to have your work published. ‘Glass Mountain’ helps young writers get that exposure.” arts@thedailycougar.com


10

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NEWS

Thursday, April 14, 2011

ASSAULT continued from page 1

where parties and alcohol have become synonymous with higher education. According to the latest annual crime report from the University of Houston Department of Public Safety, in 2009 there were four forcible sexual offenses, of which three were committed in on-campus housing. McPhail gives presentations around campus to fraternities, sororities and other groups to educate people about peer pressure

and safety. Since these groups generally host parties and get-togethers with alcohol, the line can be blurred when it comes to who consents to sex and if they are sober or not. McPhail said the best way to avoid confusion is to get explicit verbal consent. “The burden is going toward men to ask for consent and to get consent,� McPhail said. “You can’t expect that just because a women is silent, that it means consent.� Most rapes go unreported, with most victims afraid of being judged or vilified.

The Rape Abuse and Incest National Network, one of the largest rape support groups in the nation, publishes statistics on sexual assaults nationwide. According to RAINN, someone is sexually assaulted every two minutes, and around two-thirds of offenders know their victims. Each semester one or two victims of sexual assault comes to the WRC to seek help with how to cope. McPhail says she lends an ear to all victims and refers them to area organizations like the Houston Area Women’s Center, which provides counseling and shelter to victims.

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Political science senior Rori Calhoun felt the lecture provided useful information that she was unaware of before. “I thought it was very informative,� Calhoun said. “I think men and women need to understand that they have to actually say yes or no in those types of situations.� For more information, visit the WRC, which is located on the second floor of the University Center or visit its website at www.uh.edu/ wrc/. For more information on RAINN, visit www.rainn.org/.

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COMICS & MORE

Thursday, April 14, 2011

comics

crossword

Robbie + Bobby by Jason Poland

ACROSS 1 Not forward 4 Contract proviso 8 Facility 13 Not barefoot 14 Libretto feature 15 Comics orphan 16 Makes a typo 17 Diplomat’s forte 18 Tenet 19 Ruby 20 Like some textiles (hyph.) 22 Spectacular 24 Itches 25 Dernier — 26 Brick baker 28 Motel room fixtures 31 Strode along 34 El —, Texas 35 Demeanor 36 Get by effort 37 Turn color, maybe 38 Debate side 39 Query starter 40 Optimism 41 Zealot 42 Really liked 43 — colada 44 Make illegal 45 Spiteful 47 Respite 51 Early European 55 Mae West role 56 Petal extract 57 Converse 58 Wheels for the fields 59 Buyer’s concern 60 Nearly all 61 Field 62 Cults 63 Devoutly wish 64 Straw item

Chili Fingers by

Nam Nguyen

sudoku How to play

Each row must contain the numbers 1 to 9; each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9; and each set of 3-by-3 boxes must also contain the numbers 1 to 9.

Previous puzzle solved

DOWN 1 Mole cousin 2 Teeming crowd 3 Many ft. 4 Japanese mat 5 Use Artgum 6 Made with cream 7 First name in spying 8 Bum out

1

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Recognized Eating Type of bean Noted limerick writer 13 Vaccines 20 Dictionary look-up 21 Parachute material 23 Hound’s clue 26 Phi Beta — 27 Psychic’s intro (2 wds.) 29 Overrule 30 Fit of pique 31 Lascivious 32 Waikiki setting 33 Down-to-earth 34 Subatomic particle 35 City conduits 37 Bonn’s river 41 Covered wagon hoop

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San Diego team “Dick Tracy” star Pass laws Lofty capital Infra opposite Bolt for a girder Lioness of movie fame Has a snooze Raison d’— Mounties’ org. Son of Odin Pleased sigh

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SILENCE continued from page 1

Jessica Myers said. “The vow of silence symbolizes those who have taken their own lives because of harassment.” Myers is a resident assistant at Settegast Hall in the Quadrangle and is a member of a group of resident assistants that are organizing the event. UH’s LGBT student organization GLOBAL and the UH chapter of the Gamma Rho Lambda sorority will be participating in the event alongside the RA’s. This is the second year the RA’s have facilitated the NDS activities on campus. Individuals who decide to take a vow of silence for the day can get information on Thursday at registration tables set up in residential housing units on campus and the LGBT Resource Center, which is located on the second floor of the University Center. Individuals who decide to participate will be given a card explaining why they have chosen to remain silent for the day. On Friday, the registration tables and the LGBT Resource Center will become “safe spots” where participants can engage in dialogue with other participants or individuals who are curious about LGBT harassment and bullying. “Our society is not the friendliest in the world,” said Cameron McFarland, a studio art senior who is an RA at Cougar Village. “We are speaking out against the aggressiveness, stereotyping and fear that comes from closemindedness,” McFarland said. “All we are doing is trying to start a dialogue.” Post-baccalaureate electrical engineering freshman Aubrey Peloubet is the vice president of the LGBT sorority Gamma Rho Lambda. She believes that silence is a particularly effective way to address the harassment of LGBT-identified individuals. “It’s a form of peaceful protest,” Peloubet said. “It brings attention to it because nothing is said.” At 4 p.m. on Friday, a “Breaking the Silence” party will be held in the Oberholtzer multi-purpose room in the Quadrangle. For more information on UH’s LGBT Resource Center, visit its website at www.class.uh.edu/lgbt/. For more information on the National Day of Silence, visit www. dayofsilence.org/. news@thedailycougar.com

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