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Cougars seek win against Marshall

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CAMPUS

Architecture lecture features Harvard prize winner Architect Jorge Mario Jáuregui will have a guest lecture at 3 p.m. today at the College of Architecture auditorium, room 150. Jáuregui graduated from the National University of Rosário, Argentina and the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. He has created more than 20 projects in the Favela-Bairro Program in Rio de Janeiro, which uses architecture to address social issues in the city’s slums. His current endeavors include two urban redevelopment programs for the Accelerated Growth Program in Brazil. He is the recipient of the 2000 Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design from Harvard University. The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, visit the College of Architecture website.

SPORTS

Men’s basketball team rebounds tonight against Marshall The Cougars take on Marshall’s Thundering Herd in men’s basketball at 8 p.m. tonight in the Hofheinz Pavillion. According to the University’s athletics website, the two rivals have played each other six times in the past, with the Cougars leading Marshall with a 5-1 record. This will also mark the first time that James Dickey, the men’s basketball head coach, has played against Marshall. The Marshall team is currently ranked at ninth place in Conference USA. General admission tickets are available for $10. The Pick-4 package deal is also on sale now for $28, which allows admission to any four of the remaining home games. For more information, call 713-462-6647 or visit the website at www.uhcougars.com.

CORRECTIONS Report errors to editor@thedailycougar.com. Corrections will appear in this space as needed.

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EVENTS Candlelight vigil The Students for a Democratic Society will host a candlelight vigil tonight at 6:30 p.m. in front of the M.D. Anderson Library. Students are encouraged to bring posters, flags and candles. A Matter of Wit A photo collection of three artists are being featured. The witty and satirical photos are being shown at the FotoFest Gallery. The show is going on daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

FOR MORE EVENTS, CHECK OUT thedailycougar.com/calendar

UH, Baylor partner up for STD awareness Students write, direct and produce webisodes Jesus Acevedo

THE DAILY COUGAR Media productions students joined with Baylor to produce a web series to raise awareness about STDs for teens from low-income neighborhoods. The 17 students from the Jack J. Valenti School of Communication worked for the past year on putting together the six-webisode series “Caught off Guard.” “It’s been a great experience,” Jennifer Vardeman-Winter, associate professor, said. “From the beginning to the end it’s been a great partnership.” Students gained work experience during the filming and producing. Students worked long hours to film and produce the online series “Caught Off Guard, ” which will premier “These students have gotten the in mid-March to raise HIV awareness among low-income teens. | Courtesy UH CLASSr chance to write and develop these scripts, and they have videos now that they can put on their resume,” Vardeman- behavior of the boyfriend, who con- on Baylor’s website starting in midWinter said. tracts chlamydia from a different sexual March. The series is about a couple named partner. Brandon and Ashley, and the unexpected The students’ webisodes will premier WEBISODES continues on page 3

NATION

STUDENTS

Guns on campus

Family unity a rarity online

Arizona’s proposal bill could allow faculty weapons Darlene Campos

THE DAILY COUGAR The Second Amendment, or right to bear arms, could possibly extend to college campuses if House Bill 2001 were to pass. The recent Phoenix shooting has people worried, leading to such proposals. The bill would allow faculty members at Arizona universities and community colleges to carry a concealed weapon while working on campus, and Texas could follow suit. “Weapons on campus is the stupidest idea ever and will only feed into the fear of gun violence,” Anna Gallegos, communications student, said. “What happened in Arizona was truly a tragic and freak accident. However, everyone packing heat does not mean that you’ll prevent a future tragedy. The chances of someone being there at the right moment at the right time during a crime are incredibly slim.” Some students and staff members expressed that they wouldn’t feel safer because of who would be carrying the weapons. “Guns on campus would not make me feel safer,” said Wilson Torres, a food

service worker at Oberholtzer Hall. “The UH police department is trained to protect us in case of an emergency, and professors are here to teach the students. We should leave guns to be carried by cops who have been trained to handle one well. A gun is a serious thing, and if not handled safely, innocent people could get hurt instead of the person who’s causing the trouble.” Lieutenant Bret Collier of the UHDPS said this isn’t the first time a bill like this has been proposed. “It has been filed, but is still in stage one of the process. There have been many bills like this one across several states in the past few years, and I am not personally aware of any that have been successful,” Collier said. “It’s a polarizing topic; I expect you will find strong feelings in both directions.” English faculty member Bruce Martin was not optimistic about the possible passing of House Bill 2001 either. “Some will argue that no legislation will prohibit an angry or mentally unstable or completely unhinged person from coming to our peaceful campus and do the unspeakable,” Martin said. “True, but neither will arming faculty or staff keep these people from coming to our campus. GUNS continues on page 3

College students unsure about social network sharing Ashley Evans

THE DAILY COUGAR Twenty-four-year-old advertising junior Lauren Proff remembers the excitement of joy rides as a teenager and how her mother found out by a note she had written to a friend detailing the adventures. While the age of hand-written notes has fallen by the wayside, the modern era of the instant update and a virtual playbook of recent activities makes it much easier for parents to monitor their children. “Now it would be much easier to track kids’ activities and misadventures through the lens of Facebook,” Proff said. “Privacy is limited and your life and activities are sometimes put FACEBOOK continues on page 3


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NEWS 101

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

The Daily Cougar

news 101

Headlines from around the world, so you can sound like an informed person.

EGYPT

Mubarak looking to calm opposition After a week of anti-government demonstrations, President Hosni Mubarak and his newly appointed cabinet have agreed to collaborate with opposition leaders on the need for further government reform. The curfews imposed over the last couple of days have only made the situation worse. The country’s heavily populated cities – Cairo, Suez and Alexandria – have served as a hotspot for anti-government demonstrations. Reports of looting throughout the region have included historical sites, hotels and casinos and affluent neighborhoods. The military has protected specific historical sites and government buildings. Also, the military has been ordered by Mubarak not to fire upon those who are protesting in a peaceful manner. With millions planning on marching into Cairo today, the heated exchanges that have grabbed national coverage could again turn violent. More than 100 people have lost their lives since the protests began.

consume about a half of teaspoon daily. This is half of the recommended amount for individuals who are not 51 or older and do not have a history of diabetes, hypertension or kidney problems.

PAKISTAN

Five killed in suicide bomb Multiple attacks targeting police officials rocked northwest Pakistan Monday. Suicide bombers targeting police in Peshawar killed at least five people and injured 16, police officials said. Reports indicate that four of the five killed were police personnel. Hours later a second attack on a police vehicle claimed the life of the fifth police official. Unrest south of where the attacks occurred have revealed that militants torched two NATO supply trucks. Pakistan serves as a medium for U.S. and NATO supplies traveling to Afghanistan. The militants used motorcycles in their assault.

TEXAS

World’s oldest woman dies at 114

Those who are asking to pass the salt might think twice before trying to spice up their meals. The federal government announced Monday its new dietary guidelines which warns individuals of their salt intake.

A Jacksonville woman died Monday at the age of 114. According to the Gerontology Research Group out of Los Angeles, Eunice G. Sanborn was the world’s oldest person according to data coming from the 1900 census. Sanborn hands the title of worlds’ oldest person over to Georgia native Besse Cooper, who is 114 years and five months old.

The guidelines recommend that an individual over the age of 51

Compiled by Christopher Losee

UNITED STATES

US says to slow the salt intake

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LEIGHTON MEESTER SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS A VERTIGO ENTERTAIMUSICNMENT PRODUCTION “THE ROOMMATE” MINKA KELLY CAM GIGANDETPRODUCED ALY MICHALKA DANNEEL HARRIS EXECUTIVE MUSIC FRANCES FISHER AND BILLY ZANE SUPERVISION BY MICHAEL FRIEDMAN BY JOHN FRIZZELL PRODUCERS BEAU MARKS SONNY MALLHI BY DOUG DAVISON AND ROY LEE DIRECTED WRITTEN BY CHRISTIAN E. CHRISTIANSEN BY SONNY MALLHI

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NEWS

The Daily Cougar

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

RESEARCH

Bio researcher travels to Germany Prof awarded cash and chance to work Europe Louis Casiano

THE DAILY COUGAR A biology professor was recently honored with the Humboldt Research Award for his lifetime achievements in research. Professor Dan Graur, a John and Rebecca Moores Professor, who specializes in molecular evolution and the process of mutations, was notified of the award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. William Martin, a professor of botany at the University of Dusseldorf in Germany, nominated Graur for the award. Ma r t i n h a s k n ow n G ra u r since the ’90s and previously collaborated with Graur on a paper about the technique of molecular clocks. “I wrote a nomination letter that was seconded by four very prominent international experts from the US, Asia and Europe,” Martin said. “This is basically a distinguished career achievement

GUNS continued from page 1

“The argument is that fewer people might be killed. This doesn’t comfort me. Guns on campus may make us feel safer for the moment, but we lose so much of our communion and purpose by believing that

WEBISODES continued from page 1

The project required the students to work long days, mostly on weekends, with early 6 a.m. call times to load equipment and get set up at the shooting location by 8 a.m., media production manager Ward Booth said. The students would shoot at two or three different locations in one day and be back in school by 7 p.m, Booth said. Baylor decided to work with UH’s media production department based on the resources and equipment it had to offer.

recognition, so his whole disciplines. body of work that has The award’s selechelped us to use molecution committee looks at lar data to shed light on a candidate’s doctorate, the evolutionary process academic publications is basically what is being and expert references. recognized.” Dan Wells, departThe Humboldt Founment of biology and biod a t i o n i s a G e r m a n J Dan Graur chemistry chair, praised institute that promotes Graur on his award and academic cooperation between accomplishments. excellent scientists and scholars “This award further demonfrom Germany and abroad. strates his international reputaGraur will travel to Germany tion in this competitive field and this summer to receive the award, brings significant recognition to along with 60,000 Euro as prize our department and the entire money. He will also meet the Presi- University,” Wells said. dent of Germany in Berlin. Graur is focusing on analyzIn addition, Graur is invited ing amounts of molecular data to carry out research projects of and the process of mutations in his own choice for up to a year in genomes. Germany. Graur said he has no Graur received his bachelor’s plans of leaving UH to go abroad and master’s degree from Tel for a year. Aviv University, Israel and his “I am honored and will go to doctorate from The University of Germany, get the money and meet Texas Health Science Center at the President of the Republic of Houston. Germany in Berlin and I will have Currently, Graur is working on fun for about two weeks and come grant proposals to finance future back,” Graur said. research at UH in light of the budThe Humboldt Foundation get cuts. grants prizes and fellowships each year in a number of scientific news@thedailycougar.com

the intrusion of force in the guise of safety makes the University a better place. Idealistic, I know, but that’s what a university is really about.” According to the National Conference of State Legislators, Utah already permits college instructors to have a concealed weapon on campus. Arizona would be the second state to have this law if House Bill 2001

passes. “I think for someone to get a gun, they should go through background checks and training to make sure the gun doesn’t go into the wrong hands,” Una Hadzimahmutovic, Hotel and Restaurant Management student, said.

“What we had to offer was what they needed,” Valderman-Winter said. “They needed someone who could do the research and they needed a facility that could do the media production, and we have both of those.” Booth and Valderman-Winter were the staff and faculty members working on the project. Valderman-Winter was in charge of doing research for the series, while Booth was in charge of the media production aspect of the project, which included working with the students. Tamecia Henderson, a UH alumni, was a senior when the production started, and she served as

the writer, director and producer of the film. “I stumbled into the producerdirector role,” Henderson said. “Originally I was recruited as just a writer. “My manager and teacher at the time, Professor Heath, offered it to me. He said, ‘You wrote the script, do you think you can take on these other roles?’ That’s what I did and I embraced it.” Students selected for the project received credit for the communication’s Special Problems course and had completed basic and advanced production courses.

Sound like you? These symptoms could be more than just PMS — they can also describe PMDD (Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder). Baylor College of Medicine is conducting a clinical study of FDA-approved drugs ,YAZ and YASMIN, to determine if they are effective in relieving PMDD stress in women ages 13 to 20. Participants will complete a diary in addition to receiving medication in this study. Females between 13 and 20 experiencing these symptoms and comfortable with tampon use may be able to participate. Parental consent is required under age 18.

Call 713-798-5295 volunteer@bcm.edu

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Engineering Career Fair SPRING 2011 Wednesday, February 9, 2011 10 a.m. — 4 p.m., UC - Houston Room

FACEBOOK continued from page 1

out into the world, whether you want them there or not.” Kaplan Test Prep recently surveyed high school students on the issue and found that roughly two thirds of American teenagers are comfortable having their parents as Facebook friends while the rest said they ignored the request. Proff said although she is Facebook friends with her mother now, she would have thought twice about it in high school. A small number of college students surveyed stated a desire for privacy. But the consensus among

older students is that although they don’t seek out their parents or family members on the site, they also wouldn’t deny a request to interact with them. As young adults, students are more comfortable being open with their family about their social lives. Twenty-year-old psychology student John Hoang said his parents don’t use social networking tools like Facebook, but if they did, he would be part of the 30 percent who ignored the request. Hoang said he feels the lack of privacy and the inability to control what others post about you would dissuade him from connecting with family members on the site. Thirty-year-old digital media

senior Michael Gault said he keeps in touch with family members through the site, but they don’t leave it up to Facebook for communication. The rising popularity of social networking sites has family members and friends sharing a whole new level of interconnectedness; for a generation who grew up in the age of handwritten notes, the adjustment has taken some getting used to. Proff said that although she enjoys keeping in touch with family on Facebook, like Gault she still enjoys the tradition of a good sitdown with the folks. news@thedailycougar.com

Professional Business Attire and UH I.D. Required Platinum Sponsors: Cameron | CenterPoint Energy | Halliburton Schlumberger | Technip | Valero Sponsored by the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) and Society of Women Engineers (SWE) Coordinated by Cullen College of Engineering Career Center

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The Daily Cougar

opinion THE DAILY COUGAR

EDITOR Andrew Taylor E-MAIL opinion@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/opinion

A DEFICIT OF COMPROMISE AND IDEAS Courtesy of USBICEF

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR IN CHIEF MANAGING EDITORS NEWS EDITORS SPORTS EDITORS LIFE

& ARTS EDITOR

OPINION EDITOR

Jack Wehman Newton Liu, Christopher Losee Jose Aguilar, Cristi Guerra John Brannen, Joshua Siegel Mary Baak Andrew Taylor

STAFF EDITORIAL

Congressional tug-of-war puts Houston in trouble

T

he battle between Republicans and Democrats continues — but this time the battlefield is Houston, and what’s at risk is our future metropolitan transit. Conservatives on Capitol Hill are threatening to chuck a federal mass transit program that promises at least $900 million for Houston Metro, according to an article published in the Houston Chronicle. The New Starts program, which is one if the infrastructure investments Obama mentioned in his State of the Union, would pour $2 billion through the Federal Transit Administration, according to the Chronicle. The $900 million that would come to Houston is something that would be great for the city. It would allow Houston residents more options when it comes to getting around town. It would also cut down on traffic and the amount of fuel we use in the city. Those houses that used to stand along Wheeler Street were bought by Metro and are part of a light rail plan for the University. Those plans depend on the money that is at stake. But what is right is clearly not the same when it comes to party identification. “Republicans elected from suburban and rural congressional districts are targeting federal mass transit programs that traditionally benefit Democratic metropolitan congressional districts on the West and East Coasts,” the Chronicle wrote. If the money fails to come to Houston, expect to see a lot of unused land and vacant lots. Don’t expect plans to change soon, either — if we miss our chance another one will be a long way off due to the budget deficit in Texas. Annise Parker believes that the government will act in good faith and continue to fund or reimburse the cities that have already spent money on these transit projects. “We believe that Congress would not act in bad faith for cities — not just Houston, but cities across the country — that have expended funds with the expectation that those funds would be reimbursed,” Parker said. The outlook of any expansions for Metro and Houston’s transit scenario are bleak. For these programs not to be cut the Republicans would have to cut something else, something they might like or something that would infuriate their voters.

E D I TO R I A L P O L I C I E S STAFF EDITORIAL The Staff Editorial reflects the opinions of The Daily Cougar Editorial Board (the members of which are listed above the editorial). All other opinions, commentaries and cartoons reflect only the opinion of the author. Opinions expressed in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Houston or the students as a whole. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Daily Cougar welcomes letters to the editor from any member of the UH community. Letters should be no more than 250 words and signed, including the author’s full name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Anonymous letters will not be published. Deliver letters to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; send them via campus mail to STP 4015; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. Letters are subject to editing. ADVERTISEMENTS Advertisements published in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the University or the students as a whole. GUEST COMMENTARY Submissions are accepted from any member of the UH community and must be signed with the author’s name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Commentary should be kept to less than 500 words. Guest commentaries should not be written as replies to material already printed in the Cougar, but rather should present independent points of view. Rebuttals should be sent as letters. Deliver submissions to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. All submissions are subject to editing.

Power struggle siezes Middle East

T

he recent protests and revolutions in the Middle East started in Tunisia. Mohamed Bouazizi, a college graduate forced to sell fruits at a street corner, was harassed by government officials who wanted to confiscate his meager source of income. In desperation, the young man burned himself to death. Thus began the “Tunisian Dignity Revolution,” a mass uprising Dana of people from all walks El Kurd of life demanding jobs, freedom and democracy. Two weeks after Bouazizi’s tragic death, the brutal dictator of Tunisia, Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, fled the country, bringing an end to 24 years of political repression and exploitive economic policies. Protests then erupted in countries all over the Middle East, including Yemen, Libya, Algeria and Jordan. All of these countries suffer from similar issues:

economic exploitation, political repression and a young population that expects lives of hardship and poverty regardless of educational background. Many of the protests were quickly extinguished through mass arrests. Media pundits (and government officials) all over the world assured the Arab dictatorships that the revolution in Tunisia would not have a domino effect. That is, until Egypt erupted. Over 100,000 Egyptians took to the streets on Jan. 25, calling the uprising a “Day of Rage” and demanding that their 82-year old dictator Hosni Mubarak resign immediately and let democracy run its course. The protests quickly escalated when the police force found itself unable to smother the dissenters as it had done in the past. Unfortunately, our government is the main reason such repressive regimes have survived in the Arab world for this incredible length of time. The U.S. sends billions of dollars in aid to support and influence

these Arab governments despite the fact that they are openly authoritarian. In an effort to maintain our short-term interests, we have helped these dictatorships stay in power. We need to realize that our current strategy is a losing one. Brutalized people won’t remain silent for long, and no amount of funding will silence dissent. Such revolutions are inevitable and these governments will eventually reflect the wills of their people. For the sake of our long-term interests, America needs to respect the national aspirations of the Arab people by supporting their uprisings and cutting funding to their oppressors. And for the sake of people like Mohamed Bouazizi who are fighting for their freedom, let’s hope we do it soon. Dana El Kurd is a economics and political science junior and may be reached at opinion@ thedailycougar.com.

Little hope for change in Congress

L

ast week, President Barack Obama addressed the State of the Union and told everyone that we need to “Win the future.” In a display of leadership, he touched upon many of the issues that are currently facing our great nation. The downside was that despite his leadership skills and his ability to create an illusion of bipartisan eagerness, our Congress is poised Andrew to be an ineffective one. Taylor The most pressing issue for our nation is the budget, and our enormous deficit that is ever growing. Obama’s plan for the economy is to invest in domestic projects and alternative energy sources. This won’t be easy and is less foreseeable when at the same time the president is proposing a 5-year domestic spending freeze. Another factor that will surely work

against any of his investment ideas or plans for growth is the attitude and control of the Republican majority within the House of Representatives. Republicans have labeled anything that is said to be an investment as something wasteful. Increasing research among any of our promising technologies for the future or spending more on domestic infrastructure will be impossible if the Republicans continue their policy of saying no. Reaching reasonable solutions to any of the other issues Obama spoke of last Tuesday isn’t likely when you look at what the other side has to offer as far as ideas. Rep. Paul Ryan from Wisconsin gave the rebuttal to the president’s address. Ryan hammered relentlessly on the topic of the economy and the deficit. Ryan, who is the Chairman of the House Budget Committee, spoke mainly

of Obama’s stimulus and healthcare bill. “All of this new government spending was sold as ‘investment,’” Ryan said. “Yet after two years, the unemployment rate remains above 9 percent and government has added over $3 trillion to our debt.” As the newest Republican poster boy, look for Ryan to label anything that Obama speaks of as investment as something poisonous and wrong for the country. The rest of his party will follow suit. Of course their solution to the economic problems is to cut spending and decrease the size of government. How do they plan to do this? Well, the truth is, they don’t know either. All they know is that anything Obama does is sure to be our country’s downfall, and what he’s passed so far hasn’t worked. Andrew Taylor is an economics senior and may be reached at opinion@thedailycougar.com.


Tuesday, February 1, 2011

The Daily Cougar

sports

5

EDITORS John Brannen, Joshua Siegel E-MAIL sports@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/sports

overtime

AARON CISNEROS THE DAILY COUGAR

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Senior forward grabs C-USA accolade She does not usually garner the same praise as some of her teammates, but Lesslee Mason’s performance in two games last week was award winning. Mason won the C-USA Player of the Week yesterday for her efforts against UCF and SMU. In the two games she averaged 13 points, 10.5 rebounds and four blocks. Against UCF, she scored 14 points, grabbed 14 rebounds and blocked three shots. Against the Mustangs she scored 12 points, collected seven rebounds and recorded five blocks. It was the first time Mason won the award, but the

Adam Brown and the Cougars will need to increase the level of tenacity in the closing minutes to avoid a four-game losing streak tonight against Marshall. The Cougars are 9-2 in games played at Hofheinz Pavilion. | Newton Liu/The Daily Cougar

MEN’S BASKETBALL

sixth time this season for a UH player.

— Cougar Sports Services

SOCCER

Cougars look to reverse losing trend

Slate of spring games scheduled After the best season in UH history, the Cougars will return to the field this weekend in the first of a five-game set. The Cougars began group practice Monday and will travel to College Station Sunday for the Texas A&M 7v7 Tournament. On Feb. 19 the team will make the drive to Tomball for the Challenge Cup at Burroughs Park. UH will revisit College Station on March 6 to play Texas A&M. On March 26, the Cougars will host the Univeristy of Houston Tournament at Carl Lewis Field. The spring season concludes April 2 with a tournament at Rice. “Our schedule is comprised of games against strong local opponents that will be a good gauge to see where this team is heading into the summer and pre-season for next fall,” head coach Susan Bush said in a release. “Everyone is excited to get on the field and continue building where we finished in the fall. We’re returning most of the starting lineup and are going into the spring with more depth than any year yet at Houston.”

— Cougar Sports Services

BASEBALL

Alumni game serves as precursor to season Fans looking to reminisce about previous UH baseball teams can attend the Houston Baseball Alumni Game on Feb. 12 at Cougar Field. Batting practice starts at 10 a.m., and the first pitch is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. The regular season starts Feb. 18 when UH takes on UT-Arlington for a three-game series at Cougar Field. Afterward, the Cougars will host Stephen F. Austin on Feb. 22.

— Cougar Sports Services

Joachim Clarke

THE DAILY COUGAR The Cougars will try to avoid losing their fourth straight game when they take on Marshall for a brief one-game homestand. The Cougars (11-9, 3-4 Conference USA) know that they will have their work cut out for them against a Marshall team that has posted impressive wins this season. The most recent win for the Thundering Herd came in the form of an 85-70 clobbering of Memphis on Saturday. Memphis was on top of the C-USA standings before losing. Marshall (14-7, 2-4) has had strong production from freshman guard DeAndre Kane and from junior guard Damier Pitts, who both average 15.3 points per game. While Marshall is coming off arguably its best win of the season, the Cougars have stumbled, dropping their third game in a row against ECU on Saturday.

Head coach James Dickey knows that the team has given itself a chance to be competitive every time they step foot on the court. “For us it’s just a matter of finishing games,” Dickey said. “I’ve been pleased with the way that our guys have competed. The effort has been good. But we have to be good for 40 minutes rather than for 37 or 38 minutes.” Dickey also said that sophomore forward Kirk Van Slyke, who was held out of Saturday’s contest against ECU for undisclosed reasons, will be available and ready to play Tuesday. Seeking a stronger mindset Senior guard Adam Brown says that the team has to play a tougher, more intense style in order to win games. “Killer instinct is hard to come across,” Brown said. “But we’re too nice out there on the court. “We need to bring that so-called ‘dog’ out of us.” Brown leads the team with 14.8

points per game and is an essential part of the Cougar backcourt, directed by fellow senior Zamal Nixon. Nixon averages 8.9 points and five assists each outing. Although Nixon said he agrees that the Cougars are capable of winning every game; he says the team can always improve on its mishaps. “We just have to keep learning from our mistakes,” Nixon said. “When it gets down to those close games, and we’re going to have a lot of them, we just have to do a better job of executing.” Tonight’s game tips off at 8 p.m. at Hofheinz Pavilion.

GAMETIME Marshall at UH When: 8:00 p.m. Where: Hofheinz Pavilion On the air: CBS College Sports, 790 AM KBME Live coverage: uhcougars.com sports@thedailycougar.com

PROFILE

Taylor stresses value of college education Lance Jaramillo

THE DAILY COUGAR UH swimming head coach Mark Taylor, who was once forced to turn down a job offer because he didn’t have his bachelor’s degree, is in his ninth year at UH and hasn’t stopped educating himself since. He received a master’s in physical education in December from the University. “I’ve always felt education is an important thing,” Taylor said. “My dad never finished high school and my mom

graduated high school but never went on to college, so I was the first college graduate.” Taylor, 50, graduated from Satellite Beach High School in Satellite Beach, Fla., in 1979, then went on a two-year mission in Nevada J Mark Taylor has for the Mormon been at the helm of Church. He did not UH swimming since enroll in another class for 12 years. 2002. “I just started working and eventually started

coaching,” Taylor said. “That’s what I did when I grew up, I was a swimmer. After being a coach for 12 years or so, I realized that if I was going to get anywhere in the coaching profession, I was going to need a degree.” The urgency to continue his higher education did not set in until he had to decline a full-time assistant coaching offer at Arizona State University because he didn’t have a bachelor’s degree. That’s when ASU swim coach Ernie Maglischo took matters in to his own hands. TAYLORcontinues on page 8


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LIFE&ARTS

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

The Daily Cougar

COUGAR SUTRA

playlist Âť

It’s a ‘Groovy Tuesday’ playlist

S

o the worst part of the week is over — we’ve already got Monday down the hatch, which means there are only two days (possibly three, if you have Friday classes) left in the work week. To make this Tuesday as awesome as it can be, we’ve compiled a list of all the songs about one of the more arbitrary days of the week. From the Life & Arts desk to you, we hope it’s a great one. — Mary Baak Ruby Tuesday Rolling Stones

Tuesday’s Gone Lynyrd Skynyrd

Tuesday Heartbreak Stevie Wonder

Tuesday Afternoon The Moody Blues

Groovy Tuesday The Smithereens

Tuesday’s Dead Cat Stevens

New Shoes Paolo Nutini

Tuesday Grass Widow

Church on a Tuesday Stone Temple Pilots

Cold Shower Tuesdays Bowling for Soup

Being single isn’t as bad as you think Mary Baak

THE DAILY COUGAR It’s the first day of February, which means there are only thirteen days to secure a date for Valentine’s Day. Some people are fortunate enough to already have someone with whom to exchange loving wallposts and text messages. However, some of us aren’t that lucky. But is it really an issue of luck (or lack thereof)? I don’t think so. I mean, maybe I’m not in the best position to evaluate relationships because none of mine have worked out, but it was probably best that they didn’t anyway. If you’re worried about not having a date for Valentine’s Day, you’re not looking at the right side of the story. The best thing about being single is that you can live your life on your own terms and socialize with whomever you’d like, whenever you’d like. Sure it’s nice to have companionship, but that’s what good friends are for. If you feel like you’re lacking in that part of your life, the first thing you should do is step out of your comfort zone and meet new people. You can always strike up a conversation with the person that sits next to you in your classes or go to an event with a friend and talk to people that you wouldn’t normally talk to. Really, there are more than 30,000 people on this campus; you’re bound to find at least one person that’s a potential candidate. Now, you might fear being turned down by someone whom you’ve never met, but it’s all part of the game. Chances are, though,

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Feb. 14 is sometimes referred to as “Single’s Awareness Day.� If you’re alone this Valentine’s Day, don’t be upset. Instead, enjoy being single while you can. | Wikimedia Commons that someone isn’t going to reject a friendly conversation. If they do, they probably weren’t worth your time anyway — in that case, just say, “It was good talking to you,� and walk away. Not having to answer to anyone or tell someone about your plans is nice, too. You don’t have to worry about getting in an argument because you spend too much time with your friends and not your significant other; nor do you have to feel obliged to spend all of your time with one person. If that’s happening, by the way, you might want to think about why that is — clinginess is never attractive. Having a life outside of your relationship is important. Another perk of being single is that you have a bunch of options. It’s kind of like an ice cream shop — there are so many flavors to choose from, and if you don’t like one, you

just move on to the next. Jay-Z wrote a song about just that, actually. Unless you’re the type to sit at home and watch movies all the time, dating drains your bank account. Going out to eat all the time also makes you gain weight. Watch out for that — it’s a definite downside to the dating scene. So, the best thing to rememer is that you’re not alone. And even if you’re bummed about being single, just talk to someone new. This Valentine’s Day, spend time with a few friends or go see a movie. Sometimes it’s a good thing to enjoy your own company. I also hear that dating websites are a good way to meet people. I’m only kidding — that’s definitely not the best way to go about changing your relationship status — take my word for it. arts@thedailycougar.com.

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COMICS & MORE

The Daily Cougar

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

comics

crossword

Robbie + Bobby by Jason Poland

ACROSS 1 Add up 6 Industrial giant 10 Back muscles 14 Tiny organism 15 Watermelon part 16 Put out heat 17 Solitude enjoyer 18 Cornelia Skinner 19 Plebiscite 20 Space-time — 22 Iron-on picture 23 Foreign car 24 Shellfish 26 Make tracks 29 Mosaic unit 31 Famous numero 32 Spleen 33 Musher’s vehicle 34 Beach cover-up 38 Whale groups 40 Shovel 42 Put away in folders 43 Inclined gently 46 Friendly whack 49 Doctor’s payment 50 Corroded, as acid 51 Package — 52 Kept up the fire 53 Prism bands 57 “Madam, I’m —” 59 Cold weather wear 60 Espresso serving 65 Gas or tel. 66 Skirt length 67 Took a bite 68 Edgar — Burroughs 69 Babysitter, often 70 Wrinkled 71 Frog cousin 72 Warbled 73 Adversary

The Fishbowl by Thomas Hernandez

sudoku How to play

Each row must contain the numbers 1 to 9; each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9; and each set of 3-by-3 boxes must also contain the numbers 1 to 9.

Previous puzzle solved

DOWN 1 Bath powder 2 “Typee” sequel 3 Dollywood loc. 4 Is a party to 5 Rodeo gear 6 Bothered 7 In — (as found) 8 Feminine principle 9 Rural rtes.

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10 Become stable (2 wds.) 11 Former petroleum biggie 12 Child of Uranus 13 Stone marker 21 Do perfectly 22 Mr. Carvey 25 NFC gridder 26 Eighteenwheelers 27 Eurasian range 28 Fictional sub commander 30 Royal decree 35 Spat 36 Toward shelter 37 Shortfall 39 Repaired plaster 41 Dusk 44 Blues singer James 45 Van — Waals

47 48 53 54 55 56 58 61 62 63 64 66

force Volkswagen kin Chatter Jet forth Barbecue spot Noted soap vixen Word of parting Sausalito’s county TV genie portrayer Calculator key Look as if Guitarist Duane High pts.

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2010 UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE INC.

Previous puzzle solved D A D P I P E A V E C R E G I B AMB E C E L L D N A C U B S C OC T O GOU R D U N N E P E E N E R D

A R L I I N ME S A N E R S S M HOM P I U T I P I AM I I N S N MO

E A S L A C F R A P RO S C H P R I O OO T ON YM K A O E S T D OWE P I L T E R A R L R A Y

A Valentine treat for only

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$ Your message of love will fill up this heart shape! Write up to 15-20 words to a loved one.

Place your message in a special feature in The Daily Cougar for Valentine’s Day! Use this space to write your message (15-20 words), clip it out and bring it to Room 7, UC Satellite (behind Starbucks) between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday-Friday.

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... r fo e m ti a is y a D ’s e n ti n le a V

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DEADLINE: 11 a.m. FRIDAY, Feb. 11 FEATURE PRINTS: MONDAY, Feb. 14

R U P T U R E

O N S E T

A D A G E

D O T E S

S E C E OR L L A E N GN E O

P R A M

Y E N S

R S Y A A T N


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SPORTS

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

The Daily Cougar

TAYLOR continued from page 5

Think you can do better than this? You might be right, but there’s only way to prove it. Join The Daily Cougar staff today. We offer paid positions for reporters, photographers, columnists and editors. For more information, e-mail editor@thedailycougar.com or visit www.uh.edu/sp/jobs

THE DAILY COUGAR

Recycle this paper

®

www.thedailycougar.com Stay in touch.

University Career Services Spring 2011 Career Success Series! Date

Event

Thursday, February 3

Research Career Information Day, 2:00 p.m.—6:00 p.m. University Center, Houston Room Listen to panelists representing research careers in academia and industry. Visit information tables hosted by UH research centers, institutes, and graduate and professional programs to find out about research opportunities, internships, internal and external summer research programs, and career paths involving research. For more information visit: http://www.career.uh.edu/careersuccessseries/research/

Tuesday, February 8

Texas Job Fair, 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. UH Campus Recreation & Wellness Center Do not miss this TEXAS sized job fair! Employers from diverse industries are represented and they are looking for students from all majors for internships and full-time positions. Details can be found at www.haccc.org under Students/Alumni. Bring plenty of resumes and dress PROFESSIONALLY.

Tuesday, March 29

What Can I Do With My Psychology Degree? 12:00 p.m.—2:00 p.m., Student Service Center 1, First Floor Learn from a panel of professionals in a variety of fields how to achieve success as a psychology major. Your degree isn’t useless! You don’t have to go to grad school to be successful! Q&A session will follow.

Wednesday, Summer Jobs for Coogs, 1:00 p.m.— 4:00 p.m. April 13 University Center, Houston Room This job fair is open to all majors and will have opportunities available for summer jobs (parttime and full time), internships and volunteer work. More information will also be available soon at www.career.uh.edu.

Thursday, May 19

Alumni Career Mixer, 4:00 p.m.— 7:00 p.m. UH Athletics/Alumni Center Network your way to job opportunities! New graduates and alumni are welcome to mix and mingle with company representatives and recruiters. Professional business attire strongly recommended. Light refreshments will be served. Check the UCS website in May 2011 for a list of participating companies.

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1st floor, Student Service Center 1 713.743.5100 / ucs@uh.edu

“He told me, ‘Go to school now,’” Taylor said. “He made me stand up at that moment and he went with me down to the registrar’s office and helped me sign up. “He said, ‘This is the most important thing you’re going to do for yourself and for your family, to become an educated individual who can provide because he’s taken the necessary steps in life.’ I will never forget that advice.” Taylor said homework and writing papers into the early hours of the morning was the most challenging part of balancing school and maintaining a Top 30 swimming program in the nation. The hectic schedule helped Taylor identify with his student-athletes experiencing similar situations. “It was easier for me to understand when they were mentally stressed,” he said. “There are a lot of times I got mentally stressed. I’ll

I hope they realize how important education is to me,” “That’s why we push them so hard. We do study hall, tutoring and everything we can to help them be successful.” Mark Taylor Head swimming coach have a test coming up or a paper due and, I still have four hours of practice to do, four hours in the office and then I also have to make sure I get down to my kid’s play.” The message Taylor and his staff (diving head coach Jane Figueiredo and assistant swimming coach Jaime Lewis) hope to send to their studentathletes is one he’s trying to deliver through actions, not just words. “I hope they realize how important education is to me,” Taylor said. “That’s why we push them so hard. We do study hall, tutoring and everything we can to help them be successful. Since I’ve gotten here, the swimming and diving team has always been one of the better academic programs at the University.” Taylor believes in doing the groundwork in life in order to get ahead. He credits UH as an institution full of opportunity to further an education. “If you go through the list of our alumni, the people who are successful and went to UT, Harvard, UCLA, whatever, they come here to get their master’s and doctorate degrees. This is a powerful University with a great message: Come here, get smarter and learn the things you need to learn.” The skills Taylor acquired over his studies have been put to good use. He deals with the groundwork behind the scenes of a swim meet that go unnoticed to the public eye: dealing with facility managers, following protocol, marketing and promotions. In 2008, the Cougars were second in Conference USA under Taylor’s watch. In 2009, he was awarded C-USA Coach of the Year. Taylor said his focus is to win the C-USA Championships on Feb. 23-26 at the CRWC Natatorium in hopes of qualifying athletes to the NCAA Championships. His longterm aspiration is to elevate UH into a Top 10 swimming and diving program. sports@thedailycougar.com


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