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TUESDAY November 29, 2011 Volume 97, Issue 50 W W W.T H E D A I LYA Z T E C . C O M

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SCAN CODE FOR MOBILE CONTENT

SDSU’S INDEPENDENT STUDENT N E W S PA P E R SINCE 1913

INDEX:

Disability services limit students THINKSTOCK

Stephanie Saccente contributor In a typical week, 31,500 students walk across the San Diego State campus to attend classes at the undergraduate level. These students vary in race, gender and religious beliefs, but also in other ways often overlooked. Angela Van Ostran is in the minority of students not because of her personal views or native background, but rather because she uses a wheelchair to travel around campus. Van Ostran said the school’s campus is not designed for those with disabilities, which creates an unsafe

atmosphere for disabled students and faculty who must use wheelchairs at SDSU. This was brought to Van Ostran’s attention when she toured the campus for the first time. Because of the many hills and levels, she was forced to miss part of the tour. Now a junior, Van Ostran said she continues to face difficulties because of her disability that are not being addressed. Recently, Van Ostran says she experienced a problem that has inhibited her ability to attend a class for the second time. In order to attend a statistics class held in Storm Hall, Van Ostran must use an unreliable elevator, and although she has reported the problem, there has not been a change.

“The elevator is nearly pitch-black, dirty, disgusting and traps me inside on a regular basis. There’s usually one flickering light to guide a passenger to the buttons to go up or down,” Van Ostran said. “There isn’t even a sign stating the elevator is out of service. It shouldn’t be like this anywhere, much less here.” She said she tried to contact SDSU Physical Plant about the elevator on multiple occasions, but nothing has been done. According to Van Ostran, the Physical Plant’s attitude is that it will “fix it when it can.” She said she was even forced to drop the class during an earlier semester because she was not able to get to the room where the class was

Will the 9% CSU fee increase affect you much?

held. Unfortunately, the class is required and she is now haunted by the same predicament of having serious problems attending because of the route she must take. “This is the only building the class can be held in,” Van Ostran said. “All of the elevators need to be evaluated.” At this time, there are 938 self-identified students with disabilities, not accounting for students who have invisible disabilities. Derrick Dudley, a junior at SDSU who is among the 938 students, said he also feels strongly about a more accessible campus for students with disabilities. “There is no real representation on campus. We are a culture, we deserve a real voice,” Dudley said.

SCIENCE & T EC H N O LO GY

Get paid to text with convenient smartphone app

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SCAN CODE TO M A K E YO U R VOT E E N T E R TA I N M E N T

No, I think I’ll be OK. (8%, 10 votes)

Martin Scorsese directs a film adaptation of Brian Selznick’s 2007 novel “The Invention of Hugo Cabret.”

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Financial aid will cover it for me. (7%, 8 votes)

YES. (71%, 87 votes)

C R I M E B E AT

Not me, but my parents. (8%, 10 votes)

Last week, there were fewer reports of cars broken into and even fewer stolen bicycles. However, several less-common reports were made in the daily reports published by the San Diego State Police Department. Several DUI charges were filed by the SDSUPD as well, however only one incident involved an SDSU student, which occurred last Saturday. On Tuesday, an officer observed a verbal argument between two subjects and conducted a field interview. One was described as having a short Afro and wearing a black jacket and the second was said to be in his 50s, wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt and a blue shirt. About an hour later, a disturbing the peace report was made at the nearby SDSU Office of Housing Administration on Montezuma Road with two subjects

I’m not sure yet. (6%, 7 votes)

matching the same description. In the former, the officer only conducted the interview, but the subjects reported disturbing the peace were issued citations. Shortly after noon last Wednesday, the Extended Studies Center on Hardy Avenue was vandalized, with three letters spray painted in green on the building. At about the same time, a $200 miter was reported stolen from “Music” on Campanile Drive. At 8:22 p.m. on the same day, two non-SDSU students were arrested at Betty’s HotDogger near the Arts and Letters building on campus and charged with identity theft, possession of stolen property, forgery, being under the influence of a controlled substance, possession of burglary tools and driving on a suspended license.

There were no significant reports made on Thanksgiving, however on Saturday a 24-year-old intoxicated male was transported to Alvarado Medical Center after hitting his head on a cement step during an altercation with another subject. He was bleeding, but still conscious, breathing and aggressive, according to the report. On Sunday, in the garage under the Student Services building by Aztec Circle Drive, a smell of sulfur and possibly gas was reported close to the stairwell on the opposite side of the elevator. Officers responding to the call were unable to locate the source but did confirm the odor of sulfur near the northern stairwell and notified SDSU Physical Plant.

— Compiled by News Editor Bill Crotty

Smiley would make for an intriguing character if the audience were shown some glimpse of his ... capabilities. Instead, the audience is saddled with a protagonist more nebulous than mysterious. E N T E R TA I N M E N T

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W E AT H E R : PARTLY CLOUDY HIGH: 75 LOW: 51 SUNSET: 4:42PM


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D A I LY

AZTEC Tuesday, November 29, 2011

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

PsBTW app rewards deal-seeking texters Amy DeVito staff writer In a generation ruled by of smartphones, the only way to survive in the sea of SMS airwaves is to be equipped with the most modern applications. Phone conversations and personal interactions have become secondary to efficient texting and virtual substitution. However, with a faltering economy and demanding prices for the latest technology, any money-saving offer can make a substantial difference. Ps By The Way is an innovative resource for Android smartphones, granting users free text messaging communication and possibilities to earn rewards. Established by San Diego State and California State University San Marcos alumni, this enterprise is just beginning to launch, and prompting users to sign up to participate in an active testing or beta stage. The company is now progressively working with advertisers and phone users in a productive effort to foster a favorable system for all. “The basic concept is if a business is willing to pay 10 cents for you to look at a coupon, then why not pay you (the phone user) half?” cofounder of PsBTW Adam Pollock said. “Instead of the user keeping the money for themselves, why not have it go to a collective account for the organization? Now you could have 100 people or more passively earning money for their organization. This is the goal we are striving for, the ‘paid-to-text’ fundraiser.”

BROOKE VALLS, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

To access PsBTW, Android users can download the application free of charge during this trial period, without interruptions to the existing SMS account. Although participants cannot access rewards now, they will be the first eligible customers to earn coupons. As an added bonus to free drinks and reduced rates on food, users will be awarded 5 cents for each offer once the trial period has ended. With a steady rate of 10

“The basic concept is if a business is willing to pay 10 cents for you to look at a coupon, then why not pay (the phone user) half?” Adam Pollock, cofounder of Ps By The Way

coupon views daily, this adds up to approximately $180 a year in savings. Personalized flash opportunities with mobile coupons are periodically attached to incoming text messages, offering deals for Pita Pit, Cheba Hut, Aztec Tan and others. To encourage purchases, texters can access their earnings directly through PayPal as soon as the account reaches $10. Coupons display a range of discounted prices and most are valid for 24 hours. Rewards are typically delivered for local businesses and websites, so users can simply go to the counter and show the text, or type in the promotional code for Web-related deals. The company’s “Smart Mobile Coupon” is a graphical, full-screen, interactive feature that maps the location and grants access to Facebook and the business Webpage for contact information. Additionally, it scans the texts for essential terms that may tap into relevant deals within convenient reach. Participants can be from anywhere in the country. This includes large companies or small studentrun organizations. “Currently we are working with Sigma Nu at SDSU as well as other organizations at CSUSM to jump start the PsBTW fundraising program,” Pollock said. “It’s based in San Diego and we are doing our initial beta rollout at SDSU. With the large concentration of students and surrounding businesses, it’s the perfect place.” With texting at the forefront of modern-day communication and phone bills, why not reap some rewards for all that text? The launch of PsBTW is offering just that.


D A I LY A Z T E C Tuesday, November 29, 2011

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KCR

KCR is accepting applications for the General Manager position for the Spring 2012 semester, with possibility for reappointment through 2012/13 academic year. Those interested should pick up an application at the KCR offices, located in the Communications Building, Room 122 or at the A.S. Business Office located in Aztec Mesa, Room 110. Completed applications are to be submitted to the A.S. Business Office.

DEADLINE TO SUBMIT APPLICATIONS IS FRIDAY, DEC. 2, 2011 @ NOON

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BUILD YOUR RESUMÉ! THE DAILY AZTEC IS NOW HIRING ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES FOR SPRING SEMESTER! • Gain invaluable real-world work experience for after college • Work on campus in between classes • Decide your pay with up to 15% commission on weekly sales • Network with many major business owners throughout San Diego For more information, email your resumé to: advertising@thedailyaztec.com or call (619) 594-7291

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D A I LY

AZTEC Tuesday, November 29, 2011

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

PA S S T H E P O P C O R N

HOROSCOPE

‘Hugo‘ masterfully done David Dixon

To get the advantage, check the day's rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

staff writer Right now, a mother lode gold mine of family friendly entertainment is available for viewing on the big screen. The animated “Arthur Christmas” is a critical darling and “The Muppets” seems to be getting a lot of love from everyone. If that is not enough, there is the uniquely innovative adventure directed with imagination and heart by a young whippersnapper who calls himself Martin Scorsese. Set in 1930s Paris, “Hugo” is about a young orphan named, appropriately enough, Hugo (Asa Butterfield), who lives in a train station full of idiosyncratic characters such as a comically menacing station inspector (Sacha Baron Cohen) and a harsh toy salesman (Ben Kingsley). Hugo tries to start up an automaton, a self-operating machine, he and his deceased father (Jude Law) had begun to rebuild. With the help of a friendly book lover (Chloé Grace Moretz) Hugo is able to fix the automaton, resulting in a twist involving the history of cinema. Based on the novel “The Invention of Hugo Cabret,” the plot is as sophisticated as a PG film can be. The pacing is natural and never rushed, the humor is sly and screenwriter John Logan sometimes uses complex dialogue that may even baffle adult audiences. Scorsese treats his audience with respect, and believes the best way to tell a tale is not to consistently spoon-feed information, but to keep audiences guessing where “Hugo” will go next. The only aspect that might be too obvious is the heart-shaped lock attached to the automaton. This feels too purposefully schmaltzy, though criticizing the film for this minor quibble is beyond nitpicking. “Hugo” is moving, especially regarding its appreciation for motion pictures. Extended sequences

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (11/29/11) A new perspective arrives on an old family problem. This could change everything. Step into a new leadership role and a corresponding rise in status. Consider an investment in education this year, for yourself or someone close.

ARIES (March 21 - April 19) - Today is a 7 Friends are calling. Go ahead and play! Even if you're working, it's more fun together. Let folks know what you want and need. Ask them the same, and offer resources. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) - Today is a 7 Money problems don't define you. Take on more responsibility, and find another route. Devote yourself to excellence at work. Someone important is observing. GEMINI (May 21 - June 21) - Today is a 7 Take time to think it over, and make sure your systems are in order. Repairs may be necessary. A little preparation today goes a long way. CANCER (June 22 - July 22) - Today is an 8 - You don't have as much as you thought. Can you make a substitution? A little shot of divine inspiration leads to a plan you hadn't considered. LEO (July 23 - Aug. 22) - Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Today is an 8 - Join forces with someone you trust. At the end, you'll have to stop worrying and start acting. A hero comes to your rescue with the perfect solution. Thank them graciously.

include clips of old classics and could be considered nostalgic yet nontraditional, like watching something old with fresh eyes. Characters, though sometimes overly eccentric, are all portrayed with detail and depth, thanks to the acting of Butterfield, Moretz and especially Kingsley — who after appearing in an oddly miscast role in “The Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time,” is back on his A game playing an emotionally distant man whose motivation in life seems to have died long ago. Scorsese directed “The Departed” and “Shutter Island” with the energy and style of a 20-something hotshot. He filmed “Hugo” with that same passion, from his style of shooting several key pursuit sequences in the train station to the interesting subplots that take place in the station itself. This is an example of a 3-D journey that deserves to be experienced

in the format it was intended for. The attention to detail is stunning, as Scorsese’s filmmaking captures the cold, snowy Paris days and makes the giant clock at the top of the station larger than life. It is rarely showy, and always eye-catching. Opening with an amazing, nearly silent scene and ending with a bittersweet epilogue, “Hugo” rewards older silver screen buffs and children alike, which does not happen often in PG entertainment. Scorsese has created something that can only be described as pure magic. Information about “Hugo” can be found at hugomovie.com.

Director Tomas Alfredson’s Cold Warera cure for insomnia “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” attempts to balance dispassionate detachment from the subject material with close-ups of middle-aged British men sitting in offices while looking contemplative. It’s as exciting as it sounds. Alfredson’s strategic miscalculation is further compounded by the fact that the aforementioned middle-aged men are none other than the woefully underused acting heavyweights Gary Oldman, Colin Firth and John Hurt. Alfredson’s direction strives for understatement and nuance. However, his glacial pacing throttles the life out of his actors. Set in London during the early 1970s, “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” begins with Control (Hurt) imparting his suspicion that the Russians have planted a double agent in the upper echelons of British Secret Intelligence Service, MI-6. Control

©2011, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES INC.

BY THE MEPHAM GROUP, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

SUDOKU

Difficulty Level: 1 out of 4 Instructions: Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudokudragon.com

Movie: HUGO Directed by: MARTIN SCORSESE Release Date: NOV. 22 Grade: A

Solutions available online at www.thedailyaztec.com ©2011, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES INC.

‘Tinker Tailor’ spying dull senior staff writer

VIRGO (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) - Today is a 9 Focus on work for the next couple of days. You don't have to take at the expense of someone else. There's enough for everyone ... more than you think. LIBRA (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) - Today is an 8 An abrupt change occurs at work. Shift to accommodate, and get back in gear. You and a partner get a morale booster. Reward the crew with treats. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 - Nov. 21) - Today is a 7 Be open to innovation. Ask others how they would do it, and keep the best, most cost-effective ideas. Map the plan and get a boost when you set it in motion. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 - Dec. 21) - Today is a 9 - Give your analytical mind a rest, and get creative with writing. You don't have to question everything. Love drops a surprise in your lap. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19) - Today is an 8 - Bask in the glory and rake in the dough. Your decisions could result in great profitability, but don't stress about it. Maintain your resolve, and stay active. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) - Today is a 9 - You're entering a powerful phase. Let your self-esteem power you through to the finish line. Focus on your achievements, even if you don't win the race. PISCES (Feb. 19 - March 20) - Today is a 7 Make keeping old commitments a priority, and burn through that list. It's so satisfying to check things off. Share home-cooked food with those closest to you.

MCT CAMPUS

PA S S T H E P O P C O R N

Andrew Younger

BY NANCY BLACK, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

sends agent Jim Prideaux (Mark Strong) to meet with a Hungarian general willing to release the name of the double agent. The plan goes awry when the Russians lay a trap to shoot and capture Prideaux before he gets a name from the general. The plot inexplicably fast-forwards to the aftermath of the agency following Prideaux’s disappearance. This leaves retired agent George Smiley (Oldman) to piece together the identity of the mole-like Michael Corleone in “The Godfather: Part II” through a series of interviews and poorly defined flashbacks. The straight-faced (and ironically named) Smiley would make for an intriguing character if the audience were shown some glimpse of his reputation or capabilities. Instead, the audience is saddled with a protagonist more nebulous than mysterious and certainly not interesting enough to shoulder the film’s 128minute runtime. Even more problematic than a milquetoast for a hero in a globetrotting spy thriller is the lack of danger

presented. When novelist John le Carre wrote “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” in 1974, a Russian spy embedded in British Intelligence was a contemporary threat relevant to readers. However, director Alfredson neglects nearly 40 years of perspective and fails to compensate for the knowledge that the Soviet Union loses the Cold War by establishing an emotional connection to any of the characters. Alfredson, who directed the masterful Swedish vampire story “Let the Right One In,” used the same techniques in “Tinker Tailor” for the wrong effect. Whereas the deliberate pace and emotional detachment of the children in “Let the Right One In” reinforced those characters’ sense of isolation, the clinical perspective Alfredson brings to a cloak-and-dagger story makes a fascinating subject dull and impenetrable.

Movie: TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY Directed by: TOMAS ALFREDSON Release Date: DEC. 9 Grade: C-

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PLEASE NOTE: The views expressed in the written works of this issue do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Daily Aztec. Letters to the editor can be sent to letters@thedailyaztec.com. Story ideas can be sent to tips@thedailyaztec.com.

/ DailyAztecvideo CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Postseason gridiron game, and a hint to the puzzle theme found in starred answers 5 Baseball card brand 10 Young men 14 Tiny battery 15 Well-honed 16 Vicinity 17 *Sign of a typing mistake 19 Dogpatch possessive 20 Country singer Gibbs 21 Ostrich cousins 23 Quick swim 24 Before, before 25 *Indigent’s request 29 Nine-digit ID 30 Ready 31 Not a good area for nonswimmers 32 Rehab woes, briefly 34 Also-ran 35 Little demon 38 *Wizard’s game in the rock opera “Tommy” 41 B’way sellout sign 42 Shearer of “The Red Shoes” 44 ID checker’s concern 45 An original Mouseketeer 48 Séance sound 50 Make a choice 53 *Street urchin 55 “To Kill a Mockingbird” author Harper __ 56 AOL chats 57 California wine valley 58 Church chorus 60 Playwright Simon

BY RICH NORRIS & JOYCE LEWIS, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

Solutions available online at www.thedailyaztec.com 62 *Chain for plussize women’s fashion 65 Automaker Ferrari 66 “What’s in __?”: Juliet 67 Orchard grower 68 Fret 69 Pert 70 Murderous Stevenson character DOWN 1 Moistens in the pan 2 Many John Wayne movies 3 President Harding 4 Lion’s den 5 Taoist Lao-__ 6 “Well, lookee here!”

7 Road repair worker 8 Future doc’s undergrad concentration 9 Smarten (up) 10 “Well, __-didah!” 11 Desert feature 12 Fashion world VIP 13 Los Angeles bay named for an apostle 18 Smooch 22 Turtle’s protection 26 Salon service often paired with a mani 27 Memo-routing abbr. 28 GI’s address 33 Entrepreneuraiding org.

35 Makes believe 36 Memorial structure 37 Peewee 38 Eucharistic plate 39 Farming prefix 40 “Look before you __” 43 On a pension: Abbr. 46 Sung syllables 47 Francia neighbor 49 Bartlett or Bosc 50 Chicago Fire Mrs. 51 In a sty, say 52 Exam taker 54 Family matriarchs 59 Fable 61 Sad 63 911 response initials 64 Ottoman governor


11-29-2011