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SDSU awarded $145 million

TUESDAY November 1, 2011 Volume 97, Issue 38 W W W.T H E D A I LYA Z T E C . C O M

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ANTONIO ZARAGOZA, PHOTO EDITOR

Kevin Smead staff writer During the last academic year, San Diego State was awarded $145.2 million in contracts and research grants. This figure is comparable to the amount of grant money received the previous academic year, which totaled $151 million. In a statement issued, SDSU president, Dr. Elliot Hirshman, noted the importance of SDSU’s small research programs, saying it is “affecting lives in San Diego, throughout California, and around the world.” The money for the grants came from a variety of sources and is being put to use in a number of different fields. The National Science Foundation issued SDSU a total of 51 grants for a sum of $8,952,230. Part of this money

funds the work of SDSU biology professor Forest Rohwer. Rohwer and his team are working to stop the destruction of the world’s coral reefs caused by climate change and overfishing, which he says are almost 30 percent destroyed with an additional 50 percent of the reefs in danger. Rohwer is also looking at viral sequences in stressed coral, which come in the form of an ancient herpes-like virus. Another major source of funding came from the National Institutes of Health, which gave $32.2 million. The NIH is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and is the major medical research agency for the nation. The NIH is comprised of 27 different institutes and centers, all focusing on different research areas. Associated to SDSU is the National Heart, Lung and BloodInstitute, as well as the National Cancer Institute. The funding from these institutions will go to specific projects such as Mark

A few highlights in 2009-2010 Fundraising SDSU received $151 million ($18.7 million from the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act, which also provided $9.3 million in 2010-2011). National Institute of Health awarded a combined $32,206,815 through 103 grants National Science Foundation awarded a combined $8,952,230 through 51 grants SDSU researchers received a total of 799 awards, totaling $145,180,000

Sussman’s studies on heart failure and myocardial cellular survival, and Elva Arredondo’s work addressing the high rates of cancer and other chronic dis-

eases in the Latino population by promoting physical activity. Additionally, the Small Business Administration provided $599,978 to the “Advanced Defense Technologies Cluster,” which helps develop new equipment for the U.S. military. San Diego is one of three regions to receive this award. The contract is locally focused, as the work is done in conjunction with businesses in San Diego. The ADTC encompasses a number of different fields, with as focus in areas such as cyber security, communications and renewable energy. The overall goal of the program is to help small businesses based in San Diego expand into the worldwide defense marketplace. Since 2005, SDSU has been ranked as the No. 1 small-research university in the nation according to the Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index.

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Conference to spur college interest Information session hopes to motivate high school students Bill Crotty news editor On Saturday, the Hispanic Business Student Association is hosting its second annual high school conference to promote higher education and inspire students to pursue a college degree after high school. “We have different workshops that are going to provide help for students and inspire them to stay in school, keep going to school and reach a higher education,” Shastity Urias, a co-coordinator of the event, said. The event will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Exercise and Nutritional Science building on campus. Last year, about 50 students attended the conference, but more than 200 are expected at this week’s event. The conference is a necessity because Hispanic students have one of the highest high school dropout rates. According to the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics, Hispanic students had a dropout rate of 17.6 percent in 2009, 4 percent higher than the next most likely group.

To help decrease this statistic, high school students will be able to meet SDSU students and talk to them about a variety of topics that will prepare high school students for college and encourage them to attend. “The (high school) students will be able to talk about scholarships and how they can get them, different ways to become involved in college and organizations, and the opportunities available to them,” Urias said. According to Urias there would be information about different community colleges, in case students are not prepared for a four-year university experience yet. Part of the conference will focus on transferring to a four-year school after starting in community college. The keynote speaker for the event will be Geena the Latina, a co-host of the Frankie and Geena morning radio show, who, according to the HBSA, has worked through many obstacles in her life and stayed involved with her native culture. Also on the agenda are workshops about studying abroad, Latina leadership, entrepreneurship and how to pay for college. HBSA won both the Excellence in Marking Award and the Outstanding Organization Award at the 2011 Future Rising Business Leaders Awards.

Status dropout rates of 16- through 24-year-olds in the civilian, noninstitutionalized population, by race/ethnicity: Selected years, 1980-2009 ASIAN/ PACIFIC AMERICAN INDIAN ISLANDER /ALASKAN NATIVE

YEAR

TOTAL

WHITE

BLACK

HISPANIC

1980

14.1

11.4

19.1

35.2

1985

12.6

10.4

15.2

27.6

1990

12.1

9.0

13.2

32.4

4.9

16.4

1995

12.0

8.6

12.1

30.0

3.9

13.4

1998

11.8

7.7

13.8

29.5

4.1

11.8

1999

11.2

7.3

12.6

28.6

4.3

2000

10.9

6.9

13.1

27.8

3.8

14.0

2001

10.7

7.3

10.9

27.0

3.6

13.1

2002

10.5

6.5

11.3

25.7

3.9

16.8 15.0

2003

9.9

6.3

10.9

23.5

3.9

2004

10.3

6.8

11.8

23.8

3.6

17.0

2005

9.4

6.0

10.4

22.4

2.9

14.0

2006

9.3

5.8

10.7

22.1

3.6

14.7

2007

8.7

5.3

8.4

21.4

6.1

19.3

2008

8.0

4.8

9.9

18.3

4.4

14.6

2009

8.1

5.2

9.3

17.6

3.4

13.2

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2011). The Condition of Education 2011 (NCES 2011-033), Indicator 20.

PLAINTIFF

OPINION

PETA’s lawsuit against SeaWorld is purely a publicity stunt.

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D A I LY

AZTEC Tuesday, November 1, 2011

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Strangers’ posted secrets provide hope PostSecret provides an outlet for online confessionals Amy DeVito staff writer Secrets are not fun, unless shared with everyone. Hidden deep within the soul of every individual lays clandestine memories and meditations of the psyche. Some secrets are harbored inside and kept at a safe distance, even from friends and family, for the simple reason that exposing the truth can be frightening. However, candid release can

“I think of each postcard as a living work of art,” founder of PostSecret Frank Warren said. “And as art, secrets can have different layers of truth. Some can be both true and false, others can become true over time depending on our choices.” The website is adorned with drawings and photographs infused with poetry and creative artwork to produce a plethora of unique, personalized displays. Thousands of people send cards in the hopes of being featured, and every Sunday the website is updated with new entries. Each one is completely unique from the next. “I check the website rather religiously,” English junior Laura Palosari said. “Every Sunday I read through the new posts with great excitement.”

“I think of each postcard as a living work of art. And as art, secrets can have different layers of truth. Some can be both true and false, others can become true over time ...” Frank Warren, founder of PostSecret sometimes bring a profound sense of enlightenment. Postsecret.com offers that window of opportunity. PostSecret is an ongoing community art project where people mail their secrets anonymously on a homemade postcard. The initiative is not to embarrass or bring shame to those revealing cherished memories or affections, but rather to give a sense of hope and liberation through the publishing of secrets. By allowing thousands of viewers to peer into the very core of someone, a new value of connection and mutual comprehension may be established. People confess to the most profane yet genuine thoughts, revealing absolutely anything from fevered obsessions and love proposals to frightening childhood stories. Some postcards are hilarious, such as people owning up to pulling pranks on their bosses. Some admit to rather grotesque and unimaginable rituals, and then there are the deeply moving narratives that reflect upon traumatic experiences. PostSecret encourages followers to remove the shackles of secrecy in the most awe-inspiring and innovative ways possible.

Postcards are pulled from several generations and nations to illustrate the vast range of emotions and experiences shared among many people. It may come as a surprise how much inspiration naturally blooms from the works of others and how touched one can feel after reading another person’s card. Streams of jubilance and love can be found alongside dark and disturbingly unfortunate realities. For this reason, PostSecret works to be proactive and helpful while working closely with suicide prevention agencies and other health organizations. PostSecret has also published several books of confession throughout the years. Additionally, the organization has just began hosting PostSecret Live in select areas in hopes of promoting stability and unity among the larger communities throughout the nation. The website aims to foster a better understanding of self and serves as a portal for all to confide. So whether seeking to reveal a deep-rooted frustration or a lovesick obsession, PostSecret grants the public the chance to let out revelations of all proportions on one tiny postcard.

Need a job? The Daily Aztec is hiring for the spring semester. Open positions include: —New Editor —Web Editor —Assistant Copy Chief —Art Director —Assistant Art Director For an application or job description, email jobs@thedailyaztec.com. Interviews will be held on Monday, Nov. 21 from 3:30-7 p.m.

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D A I LY

AZTEC Tuesday, November 1, 2011

OPINION

PETA’s slavery lawsuit serves no porpoise

S

hamu and the gang have become a revered symbol of America’s finest city — at least according to Ron Burgundy — not to mention one of San Diego’s biggest tourist draws. But now an outside force conspires to tarnish our pride and taint our entertainment with foul accusations. Animal rights group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has sued SeaWorld for violating the 13th Amendment of the Constitution by holding the orca whales in a condition of slavery. And who, you ask, are the plaintiffs of this case? The five whales. I’m sure this viral news story has already provided a welcome dose of humor for many readers in San Diego and around the country. But as amusing as it is to picture a 6ton orca being wheeled into the courtroom in a glass tank, the substance of the complaint and the strategy behind it are worth a more serious examination. Of course it should be obvious to any rational person the U.S. Constitution only applies to humans. The preamble makes it clear the document applies to “We the people of the United States,” not “We the various mammals, indigenous and intro-

Randy Wilde staff columnist duced,” though apparently corporations are close enough. The fact is, there is no legal basis for the lawsuit, and I think even PETA knows it’s just a charade to get attention. This kind of wacky publicity stunt has become PETA’s MO. Campaigns with celebrities posing nude, red paint thrown on fur coats and porn websites promoting vegetarianism may make headlines, but I’ve seen little evidence of real change resulting from such tactics. In fact, it may have the opposite effect, alienating reasonable people and making it harder to understand and contribute to a just cause. You’d expect such a well-known organization to do better than play the naughty toddler acting out to get Mom and Dad’s attention. However, the lack of constitutional corroboration and PETA’s questionable tactics don’t render the moral core of the argument unjustified. It may indeed be true that the orcas’ conditions — and porpoises, turtles, penguins, otters and other oceanic animals — cause the animals stress, discomfort and poor health. It’s hard

to imagine a huge animal accustomed to swimming freely from one hemisphere to the other being happily confined to a small concrete pool. Almost everyone can agree we must take the suffering or well-being of animals into moral consideration. The profusion of pets is evidence enough of our human desire to care for animals — a surprising 63 percent of U.S. households have at least one pet. And yet, somehow this respect and empathy often stops at furry house pets, or, at most, large, pretty mammals such as polar bears and tigers. The fact that SeaWorld’s whales are large charismatic creatures capable of garnering sympathy may be the reason PETA chose to focus on them. This is the organization’s second mistake. If you’re going to talk about inhumane treatment of animals, there is no reason not to start with the horrendous conditions of animals on factory farms, or other abuses on a systemic scale. Even ugly creatures from outside class mammalia can suffer, thrive and play an integral role in a wider ecosystem. Making the public more conscious of that fact would be much more useful than playing into unhelpful stereotypes. My final issue with this lawsuit is that the application of the 13th Amendment seems to equate animal domestication with human slavery, and assumes animals deserve completely equal rights to humans. I find this view somewhere between flawed and morally reprehensible. If an organization really wants to make progress, it should focus on education to lay the groundwork for an attitude shift. It should focus on achievable goals that can attract wider support to make real policy changes. A better strategy to help the whales would have been to focus on the facts in exposing their poor conditions, rather than distracting the issue with ridiculous gimmicks that will turn most people off. Sometimes public sentiment and consumer pressure are mightier than the gavel.

RANDY WILDE IS AN ISCOR SENIOR.

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HOROSCOPE TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (11/1/11) Celebrate at home with people you love, and let them shower you with affection. Don't be afraid to return a compliment. Say what you have to say, but the gold is in how you listen. Fill your year with experimentation, for breakthrough discoveries. To get the advantage, check the day's rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. ARIES (March 21 - April 19) - Today is an 8 A quiet, reflective morning suits the mood and gets stuff done. It's a good time to sell. Talk more in the afternoon. Your social life heats up this evening. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) - Today is an 8 - Trust the friends that believe in you more than you do. Launch your next project, and enjoy the ride as well as the destination. There's fun ahead. GEMINI (May 21 - June 21) - Today is a 7 Review all logical steps, prepare everything in private, and then make your decision. Celebrate with good friends, great food and beautiful scenery. CANCER (June 22 - July 22) - Today is an 8 - The road to acceptance has denial and resistance. It's all part of it. You can find the necessary funds. Don't get blinded by reality or success. Say "thank you." LEO (July 23 - Aug. 22) - Today is an 8 Spend some time exploring new partnerships. It's not always about you. Really listen to what others have to say. A female reveals a secret. It's getting interesting.

VIRGO (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) - Today is an 8 Don't get so busy that you forget what's really important. Your creativity is a plus. The fewer words you use, the better. Keep things focused and clear. LIBRA (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) - Today is a 7 Romance is a growing possibility for the next two days. Creativity and beauty play a larger part than normal. Escape to a peaceful spot to get an idea to flower. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 - Nov. 21) - Today is a 7 Personal comfort must be considered today. Stay close to home, and nurture yourself (saving money in the process). You can still be productive. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 - Dec. 21) - Today is a 9 - Money's not everything, but it sure helps. Don't go around wasting what you don't have. Accept an invitation. You notice beauty in random places now. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19) - Today is an 8 - Focus on finances to grow profitability. Avoid distractions that create new work. Be inventive, and barter if needed. Trade services. Get what you need. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) - Today is a 9 - You're on top of your game and ready for a touchdown. Bring it on! Nothing can stop you now, in communication, art or love, all of which are in perfect harmony. PISCES (Feb. 19 - March 20) - Today is a 5 It's not the best time to pop the question ... or for romance in general. The mood's a bit flat. Focus instead on learning skills and practicing. Make your pitch later. ©2011, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES INC.

BY THE MEPHAM GROUP, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

SUDOKU

Difficulty Level: 1 out of 4 Instructions: Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudokudragon.com Solutions available online at www.thedailyaztec.com ©2011, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES INC.

LIKE SDSU news? CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Held, as a protest 7 Beggar’s request 11 T-shirt sizes, for short 14 Bow user 15 Homebuyer’s request 16 “Bali __” 17 “Great” Russian emperor 18 Missing someone special 20 Modern recording device 22 “Now, listen to me ...” 23 Start of a fictional sea shanty 27 Flair 28 “Was __ forward?” 29 Have on 30 Enjoys the shallows 31 Duke U.’s conference 32 Jib or spinnaker 33 Flab 34 ’80s-’90s ABC drama 40 Time workers, briefly 41 Topsoil 42 Not worth a __ 43 Doorposts 46 Male swine 47 Poetic black 48 Layer between the sclera and retina 49 Quick nap 51 Interrupt 53 Adam’s second 54 Competitive look 56 Black Sea port 60 Before, in an ode 61 Country south of Iran 62 Discrimination based on years 63 Damascus is its cap.

/ Daily Aztec BY RICH NORRIS & JOYCE LEWIS, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

Solutions available online at www.thedailyaztec.com 64 Divisions in 65Across 65 Where one hears the starts of 18-, 23-, 34-, 49- and 54Across DOWN 1 Oozy tree output 2 Italian trio 3 Performance 4 Inner city area 5 Weird 6 Garage entrances 7 More than most 8 Not so tight 9 Expert 10 Bygone knife 11 Protection against spears 12 Gordon of “Oklahoma!” (1955)

13 Notes similarities (to) 19 Blade cover 21 “__ the loneliest number”: old song lyric 23 Italian automaker 24 Skin irritation 25 Centers of attention 26 Unpleasant smell 30 Measure of power 32 Conventions, for short 33 Interisland transport 35 Dealer’s incentive 36 Sporty Mazda 37 Literary ID 38 Barnes & Noble e-book reader

39 Six-shooters 43 Court figures 44 Zoo section 45 German physician from whose name a spellbinding word evolved 46 Black-spotted feline 47 Brennan of “Private Benjamin” 49 Oil holder 50 Golfer’s lofted iron 52 Sci-fi subjects 55 One-point Scrabble letters 57 It can be carnal or cardinal 58 Govt. assistance program 59 Trans __: certain Pontiacs

11-01-2011  

Volume 97, Issue 38