Issuu on Google+

CSU trustees approve pay raise Amy Williams staff writer The California State University Board of Trustees voted 11-3 on March 20 to increase the salaries of two CSU presidents by roughly 10 percent. Cal State Fullerton President Mildred Garcia will now receive $324,500 a year, while Cal State East Bay’s Leroy Morishita will receive $303,660. Each president will also receive a $12,000 car allowance and $60,000 for housing annually. The decision angered students protesting outside the meeting, who represented those who face further tuition hikes and enrollment cutbacks. Gov. Jerry Brown spoke in opposition of the pay increases. “The colleges, and not just those, but a lot of public employers, think they have to give pay raises. I don’t think so. Because the average person has not gotten a pay raise, and the kids have been paying more in tuition.” CSU administrators defended the raises, as they said they are necessary to attract the best presidents possible to the CSU system. According to CSU trustee Lou Monville, last year the two

presidents in question, “brought in $343 million in external resources back to this institution.” The 23 CSU presidents’ combined salaries consume $7 million of the approximately $2 billion CSU budget. This equates to 0.35 percent. Many who defend the raise said compared to universities across the United States, the CSU schools still have a lower average presidential salary. In response to the decision, Senator Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) introduced Senate Bill 967 to the Senate Education Committee, which would prohibit pay raises for both CSU and University of California administrators within two years of a tuition hike or budget cut. The bill did not pass the committee. Instead, the Board of Trustees are constrained by the 10 percent limit on presidential salary raises. The decision became even more controversial because at the same meeting, the trustees discussed how to assess the $200 million cut that will occur if Brown’s tax initiative fails this fall. All but eight CSUs may have to wait list all applicants to the Fall 2013 semester, and the Cal Grant system will be further hurt. Some schools may enact unit caps on students.

MONDAY April 2, 2012 Volume 97, Issue 96 W W W.T H E D A I LYA Z T E C . C O M

facebook.com/dailyaztec twitter: thedailyaztec

SCAN CODE FOR MOBILE CONTENT

SDSU’S INDEPENDENT STUDENT N E W S PA P E R SINCE 1913

INDEX:

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

Mildred Garcia (left) and Leroy Morishita (right). | COURTESY OF MCT CAMPUS AND CSU EAST BAY

Secrets, regret and emotions roil in The Old Globe’s latest production.

2

Harambee Weekend opens arms

More than 50 African-American students received a warm welcome to kick off Explore SDSU weekend last month. | COURTESY OF BRANDON WILLIAMS

Edward Henderson senior staff writer Last month, San Diego State’s Cross Cultural Center hosted its third annual Harambee Weekend. The event, named after the Swahili word meaning

“all pull together,” hosts recently admitted African American students and their families. Students are given the opportunity to interact with current SDSU students and spend the night in a residence hall before Explore SDSU activities begin the next day. Parents are able to speak with current students, faculty and administrators about pro-

grams SDSU offers to make their children’s transition into college as smooth as possible. The event was created in response to backlash from national coverage of the Compton Cookout hosted by fraternity members from University of California San Diego in February of 2010. The off-campus cookout was hosted to mock black his-

tory month and encouraged guests to wear “ghetto attire.” SDSU student Nasnet Andemariam served as one of the facilitators of Harambee Weekend. “Students were going to feel like they couldn’t come to any school in San Diego because all the schools were racist,” said Andemariam. “(Harambee Weekend) was a part of an initiative to show prospective African American students that SDSU isn’t like that.” Once African American high school students receive acceptance letters from SDSU, they also receive an invitation to attend Harambee Weekend. This year’s event hosted 50 students and their families. While parents spoke with faculty and administrators, student volunteers provided entertainment for the high school students. Performances included spoken word poets, singers and a dance routine from SDSU’s K.O. Hip-Hop Dance Team. After the performances, the overnight portion of the event began in Chapultepec. SDSU student volunteers held an open discussion with the high school students answering questions and concerns about what life is like at SDSU. Volunteers ended the night with games, music and one-onone interaction with students.

Hundreds gather for Pow Wow Faculty behind SDSU’s American Indian studies honored Alejandra Paz staff writer On Saturday, March 17, the San Diego State American Indian Alumni Association hosted its Iipay Mateyum 41st

Annual Pow Wow at the Parma Payne Goodall Alumni Center. The event was sponsored by the SDSU’s President’s Fund while the SDSU Native American Student Alliance tabled in support. Children as young as two years old were in attendance and were exposed to the university at an early age, called the Soaring Eagles. Vice President of the American Indian Alumni Association, Jerry Martinez said the purpose of the powwow is to promote awareness of Native

American heritage throughout the community and surrounding areas. “It is important to enhance the Native American heritage in our campus,” Martinez said. “Presently we have an underrepresented presence of Native Americans on campus.” During the ceremony, retired professor emerita Dr. Gwendalle Cooper was honored for her service to the community and for playing an integral role in inaugurating American Indian studies at SDSU.

SDSU’s Chief Diversity Officer Dr. Aaron Bruce said it is important to acknowledge those who have contributed to the community. He said it was great to see Cooper’s former students supporting her. Bruce said becoming aware of what SDSU was before becoming a university is imperative. “This campus is Kumeyaay land, the land of the original people,” Bruce said. “We must recognize the importance of history as we move forward.”

E N T E R TA I N M E N T New releases from The All American Rejects and Adestria delight.

S DS -V I E W

2 4

I stopped caring if the answers were correct or not. My brain spewed ridiculousness, it was hard enough to pick up a pencil at that point. B A C K PA G E

8

W E AT H E R : SUNNY HIGH: 76 LOW: 50 SUNSET: 7:10PM


2

D A I LY

AZTEC Monday, April 2, 2012

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

A L L T H E W O R L D ’ S A S TA G E

‘Anna’ sails on emotionally turbulent seas David Dixon staff writer The Christopherson’s sure are an interesting family. Chris Christopherson (Bill Buell) and his daughter Anna (Jessica Love) both want to protect each other for completely different reasons. Ironically, their good intentions lead them to suffer the consequences of their own actions. The Old Globe’s production of “Anna Christie” is set during Fall 1910 when the alcohol-loving coal barge captain, Chris, is reunited with Anna. He abandoned her as a child because he did not want to expose her to the dangers of the sea. Chris allows the emotionally distant Anna to join him on his barge. Soon after, she falls in love with an easily angered sailor, Mat Burke (Austin Durant). Once Anna tells her father and Mat a secret she has been hiding, they both react in shocking ways that will affect all of their lives. Eugene O’Neill’s dialogue is a big selling point in this revival. His words can be gloomy, yet there are beautiful, poetic moments of hope

in which he shows empathy from the main characters. At its heart, “Anna Christie” is a threeperson play, though there is a total of nine performers. The second half of the production is comprised of lengthy intimate conversations, which is when “Anna Christie” is at its best. As individual performers, Love, Buell and Durant can be great, but together they fuse metaphorical fireworks with the almost overwhelmingly disturbing scene when Anna reveals her hidden past. It comes as a shock because there are very few indications that the plot will take such a grim turn. Director Daniel Goldstein’s vision is perfect for O’Neill’s melancholy prose, though he also includes personal touches such as when Anna is trying to make a crucial decision for her future as Joni Mitchell’s song “Blue” plays in the background. It is risky incorporating the 1970s single into something that was written more than 50 years prior, but it pays off as Mitchell’s voice along with Love’s sad silence adds a surprising amount of pathos. Goldstein’s direction stands out the

most in a transition from Act 1 to Act 2. The unforgettable moment occurs when a saloon is suddenly transformed into Chris’ barge. This sequence is a wonderful couple of minutes that cannot be done justice in a review and should be experienced as a live stage performance. “Anna Christie” is surprisingly timeless in its themes. The issues involve abandonment, forgiveness and redemption that all factor into the decisions the flawed characters face. These characters are so emotionally damaged they should not earn sympathy from the audience. Fortunately, O’Neill’s writing along with the amazing central actors make them full of humanity. Without aging a bit, “Anna Christie” is still a beautiful small-scale story with individuals who are not necessarily superior to anyone else in real life. They are only trying to do what every decent person should, attempting to make up for crucial mistakes they have committed in the past. Tickets and information about “Anna Christie” can be found at theoldglobe.org.

The small cast deals with intense emotions in a compelling way. | COURTESY OF HENRY DIROCCO

TURN IT UP

Rejects and Adestria drop quality albums The All-American Rejects are back with characteristic alt-pop The title of the new The AllAmerican Rejects full-length is a bit ironic: the foursome, led by hollowcheeked beauty Tyson Ritter, are not kids. If anything, “Kids in the Street” proves the band’s maturity. Ritter no longer sings sassiness such as “When the World Comes Down’s” “Gives You Hell,” but instead croons with a ripeness unheard in previous albums (vulgar language included). The result is a powerfully moving set of tracks, each with its own quirkiness that only the Rejects can pull off, and all representing a pure form of rock that has mostly disappeared in today’s dubstep and pop world. The album is dripping with the group’s unique flavor, which is most apparent on tracks “Beekeeper’s Daughter,” “Kids in the Street” and “Someday’s Gone.” Others, such as

Allie Daugherty editor in chief “Bleed Into Your Mind,” are more experimental, but still as enjoyable. Ultimately, “Kids” proves itself worthy of the more than three-year wait.

The All-American Rejects Kids in the Street

Young yet talented, Adestria Adestria blends styles Chapters and makes its own Adestria’s latest full-length album is an energetic punk / heavy metal / pop blend that seems to be the latest thing in today’s music world. But don’t let that be deterring — “Chapters” rises above the crowd with musical precision and frontman Matt Anderson’s vocals stand on par with other screamo bands such as The Devil Wears Prada and August Burns Red. This is a feat, considering the oldest member of the San Diego sextet is merely 21. Meanwhile, the fullness in melody supporting the lyrics gives the album momentum with an edge. Every song, save for the piano ballad “More Than You Know,” is an instant catalyst for a mosh pit. The band also gets a fair share of help from members of The World Alive, Vanna and In Fear and Faith, which each contribute to a song. The record is fierce and enjoyable, and for a young band beginning to emerge onto the scene, that’s not a bad way to go.

COURTESY OF RAZOR AND TIE PUBLICITY

BEHIND THE NUMBERS

SPONSORED BY

ON A BOAT 4

Cruise ship companies using the Port of San Diego

1,187

Length of the world’s largest cruise ship, Allure of the Seas, in feet

1,101

Length of the USS Enterprise CVN-65, in feet

746 3

Estimated capacity of a Maersk PS class container ship, in millions of bananas The fastest transatlantic crossing by boat, in days

173

The fastest transatlantic flight, in minutes

30

Confirmed dead in Costa Concordia disaster

155

COURTESY OF RAZOR AND TIE PUBLICITY

Advanced Test Preparation

Loss in profit for Costa owners Carnival after disaster, in millions of dollars

Advanced Test Preparation

Score Higher, Aztecs!


D A I LY A Z T E C Monday, April 2, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS HELP WANTED

SERVICES

SERVICES

SERVICES

UCSD female cancer survivor studies. Compensation for participation. For more information call (858) 822-0768 or email ayastudy.ucsd@gmail.com

SERVICES ARRESTED? DUI? THEFT? Call Attorney Bradley Corbett for all Misdemeanors and Felonies. (619) 800-4449. Student Discount.

5BR/4BA, 2500 sq. ft. XXL Bedrooms! Located near SDSU. 5000 sq. ft. yard, parking, W/D, and fireplace. Available July 1, 2012. $3200. (619) 985-9739.

589-9900 www.aplusreview.com

College of Business Econ Stats Math MIS Acctg 102 119 120 180 201 MIS MIS FIN FIN FIN 301 302 323 325 329

PLEASE RECYCLE SCORE YOUR HIGHER PAPER IN A RECYCLE BIN OR PERHAPS A the BIRD daily aztec CAGE.

ROOMS FOR RENT FEMALE STUDENT ROOMMATE WANTED to sublease bedroom in 4 bed/2 bath apartment at the Granada on Hardy for June and July. Fully furnished, W/D included, free tanning bed, study room, Free HBO & TiVo, Market at complex, steps from campus, friendly cool roommates. Call Breanna 805-551-9159 or email breannaburditt@yahoo.com

Our entire purpose is to prepare and perform a “perfect” exam-review, whereby our students get the highest grades in the class. PERIOD. We dumb down the material and spoon feed it to you. Together we work through every possible problem and every possible concept.

THE DAILY AZTEC DOES NOT ENDORSE OR SUPPORT AND HAS NO AFFILIATION WITH THE PRODUCTS OR SERVICES OFFERED IN THE CLASSIFIEDS SECTION.

HOUSES FOR RENT

REVIEW Econ 101 Acctg 202

3

Tired of the economic Try the low rates of The Daily Aztec! Display/Online 619-594-6977 • Classifieds 619-594-4199

please recycle your paper.


D A I LY

AZTEC Monday, April 2, 2012

4

B AC K PAG E

MISCELLANEOUS MUSINGS

HOROSCOPE

Dawn, dead on my feet

H

ave you ever seen the first five minutes of a zombie movie, when the zombies stumble around, groaning, uttering nonsense, bumping into things while causing general chaos with their mindlessness? I haven’t, but I assume it goes something like that. I recently lived through midterms. Countless tests, long study hours, events and meetings and no time to sleep. The duration left me feeling a little less energetic, and a little more zombie-like.

Bree Lutjens staff columnist Then, I stumbled down the hall to the bathrooms, probably scaring half of the people in my residence hall who were tired enough to believe there was an actual zombie wandering the halls. I may or may not have run into the couch in the lounge on my way out, because, let’s face it, I’m not terribly graceful … especially in the morning. I tried to avoid looking at my face in the mirror because goodness knows it was not a pretty

Each morning, I woke ... and stumbled around, trying to pull something out of my closet that actually matched ... like jeans and a shirt, as opposed to two shirts and a sock. Each morning, I woke up after six alarms — yes, six — and stumbled around, trying to pull something out of my closet that actually matched. Not “looks cute” matched, but legitimately could be paired — like jeans and a shirt, as opposed to two shirts and a sock. After that, I attempted to put them on, which took a good 10 minutes, because my too-tired brain couldn’t seem to remember pants go on legs and shirts cover the top half.

sight. I brushed my teeth, praying no one came in while I was there, because that’s just one more person who’s not going to be able to watch “Dawn of the Dead” again without having compounded nightmares. During the day, my zombie-ness was only slightly reduced. I could just barely tolerate sunlight, but I could make it through my day. When I arrived at each class I was met with a slightly conscious person, but only

just. I don’t sleep through classes, but my tired brain was barely able to retain anything past the fact that I still needed to be studying for another class as soon as that one was finished. Like a zombie, I was not completely dead, but I was barely there, occasionally mumbling nonsense and easily distracted. That’s all I could do to get through tests without sleeping. After that, I just answered questions, filled out scantrons and left as soon as possible to a place where there was a bed and a pillow with my name on it. At a point, I stopped caring if the answers were correct or not. My brain spewed ridiculousness, and it was hard enough to pick up a pencil at that point. Then finally, mercifully, the weekend came, and I didn’t know what to do. I continued to stumble, muttering words about food and sleep, running into things and scaring the poor souls who have to live near me. And then the realization hit — it was the weekend. Tests were done. I didn’t have to study. I didn’t have to sit in class for the next two days. I was free. And then the most important realization: I could sleep. And so I went to bed, finally reunited with the pillow that had been so patiently waiting for me. I hoped when I woke (probably two days from then) I would be much less a zombie and much more a regular person.

—Bree Lutjens is a public relations freshman.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (4/2/12) The framework you've been building is coming together. Your network is your greatest treasure, so find ways to remind everyone in it. Career bustle and prosperity could tempt a spending increase, but save for rainy days, too. More and more, you discover how much you make a difference. To get the advantage, check the day's rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. ARIES (March 21 - April 19) - Today is a 7 Wait to make a final decision; there's no need to rush. Think over all the hidden options. Take a hike or get into physical action, and the perfect answer percolates. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) - Today is a 7 Yesterday's fool had pranks (or not). Today you may as well wait to make a move. The joke would fall flat. Keep planning, and analyze a strategy for success. GEMINI (May 21 - June 21) - Today is a 7 Cash flow improves, and you feel more balanced now. It's not as much as you hoped, or as little as you'd feared. Stick with the facts, and let the rest go. CANCER (June 22 - July 22) - Today is an 8 - Abundance is yours. Sync schedules with your partner. Some of the things you try might not work, but your community has all the resources you need. LEO (July 23 - Aug. 22) - Today is an 8 Don't fear exploration and adventure. Finish tasks at work, work out the finances and make it happen. You have what it takes. Whatever you lack can be found close by.

BY NANCY BLACK, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES VIRGO (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) - Today is a 7 You may find an answer in a dream. You're wiser than you realize. Big stories are just that. You feel more balanced and assured, so take on a new leadership role. LIBRA (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) - Today is a 7 Meditate for equilibrium, and that peace gives you focus and strength to power through the day. It's not a good day for travel. Distractions could tempt. Stick to basics. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 - Nov. 21) - Today is a 6 Stick to your principles. Ask for what you want. Generate harmony at home. Friends and finances don't mix for about thirty hours, so postpone money talk. Get some sunshine. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 - Dec. 21) - Today is a 7 - Don't fear the road less traveled. You're likely to find romance along the way. Avoid financial risks, though. Trust your intuition and dance into the night. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19) - Today is a 6 - When all else fails (or before it does), focus on the small details. It's easy to get distracted from your financial goals. Adaptation is key. Watch the trail ahead. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) - Today is a 7 - Start the week with an injection of optimism and self-confidence. Focus on abundance, even if it seems impossible. You can rely on others, and they on you. PISCES (Feb. 19 - March 20) - Today is an 8 - Your imagination comes in handy to solve a work problem. Beware of a mirage, financially speaking. Reward yourself with good amounts of deep, delicious rest. ©2012, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES INC.

BY THE MEPHAM GROUP, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

SUDOKU

Difficulty Level: 1 out of 4 Instructions: Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudokudragon.com

S DS -V I E W

Solutions available online at www.thedailyaztec.com ©2012, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES INC.

M O .C C E T Z A Y IL A D E H .T W WW CROSSWORD

PADDLE ON, AZTECS Stand up paddling instructor Pamela Strom took this shot of her students exercising on their boards at the Mission Bay Aquatic Center.

C O N TA C T : GENERAL INFORMATION

619.594.4199

FOR ALL OTHER CONTACTS, PLEASE VISIT

thedailyaztec.com

PLEASE NOTE: The views expressed in the written works of this issue do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Daily Aztec. Letters to the editor can be sent to letters@thedailyaztec.com. Story ideas can be sent to tips@thedailyaztec.com.

ACROSS 1 Jon of “Mad Men” 5 Knight fights 11 Roll of dough 14 Slangy prefix meaning “super” 15 Oust from office 16 Ornamental climbing plant 17 Roller coaster feature 18 Batter’s position 19 Anonymous John 20 One completely lacking morals 23 Small batteries 24 Sound preceding “Oof!” 25 2009 Will Ferrell dinosaur movie 32 Vaudeville show 33 Landlord’s contract 34 Paid athlete 36 “__ it now”: “Understood” 37 Writer H.H. or Alice 38 Security breach 39 Place for pickups 40 They may be cracked using stethoscopes 41 Abacus pieces 42 Woman with varying roles in Arthurian legend 45 __ guzzler 46 Indian bread 47 What exacting judges follow 55 __ Mahal 56 Political fugitive 57 Delude 58 Big fuss 59 Singer Bette 60 Team on a farm 61 Alphabet ender

BY RICH NORRIS & JOYCE LEWIS, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

Solutions available online at www.thedailyaztec.com 62 Animals for 5Across 63 Call to a queue DOWN 1 Boat’s bottom 2 “Peek-__!” 3 Siamese sound 4 Longtime logo with a top hat and monocle 5 Exactly right 6 Suspicious of 7 Defense gp. with pilots 8 Mailed 9 Gadget measuring rpm 10 Church high point 11 Hairline’s midpoint, perhaps 12 Swear

13 Change the color of, as hair 21 “Smooth Operator” singer 22 Lav in Leeds 25 Word before pad or tender 26 Common man with a six-pack? 27 Plump (up) 28 Basic principle 29 Severe 30 That, in Tijuana 31 Swap 32 You might brush barbecue sauce on one 35 Approves 37 “Little Red Book” writer 38 Used for support

40 Gamblers’ methods 41 Dull 43 “Who __?”: New Orleans Saints’ fans chant 44 Keys in 47 Stow below 48 Give off 49 Disney World’s Space Mountain, e.g. 50 Leer at 51 Wilma Flintstone’s guy 52 Opulence 53 Highest point 54 “What __ wrong?” 55 Looney Tunes devil, casually


04-02-2012