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Wednesday, March 10, 2010

Vol. 95, Issue 88

THE

DAILY

w w w. T h e D a i l y A z t e c . c o m

AZTEC

Tw i t t e r : T h e D a i l y A z t e c

San Diego State University’s Independent Student Newspaper since 1913

I N S I D E T O D AY FOOD & DRINK

Graduation report released

TEQUILA TASTING Test out the Tequila 101 course at El Vitral Restaurant twice a month. page 2

SPORTS

MADNESS BEGINS See what both SDSU basketball teams have ahead of them in this week’s MWC Tournament. page 4

TEMPO

DON’T BE LATE Tim Burton’s anticipated “Alice in Wonderland” hit theaters last Friday in IMAX 3-D. page 5 File Photo

While SDSU’s overall six-year graduation rate has significantly increased throughout the past decade, the report shows certain student groups are more likely to graduate than others.

SATURDAY @ SDSU Women’s Rights Symposium 6 p.m., Hardy Tower, room 140 Panelists from across the globe will address women’s roles in art, human rights, civil and military aviation. For more of today’s headlines, visit:

www.thedailyaztec.com

CONTACT GENERAL INFORMATION 619.594.4199

EDITOR

IN CHIEF, FARYAR BORHANI 619.594.4190 EDITOR@THEDAILYAZTEC .COM

CITY EDITOR, WHITNEY LAWRENCE 619.594.7781 CITYEDITOR@THEDAILYAZTEC .COM

FEATURES EDITOR, NICOLE CALLAS 619.594.6976 FEATURE@THEDAILYAZTEC .COM

Report targets groups with low graduation and retention rates A L E J A N D R A PA Z CONTRIBUTOR

San Diego State has worked to improve student success, and a recent report shows the extra effort has paid off. The Division of Undergraduate Studies released its Facilitating Graduation SDSU Delivery Plan Feb. 26. The plan not only highlights SDSU’s increasing graduation rates, but also outlines ways in which the university plans to increase the retention rate. The plan includes ways to increase graduation rates among first-time freshmen, transfer students and local area students.

SPORTS EDITOR, EDWARD LEWIS 619.594.7817 SPORTS@THEDAILYAZTEC .COM

OPINION, ALLAN ACEVEDO 619.594.0509 OPINION@THEDAILYAZTEC .COM

TEMPO EDITOR, ALLIE DAUGHERTY 619.594.6968 TEMPO@THEDAILYAZTEC .COM

ART DIRECTOR, ELENA BERRIDY 619.594.6979 ARTDIRECTOR@THEDAILYAZTEC .COM

PHOTO EDITOR, GLENN CONNELLY 619.594.7279 PHOTO@THEDAILYAZTEC .COM

WEB EDITOR, MYLENE ERPELO 619.594.3315 WEB@THEDAILYAZTEC .COM

ADVERTISING 619.594.6977

INDEX FOOD & DRINK............................................................2 BEST OF STATE BALLOT...............................................3 SPORTS.............................................................................4 TEMPO..............................................................................5 CLASSIFIEDS....................................................................7 THE BACK PAGE............................................................8

“What we can do and what many departments and colleges are increasingly doing is trying to track our students more closely ...” —Christopher Frost, Ph.D. Undergraduate Studies Geoffrey Chase, Ph.D., dean of the Division of Undergraduate Studies, said in the report that graduation and retention rates have increased. Among all California State University campuses, SDSU has risen to the top in six-year graduation rates.

“The graduation and retention rates overall have been steadily increasing over the last six to eight years,” Christopher Frost, Ph.D., associate dean of the Division of Undergraduate Studies, said. “I would say one way to frame this is as a university, we have made graduation and retention a priority.” From 1999 to 2002, the graduation rates for full-time freshmen have increased from 53 percent to 61 percent. The graduation rates also increased for minority students from 45 percent to 57 percent. While the overall rates paint a favorable and progressive picture, the report also shows that there is still one group that remains at risk for not making it to the big day with a cap and gown. Local-area students, who, because of a point system associated with local admissions guarantees, typically do not need to meet as high a standard as out-of-area students to gain acceptance into SDSU. “Out-of-area students who meet higher GPA and SAT / ACT score requirements have higher rates of retention and graduation; local-area students admitted with lower GPAs and test scores sometimes struggle to remain and to graduate,” the report states. Thus, out-of-area students are 4 to 15 percent more likely to continue their education at SDSU after their first year, depending on their need to improve skills in areas such as writing or math. Frost said that according to research, students are more successful if they are ready for college in the fall. Therefore, every student with remedial needs in various subjects will have to take courses in the summer to be better prepared for their

first semester. Frost said he would like to advise future students who apply for graduation to not only look at their academic maps, but to understand them as well. He addressed the issue of students who are not graduating and suggested what can be done to avoid these issues in the future. “What we can do and what many departments and colleges are increasingly doing, is trying to track our students more closely … so that we can identify students (when) it looks like the major they’ve chosen and their academic progress aren’t lining up and try to do earlier advising and intervention,” Frost said. Bonnie Anderson, assistant dean for the Division of Undergraduate Studies, said some students are not graduating because they are simply not paying attention. She said she

believes that reminders are part of the solution to the problem. “There should be something that will remind students in the sophomore year that there are some things they need to pay attention to,” Anderson said. “You get all this information (at freshman orientation) and it’s overwhelming and some of it doesn’t pertain to you right at that moment. A lot of people forget what they’ve been told.” Although the experience of obtaining an education is valuable, earning a degree is most important, Anderson said. She said most employers, unless it is a very specific job, do not care what your major is, but they care if you have a degree. “You need to get that degree to compete in this world,” Anderson said. “Without that degree, what do you have? A couple years in college just doesn’t work in this world.”

GREEK BEAT Sorority hosts house event Alpha Phi will host a “Team SDSU” reunion at 4 p.m. Sunday at its chapter house. The dinner event is for all chapter presidents and leaders of all four councils who attended the annual retreat at Palomar Mountain in January. The event will start with a brief presentation about the goals the presidents set during the retreat, Alpha Phi President Brenna Mulvey said. “I’m just excited that Alpha Phi’s house is hosting this event and that we’re coming together to remind each other of the goals we set and make

sure we’re upholding them,” Mulvey said. She said some of the goals set at the retreat include uniting Greek life across all chapters and presenting it in a positive light.

Fraternity moves to new house Phi Delta Theta will be moving onto Fraternity Row soon, according to Doug Case, coordinator of Fraternity and Sorority Life. Fraternity Row has eight chapter houses and encircles a 62-unit apartment complex.

-Compiled by Senior Staff Writer Reem Nour


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The Daily Aztec

FOOD & DRINK

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

South Park pub packs in locals A N T H O N Y A R TA L E CONTRIBUTOR

Lost among the sea of dive bars in the South Park area is a tiny pub that has become a local favorite. Compared to others, Hamilton’s Tavern on 30th Street is a bar with tons of flavor. Hamilton’s has an enormous selection of beers along with quality in-house bar food to create an atmosphere similar to “Cheers.” Prior to becoming Hamilton’s, the bar was called Sparky’s, which served wine and beer for more than 75 years, making it the oldest licensed beer and wine bar in San Diego. In 2006, Sparky’s switched owners and was renamed after Herman Hamilton, a local resident and a member of the Montford Point Marines Association, the first AfricanAmerican Marine unit. Hamilton’s is a beer lover’s paradise with more than 200 bottled beer varieties, ranging from Bud Light to a chocolate beer called Young’s Double Chocolate Stout from England. The pub also has 28 beers on tap along with two casks, and several of the beers come from local San Diego breweries. But liquor drinkers are out of luck at Hamilton’s because it doesn’t serve hard alcohol. The heavy beer influence worked its way onto the menu at Hamilton’s Café, which is adjacent to the bar. Almost everything served has beer in the recipe. The café is open to all ages, and the menu has something for everyone. It ranges from wings to grilled cheese, and almost every dish has a vegetarian option and even a few vegan choices. The prices are fair; no item exceeds $11. The star of the menu is the Hop Sausage, which is made inhouse by bartender and general manager Dennis Borlek. “I’m a little biased because I made them,” Borlek said. “But the hop sausages are really good.” The atmosphere at Hamilton’s is laid back. The bar allows dogs inside the establishment, so it’s not uncommon to walk in and find a patron’s four-legged friend hanging out with

the crowd. The age range at Hamilton’s varies from early 20s to late 40s. The customers are mostly local, but because of the bar’s popularity, it draws in people from all different areas. “We were at a gas station and asked about a good local bar,” a tourist from Las Vegas said. “And the guy pointed us to Hamilton’s; we love the atmosphere here. Everyone is so chill and friendly.” The happy hour is daily from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. I t ’ s

hard to find a time when Hamilton’s isn’t packed. There are two pool tables along with a shuffleboard and three plasma TVs. If a sports game isn’t on, customers might find a classic movie or an episode of “South Park” playing. Hamilton’s may not be packed to the brim with college kids every night, but it is full of friendly people of all ages, looking to enjoy the food, the beer or just a good conversation.

Jeff Lewis / Staff Photographer

Tequila tasting removes former reservations K A R I L UU S TA F F W R I T E R

Paige Nelson / Staff Photographer

El Vitral, located next to Petco Park, serves high-quality, rare tequila that is meant for sipping and enjoying, unlike it’s cheaper stepbrother, José Cuervo. Paired with specialty sides, the shots are showcased at their finest.

Stop suppressing that gag reflex when gulping down a shot of tequila. This alcohol is no longer counterpart to Taco Tuesday or a necessity when getting drunk on Friday nights. Images of popular tequilas such as José Cuervo or Patrón may come to mind when thinking of this alcohol, but El Vitral Restaurant and Tequila Lounge removes any preconceived notions of this beverage. Perched against Petco Park in downtown, El Vitral is a Mexican eatery that adds class to the notorious liquid. According to El Vitral’s Tequila 101 Handbook, tequila was created by fighting gods in Mexican mythology. For several months, this restaurant has been hosting Tequila 101 twice a month on Thursday nights, which is a crash course with an evening filled with tequila tasting and complementing Mexican dishes. This course is taught by El Vitral beverage director and connoisseur Juan Calderón. “I met my cousin ‘José’ when I was 18,” Calderón said. “He was not kind to me at all.” Sophisticated Mexican eateries can be difficult to find among the plethora of chain restaurants in San Diego. But El Vitral’s walls are painted with warm colors and steel star lanterns brighten up the room. The bar is crammed with more than 250 different types of tequila, demonstrating the restaurant’s priorities. Calderón insisted that the course is a good way to spend a Thursday night because for $30, course crashers will receive a meal and a binder with the condensed history of the alcohol. “When we decided to do tequila paired with Mexican food as a concept for the lounge, we also decided the most important thing was knowledge (of the tequila) and to inform people what they were drinking,” Calderón said. “We wanted to tell them a little about it so they have a little more of a back story and find a different way to enjoy it.”

Tequila is an agave-based spirit and distillate usually produced from the aguamiel (honeyed water) of the agave plant, which is not a cactus, but rather in the lily family, according to El Vitral’s Tequila 101 Handbook. Like Cognac, tequila has to be grown in a particular area, and must be produced in a declared territory to be considered tequila. On a given night, one may thoughtlessly choke down tequila if there is a need to get drunk, but at El Vitral, visitors may not be stumbling out of the restaurant with a dizzy scope. The lesson includes an appetizer of traditional guacamole and warm chips paired with Casa Noble Crystal, a meal of Cochinita Pibil, which is pulled pork and Casa Noble Reposado. For dessert, Arroz con Leche with Casa Noble Añejo is served. The amount served is slightly smaller than a typical shot and compared to traditional tequila, Reposado and Añejo is higher in alcohol content and has a longer aging process that alters the taste to become smoother, richer and more complex. “Depending on how the tequila is produced, we try to match it to anything on the menu,” Calderón said. “For example, we try to match something acidic and something very rich versus combing two acidic items. We try to make it very palatable for the eater.” Although he is more of a wine connoisseur, Calderón’s appreciation for tequila substantially increased when he wrote the Tequila 101 Handbook for the restaurant. He said if El Vitral garners more customers for the course, it will continue with higher courses, such as Tequila 201. “I have come to not only enjoy it as a spirit but see how it has evolved in the last couple of years, and it’s continuously growing, especially in our society and economy,” Calderón said. “It’s coming up as more of a multi-premium spirit and you hear the term ‘tequila connoisseur,’ which you would never have heard of before, and people are educating themselves.”


T! O U IS TH

E H T R O F E T O V R U O Y T S A C

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! E T A T S F O T S E B

Let us know your choices for the BEST that San Diego has to offer!

RULES: • Choose your favorite “Best of” from our list of 4 finalists. • Drop off your completed ballot at The Daily Aztec offices, located in the basement of the EBA Building. DEADLINE TO SUBMIT BALLOTS IS THURSDAY, MARCH 18th.

Write your name & number below to be entered in a drawing to win a FREE gift card! ___________________ ___________________

1) Best Guy's Night Out: q Hooter’s q Effin’s q East Village Tavern + Bowl q The TapRoom 2) Best Dive Bar: q Effin’s q Bubs q The Dog q Alibi

6) Best Professor: q Dr. Stoddard (Pol. Science) q Martin Kruming (Journalism and Media Studies) q Professor Lund (Business) q David Hewitt (Art) 7) Best Coffee Shop: q Starbuck’s q Peabody’s q Cutter’s Point q The Living Room

3) Best Radio Station: q 105.3 FM q 94.9 FM q 91.1 FM q XX1090 4) Best Concert Venue: q House of Blues q Viejas Arena q Cricket Wireless Amphitheatre q Casbah 5) Best Beach: q Del Mar q Pacific Beach q Black’s q Ocean Beach

8) Best Pizza Joint: q Woodstock’s q Milo’s q Fatties q Bronx Pizza 9) Hottest Date Spot: q Shout House q RA Sushi q Donovan’s Prime Steakhouse q Benihana 10) Best Happy Hour: q Pacific Beach Bar & Grill q Olde City Grill q State St. Grill q 4.0 Deli

11) Best Girl's Night Out: q Whiskey Girl q Typhoon’s q Stingaree q 207 at Hard Rock Hotel

16) Best Burger Joint: q In-n-Out q Hodad’s q Fuddrucker’s q Big Kahuna’s

12) Best Nightclub: q Stingaree q 207 at Hard Rock Hotel q Voyeur q Belo

17) Best Breakfast: q Broken Yolk q Daily Grind q Denny’s q The Mission

13) Best Sushi: q Tokyo Sushi q RA Sushi q Chiba’s Sushi q State St. Grill

18) Best Taco Tuesday: q Fred’s Mexican Café q Pacific Beach Bar & Grill q Rubio’s q Café Coyote

14) Best Late-night Munchie: q Trujillo’s q La Casita’s q In-n-Out q Jack in the Box

19) Best Surf Spot: q Black’s Beach, La Jolla q 15th Street, Del Mar q Sunset Cliffs, Ocean Beach q Pipes, Cardiff by the Sea

15) Best Taco Shop: q Trujillo’s q La Casita’s q Cotija’s q Sr. Pancho’s

20) Best Place To Get Spoiled By Your Parents: q Donovan’s Prime Steakhouse q Apple Store q The Melting Pot q Ikea

Results will appear in our Best of State issue on Thursday, April 8th!

Tired of that long commute? Go to www.TheDailyAztec.com and click on the Housing tab to search for housing and apartments near SDSU!

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View images of properties and neighborhoods, compare rents, and browse for housing using our interactive map!

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SPORTS

MWC Tournament Preview

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP

MEN’S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP Wednesday, March 10

Thursday, March 11

Friday, March 12

Saturday, March 13

8 Wyoming 2 p.m.

4 San Diego State

9 Air Force

6 p.m.

Saturday, March 13

2 p.m.

4:30 p.m.

5 Colorado State

4 p.m.

2 BYU

6 p.m.

8 Colorado State

MEN’S CHAMPION

1 TCU

6 Wyoming

7 UNLV

12 p.m.

1 p.m.

7 p.m. 7 p.m.

3 San Diego State

8:30 p.m.

3 UNLV

4:30 p.m.

5 New Mexico

2:30 p.m.

6 Utah

Friday, March 12

4 Utah

12 p.m.

7 TCU

Wednesday, March 10

Tuesday, March 9

1 New Mexico

9 Air Force

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

2 BYU

8:30 p.m.

WOMEN’S CHAMPION

2:30 p.m

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

MEN’S BASKETBALL

SDSU in quarterfinals today Aztecs draw Colorado State D AV I D P O P E

A S S I S TA N T S P O R T S E D I T O R

Riding a three-game winning streak and boasting arguably the most talented roster in the league, the San Diego State women’s basketball team is poised for another run to the championship game of the Mountain West Conference Tournament in Las Vegas this week. SDSU, the tournament’s No. 3 seed, has won four out of five games, including victories against the MWC top two teams, TCU and BYU, to close out the regular sea-

Glenn Connelly / Photo Editor

E D WA R D L E W I S SPORTS EDITOR

The San Diego State men’s basketball team heads into the Mountain West Conference Tournament tomorrow as a fourth seed and will take on Colorado State at 2:30 p.m. at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas. SDSU has beaten CSU twice this season by a combined score of 132107 and didn’t sound too worried about taking on the Rams during Monday afternoon’s press conference. The bigger game the Aztecs

seemed more worried about was the potential second round matchup with No. 8 New Mexico. Regardless of who it plays, though, SDSU will likely have to win two games in this week’s tournament to have a shot at earning an at-large berth in the NCAA Tournament. “We’re going to Vegas with the thought of winning three games,” head coach Steve Fisher said. “We can do that, but we’re going to have to play great basketball in order to make that happen and it starts and ends right now with Colorado State.”

son with an 18-10 (10-6 in MWC play) record. With the third seed, the Aztecs got a bye in the first round and will play at 7 p.m. today in the quarterfinals against the winner of yesterday’s Wyoming vs. UNLV matchup. SDSU has made it to the final round of the tournament the past two years in a row. “We’re obviously excited with the opportunity that’s in front of us,” head coach Beth Burns said. “We have no delusions of grandeur, in that we know what we have to do. Which is go to Las Vegas and win three games.”

Glenn Connelly / Photo Editor


TEMPO

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

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PASS THE POPCORN

Courte

sy of W alt Disn ey

Courtesy of Walt Disney Pictures

tu re Pic isn ey D of W alt

Once upon a time, a 7-year-old girl fell down a rabbit hole and landed in a delightful world of magic and wonder, full of new friends and charming oddities. Tim Burton’s movie “Alice in Wonderland” is not that tale. True, the story is still about Alice (Mia Wasikowska) and her misfortune of falling down a hole, but this time the blond-haired heroine is 19 and her plunge was no inquisitive accident. The White Rabbit (voiced by Michael Sheen) has brought her back to Wonderland for the first time since her childhood because its inhabitants believe she is the only one who can put an end to the Red Queen’s (Helena Bonham Carter) reign of terror. In order to do this, however, she must battle and slay a dragon-like creature known as the Jabberwock — a daunting task considering

clothes for each different location she ventures to, which produces a large wardrobe of wonderful styles. The mix of computer animation and live action within the movie also brings a fantastical element. Nonetheless, viewers unfamiliar with Burton’s work must remember to keep an open mind in order to appreciate his method of filmmaking. “Alice in Wonderland” is the seventh collaboration between Burton and Depp, adding to classics such as “Edward Scissorhands,” “Sleepy Hollow” and “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.” It is also the sixth collaboration between Burton and Bonham Carter, who are an offscreen couple. This imaginative adventure was released nationwide last Friday in IMAX 3-D. sy

TEMPO EDITOR

Alice remembers nothing and no one from her first visit. Things never stop becoming “curiouser and curiouser.” Along her journey to save what the creatures insist has always been called Underland (changing the name to “wonder” was merely a childish novelty from Alice), she once again becomes friends with some of Lewis Carroll’s most beloved characters, including the Blue Caterpillar (voiced by Alan Rickman), the Dormouse (voiced by Barbara Windsor), Tweedledee and Tweedledum (voiced by Matt Lucas), the Cheshire Cat (voiced by Stephen Fry), the White Queen (Anne Hathaway) and the Mad Hatter (Johnny Depp), who is now Scottish and a master of the futterwacken dance. The Mad Hatter also brings other elements from the books “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” and “Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There” to the movie, such as the original “Jaberwocky” poem and the infamous riddle, “Why is a raven like a writing desk?” Audience members expecting Carroll’s famous story may be disappointed as Burton swaps unstr uctured foolishness for a darker chronicle of faith and life’s unexpected turns. Others may be delighted at the sensational costumes — especially Alice’s. Her constant size-changing forces her to find new

Co ur te

A L L I E D AU G H E R T Y

s

Things get curiouser in ‘Alice in Wonderland’

Movie: Alice in Wonderland Distributor: Walt Disney Pictures Director: Tim Burton Grade: A


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TEMPO

The Daily Aztec

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

NOOB PWNING 101

‘AVP’ video game a violent fight for survival Fans will enjoy this game best despite a different story line from the movies A L L I E D AU G H E R T Y TEMPO EDITOR

The title for the new video game “Aliens vs. Predator” might be a little misleading. The main premise of the game does pit aliens against predators, true, but any assumption that it follows the same story line as the “Aliens vs. Predator” movies will be sorely wrong. The game is similar to “Batman: Arkham Asylum” in the sense that it borrows simple distinctive properties from the film franchise, e.g. weapons, basic characters and sounds, and uses them to create a whole new entity. In the case of “AVP,” sticking to the original plot may have been a smarter idea. This first-person shooter game has three single-player campaigns for game play: Alien, Predator and Marine. The namesake for the campaign is the character the player hunts as. These are relatively short with five levels for each and the level of difficulty, ranging from “easy” to “nightmare,” can also be chosen. The cinematics, aka the in-play video clips, are short but abundant. They help each campaign’s individual story unfold and reveal more about the plot. Although there is a different narrative for Alien, Predator and Marine, the three eventually overlap to create something more complicated. The overall graphics of “AVP” aren’t stunning, but are up to par with newer games currently on the market. Aesthetically the game is eerie but not entirely realistic, which may have been done on purpose considering its extremely violent nature. The heavy use of melee combat keeps the blood and gore ever-present, playing a large part in the game’s “M” rating. For example, a stealth kill includes ripping a Marine’s head off; the visuals include an Alien or Predator holding the severed head with the spinal cord still attached. Learning the controls for “AVP” may be complicated at first because they differ slightly from the average shooting game. This is especially true in the Alien campaign where walking on walls could take some getting used to. Each species has its own advantages, such as the ability to scale walls, which can be used to defeat certain levels.

Courtesy of SEGA

‘AVP’ was formerly banned in Australia because of extreme violence. SEGA announce it would not release a tamer version, but Australia later decided to retract its decision.

Although single-player is fun, multiplayer is truly where “AVP” shines. Complete with seven different game modes, multiplayer has something for every gamer to enjoy. It also allows the use of voice chat so players can communicate with one another in the heat of battle. The only downside is that most maps are exact replicas of those in single-player. For fans of the movie franchise by the same name, “Aliens vs. Predator” is a sure win. However, those merely seeking another first-person shooting game may be disappointed. “Aliens vs. Predator” was released for PC, XBOX 360 and Playstation 3 last month.

Game: Aliens vs. Predator Rating: M for Mature Release Date: Feb. 13 Grade: B Courtesy of SEGA

PASS THE POPCORN

Annual Latino film festival returns with 185 films

Courtesy of Media Arts Center of San Diego

Courtesy of Media Arts Center of San Diego

The SDLFF may be the only chance to view some of the foreign films because many won’t be released in the U.S.

M AG G I E P E H A N I C K S TA F F W R I T E R

Film buffs rejoice — the 17th annual San Diego Latino Film Festival kicks off this week at Ultrastar Mission Valley Cinema. Hosted by Media Arts Center San Diego, the festival boasts 185 films honoring the best

in cinema from Mexico, Spain, Cuba, Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Columbia, Peru, Venezuela and the United States. The festival was host to about 20,000 attendees last year, including some notable guests from the Latino film community. This year, attendance is expected to be even greater, as interest in this year’s crop of films has grown.

“These are some of the best Latin American films in the world,” festival curator Lisa Franek said. “Chances are this is the only opportunity students will ever get to see them since most of them will never be released in theaters in the U.S.” The festival offers a plethora of films that will appeal to students, from Argentinean horror flick “Los Aparecidos” to Mexican sci-fi “2033” to “Solo Quiero Caminar,” a

gangster film starring one of Mexico’s brightest stars, Diego Luna. The festival will show a variety of films in several aptly named categories including Cine Gay, Cine’macion, Cine Mujer, Frontera Filmmakers Program and Para la Familia, just to name a few. While the SDLFF is open to the public, Innovations and Programming Director Patric Stillman calls it a perfect venue for aspiring student filmmakers. “Student groups often come to see specific documentaries, local filmmakers and participate in Reel Talks,” Stillman said. For those interested in more than just the film screenings, the festival is a great opportunity to take part in programs such as “Reel Talks,” live workshops and panel discussions. For $9.50, participants can take a look at music video production in “Cinestesia: Music Video Workshop” while mingling with professionals from MTV and EMI Latin. In addition to screenings and workshops, those with all-access passes can partake in the New Media Tent and opening and closing night galas, hosted by the Media Arts Center. This year, dozens of producers, directors, writers, actors and actresses will appear on the panels as well as at the screenings. For a full list of special guests and information about tickets and films, visit the San Diego Latino Film Festival’s Web site at www.sdlatinofilm.com.


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HUMOR: TOADSTOOL CHRONICLES

Alternate ego for love’s sake

A

h, spring. The birds are chirping, the tulips are in bloom and the sky is an endless baby blue. Yes, springtime is the season of love. It makes me quiver in sheer delight. This is where I am right now in my quest for love: I am making a female alter ego on Facebook who will write flirty comments on my wall in my dire hope that the girl I actually like will see them and suddenly like me. Yes, the tidings of spring fare well for this one. So here I am, about to make someone else assume a 22-year-old model named Delilah Fiori has a crush on me. Delilah’s going to be a Libra, just like me. Delilah’s going to love tortas, just like me. And we’re going to have the best conversations that are tinged with the cutest subtle ironies. This is what I call “Internet guerilla warfare.” And we’ve all done this before, so don’t even try to deny it. The anonymity that exists online allows us the freedom to conjure up wonderful fake personas. And not just on Facebook. There are plenty of Web sites that make it possible for people to lie about themselves and create people who don’t exist (e.g. www.match.com, www.eHarmony.com, www.chemistry.com).

N O A H H E N RY S TA F F C O L U M N I S T

I recently made up a person named Caesar Agosto. He’s a salsa instructor who looks like a young Antonio Banderas. Caesar messaged the girl I’m interested in and turned on the charm: “Hello Bonita. My name is Caesar Agosto. Your MySpace page beckoned my name like a wolf howling at the moon. Your default picture came from the heavens and descended upon me like a Spanish sunset. Do you believe in destiny, sugar lips?” She immediately blocked Caesar within a few hours, and passed phase one of my guerilla test with flying colors. Because I enjoy a little variety in my life, I made up another character I nicknamed “The Taunter.” He’s a redhead named Robby, born Robert McKay, who basically just annoys the hell out of anyone I want. Usually her exboyfriends I’m jealous of. And then there’s the dubious Karl, whom I only use on very rare occasions, out of fear of a police investigation. Karl is a creepy 52-year-old man with a skinny moustache and thinning hair. He wears thick, coke-bottle glasses and lives in the basement of his mom’s house with his three cats. The only time I use Karl is

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

when I want to make myself appear protective. The girls I like usually say, “Noah, this really creepy old guy keeps messaging me on Facebook telling me he likes to rub baby food on his body and watch ‘JONAS’ on the Disney Channel. I’m scared.” I then tell her that I’ll protect her from the creep. Some say technology is a way for us to connect and globalize. I think it cheapens us to a flurry of assumptions — assumptions about that ambiguous status she put up last night or assumptions about that ill-perceived text he sent. In the bleak hope that this column has any semblance of a moral to it, I motion that we stop assuming so much and come out from behind the guise that technology has created for us. It’s spring after all, so what better time to walk outside and experience the real thing? I’d love to keep writing about this, but I’ve got to go. Karl’s outside my girl’s window peeping in and I have to save her. Damn, it’s cold out here.

BY LINDA C. BLACK, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (3/10/10).This year you will weave together different elements to achieve success.You may begin with logic, but you take the next step into the realm of imagination by following a dream. Then you make your dreams concrete using all of your creative talents together. ARIES (March 21 - April 19) - Today is an 8 - Ideas flow easily today, allowing you to express your desire, formulate a plan and consult with co-workers.Then, roll up your sleeves and get busy. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) - Today is a 7 - Your less-than-perfect world places you at home when you wish to be climbing mountains. A female produces the perfect plan to make work enjoyable. GEMINI (May 21 - June 21) - Today is a 6 As the sand filters through the hourglass today, set aside imagination in favor of practical considerations. Money may be an important factor. CANCER (June 22 - July 22) - Today is a 6 An older person bows to the creative inspiration of a female. She understands the practical problem.You work out the cost. LEO (July 23 - Aug. 22) - Today is a 7 - If you want things to work out as quickly as possible, step back for a moment and allow an idea to unfold.Two minutes now will save hours later. VIRGO (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) - Today is a 7 -

Allow your imagination to run wild. Let your logical mind control the spending. Another person may contribute. LIBRA (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) - Today is an 8 The more you satisfy your practical desires, the better you work with your team. Group creativity incorporates logical decision-making. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 - Nov. 21) - Today is an 8 - You learn about karmic results today. Reasonable effort has produced fiery, even argumentative results. Deal with the fallout immediately. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 - Dec. 21) - Today is a 6 - Divide your attention between group responsibilities and your recreational desires. Both can happen if you manage time well. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19) - Today is a 5 - If at first you don't succeed, try something new ... really and truly different. It may not feel logical, but it will work. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) - Today is a 6 - A dream image reveals the creative direction of someone in your circle.They weren't keeping secrets; they just weren't talking. PISCES (Feb. 19 - March 20) - Today is a 7 The girls in your group take a practical approach. Find a unique angle to convince the guys. Logic probably isn't enough. © 2010,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES INC.

—Noah Henry is an English senior. —This column does not necessarily reflect the opinions of The Daily Aztec.

LOOKING THROUGH OUR LENS

SUDOKU

BY THE MEPHAM GROUP

Level:

1 2

3 4

Instructions: Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution available online at www.TheDailyAztec.com © 2010 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

CROSSWORD

NOURISHING NECTAR Staff Photographer Stephen FinLayson captured this up-close image of a furry bee planted on the bud of a flower for the nourishing nectar.

ACROSS 1 __ de deux 4 Therapy center, for short 9 Parts of fast food orders 14 Four-legged bugler 15 Where the ecstatic walk 16 Salt’s “Halt!” 17 National sport of South Korea 19 Having a beanpole physique 20 “Baseball Tonight” station 21 Year-end mall temp 23 Jon Stewart’s “moment of __” 24 Like drive-thru orders 27 Bosom buddy 29 Longtime skating partner of Randy Gardner 33 The Trojans of the Pac-10 34 Go hither and yon 35 Au __: menu phrase 38 Places to order tom yum goong 44 “Xanadu” band, for short 45 __ time: pronto 46 Like some grins 47 Host of “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition” 52 12 Tribes religion 55 Caesar’s unlucky number? 56 Schooner filler 57 One of the Yokums 60 Pre-dye shade, perhaps 63 Open, in a way 65 Overtime causes 68 Mother-of-pearl 69 In first place

EDITED BY RICH NORRIS AND JOYCE LEWIS

Solution available online at www.TheDailyAztec.com 70 Prior to, in verse 71 Tiny amount 72 Tack room gear 73 RimskyKorsakov’s “Le Coq __” DOWN 1 “Our Gang” dog 2 Word of pity 3 Having one’s doubts 4 Heed the coxswain 5 Ambient music composer Brian 6 Brinker of kiddie lit 7 Operatic slave girl 8 Old Ford SUV 9 Sub meat 10 In vitro cells 11 Tony of “Who’s the Boss?”

12 Part of FAQ 13 “Gypsy” composer Jule 18 Door feature 22 Bricks unit 25 “Mr. Mom” actress 26 Instrument to which an orchestra tunes 28 Big Indian 29 Word of rebuke 30 Big Apple tennis stadium 31 Drips in an ICU 32 Open the door to 36 Like 007’s martinis 37 Normandy battle site 39 Wee bit 40 Gothic novelist Radcliffe 41 Operating system developed at Bell Labs

42 Rice-A-__ 43 Roget entry: Abbr. 48 “Hooray!” 49 Non-commercial TV spot 50 Caveat __ 51 Computer acronym about faulty data 52 Quick trip 53 Of an arm bone 54 Bing Crosby’s primary label 58 Bench material 59 Hairy mountain sighting 61 Musical prefix with smith? 62 River of Flanders 64 Slo-pitch path 66 Zak, to Ringo 67 Early computer printer speed meas.


The Daily Aztec - Vol. 95, Issue 88