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SEPTEMBER 2020 / VOLUME XV / Issue III

DINING ALONG THE CORRIDOR ~ Tulsa to Oklahoma City and everywhere in between ~


Now offering Telemedicine | Call us today! Same-day appointments available! Call 918.725.1901 Blaire Blankinship, APRN | Amber Reinecke, PA-C | Colm McCauley, DO

1030 E. Cherry St. | Cushing 918.725.1901

Brian Hightower, DO | Randy Grellner, DO Lisa Noe, PA-C | Courtney Elliot, APRN | Bethaney Jenkins, APRN | Jaime GrifďŹ th, APRN

Accepting new patients! Walk-ins welcome Accepting most insurances including Soonercare 600 S. LINWOOD AVE. | CUSHING, OK | 918.725.1599

2 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020

CUSHING


LOOKING FORWARD

Not just a magazine...a part of your life! Next Month:

NOVEMBER: HUNTING & THANKSGIVING EDITION

DECEMBER JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER

Christmas Edition Health & Fitness Edition Love Edition Home Improvement Edition

ON THE COVER Mmmmm good! Mmmmm good! These ribs are Mmmmm good! Little Miss Callaway Percell thinks she is in BBQ heaven as she enjoys some award-winning ribs. Located on Highway 66 in Wellston, The Butcher BBQ has won awards with their recipe worldwide. They serve customers every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday until it is gone. Their connoisseurs form a line inside, outside and along Highway 66 if needed. Go enjoy! COVER PHOTO from CRYSTL’S PHOTOGRAPHY

Sports Edition Real Estate & Industry Edition

& Auto Service

Travel Edition Back to School Edition Fall Festivals

HOURS: M-F 8-5 Sat 8-1

918-367-2224

115 W. 4th St. (Rt. 66) BRISTOW, OK

YOKOHAMA • FALKEN • NEXEN

Dining Edition

INDEPENDENT DEALER / FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED

www.bristowtireandautoservice.com

Enjoy Our

The Corridor Magazine is published by The Corridor, LLC

OUR ADVISORY TEAM: PUBLISHER:

Joe Gooch (405) 823-7561

joe.corridor.magazine@gmail.com ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER:

Debbie Davis (918) 312-7965 davisdebbie108@gmail.com GRAPHIC DESIGNERS:

Cheryl Payne

cherylpay@gmail.com

Jeree Milligan

OFFICE: P.O. Box 885 / Cushing, OK 74023

405-823-7561

joe.corridor.magazine@gmail.com We will deliver directly to your home or place of business! Phone or email your order now, or mail to our office Only $45 per year!

FIND US ONLINE AT ISSUU.COM

FIND US FACEBOOK THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE

jereeann@me.com EDITORIAL ADVISORY:

Jeree Milligan, Rick Reiley, Diane Brown, Pastor Paul Ragel, Missy Husted, Robbie McCommas and Michelle Brown

©2018. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to The Corridor Magazine, at the above address. Advertising claims and the views expressed in this magazine do not necessarily represent those of the publishers or its affiliates.

With a twist of Mediterranean

r

Daily Specials AND Don’t Forget... We Have Drive-thru Service!

600 E. Main St. / CUSHING

918-225-3115

Check us out on Facebook! / www.NaifehsDeli.com THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020 3


DINING EDITION WE CATER

COWBOY COOKIN’ with a KICK! hickory smoked bbq Steak • Chicken • Pork • Catfish Cold Beer & Wine banquet rooms

available! Please Come and Dine In or Carryout! HOURS: Sunday 11AM-2PM / Wed-Sat 11AM-8PM Closed Monday and Tuesday

5

EDITORIAL by Joe Gooch

6

ALL LINED UP FOR BBQ by Robbie McCommas

10

DINING ON THE CORRIDOR

12

SENIOR DINING by Michelle Browen

18

PASTOR PAUL by Paul Ragle

22

KIDS ON THE CORRIDOR by Jeree Milligan

30

SATURDAY IN TOWN by the late Agnes Brewer

32

CORRIDOR CUTIES

38

NOTES ON THE CORRIDOR by Rick Reiley

40

DELILAH’S DILEMMAS by Diane Brown

46 RECIPES by Jeree Milligan

While you are here, enjoy lunch at the best kept secret in town!

F

HIGHWAY 51 / YALE, OK www.mugsysgrubhouse.com

LUNCH SERVED

918-387-4200

918-306-4242

4 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020

Tuesday-Friday 11a-2p 201 E. Broadway / Cushing


From the EDITOR Being seventy-one and seemingly aging faster, I keep losing weight. As wonderful as food is, I have lost my appetite. Okay... you are not going to believe me, but while traveling to all the newspapers in Oklahoma and Arkansas for my company during the 90s, I weighed 206 pounds. Today I weigh 165. What is going on? Aging maybe? After finishing this October Dining Guide, I proofed it very thoroughly and said, “Oh my gosh, I am hungry!” Maybe it’s because this theme of Dining Along The Corridor is one of my favorite issues of the magazine! There are a record number of eating establishments promoting their great food in this issue. And YES! They are open and ready to serve you. The virus destroyed our annual festival outings. Normally, The Corridor area hosts close to forty festivals each year. Down but not out, hopefully, we can have even more festivals next year.

by JOE GOOCH

Cities around us have been forced to make numerous changes over the past six months. I want to hear from YOU, our readers, and make you an offer. If you have a story, a suggestion, or an opinion that you would like to share with me and our readers, please email me at joe.corridor.magazine@gmail.com. Is there a new theme that you think would be valuable to our readers? Check out The Corridor Cuties on page 32. I will close this October editorial with a question from a best friend in Eldorado, AR, Mr. Gus Looney. “Joe do you know what’s better than eating chicken?” I said, “Why no, Gus. What is better than eating chicken? Gus replied, “Eating two chickens!”

LET'S KEEP THIS TRADITION ALIVE. SHOP BROWN FURNITURE FOR DINING WWW.BROWN-FURNITURE.COM

405-258-1717 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020 5


The Butcher BBQ Stand by ROBBIE McCOMMAS

PHOTOS PROVIDED

“This is what I tell my guys. People don’t drive hundreds of miles for sub par meat, so we do what it takes to offer our best.”

Looking for the next adventure along The Corridor? Why not head down rural Route 66 toward the town of Wellston and see what competition style BBQ tastes like? You’ll know you’re there when you see a lot of people, a big foot, a vintage pick-up truck with a sign and smell that mouth-watering aroma! “You don’t get a second chance at a first impression,” says Levi Bouska, owner of The Butcher BBQ Stand in Wellston. “This is what I tell my guys. People don’t drive hundreds of miles for sub par meat, so we do what it takes to offer our best.” This second generation butcher and third generation

6 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020

barbecue expert, starts the weekend with 4,000 pounds of meat! Yes, you read it correctly, that 4K of meat to be prepped, smoked, cooked, and wrapped using about one mile of aluminum foil! Years of BBQ experience will be presented to the pending crowd. The Butcher BBQ is open only three days a week, Friday, Saturday and Sunday for lunch, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., or until sold out. They offer brisket, burnt ends, pulled pork, turkey breast, St. Louis ribs, chick-Q nuggets, smoked sausage and hot links. Sides include apple pie BBQ beans, mac-n-cheese, potato salad, coleslaw and corn-on-the-cob. They have eight different sandwiches, Rednexican nachos and 12 beers on tap. The menu plainly states, “We’re BBQ’rs, not bakers!” Meals come with a ‘Twinkie’ for dessert! Levi grew up in Wellston where his grandparents, Clifford and Billie Scott, owned the Pioneer Camp barbecue restaurant in 1995. Later, Levi’s father, David Bouska, opened a meat processing plant in Warwick. Then, in 2006, David began entering barbecue competitions. Within a year, he was nationally ranked. “It’s been a fire storm from there, competing every weekend,” Levi added. “In 2014, I decided to take the competition style barbecue to the public. My grand-


mother deeded the land and dad provided a conex storage container that I worked out of. On May 16, 2015, I opened the stand and served people outdoors. In early 2020, we built a building and now have indoor seating.” The restaurant walls are dotted with accomplishments and memories of people and the past. The establishment sets off a warm feeling and you’ll get a kick out of the tire marks in the floor. No, it’s not paint! When a friend recently asked if he could peel-out inside the restaurant, Levi obliged and moved all the tables. You can’t get more nostalgic than that! Oh, to be free and young with a great talent, a skillful work ethic, and a phenomenal business! As you look around, you begin to understand the level of commitment that brought the business this far. Named the best BBQ in ‘area code’ 405 in 2017 and 2018, and featured in newspapers, magazines and television shows, the legacy is well on it’s way into the fourth generation. “This place is very me,” Levi contently stated as he looked around at the indoor seating area. “Nothing’s perfect, nothing’s square about it. There are mis-match tables, chairs and picnic tables. It’s an atmosphere, an experience that you can’t recreate anywhere else.” “There’s no right or wrong in barbecue, I’ll show anyone how to do it,” says Levi. “Your own personality goes into the food.” People wanting a taste of this award winning cuisine

need to plan early. Folks are used to standing in line, but say it’s worth the wait! Though doors open at 11 a.m., the line starts to form by 10 a.m. “One couple during the COVID 19 pandemic drove all the way from California, picking The Butcher’s BBQ Stand as an ending destination,” Levi explained. “They had seen it on television, planned their trip, and stayed three days before driving back home!” Another group drives from McKinney, Texas to buy barbecue for everyone in their area. They make a run bringing a list of orders. Levi says about 95 percent of his business is non-local people. He said locals aren’t interested in the long wait with so many people. Time flies for those in line, especially with “the voice” of The Butcher BBQ Stand, Austin Allsberry, who is a stand-up comedian! Austin’s humor adds to the experience and atmosphere. A total of 10 guys prepare and serve the food along with Levi’s wife. The group handles 69 tickets per hour, and 275 tickets per day, plus catering. They have the work down to a science, one might add! “By the time a customer reaches the front and orders, we have their food ready about the same time as it takes to pay out,” says Levi. “Within a minute and a half.” You might ask yourself, how does he plan that much food? Well, he has a semi refrigerated trailer stacked full of boxed food on Wednesday and by Sunday, it is completely empty. Thursday is his big work day. At 6 a.m. he trims all the briskets and preps all the chickens and turkeys. At 3 a.m. on Friday, the smokers are filled. Each smoker is designated for a specific cut and type of meat. If you’re wondering how Levi came up with the the plan as a whole, he said he and his dad took a year traveling around to barbecue restaurants. “We found that we could take something good out of everywhere we went,” he said. When asked, “What is your favorite part of running The Butcher BBQ Stand?” Levi answered, “One hundred percent the people, my customers and my staff!” n

THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020 7


DINING ALONG

THE CORRIDOR

2020 RESTAURANT DIRECTORY AGRA

Robin’s Main St Café 7 Main St. 918-375-2597

BRISTOW

Mid America Stockyards 36970 W Hwy 16 918-367-2300

CHANDLER

Manvel Avenue Coffee 905 Manvel Ave 405-258-0905

CUSHING

Naifeh’s 600 E Main 918-225-3115 Steer Inn 1340 E Main 918-225-3501 Wings 4U 1430 E Main 918-725-1500 Pueblo Viejo 211 N Cleveland 918-285-3055

DAVENPORT

Dan’s BBQ Pit Hwy 66 918-377-2288

Backroom Café 201 E Broadway 918-306-4242

Scotty B’s 1110 Broadway Ave 918-377-2468

Circle S Meats 823 N Little 918-223-9507

Tammy’s 1023 N Broadway 918-377-2230

Homestead 1001 E Main 918-225-2415

MEEKER

Mi Casa 2102 E Main St 918-223-9321

LaDonna’s 524 S Dawson 405-279-3233

PERKINS

Café 33 419 E Hwy 33 405-547-5581

PRAGUE

The Kitchen 1105 N Jim Thorpe Blvd 405-567-3333 Juana’s 700 Tim Thorpe Blvd 405=567-0036

STROUD

D’s Specialty House 507 W 4th St 918-968-4228 Five Star 619 N 8th Ave 918-987-0227

WELLSTON

Butcher BBQ 3402 W Hwy 66 918-241-3437

YALE

Mugsy’s Hwy 51 918-387-4200

CHECK OUT THE ADS IN THIS ISSUE FOR THESE FINE RESTAURANTS ALONG THE CORRIDOR! 8 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020


CALL ORDERS IN TO US AT 405-258-0905 OR ORDER ONLINE AT MANVELAVECOFFEE.COM

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THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020 9


N NOW OPE to y and Read ’ ‘MEAT ds! Your Nee

CELEBRATING 44 YEARS OF GOOD HEALTH COME SEE US FOR SOME DIGESTIVE ENZYMES! ©NEITMAN PHOTOGRAPHY 2018

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10 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020


2102 E. Main • Cushing • 918-223-9321

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RELLENO DINNER $ Served with Rice & Beans

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THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020 11


Senior Dining ON THE CORRIDOR

by MICHELLE BROWN

PHOTOS by KBPhotography

Home is where the heart is. – Pliny the Elder

There is a saying we are all familiar with. It’s a comforting statement that reaches into the corners of our memory and brings back childhood thoughts of days gone by. I am referring to the profound, yet simple statement, “Home is where the heart is.” Pliny the Elder, a famous Roman scholar, is attributed for conveying such a deep concept. This phrase was first used approximately 73 A.D. Obviously, with such longevity, the home is where the heart is idea is untouched by the changing generations and time. When I think of this home and heart cliché’, it reminds me of time spent at my Grandma and Grandpa’s old farmhouse. Grandma Bessie always had some kind of homestyle meal warming on the stove. After the evening chores were finished, I sat at the kitchen table with Grandpa Coy sipping coke floats. We talked about cows, rain, the Paul Harvey Radio Show and what article Grandpa had recently read in Western Horseman Magazine. Seems like every visitor hurried through the living room, went straight to the kitchen to first kiss Grandma, then had a taste of what made the house smell so good. I remember those times like they were yesterday. Those warm memories spark happiness from my heart. With the continued COVID pandemic, we have found ourselves at home more than ever and spending more time in the kitchen. Once again, the kitchen has become the heart of the home. It is now a gathering place for conversations of the days’ happenings with meals bringing us together for a time of reconnection. Our Corridor friend and relative, Marion Lytle, who is

12 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020

Joe Gooch’s sister, and 22 others are residents of Prairie Pointe Assisted Living Center. Located in Stroud, the residents enjoy the many amenities of Prairie Pointe, but especially appreciate the home cooked meals. Similar to my Grandparent’s farmhouse, the Prairie Pointe kitchen and dining room provide an invitation for all to relax and enjoy mealtime with friends and family. Here is a sample of the home cookin’ – southern fried chicken, battered deep fried fish, chicken fried steak with good ‘ole country gravy, meatloaf and even smothered pork chops. A delicious salad bar is always available. With cooler weather coming on, homemade beef stew paired


up with cook Jo Weeks’ famous homemade hot rolls are sure to be in high demand! Ms. Jo does not leave the Prairie Pointe residents hankerin’ for dessert either. She whips up an awesome batch of cinnamon rolls and kolaches too! Dedicated volunteer, Clara Hodgens, described the special time she spends with residents after lunch each day. With dessert, coffee or tea in hand, the residents gather around and enjoy a relaxing moment as Clara reads to them. Oklahoma history stories, the Chisholm Trail and even the entertaining and comical writings of Erma Bombeck are among the favorite reading mate rial. Clara remembers the first book the group read – a fabulous read called The Boys by Judge Paul Vassar of Chandler. What an exciting and peaceful way to end mealtime! Just proves that the heart of the home centers around the kitchen. Clara, along with Administrator/Director of Nursing, Lisa Gordon and Prairie Pointe staff are anxious for visits and mealtime to return to normal. Usually, Thanksgiving

But you can bet Prairie Pointe is serving up some fantastic meals despite the current adversity! They continue to provide a table filled with home cooked dishes where residents can experience a foundation of love, warmth and happy memories. n

1. 2. 3.

Jo Weeks and Christine Beck prepare the salad bar.

4. 5. 6. Anna Dobrinski and Beverly Graham enjoy a visit on the front porch.

Margie Testerman relaxes in the rocker on the patio.

and Christmas consist of family togetherness in the Prairie Pointe dining room. Special meals are traditionally served during Easter and Mother’s Day and a treat for children on Halloween. As holidays approach, time spent with families and friends may be a little different this year.

8. Residents enjoy a meal in the Prairie Point dining room.

THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020 13


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THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020 15


PA S TO R PA U L’ S PA S S A G E S by Pastor Paul Ragle

thanksgiving 2020

give thanks,

“Always be joyful. Pray regularly. In everything for this is what God wants from you who are united with Christ Jesus.” ~ I Thessalonians 5:16-18

Everywhere I look and listen, folks are dissing 2020, suggesting we return to January 1st to reset the year. One Facebook rant asks mom whether her threat to knock her daughter/son into next year is still good this year. Folks are labeling 2020 as the year we’d like to forget. Yep, 2020 has been a challenge: 200,000 deaths from the Covid-19 virus in our nation alone, racial unrest and protests in city streets, shootings, deadly wildfires, storms, and the pandemic’s demand on us to shelter in place. We’ve been exiled from our favorite eateries, theatres, sports venues and even worship in churches, mosques, temples and synagogues. 2020 has seen much of our status quo shaken from its foundations. I read a Facebook post encouraging us to skip Thanksgiving Day this year in protest of all that has been unpleasant in the year 2020. Friends, we need Thanksgiving 2020 as much or even more than in many other years. Our attention has fixated on the overwhelming pall brought on by the past nine months of pandemic. There has been tragedy, and often in tough times, folks look for somebody to blame - an unbelievable amount of finger pointing! We have been mesmerized by stories of America’s grief and burdens. As important as it is to grieve, to feel the weight and depth of loss, the path to restoration and abundant living is reached through gratitude. We remember those who lost life this year, but we must also celebrate the entirety of the lives these wonderful people lived. Their lives mattered and matter still. They lived and loved. As one wise woman grieving the death of her son said, “God knows what I don’t know; we must pick up the pieces and see what we can make of them.” Although much in our lives was disrupted in 2020, we cannot return to January and reset the year. However, we can refocus our vision and celebrate the depth of the gifts we have received during the year. I give thanks for the heroes of 2020. Folks who stepped

16 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020

up to make our lives better. Health care workers again and again have risked their lives to save lives. Truckers and grocery store workers - deemed “essential” – kept food and essential products available to the public. School teachers and administrators adapted their lives to offer students distance learning options. Parents adjusted family life to welcome children into the home classroom. Pastors and church staff worked tirelessly to help parishioners remain connected to the Holy One. We give thanks for these heroes who have shone the light of love and goodness in our lives during the pandemic of 2020. I celebrate one last Oklahoma hero: Tim Tiller is the head security guard at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City. Like so many of our favorite venues last spring, the museum was forced to temporarily to close its doors. With most museum employees sent home, Mr. Tiller was given a new responsibility, to run the museum’s Twitter account. He had little experience with social media, but he took on the task in the best way he could. He began tweeting pictures and comments about various displays and artifacts housed in the museum. Although he fumbled through Twitter etiquette, he gained a huge following drawing national attention. In one tweet, Mr. Tiller shared a picture of the hat and eye patch John Wayne wore in the movie “True Grit.” In another, he shared a picture of Sherriff Woody and his friends from “Toy Story;” he apologized to his grandchildren for not catching them moving! Tim Tiller and the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum have become a social media icon. Mr. Tiller’s tweets encouraged many folks during the pandemic. When we sit down with loved ones on Thanksgiving Day, perhaps we could take a few moments to thank God for the human lives impacted by the pandemic and to celebrate the heroes who have encouraged us to live and love more abundantly in these tough times. n


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THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020 17


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Saturday IN TOWN by the late AGNES BREWER ILLUSTRATOR, DANNY BELTZ

On Saturday morning, we came alive, and did our chores by the earliest light. Then back to the house we kids would stream to the milk and cream. We had gathered eggs and slopped the hogs, turned cows out to pasture and split the logs. We had fed the chickens, and horses, carried in the wood, and then we were through. The big round table was piled with food and Mama asked a blessing, as we knew she would. From our own smokehouses – thick slices of ham, and homemade molasses, black as a pan, fresh churned butter, molded just right, a big pan of biscuits, fluffy and light, thick milk gravy, a platter of eggs, and blackberry jelly that Mama had made. There was six of us kids, and Dad and Mom; we talked about things on the farm. Our folks said the depression was getting much worse, couldn’t sell anything, just like a curse. Well that kind of talk just went over our heads. We were much too young to know what was actually said. And what were we sittin’ here for? Jes’ a laggin’ when today was town day in our big yellow wagon. There wasn’t money to go to a show but we didn’t care. We just wanted to go. As we made the beds and washed up the dishes, and put on our best clothes, we each made some wishes. Dad thought to himself, “I’ll talk to the men, and we’ll have us a beer in the pool hall, and then I’ll just do some listening. It won’t do no harm, might hear of a place to sell stuff from the farm.”

30 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020

Mama was quiet all the way into town, ‘cept once in a while she told us to pipe down. She had a long list, and was thinking real fast, what she had to get first, and then leave ‘till the last. She knew the money from her eggs and cream wouldn’t come close to filling our dreams. Maybe if she took the eggs over to one store and the cream to another, then she would get more. But she had her pride, and couldn’t come down to being a peddler, like begging in town. “No,” she decided, “I’ll stay with my friends, and go to the store where I’ve always gone.” “This year was the hardest,” she thought with a sigh, soon school would start and school things to buy. “Couldn’t give things away, and we’ve had good crops, corn, cotton, peanuts and fat livestock.” She forced her thoughts back to the present, then smiled at each of us kids in the back, to each child, “While I do my trading, you stay with the team, then we’ll find us a parlor where they sell ice cream.” Now that was a dream for which we all yearned and nothing could budge us ‘til Mama returned. The dirt roads would be dusty, sun hot as could be, so at times we would rest ‘neath a cottonwood tree. As we went down a hill, Dad put on the brake; my Lord, it was steep, it make our bones ache. A bridge crossed the creek made of boards long and wide, as we rattled across, we looked over the side. The water looked green, and deep and cold; we could almost see our old swimmin’ hole. Then for awhile the road wound and led


under pecans and elms that arched over our heads. And grape vines climbed, and tangles all through blackberries, redbuds, and poke berries, too. Then up the hill, on the other side, cedars and blackjacks were far and wide. As we turned west, at the top of the hill, we saw our old school house, quiet and still. It was freshly painted, and we could see our swings beneath the old oak tree. We went past farms, all folks we knew, they waved at us, and we waved back too. We were getting excited, for we knew well, just around the bend, we would see the bell that hung in the steeple of the church so white, as it stood on the corner, to our right. As our horses plodded through the town, new sights and smells were all around. It boggled our minds, and we just stared; there must have been a hundred people there, all walking up and down the street that was paved with brick, so nice and neat. Well, our wagon clattered over the bricks, then we turned down an alley-way, quick! Behind our trading place Dad spied a tree, and there our horses tied. He helped Mama down, of course, a bag of grain he gave each horse. They said that we could stretch our legs, but you couldn’t budge us from that shade. We discussed all the different kinds of ice cream, we hoped we’d find. Maybe one of us would say, “I’d rather have a strawberry pop today.” The rest of us just talked him down, ‘cause Mama said “ice cream,” when we got to town. When Mama finished in the store she called to us, from the back door. With wonder in our eyes at stuff piled high, and the smell of spices for homemade pies. Big barrels of crackers and hunks of cheese, and sacks of flour, above our knees; shelves of canned goods, against the wall, a glass case full of candy, in front of it all. We could have stood there ‘til our eyes were sore, just lookin’ at all the things in that store. Mama had stopped with a neighbor to talk, then we all went out to the front sidewalk. And, oh, it was

wondrous to think, in this town, there wasn’t no mud when the rain came down. We were real good, didn’t have to be bossed, and we held hands so we wouldn’t get lost. On up the sidewalk with Mama we walked, just looked in the windows, and we didn’t talk. On past the barber’s and a hardware, and then, a dry goods store, and the old five and ten. Out in the street, a commotion we saw, a new motor car being chased by a dog! When that was over, we all turned around, and there was the Bon-Ton, best ice cream in town. We hurried in fast, ‘twas already late, and found us a table, we just couldn’t wait. The tables were tiny, so sparkly white, and the chairs were so dainty, we had to sit right. After what seemed ages, the moment arrived; here came the lady with dishes piled high. Then that first taste….so cold and delicious, we shivered with joy and it answered our wishes. We ate it so slowly, it almost got warm, then we knew it was time to head back to our farm. We climbed in the wagon, then we saw our Dad but he walked so slowly, his shoulders just sagged. He’d had no luck selling our cotton and corn, and he knew in the winter we had to be warm. But Mama smiled bravely, and patted his knee; her love and affection were easy to see. That she’d think of something, he had no doubt, whatever the problem, she’d find a way out. Twilight was falling, and cool nice weather, memories of a Saturday…. the Family Together! Agnes Owens Brewer was a native of Stroud, OK. In this writing, “Saturday in Town,” she recalls a childhood visit to the Stroud community during the dust bowl days of the depression. Ms. Brewer’s work has been published in the Christian Science Monitor, Capper’s Weekly, Woman’s World, The Disciple, and various regional and local publications. Danny Beltz, Illustrator, is a life-long Stroud resident and a frequent contributor to The Corridor Magazine with his wonderful memories of life along The Corridor.

THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020 31


Cuti es o

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2013 Chloe Gross

2014 Brant Young

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NOTES ALONG THE

Corridor

by RICK REILEY

MAKING MUSIC ALONG THE CORRIDOR

BERLINE, BAXTER and BAYS

Byron Berline has long been a fixture in Oklahoma music. The world renowned fiddler, bluegrass music maker and promoter and all around good guy who’s never met a stranger, continues to persevere in Guthrie. The Oklahoma International Bluegrass Festival (cancelled for this year) was begun largely through Berline’s efforts. Berline who’s recorded with everyone from the Rolling Stones to Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass Boys has called Guthrie home for decades now. He lost his music shop/ concert hall, Double Stop Fiddle Shop in downtown Guthrie a couple of years ago to fire. But he was able to bounce back just in time to be waylaid by this current COVID 19 pandemic. His band regularly tours the country, as well as interna-

tionally, at festivals and other events but those have also been cancelled for the year as well. According to an interview with Byron by Perris Jones on KOCO-TV in OKC, his music shop is fully stocked and back in operation as well. The music hall is back in performance mode as well. But instead of seating 100 or so, as in the past, they’ve limited capacity for safer distancing. His recent book, Byron Berline, A Fiddler’s Diary, is filled with first hand accounts of his life as a Los Angeles session musician and his involvement with various well known bands throughout the years. It’s a must read for those interested in popular music history, especially those whose lives have been marked and defined by popular music. Byron is a true Oklahoma living legend who’s still performing at the top of his game. All Shows begin at 7:30 at the music hall. The posted schedule for the rest of the year: October 17 - The Byron Berline Band October 31 - The Byron Berline Band November 14 - The Byron Berline Band November 28 - The Byron Berline Band December 12 - The Byron Berline Band There’s no better place to hear live bluegrass! Follow the Double Stop Fiddle shop Facebook page for hours and performance schedules. Joe Baxter of Oklahoma City is a bona fide songwriter that I like to think of as a true people’s poet. This fella who has penned such country songs as ‘Don’t Take the Beer with You Wanda’, ‘Drunk on Communion Wine’, ‘Bluebird of My Heart’ and ‘Rest Home Romeo’ is equally adept at writing instrumentals that provide a safe place to dream and to soothe the spirit. From old time gospel feel to rockin’ country to folky reminiscences of grandma’s garden, Joe covers a lot of ground. Since Joe’s retirement from his long time job at Tinker Air

36 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020


Force Base a few years ago, he’s recorded six albums, the most recent is ‘Arcadia’. Of course this is a tip of the hat to his love of Arcadia’s Round Barn on Route 66. Joe has served as a volunteer there on Tuesdays for quite awhile and also schedules and provides live music there for the visitors on weekends. I’ve heard one cut of his upcoming CD, ‘Sweetie Pie’. It’s a fine tune to tickle and lift the spirit, and I’m anxious to hear the whole project. This new album titled ‘Arcadia’ is scheduled to be released in late October. My first experience with his music was his 2010 album, ‘Old Piano’. Which was followed by ‘Soldier Creek Waltz’, 2012, ‘Okie Boy’, 2013, ‘Pick Rash’, 2016 and ‘The Weather’, 2018. An old rock and roller Joe also recorded five albums with his band the Regular Joes from 1994 to 2005. The Regular Joes are reuniting for a performance at the Round Barn on Oct. 4th. Here’s the schedule for the Round Barn music sessions and guest performers for October. Saturday sessions are from 10:30 to 12:30. Sunday (when they are scheduled) from 1:30 to 3:30.

Tim Bays, over there in Chandler, has long been making and recording music. From cover bands, bar bands, to acoustic trios and Celtic music - perfect for St Paddy’s Day, Tim has done it all. These days his live performances, like so many others, have been put on hold but he’s still writing and recording with his brother Jeff at their home-based studio. He has a brand new, New Orleans influenced album, ‘Voodoo Lily’ scheduled for release on all streaming services on October 11th. This one is a wild but steady ride. The opening cut titled, ‘The Finest of Times’ is a Tom Waits style tribute (maybe tongue in cheek?) to a rough life, lived dangerously with no guard rails and fewer regrets. Take country blues oriented lyrics, Tim’s deep raspy voice, combined with occasional jazz influence, drive it down a rough, Lincoln County road at 30 miles an hour, in the moonlit dark, in a 1980s Lincoln Town Car with the windows down and the volume turned up and you’ve got the perfect atmosphere for Tim Bays ‘Voodoo Lily’. (I ain’t kiddin’! But don’t drink and drive!) This is a good piece of work! And Tim’s mom, Linda Bays, provided the cover art! Tim released two projects in 2018, one titled ‘Hey Now’ and another rockabilly album titled ‘The Devilish 3’. Both available on iTunes and Spotify. So yes, folks! Music is still being made, played and recorded right here at home. Nothing stops the spirit through those stalwart souls driven to create, record and perform. If you still want to get out and about and hear live music, and do it with a reasonable measure of safety, it’s still there! And if listening at home is currently your cup of tea there’s plenty of that to be had too! So however you enjoy it, do it with a smile and be sure to pass it on! n

October 3 - Ben and Alycia Groeke October 10 - Middle Sister October 17 - Dan Siebert October 24 - Janice Frances Smith And don’t forget, on Sunday October 4th Joe Baxter and the Regular Joes outside under the Elm Tree from 1:30 - 3:30. Don’t forget to ask about his CDs! Music sponsored by the Arcadia Historical and Preservation Society. All music is free but donations are appreciated. Please check Joe Baxter’s posts to the Arcadia Round Barn Facebook page for updates and details.

THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020 37


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Delilah’s DILEMMAS

They are gone – your turn now. Two days had passed since Delilah received that email, and no other missives had arrived via email or other means. In addition, there had been no attempts on her life. This was small consolation for Delilah’s father, Buford, who was ready to pack her up and move her back to Georgia. To begin with, Delilah’s argument for staying on the ranch was that if these people were out to get her, being in Georgia, or anywhere else in the world for that matter, would not stop them from getting to her. Secondly, the ranch was a business, HER business, and she would not, could not abandon it. And lastly, but certainly not leastly, in pure Delilah form, she was simply digging her heels in and being a stubborn, nonconforming rebel. And though she wouldn’t admit it, she still believed Eli and Dooby were alive and would be home any time, despite the fact they had been missing nearly a week, and no one had heard from, or seen hide nor hair of them. It was as though they had simply vanished from the face of the earth. It was Wednesday and the mid-June air was thick with warm moisture. “You know what you need?” Daniel said, as he, Delilah, Joel, Buford, and Damon walked from the house to the stable. “You need to get one of those Gator tractors.” “Yeah,” Damon said enthusiastically. “Or a four-wheeler.” “Uh, we have these four-legged animals here,” Delilah said sardonically. “They’re called horses. And we also have these really cool things called saddles. You strap them onto the four-legged animals and . . .” “Okay, okay. I get it,” Damon said as everyone chuckled. “Four-legged animals are good,” Daniel said, nodding. “But the Gator tractor has attachments, and you can haul stuff like tools, equipment, supplies.” “You sound like a commercial,” Delilah said. “Eh, probably,” Daniel said, shooting a salacious look at Delilah. “But still.”

40 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020

by

DIANE BROWN

Daniel and Damon saddled horses to ride the fence line. Joel tended to Mae’s Thunder and her two foals. Delilah and Buford were taking inventory in the tack room. “He’s got a point, you know,” Buford said. “Beg your pardon,” Delilah said. “The Gator,” Buford said. “Not a bad idea. It can get into places a pickup or tractor can’t. And I’m sure it would be more effective than horses, in certain circumstances.” “OH!” Delilah cried. “Not you, too.” “Give it some thought,” Buford said. Light wisps of clouds rolled in mid-afternoon, scarcely foretelling the thunderstorms that had been forecasted. Delilah had tip toed on the edge of skittish when it came to storms since the small tornado passed through the property just two months prior. And even though the severity of the inclement weather had been predicted negligible (at the very most, pea-sized hail and mid-level wind gusts, according to the weatherman), Delilah instructed the three ranch hands to batten down the hatches, and secure the livestock. By 4:00, she had sent Daniel and Damon home, though Daniel had objected, and offered to stay in the mobile home currently occupied by Joel. Buford had already gone to the house, and Delilah and Joel were headed that way, when they heard a faint buzzing sound above them. “What is that?” Delilah asked, holding a hand at her forehead to block the light from her eyes.


“It’s a UAV,” Joel replied with little gusto. “A what?” Delilah said. “A UAV,” he reiterated, as though he was totally puzzled that she didn’t know what he was talking about. “Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. You know . . . a drone.” “Oh, that’s a drone,” Delilah said with amusement. And then the perplexity of the statement hit her. “Why would a drone be flying over the ranch?” Joel shrugged. “Historically, they’re used for military and intelligence surveillance,” he said. “You think it’s got a camera on it?” Delilah asked. “I don’t know, maybe,” Joel replied. Delilah gasped. “You don’t think it’s terrorists checking out the tank farms, do you?” she asked. “No,” Joel admonished. “Tank farm is at least five, six miles away. This thing’s hovering over the ranch.” Delilah and Joel stared at each other for a long moment. “But why?” Delilah finally asked. “And who’s controlling it?” They both looked toward the road, and around the property. Delilah began to feel very uncomfortable. “How far away can the controller be?” Delilah asked, as the drone began moving from the position over the stable, north headed for the house. “500 feet for commercial varieties used by hobbyists,” Joel said. “But they’re getting more and more sophisticated. There are military grade drones that can go over a mile. But that one looks smaller than the military models.”  The drone buzzed around all sides of the house, and then

took off toward the road like a fly in a clean room at Area 51. “I think you need to stay in the big house tonight,” Delilah told Joel. “Why?” Joel asked. “The storm,” Delilah said. “In case we need to go to the cellar.” “Delilah!” Joel exclaimed. “It’s not supposed to be that bad.” “Don’t argue with me,” Delilah snapped. “I’ve got a weird feeling about that drone. We just all need to be under the same roof. Okay?”   Over hot dogs and baked beans, Buford parroted Delilah’s concern about the drone. Once supper had been eaten, he made a swift bee-line to the gun cabinet in the living room, loaded every fire arm, and then, with some trepidation, he gave Joel a crash course in how to shoot said guns.    The first rumbles of thunder could be heard shortly after 7:00, as the evening light was devoured by inky, angry clouds. Delilah surfed the television channels so as not to miss any applicable warnings. An hour later, it was full-blown storm at the Royal Flush Ranch. With each bolt of lightning, every crack of thunder, all the drops of rain, and the howling wind, Delilah’s anxiety grew. Suddenly, the back door blew open like a bomb. Delilah, Buford, and Joel jumped with fright. Buford reached for the Remington shot gun he had placed on the coffee table, and Delilah grabbed the Ruger next to it. Joel started down the hall to the kitchen. “Joel!” Buford yelled from the living room. “Get back here!”

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Email: freedom76outdoors@gmail.com THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020 41


Delilah was first to reach the kitchen, and she quickly closed both the storm and interior doors and secured them. While doing so, she saw a faint, small flash of light from one of the windows in Dooby’s otherwise darkened apartment above the garage. She turned sharply to her father who was coming up behind her. “Did you see that?” she asked, breathlessly. “What?” Buford said, stepping closer to the door. Delilah turned back toward the door and gawked through the window. The combination of the amber colored security light, and the wind violently whipping the limbs of the hundred-year old live oak tree in the back yard, caused disturbing shadows to dance on the lawn and side of garage. “There was a light in the living room window of the apartment,” she replied with far less conviction. Perhaps it had just been the dancing light from the security lamp. As Delilah and Buford began making their way back to the living room, the electricity went off. All the electricity. It was dark as pitch, except for the flashes of lightning. “Delilah? Mister Beauregard?” Joel squeaked from the living room. “Stay where you are, Joel,” Delilah called out. “I’ll get candles. Daddy, go on to the living room.” Delilah inched her way back to the kitchen, gun in one hand, the other hand on the wall. She felt her way to the pantry, sat the gun on a shelf, and filled her hands with candles and a box of matches. When she closed the pantry door with her elbow, and glanced through the window over the

kitchen sink, she caught a glimpse of the ball of light, again. This time bouncing along the driveway in the direction of the garage. It was gone as quickly as it appeared. In the living room, Delilah lit candles, and then called the electric company to report the outage. She, Buford, and Joel settled into the cushy furnishings and waited for the storm to pass. Their comfort was short lived, however. Within ten minutes, the back door was once again flung open with considerable force. It was at this point Delilah realized she’d left the Ruger on a shelf in the pantry. Buford and Delilah hastened to the kitchen, the Remington rifle cocked and ready to fire. “Oh my God!” Delilah shouted, throwing her arms around Eli’s neck, and embracing him so tightly he could scarcely breathe. She pulled back slightly and kissed his face several times. “Where have you been?!” Delilah cried, literally, tears gushing from her eyes as she slapped his arm. “I thought you were dead. I thought you were both dead.” She turned and stepped away from Eli, shaking with fury. Eli held a finger up to his lips and shook his head. He pulled a mechanical apparatus from a bag slung over his shoulder and pressed a couple buttons. He waved the device around the room and up toward the ceiling. “Delilah, we couldn’t,” Eli began in a whisper, stepping toward her, and extending his arms. “No!” Delilah said. “I am so mad at you right now.” “Look, I’m sorry,” Eli said.

258-5002 121 W. 10th • Chandler • IAFR.com/Thompsons 42 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020


“Yeah, me too,” she snapped. “And you!” Delilah snarled, as Dooby joined the reunion. “Why? Why didn’t you just let me know?” “No other choice,” Dooby said dryly. “Is it all clear?” Eli nodded.

Delilah thought Dooby’s countenance seemed unusually cross. Had she not been so bitterly mad at him she might have been concerned. “Buford,” Dooby said with a curt nod. “What’s goin’ on here, son?” Buford asked Dooby. “Long story,” Doody said.        “I was planning your funeral, Eli,” Delilah finally said. “Both your funerals.” “That’s actually a good thing,” Dooby said with a hint of satisfaction. “What are you talking about?” Delilah demanded. “We had to make everyone believe we had been killed,” Eli said. “And to do that, we pretty much had to disappear,” Dooby said.  “But why?” Delilah pressed. “And why in the world couldn’t you somehow let us know?” “No one could know. If Patty had discovered her plan went awry, she’d have made sure it didn’t fail a second time,” Eli said. “You know she’s dead, right?” Delilah said. “Yeah,” Eli said.

“Didn’t see that coming,” Dooby added. “Neither did we,” Joel said. “Wait,” Delilah said. “How did you know it was Patty?” “Abigail,” Eli said. “Where is Abigail?” Buford asked of his niece. Dooby and Eli exchanged a furtive glance, and then sighed in unison. “Unfortunately . . .” Dooby said, head hanging low. n            

What has happened to Abigail? Is she yet another casualty of the Mrs. Wrigley operation?

Where have Eli and Dooby been for an entire week? Stay tuned for another riveting installment of Delilah’s Dilemmas in the November Corridor Magazine .

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THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020 43


Welcome to College...

DORM LIFE, STUDYING & FOOD by MORGAN SHROPSHIRE

Hi! My name is Morgan and I am a freshman at Oklahoma Christian University (OC) in Edmond. Coming into college I was so nervous and had no real thought of what college was about to be like, so hopefully at the time of this writing I can give some high school students a little insight. Transitioning from high school to college was not super easy. Even though I was so excited to start this next chapter of my life, there was so much I wasn’t accustomed to such as dorm life, college classes and learning to navigate the café every day. When it comes to dorm life, it was kind of odd at first sharing a tiny room with a complete stranger. And, by the way, my roommate did turn out to be amazing! And it was tough to figure how to work around and with each other.

As for college classes, man oh man, I truly thought I had developed very good study habits in high school, but coming to college...

As for college classes, man oh man, I truly thought I had developed very good study habits in high school, but coming to college, I learned that I had to find different ways to study in order to succeed. Even though college classes are not the easiest, OC is such an amazing school filled with awesome students and supportive faculty who are always willing to help because they want to see you succeed. Another random thing I had to get used to was learning how to navigate the café, which we call “The Branch”. I know it sounds silly to talk about 44 THE CORRIDOR MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2020

navigating The Branch along with these other challenges, but I just was not really used to getting to pick from a ton of options every day. When it comes to The Branch, there are several stations with all kinds of foods, from “fresh” with salads to “flame” with hamburgers. Each day one never knows what is going to be in the café but if there is something that you really like, you can email the people who run the café and ask them to serve that meal and they will! Even though it was a bit of a transition from high school to college, I am loving it and have learned that Oklahoma Christian truly is home. n

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