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March 2019

Serving Hypoluxo Island, South Palm Beach, Manalapan, Ocean Ridge, Briny Breezes, Gulf Stream and Coastal Delray Beach 

Volume 12 Issue 3

South Palm Beach

Beach project appears dead after county backs out

By Dan Moffett For nearly 13 years, Palm Beach County and South Palm Beach have worked together on a controversial plan to use a network of concrete groins to relieve the town’s chronic beach erosion problems.

They spent $1.7 million and devoted countless hours to the joint venture, consulting with scientists and engineers, lobbying politicians and state officials, and twisting the arms of skeptical residents and neighbors. Now, months before

construction of the groins was scheduled to begin, it appears the project is dead in the water. On Feb. 5, the county sent a letter to the state Department of Environmental Protection officially withdrawing a request for the permits needed to move forward. County environmental

managers say the project has grown too expensive to make sense anymore. “We have determined that the project is cost prohibitive,” said Michael Stahl, deputy director of the county’s Environmental Resources Management department.

What was envisioned as a $10 million plan a decade ago has ballooned now to something closer to $25 million, Stahl said. Though the state has promised to cover half the cost, the new estimate is a deal breaker for the See BEACH on page 18

Ocean Ridge

$675 payment ends Lucibella felony saga By Steve Plunkett

Age is just a dance number The New Florida Follies performs last month at Spanish River High School in Boca Raton, which will be the site of two more shows, on March 24 and 31. Some women in the troupe dance into their 80s and beyond. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star Story, Page 32

Lantana

Veterinarian had passion for life and work, friends recall

By Arden Moore, Mary Thurwachter and Rich Pollack Neighbors, family members, longtime clients and anyone else who knew veterinarian Ken Simmons rarely were at a loss for words to describe him. He stood 6-foot-8, but his attitude and actions stood out even more. They talked about his unyielding compassion for pets, his reputation for innovation and most

of all, his determination to get the best out of life every day. These traits were shared by Alice, his wife of nearly 33 years. On the afternoon of Feb. 1, Ken, 62, and Alice Simmons, 59, of Hypoluxo Island, loaded up their 1979 Piper Lance II single-engine aircraft with supplies and their golden retrievers, Lily and Bailey, bound for their favorite and frequent destination, Great Guana Cay in the Bahamas, See SIMMONS on page 33

Ken and Alice Simmons are presumed dead after their plane disappeared Feb. 1.

Onetime Vice Mayor Richard Lucibella walked out of the Palm Beach County Courthouse after his trial with his bank account $675 lighter and with a dark cloud over his Lucibella head gone. The felony case against the Ocean Ridge resident, which lingered in the criminal justice system for 27 months, resolved itself Feb. 21 in comparatively short order: • Prosecutors called five witnesses to testify; defense attorneys also called five. • The jury, seated Jan. 28, a Monday, spent barely five hours — including lunch the following Friday — in reaching its verdict: not guilty of felony battery on a law enforcement officer or resisting arrest with violence, but guilty of misdemeanor battery. • In a 10-minute sentencing hearing Feb. 21, Palm Beach County Circuit Judge Daliah Weiss upheld the verdict and ordered Lucibella to pay $675 in court fees and ordered no jail time. “I am going to adjudicate you guilty of the misdemeanor battery. I’m going to impose standard fines and court costs,” Weiss said as the crowded courtroom erupted in applause. Contacted days after the See LUCIBELLA on page 24

Inside Election 2019

Your guide to issues, candidates in South County. Pages 15-17

Fresh start

Home tour

Annual Delray event offers a look inside local houses. Page AT1

Taylor-made

Paul Taylor Dance comes to Duncan Theatre. Page AT11

Interfaith group helps provide showers to homeless. Page H1


22Editor’s E ditor’sNote/Coastal Note Star

The COASTAL STAR 

November March2019 2019

Coastal Star Publisher Jerry Lower publisher@thecoastalstar.com

Advertising Executives Mike Mastropietro Jay Nuszer

Executive Editor Mary Kate Leming editor@thecoastalstar.com

News Operations Tracy Allerton Chad Armstrong Sara Babb Kathleen Bell Brad Betker Jodi MacNeal Steve Plunkett Victoria Preuss Michelle Quigley Clare Shore Scott Simmons Michele Smith Margot Street Tom Warnke Amy Woods

Advertising Manager Chris Bellard sales@thecoastalstar.com Managing Editors Henry Fitzgerald henry@thecoastalstar.com Mary Thurwachter maryt@thecoastalstar.com Founding Partners Carolyn & Price Patton

www.thecoastalstar.com

The Coastal Star is a monthly newspaper with two editions serving Hypoluxo Island, South Palm Beach, Manalapan, Ocean Ridge, Briny Breezes, Gulf Stream and coastal Delray Beach; Highland Beach and coastal Boca Raton. ©2008-2019

Send letters, opinions and news tips to news@thecoastalstar.com The Coastal Star 5114 N Ocean Blvd. Ocean Ridge, FL 33435 561-337-1553

Editor’s Note

Are we willing to pay now to save paradise for future?

$

378 million to keep a city above water. $45 million for renovations along A1A. $25 million to keep sand on the beach. These are a few of the dramatic numbers we’ve seen discussed in our coastal area recently. The cost of updating our aging infrastructure is not going to be cheap. Retaining paradise is about to get expensive. Thankfully, taxpayers in Palm Beach County voted in 2017 for an extra 1-cent sales tax. A portion of that revenue will be returned to municipalities over a 10-year period. The money is earmarked for infrastructure: roads, sewers, water lines, fire stations and more. This will help — a little. Much of the coastal area was developed more than a half century ago, so we shouldn’t be surprised if roads need repairing or water systems need revamping. And we shouldn’t be surprised to learn that some of the barrier island land is sinking, or that rising seas contribute to crumbling roadways, bulkheads and seawalls. And more than ever before, each hurricane season we wait for the “big one” to find out if we have enough of a buffer on the beach to keep buildings

from being compromised. We also wait to see if storm surge will overwhelm our water and wastewater systems. Although the latest proposed price tags for sustainability are eye-popping, remember that our coastline communities account for 16 percent of the property value of Palm Beach County. We have the wealth to protect us from future disaster — if we are willing to spend now for tomorrow. Fixing infrastructure will not be sexy. It’s likely to be messy as repairs are made. Still, our elected officials need to be unafraid to explore ambitious solutions to our growing infrastructure problems. In this fiscally conservative area it’s going to be tough to convince everyone of the value of spending for solutions we may not see in our lifetime, but it will be necessary. Residents in Highland Beach, Ocean Ridge and South Palm Beach have an opportunity on March 12 to elect candidates with the best skills and ability to navigate this increasingly complex and expensive road to the future. Please vote. — Mary Kate Leming, Editor

Debra Ghostine of Hypoluxo Island takes on volunteer opportunities like athletic events. She pitched softball in her youth and plays tennis and golf. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star

Co-chairwoman is a great sport at making literacy luncheon a success By Stephen Moore

Volunteering and athletics are big parts of Debra Ghostine’s life. In fact, she approaches every volunteer assignment like an athletic competition — working hard and doing the best she can to get the best possible results. And she excels at both. For the second consecutive year, Ghostine is co-chair of the Love of Literacy Luncheon hosted by the Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County. It takes place March 14 at the Cohen Pavilion at the Kravis Center. The program, presented by Bank of America, will feature New York Times bestselling author Jacquelyn Mitchard as the guest speaker. “We love it when people are passionate about literacy,” Ghostine said, “and Jacquelyn Mitchard is that type of person.” If this event, the Literacy Coalition’s largest fundraiser, needed any more accreditation, Mitchard brings it. She has written 12 novels for adults and seven for young adults. The Deep End of the Ocean was part of Oprah’s Winfrey’s first book club list, in 1996, and was made into a motion picture starring Michelle Pfeiffer. With 600 people to attract to the event and sponsors and donations to secure, along with raffle gifts and auction prizes to collect, Ghostine’s work is detailed and time-consuming. “She really knows what she is doing,” said co-chair Bernadette O’Grady, program director at WPTV. “Debra is

If You Go

What: Love of Literacy Luncheon When: Registration begins at 11 a.m. March 14 Where: Kravis Center’s Cohen Pavilion Tickets: Start at $150 Info: 279-9103 or www. literacypbc.org so easy. She is up for anything. She is not intimidated to call people and ask for donations. She is a go-to, get-it-done mom. She must have a time machine because she is always on the go, go, go.” It seems as if Ghostine, 54, has always been on the go, go, go. Growing up in New Hampshire, she was a hotshot softball pitcher for her state-champion high school team. She signed a scholarship to pitch for New Hampshire College, where she majored in business administration. Now Ghostine, her retired husband, Paul, son, Joseph, 14, daughter, Sarah, 12, and two rescued dogs, Bella and Lucky, live an active, sporting life on Hypoluxo Island. “Summers always revolve around outdoor activities,’’ Ghostine said. “Water skiing, tubing, fishing, boating to the Bahamas. And of course, there is tennis. I am the co-captain of our recreational tennis team at the Ocean Club. And yes, I also play golf.” Ghostine’s crusade for civic duty has trickled down to her children. Joseph and Sarah, students at the Gulf Stream School, have started a

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nonprofit organization called Bones and Me, which donates money to rescue and shelter dogs. “They are really into it,” Ghostine said. “They have around 8,500 followers on Instagram and Facebook and are looking to go nationwide. We are looking forward to growing and trying to support as many shelters as we can. My kids do not like the idea of dogs not being cared for and not getting homes.” Her children’s school also receives the benefit of Ghostine’s expertise. She is on the board of directors at Gulf Stream School, in charge of marketing, trustees and events. But all other volunteer gigs have been on hold lately since she has been busy with the 28th annual Love of Literacy Luncheon. “It can be almost a yearround job,” she said. “We are always thinking about it and talking about it.” Her support system is well intact. Literacy Coalition CEO Kristin Calder sees to that. “I met her through the Gulf Stream School about seven or eight years ago,” Calder said. “And she worked with us on a Literacy Coalition program. I remember she was always volunteering for jobs that nobody else wanted. She was incredible. “This luncheon is a great place to showcase what we are doing, and it is great to have someone as gracious and friendly and pleasant and cordial as Debra running it.” Ú

Send a note to news@thecoastalstar.com or call 337-1553.


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66Letters News to the Editor

The COASTAL STAR 

Local Voices

November March2019 2019

Staying true to Delray’s vibe

By Shelly Petrolia “Florida’s New Sweet Spot” is how the Wall Street Journal described Delray Beach in a headline. The article went on to describe three perfect days in our city, noting it had been transformed Petrolia and “now has a distinctly different vibe.”

That vibe can be observed in the mix of creative people in Pineapple Grove and felt in special places of cultural significance, like newly renovated Cornell Museum. You can watch the vibe in motion at the drum circle or listen to it at a concert on the grounds of Old School Square. You can visit the Historical Society or walk the five designated historic districts in Delray to soak up vibrations from Delray’s past. Visitors strolling our

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charming tree-lined downtown, with institutions like Hand’s Stationery, The Colony Hotel and Huber Drugs on the same blocks with hip new stores and hangouts like Urban Outfitters, Capital One Cafe and Subculture Coffee, experience the Delray vibe. And the nightly singalongs at Johnnie Brown’s as the train rumbles by are part of the Delray lore visitors take home. In my capacity as mayor, I often wrestle with how to guide the city forward and yet stay true to Delray’s “distinctly different vibe” that has garnered our city so much recent national attention. I believe elected officials must be faithful and responsible stewards of the city, respectful of the decades of hard work before them. And in my case, a preservationist at heart.    But Delray faces many

challenges, and it’s going to take the cooperation of the entire village — elected officials, stakeholders, business owners and residents — to keep Delray from becoming indistinguishable from so many other South Florida cities.   We see developments encompassing whole blocks threatening to canyon-ize certain streets in Delray. Our historic districts are now targets of inappropriate development, despite their restrictive zoning. There was a recent challenge to the three-story height restriction for buildings on Atlantic Avenue, and a proposal for bike lanes on historic Swinton Avenue almost caused 150 trees to disappear. And the list goes on.  We win some battles, and lose others, but this is how the charm of the city is slowly eroded.

In the near future, the Northwest/Southwest neighborhood will finally be developed — a huge undertaking to finally unite West Atlantic and create a project that honors the historic home of our African-American community. This is an exciting opportunity, but we must remain vigilant that this project hits all the marks.   Delray has such an engaged citizenry: They are the guiding force who often sound the first alarm that something is not in keeping with Delray’s authenticity.  If the City Commission does its part, we can shape the future of our city instead of having it shaped for us. Let’s keep the vibe going. Shelly Petrolia is mayor of Delray Beach.

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Letters to the Editor

Ocean Ridge transition needs wise leaders

As a longtime Fortune 500 senior executive and business owner, I knew the right location was critical when we moved here from New Jersey as fulltime residents. My husband, Roy, and I selected Ocean Ridge after looking carefully at several small coastal towns, finding the town well-run and the engagement of the citizenry and sense of community very apparent. That level of management takes work, and I have recently learned that the town manager, Jamie Titcomb, who is responsible for many of the key town projects, will be leaving

his role in March. This creates a gap in the town management that will take some time to fill properly with a seasoned candidate. This is a cause for concern. When I have attended the Town Commission meetings of late it is apparent that it takes experience, knowledge of town needs and how to ensure our safety and well-being. Steve Coz, who has a high level of experience and has consistently represented the town’s best interests, is up for re-election in March. His experience would be very helpful during the

transition period. This will be critical, as a poorly managed transition could result in lost opportunities for improvement and likely cost taxpayers money. So often people do not exercise their critical right to vote. Why does this matter in a small town like ours? Because we need to ensure that this beautiful town that we love remains a safe and good place for ourselves and our loved ones. Show up to vote on March 12. — Janet Schijns Ocean Ridge

Exercise your voting rights fully

In a few days it will once again be election day here in Ocean Ridge. As I hope we all recognize, there are three candidates running for two seats on the Town Commission. Qualified voters will have two votes to cast, two chances to shape the future for our town. During the last town campaign, some people in Ocean Ridge advocated for

“bullet voting,” the tactic of casting a ballot for only one person even when two positions are open. The purpose of “bullet voting” is to give one’s favored candidate a vote, while denying votes to other candidates. To my way of thinking, it is a destructive stratagem, a negative way of pursuing one’s civic duty. The town needs two commissioners, not just one,

After

and I hope people in Ocean Ridge will exercise their right to vote completely. This is an important election after all, and it would be great to know that the town has the two best new commissioners, when all is said and done. — Peter Hoe Burling Ocean Ridge

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March 2019

News 7

Delray Beach

$378 million price to fix flood-prone areas stuns commission By Jane Smith

When local TV stations look for scenes of tidal flooding, Delray Beach is the poster child, city commissioners heard on Feb. 12. That set the stage for a stormwater consultant’s report stating the city will need to spend $378.2 million to keep homes, offices and restaurants safe from flooding caused by higher tides, storm surge, heavy rains and sea-level rise. That multimillion-dollar price tag astonished the commissioners. “How are we going to manage a $300 million endeavor in little Delray Beach?” Mayor Shelly Petrolia asked. The Federal Emergency Management Agency requires cities to update a stormwater master plan every five years to allow property owners to get reductions in flood insurance rates. The consultant had been retained by the Public Works department to prepare the plan update. The price tag in the report covers only the 13 most floodprone areas of Delray Beach. Other parts of the city would be addressed later, said Jeff Needle, the city’s stormwater engineer. Two of the flood-prone areas are west of Interstate

95. The remaining 11 sit along both sides of the Intracoastal Waterway. Fixes for Marine Way, which floods several times a year, were not included in the total amount because the road is part of a separate project, Needle said. Delray Beach is trying to determine who owns Marine Way and acquire the easements. The estimated $2.8 million needed remains in the current year’s capital budget. Even so, the road is among the 14 flood-prone areas listed by the consultant, Alex Vazquez of A.D.A. Engineering. Of the 11 Intracoastal locations with price tags in the report, the Tropic Isles neighborhood was the most expensive at $157.2 million. It sits on the west side of the Intracoastal south of Linton Boulevard. The fixes include new outfall pipes that have back-flow prevention devices to stop tidal water from flowing in, lined stormwater pipes to prevent groundwater intrusion and raised roads. The lowest amount needed was $6.4 million for a portion of Southeast Seventh Avenue, south of Southeast Seventh Street. A small section of Atlantic Avenue east of the Intracoastal

was included in an area that needs about $28 million in fixes. Delray Beach last updated its stormwater master plan in 2000, Needle said. Commissioners were so overwhelmed as Vazquez showed various hydrologic models and higher-level math equations that they were content to approve the stormwater master plan that same day. But commissioners decided to wait until June to prioritize the stormwater projects when they discuss the city’s capital budget. On Feb. 12, the commission also declined to discuss a sea wall ordinance without specifying a return date. Needle said most of the sea walls along the Intracoastal Waterway will need to be replaced or raised. Delray Beach owns less than 1 mile of sea walls. The remaining 29 miles of sea walls are held privately. The city will have to coordinate with the private property owners, Needle said, creating the need for an ordinance. Petrolia asked the city staff to send the stormwater report to U.S. Rep. Lois Frankel. The congresswoman called a forum of mayors and city managers in her district on Feb. 11 to

ask what their needs are. She was just appointed to the appropriations committee in the U.S. House. At that meeting, Petrolia asked for money to raise roads. The stormwater plan, she said, will bolster that request. In other action on Feb. 12, the commission: • Decided to keep the start of its regular meetings at 4

Delray Beach

p.m., despite several people saying that start time doesn’t allow working people to attend. The mayor and Deputy Vice Mayor Shirley Johnson wanted to push the start time later, but they were outnumbered by three commissioners. The commission will revisit the start times in six months. • Formally approved Lynn Gelin as city attorney. Her salary will be $195,000. Ú

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March 2019

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Green turtles’ pattern accounts for sharp drop in nesting numbers

Experts call 2018 average, expect rebound in 2019 By Rich Pollack At first glance, the dramatic drop in the number of sea turtle nests along the Palm Beach County coastline during the 2018 nesting season appears alarming. Overall, the number of turtle nests on beaches from Boca Raton to Tequesta dropped about 33 percent — from 39,715 to 26,458 — according to numbers compiled by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Those numbers, however, don’t tell the whole story because they are skewed by an expected drop in the number of green sea turtle nests — with 2018 seeing close to 12,000 fewer green turtle nests than the year before. Because the pattern for decades has shown that the number of green turtle nests on Florida beaches alternates from extreme lows one year to extreme highs the following year, local turtle researchers are unconcerned by the drop and predict high numbers this year. “We’re expecting a busy green nesting season,” said David Anderson, sea turtle conservation coordinator for the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton. Remove the drop in green sea turtle nests from the equation and it appears the 2018 season did not have a lot of surprises. There were only about 1,300 fewer nests last year in Palm Beach County than in 2017, if you don’t include the green turtle nests. “If you look at it overall, it was about an average year,” said Kelly Martin, a senior environmental analyst for the Palm Beach County Department of Environmental Resources Management. Though there were large amounts of sargassum seaweed on the beaches, and some red tides, neither seemed to have much visible impact on nesting or on the number of eggs that hatched in 2018. Along with the drop in green turtle nests, there was a slight decline in the number of loggerhead turtle nests on county beaches, from 26,245 in 2017 to 24,876 last year. Again, the drop didn’t set off alarm bells, in part because most species of sea turtles nest every two to three years. “Loggerhead numbers seemed pretty normal,” said Luciano Soares, assistant research scientist for the FWC’s marine turtle program. There was actually a significant increase in the number of leatherback turtle nests in 2018, with 305 nests compared with 207 in 2017.

A hatchling green turtle makes its way into the surf. Green turtles typically nest every other year. Photo provided nests in Highland Beach there was evidence that more than Sea turtle 50,600 hatchlings left their nesting totals shells, about 75 percent of the overall eggs. Boca Raton In Boca Raton, the hatch rate 2017 – 1,071 was slightly lower at 65 percent, 2018 – 723 but that was an increase from 58 Highland Beach percent in 2017 and a low of 38 2017 – 1,829 percent in 2016. 2018 – 955 Sand temperature and rain, Delray Beach Anderson said, play a large role 2017 – 304 in those numbers. If the sand 2018 – 278 is too hot and there’s no rain to Gulf Stream cool it down, the egg could be 2017 – 806 destroyed. 2018 – 448 While the hatch rate Gulf Stream Park appeared good in 2018, it’s 2017 – 68 difficult to know how many 2018 – 53 hatchlings made it to the ocean Ocean Ridge (includes or were strong enough to Briny Breezes) survive once they made it to the 2017 – 710 water. 2018 – 638 Some hatchlings did get Manalapan caught in the sargassum, 2017 – 2,013 Anderson said, with a few 2018 – 1,071 rescued by people. Still, some South Palm Beach of those young turtles may 2017 – 1,503 have used up energy they 2018 – 1,465 needed to survive in the ocean Green turtle nests while struggling to get past the 2017 – 1,860 seaweed. 2018 – 134 On its website the FWC says that only about one in 1,000 Total nests, turtles survives to adulthood, Palm Beach County because of predation from birds, 2017 – 39,715 crabs and other animals, as 2018 – 26,458 well as dehydration if they don’t Green turtle nests, make it to ocean quickly. countywide One interesting phenomenon 2017 – 13,263 in 2018 was the discovery of 2018 – 1,277 sea turtle nests in places that had never seen them before. In the southern portion of One Kemp’s ridley nest was the county, South Palm Beach discovered as far north as New had an increase in the number York. Could climate change of loggerheads, to 1,432 nests in be responsible for a bit of a 2018 from 1,352 in 2017. Delray Beach also saw a slight rise, with northern migration, as well as for what seems to be a longer the number of loggerhead nests nesting season, which officially increasing from 252 to 271. Many communities saw begins this month? increases in leatherback nests, That’s a big topic among researchers, who haven’t come with Boca Raton reporting 18 to any conclusions yet, local nests — up from five in 2017 — experts say. and Highland Beach reporting Palm Beach County’s Martin seven, up from three the points out that the largest previous year. In Highland Beach, turtles concentration of leatherback came ashore to nest 1,825 times, turtle nests used to be found in with 955 staying to nest and 870 Palm Beach County. false crawls. The close to 50-50 Now there are more nests in ratio is common, according to Martin County than here. “Climate change could drive Barbara James, who coordinates turtles to high latitudes,” said the sea turtle program in the Soares, “but not as far north as town. There were some positive New York.” signs when it came to hatch That turtle, researchers say, maybe just got lost. Ú rates in 2018 as well. During an inventory of 645


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

News 9

Gulf Stream

New construction may face time limits

By Steve Plunkett Town officials are poised to create time limits between 16 and 30 months on future new construction in Gulf Stream. The new rules, which town commissioners will consider on final reading in March, come after unhappiness at the slow progress at 3140 Polo Drive, an 8,560-square-foot house that passed the threeyear mark of building activity in February. The pending ordinance notes that “lingering construction projects have a negative impact on the health, safety and welfare of town residents.” The clock will start when a building permit is issued, and the allowable time is based on square footage. Trey Nazzaro, Gulf Stream’s staff attorney, looked at all home construction in town for the past eight years and at Palm Beach’s rules to develop the sliding scale. Projects up to 3,999 square feet must finish in 16 months; those 6,000 to 10,000 square feet will get 24 months. Anything larger will get 30 months. “In all the projects dating back to 2011 only one dragged on significantly longer than the proposed schedule. There were, I think, three or four that were one month over,” Nazzaro said. Extra time can be granted by the Town Commission “for good cause.” Commissioners have the option to impose a fee for additional days, perhaps 10 cents a square foot, Nazzaro said. Commissioner Paul Lyons wanted to make sure homeowners and contractors received a schedule of fees. “A lot of people get instructions more clearly if they understand the consequences of failure,” he said. Commissioners also had a lively discussion on a separate proposal to limit time between demolition of a house and the commencement of rebuilding. Nazzaro suggested 30 days, but Vice Mayor Tom Stanley said 90 days was more realistic. And Commissioner Joan Orthwein said it might be time to shorten the winter ban on construction from six months to five. Commissioners will review a revised proposal in March. In other business on Feb. 8: • Police Chief Edward Allen introduced the town’s newest police officer, Allen O’Neal, who comes to Gulf Stream after five years in Manalapan and 26 years in Riviera Beach. “We look forward to

seeing you around town,” Mayor Scott Morgan said. “It’s a small town and we get to know our police officers.” • Commissioners agreed to reduce a $200,000 lien on a house at 2900 Avenue Au Soleil to $20,000. The lien started accruing in November 2006 for code violations; property owner Anthony

Turner died the following August. His estate, which disputed the validity of the lien, was unable to sell the property with the $200,000 cloud over it, commissioners were told. As part of the settlement, the estate promised to make the property comply with code within six months. Ú

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March 2019

Manalapan

Town studies purchase of bank site to house Police Department

By Dan Moffett

Manalapan commissioners are exploring the possibility of buying the vacant BB&T Bank building at the northeast corner of Plaza del Mar as a new home for the town’s expanded Police Department. Town Manager Linda Stumpf told the commission during its Feb. 26 meeting that the property, covering roughly two-thirds of an acre, went on the market for about $1.6 million after the branch closed and BB&T merged with SunTrust Banks, Inc. Commissioners unanimously agreed to seek two appraisals for the property to consider whether negotiating a deal makes sense. “I’m interested at the right price,” Vice Mayor Peter Isaac said. A service station stood on the site decades ago, raising

Richard Granara takes the oath of office after his appointment to the Manalapan Town Commission. He will serve the year remaining on the term of Monica Oberting, who moved away from town. Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star the possibility that old gasoline a first step, Town Attorney tanks or other environmental Keith Davis said, and then problems may be lurking commissioners can seek more beneath. information as part of due The two appraisals are diligence if they decide to proceed with negotiations. Manalapan expanded its Police Department from eight full-time officers to 12 last year as part of a response to a series of auto thefts. The department also moved its dispatch center from the guard shack on Point Manalapan to Town Hall. A move to the bank site could help provide the space to relieve the department’s growing pains, officials said. Stumpf said she hoped to

have the appraisals for the commission’s review within weeks. In other business: • Palm Beach developer Jeff Greene wants to flip the housing pattern on State Road A1A at Manalapan’s southern entrance. Greene owns the three lots that are adjacent to Boynton Beach Inlet and divided by the road, with a house on the west side of the thoroughfare. He wants to build three new homes on the eastern, oceanfront side of the properties and use the western lots for docks, decks and cabanas. Greene’s attorney, Ken Kaleel, said the change is logical because “the land mass is greater to the east than to the west.” A zoning change would affect only seven lots in the town, Kaleel said, and the other owners in the small zone support the move. He said the plan would enhance the “arrival view” when people enter the town from the south. The commission voted 4-1 to refer the proposal to the town’s Zoning Commission for review. Commissioner Jack Doyle voted against the referral, arguing that new construction on the east side needs sea walls, which the state no longer permits. “We’re supposed to be forward looking,” Doyle said.

“I’m talking about a future disaster here.” Mayor Keith Waters said even if the town decides to change its code, Greene’s plan would still need state approval to go forward, which could take many months. “This is a marathon,” Waters said. “It’s not going to happen in one or two meetings, I promise you.” • Commissioners unanimously approved the appointment of Richard Granara to serve out the year remaining on Monica Oberting’s commission seat, which represents the Point. Oberting, who joined the commission in 2017, sold her home and moved out of Manalapan recently. Waters said Granara has a background in real estate and construction, “a great deal of experience” that will help the commission. Granara has served on the town’s Zoning Commission for four years. It was the last commission meeting for Isaac, who after six years on the panel became the first elected official in the town’s history to be ousted because of the term limits voters approved in 2013. Isaac will be replaced this month by Stewart Satter, who qualified for the at-large seat in the March 12 election and was unopposed. Ú

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November March2019 2019

Along the Coast By Steve Plunkett

Cities act to improve websites after ADA challenge

A federal lawsuit filed against Boca Raton has coastal communities scurrying to update their websites before they too wind up in court. Juan Carlos Gil, a legally blind resident of Miami who has sued roughly 200 governments, stores and restaurants over access to information on the internet, added Boca Raton to his list of defendants Jan. 7. Gil went to myboca.us in September to educate himself “on the quality of life and governmental functioning” in Boca Raton, his suit said. He quickly realized that PDFs on the website did not interface with “screen reader software” that visually impaired people use. That’s a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act,

Gil said. “This exclusion resulted in plaintiff suffering from feelings of segregation, rejection and isolation as plaintiff was left excluded from participating in the community programs, services and activities offered by the city of Boca Raton in a manner equal to that afforded to others who are not similarly disabled,” the suit said. Boca Raton posted a notice online Feb. 15 saying that it is reviewing its website to make sure documents, forms and information meet accessibility standards. “During this renovation period, we will be assessing the content on the site, removing documents that are not compliant, and removing links to some external sites and resources,” the notice said. “Many of these documents will

be remediated and reposted as staff and resources are available to update documents.” One of the first apparent changes was to the online City Council agendas. Those for the Feb. 25 and 26 meetings had no links to PDFs of the backup information on various items. Backup material was linked to the Feb. 11 and 12 meetings. Boca Raton is hardly alone in trying to cope with how it gets information distributed over the web. Gulf Stream, which became the poster child for municipalities facing lawsuits over public records starting in 2013, spent $1,800 in January to make its website more ADAcompliant after hearing about the Boca Raton lawsuit. Changes included boosting the contrast on webpages to ensure their compatibility with digital readers.

“We feel like we’ve made a very good-faith effort to be ADA-compliant,” said town finance officer Rebecca Tew, who heard about Boca Raton’s lawsuit at the January meeting of the local chapter of the Florida Government Finance Officers Association. Tew and Gulf Stream’s executive assistant, Renee Rowan Basel, also signed up for three days of website training in April. Meanwhile, the Greater Boca Raton Beach & Park District was finishing a $42,000 upgrade of its webpages. Chrissy Gibson, Boca Raton’s chief spokeswoman, said the city was preparing a request for bids to see how much it will cost to update web documents. Converting just the 326-page city budget for 2018 cost $2,000, she said. Gil’s lawsuit seeks

screen-reader versions of the budgets for 2017, 2016 and 2015 “and all City Commission agendas and backup for 2018, 2017 and 2016,” as well as “the many other documents” online. Boca Raton has also hired the Florida Institute of Government at Florida Atlantic University to train city staff on how to create ADA-compatible documents. How long it will take to convert the old PDFs has not been determined. In the meantime, “I’d be happy to meet with someone and read a document to them,” Gibson said. Gibson and Tew both said no resident has ever complained to them about website accessibility. Gil’s lawsuit against WinnDixie stores in 2017, which resulted in the grocery chain’s paying almost $109,000 for Gil’s attorney fees and costs, opened the floodgates on ADA website complaints. The number of ADA web lawsuits filed in federal courts nationwide jumped from fewer than 200 in 2016 to almost 1,200 last year, according to the Florida League of Cities. Florida is the second-most sued state. Gil settled an ADA lawsuit with the Palm Beach County Clerk and Comptroller’s Office in September for $9,500, The Palm Beach Post reported. In June the Palm Beach County Commission paid $15,000 to settle litigation with Eddie Sierra, a deaf Miami man who has filed more than 30 ADA lawsuits demanding that online government videos include closed-captioning, The Post said. The same month the Palm Beach County School Board settled a suit with Sierra for $15,000. Boca Raton in August paid Sierra $11,000 for his attorney fees, it said. Elsewhere, Delray Beach took minutes, agendas and videos offline in October while it revamped its website. A new website, delraybeachfl.gov, went live in January. Since December, Delray Beach streams only its City Commission regular meetings and Community Redevelopment Agency workshop and regular meetings. Meeting videos with captions are posted later. In January, commissioners asked that their workshops be streamed. Previously, the city streamed all commission, CRA and advisory board meetings. Boynton Beach does not stream its meetings but uploads videos to YouTube, which provides closed-captions. Lantana no longer puts recordings of its meetings online because of ADA concerns. Highland Beach briefly stopped streaming meetings last summer, then hired signlanguage interpreters to help hearing-impaired website visitors. Ú Jane Smith and Mary Thurwachter contributed to this story.


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Delray Beach

Veteran Delray officer named to succeed chief By Jane Smith

When Javaro Sims becomes Delray Beach police chief in May, he will be the city’s first black police chief. City Manager Mark Lauzier announced his decision at the Feb. 12 City Commission workshop where fellow officers packed the first three rows of the chambers. “After an indepth process in which Sims and Assistant Chief Maria Olsen tried out for the police chief’s job, I offered the job Sims to Sims,” Lauzier said. “He has the support of the department, the command staff and the community.” According to the latest census estimates, minorities accounted for 37.9 percent of the population in Delray Beach, 36.5 percent in Boynton Beach and 25 percent in Palm Beach County. Boynton Beach also recently named a black police chief. In January, Lauzier set up a special phone line for residents and city employees to provide input on the police chief selection. He said he would take the calls and listen to the voicemails. The current chief, Jeff Goldman, became acting assistant city manager in August, allowing for Olsen and Sims to spend some time in the

chief’s chair. Goldman returned to the chief’s position on Feb. 11. He will retire in May and then Sims will become chief. Lauzier said he was impressed with Sims’ “onecommunity philosophy” that states when one neighborhood is hurting, the whole city is affected. Deputy Vice Mayor Shirley Johnson, who lives in the Northwest neighborhood, was pleased that the announcement came during Black History Month. Sims, 58, was hired by the department in 1992 after spending four years as a teacher. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Florida A&M University and a master’s in criminal justice from Lynn University. As Sims rose through the ranks in the Police Department, he supervised the Community Policing Unit, the Street-level Narcotics Unit, the West Atlantic Avenue Task Force, the Community Response Division, the Criminal Investigations Division, the Support Services Division, the Community Patrol Division and, as assistant chief, the Special Services Bureau. He graduated from the FBI National Academy in June 2014. Olsen, 55, was hired by the department in 2014, following her retirement after 32 years with the West Palm Beach Police Department. She will remain assistant police chief in Delray Beach. Ú

News 13

A Letter from Ocean Ridge Mayor Steve Coz Dear Fellow Ocean Ridge Residents, Thank you first of all for previously electing me to your Ocean Ridge Town Commission. It has been a privilege and honor to serve you in this office. I would like to thank my fellow Commissioners for voting me in as Mayor. I have worked hard to ensure that the fine tradition of leadership in Ocean Ridge continues.

“With the departure of our Town Manager, we need experience to get us through this transition.”

I am also pleased to announce that as I run for reelection in March, I have the endorsements of our last three mayors: Jim Bonfiglio, Geoff Pugh, and Ken Kaleel. Change is coming to our town. Town Manager Jamie Titcomb is leaving us in March. With Jamie’s departure we need experienced commissioners to guide us through this transition. I believe that I have the knowledge necessary to guide us as we search for a new Town Manager.

Before serving on the Town Commission, I was appointed to both the Board of Adjustments and the Planning and Zoning Commission. Having been a town resident since 1985—raising three children with my wife Val— I know our town, our neighborhoods, our challenges. During my tenure I worked to achieve:  Increased Police Presence across town  35% Open Green Space on new dwelling construction  License Plate Recognition Cameras  Drainage Improvements throughout town  Street Paving &Traffic Calming Devices

Coz4OceanRidge@gmail.com

I am against raising property taxes. I have been a leader in our town’s efforts to get in front of Boynton’s population growth. The preservation of our natural resources and our lifestyles for all residents are uppermost in every decision I make. I hope that I have earned your vote once again on March 12th. Thank you, Steve Coz Paid by Steve Coz for Ocean Ridge Town Commission

Ocean Ridge Mayor Steve Coz


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period. Mayor Steve Coz was absent and did not vote because he was called as a witness in Several dozen condo the trial of former Vice Mayor residents from southern Ocean ROOT REMOVAL BAD SEALER REMOVAL Richard Lucibella. Ridge jammed Town Hall on B B “I appreciate your Feb. 4 to make their case to the B EXTENSIONS B PAVER CLEANING / SEALING confidence,” Stevens said, Town Commission for an A1A B INSTALLS “andREMODEL I’m excited about the crosswalk. B POOL/DECK B REPAIRS B DRAINAGE ISSUES They pretty much had the opportunity.” hello. Police Chief Hal Hutchins B REPAIRS B at REMODELcommissioners B INSTALLS B POOL/DECK DRAINAGE ISSUES Town Manager Jamie also had sought the Titcomb told the group that the interim manager’s job, and commissionB hasPAVER intended to CLEANING commissioners/considered B TO TRUSTED AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICE FROM START FINISH EXTENSIONS SEALING appeal to the state Department splitting duties between him of Transportation for a and Stevens. 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Several Crown Colony through the incorporation residents spoke in support of the process. • The Florida Department of plan. “What we’re waiting for is Environmental Protection has an accident to happen,” said Sal awarded a $72,000 grant to an Masarof, who said crossing the alliance of Palm Beach County road has gotten more dangerous coastal communities that is over the years — especially studying the potential effects of for disabled residents — with sea level rise. Representatives of the increasing traffic levels. Results of the traffic study communities have been Your Complete Home Services Business should be available in weeks, but meeting for months to discuss it likely will take months before ways to prepare for looming PH: 561-945-5803 the town hears definitively from environmental changes. Vice the state. Mayor Don MaGruder has OWNER: Don Hubiak In other business: represented Ocean Ridge in the • During a special meeting group, which also includes Boca PAINTING / PRESSURE CLEANING / TREE TRIMMING / DRIVEWAYS on Jan. 30, commissioners Raton, Boynton Beach, Delray approved appointing Town Beach, Highland Beach, Lake PROPERTY MANAGEMENT / HOME MONITORING / KITCHENS Clerk Tracey Stevens as acting Worth and Lantana. The state grant will help town manager, beginning the participants assess March 18, when Titcomb vulnerabilities in infrastructure, is resigning to manage study the barrier islands, Loxahatchee Groves. The vote was 4-0 to give collect data and promote public Stevens the job for a 180-day awareness about sea rise. Ú By Dan Moffett

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The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

News 15

Ocean Ridge

Ocean Ridge offers different terms for winner, runner-up One three-year term and a partial one-year term are contested this time around for the Ocean Ridge Town Commission. The top vote getter receives a three-year term and the runner-up gets a one-year term, which is the remainder of James Bonfiglio’s term. Bonfiglio resigned his seat to run for the Florida House. Seats are at-large. Steve Coz (Incumbent) Personal: 61; Cum laude in English & classics from Harvard University; full-time Ocean Ridge resident for 32 years. Married, three grown children. Professional: President of Coz Media since 2004, serving clients in the health field. Political experience: Three years on the Ocean Ridge Town Commission and was appointed mayor in late 2018; has also served on the town’s Planning and Zoning Board and Board of Adjustments. Positions on issues: Wants to hire a permanent town manager; concerned about population growth, town drainage, protecting beaches, traffic-related issues. Quote: “I’m running again because I have experience. We have a relatively young commission and I’ve helped them deal with town matters for the last three years. I’m very familiar with the town, the challenges the town faces and the residents of the town. I’m also familiar with our various neighborhoods. We face challenges and I feel I can best help our town successfully overcome those challenges.”

Candidate profiles compiled by Steven J. Smith

Susan Hurlburt Personal: 63; Attended the University of Florida and graduated from Florida Atlantic University with a bachelor’s degree in art history with a minor in art education; full-time Ocean Ridge resident for five years. Married, three grown children. Professional: Retired; spent her career in museum administration as a curator and gallery director at the Fort Lauderdale Museum, the Boca Raton Museum and the Schmidt Gallery at FAU. Also went into interior design and ran an antique shop in Delray Beach called Bad Blonde Designs. Political experience: Never held public office, but was appointed to Delray Beach’s Historic Preservation Board, serving for nearly a decade. She also served 12 years on the Beach Property Owners Association in Delray Beach. Positions on issues: Supports managed growth; concerned with aging infrastructure; wants to preserve the town’s quality of life; favors emphasis on environmental protection. Quote: “I believe in proactivity. If I’m going to be part of a community, I want to be the part of it that speaks up, listens, hears the issues and works toward making everything better. I love my town. That’s why I’m running. I want to preserve and protect our slice of heaven.”

John D. Lipscomb Personal: 60; Graduated from Columbia College in Missouri with a bachelor’s degree in business and a minor in marketing; full-time Ocean Ridge resident for six years. Married, two grown children, three stepchildren. Professional: Realtor with The Presson Group for the last year. Also a property manager for the Villas of Ocean Ridge and author of two books — The Painting and the Piano and Through Jasper’s Eyes. Political experience: None. Positions on issues: Wants to see more preparedness for climate change; concerned about flooding; wants a city sewer system; supports mitigation of beach erosion. Quote: “I’d like to speed up the process of the way things work in Ocean Ridge, so that we don’t get caught behind the eight ball in terms of being prepared for climate change. Ocean Ridge is a great town and I want to keep it the way it is. We’re the best-kept secret in Florida. I want to preserve our town and keep developers from coming in and overrunning things. I’m big on technology. I think that can help us a lot, in terms of modernization.”

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The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Ocean Ridge

Four charter changes to be on ballot

would retain control. The proposal also removes the requirement that suspended police officers receive hearings. The rules for selecting a mayor and vice mayor and filling commission vacancies under certain circumstances are addressed in another proposal. The amendment would also require a minimum 12 hours’ notice for special meetings. A fourth amendment deals with housekeeping issues throughout the charter, cleaning up spelling errors and removing language that is no longer relevant. The proposals are the result of months of deliberation last year by the town’s charter review committee, chaired by former Commissioner Zoanne Hennigan. Other committee members were former Mayors Geoff Pugh and Ken Kaleel, former Commissioner Terry Brown and Polly Joa. Ú

By Dan Moffett

Besides filling two commission seats in the March 12 municipal election, Ocean Ridge voters will have to decide the fate of four proposed amendments to the town’s charter, the document that dictates government rules and procedures. Probably the most contentious proposal contains a provision that imposes term limits on commissioners. If it’s approved, a commissioner would be restricted to three consecutive threeyear terms, and then be required to sit out a year before running for the commission again. Another proposed amendment governs the power of the town manager. The manager would have the authority to hire and fire employees without commission approval — except for the police chief position, over which commissioners

Official Ballot Language

Town of Ocean Ridge Charter Amendment Questions

QUESTION 1

Shall Ocean Ridge amend its Charter to address various housekeeping and administrative issues relating to qualifying periods, forfeiture of office, commencement date of Commission terms, date of Election, qualification of electors, form of ballots and correcting spelling errors?

QUESTION 2

Shall Ocean Ridge amend its Charter to clarify Town Managers are not required to be residents; modify the votes required to appoint, remove or compensate Town Managers; provide the Town Manager with authority to hire and remove employees, without confirmation or appeal by or to the Commission, but requiring Commission approval for termination of the Police Chief, and delete the requirement that a suspended Police employee is entitled to a Town Manager hearing?

QUESTION 3

QUESTION 4

Shall Ocean Ridge amend its Charter to modify the selection of Mayor and ViceMayor; to modify Commission vacancies, forfeiture of office, the filling of vacancies and to add a provision on suspension from office; to increase Special Meeting minimum notice requirements; and to provide that three affirmative votes, by the Commission, are required for any approval?

RICK’S ALUMINUM

Shall Ocean Ridge amend its Charter to provide that a Commissioner may not serve more than three consecutive terms, of three years each, unless there is, at a minimum, a period of one year at the end of a term in which the person does not serve as a Commissioner?

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Three commission candidates in Ocean Ridge found a lot of common ground when they squared off against each other during an hourlong election forum, sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Palm Beach County on Feb. 7. They all opposed sober homes, supermajority approval requirements and raising taxes. They all supported term limits, a proactive approach to sea rise and maintaining Ocean Ridge’s special quality of life. An area of potential disagreement surfaced concerning how to deal with street flooding and the impact of rising seas. Political newcomers Susan Hurlburt and John Lipscomb say they are open to the idea of raising street levels, if engineers endorse it. But Steve Coz, the incumbent mayor, is soundly opposed. “I just don’t see how that works practically,” Coz said. “It’s just not a solution.” Coz said raising the level of some roads will mean residents hit a hump as they exit their driveways. He said the town recently changed its building rules and now requires new construction projects to start 18 inches higher. “If we’re raising home elevations 18 inches,” Coz said, “imagine going through town and raising roads 18 inches.” Coz said the town has completed drainage improvements for some neighborhoods, in particular Inlet Cay, and residents are “extremely happy” with the results. The work included repairs and maintenance to stormwater lines. Hurlburt, for years a historic preservation advocate in Delray Beach, said that besides following the guidance of engineers, the town should pay attention to what other cities are doing and learning about rising seas. “Miami and the Keys are putting big money into studies looking for different ways to address this situation,” she said. The message for Ocean Ridge: “It’s coming and it’s better to be proactive.”

Lipscomb, an entrepreneur and real estate agent originally from St. Louis, said there is no time like the present for infrastructure improvements. “It’s cheaper to do it now than to do it later,” he said. Lipscomb said the town will have to deal with the longterm prospect of eliminating septic tanks and connecting with the Boynton Beach sewer system. He said it likely would make sense to “raise the roads and raise the sidewalks” while overhauling the sewers. Lipscomb broke with his rivals by saying he could support spending public money to help condo associations upgrade their sewer systems. Coz and Hurlburt are against the idea, saying taxpayer dollars shouldn’t go to private entities. All three support the proposed charter amendment on the ballot that would impose term limits on town commissioners. Hurlburt said the limits “are like a doubleedge sword” in that, while they advance wider participation, they also may push qualified officials out of office. Coz said the proposed amendment strikes the right balance because it puts a threeterm limit on commissioners but allows them to run again after sitting out a year. All three candidates oppose requiring a supermajority vote of four commissioners to approve high-density construction projects. The idea came up during last year’s charter review but commissioners voted it down. “I’ve never understood the supermajority argument,” Lipscomb said. The commission has to be “ahead of the game,” Hurlburt said, “and you don’t need a supermajority to do that.” Coz argued that a supermajority rule would give too much power to a minority of two commissioners. Two seats will be contested in the March 12 election. The top vote-getter will serve until 2022, and the second-highest will finish the year left on the term of former Mayor James Bonfiglio, who resigned last year and unsuccessfully ran for the state Legislature. Ú

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The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

News 17

South Palm Beach

Four candidates contend for two commission seats

Four candidates vie for two open at-large seats, each with a two-year term. The top two vote getters will each win a seat. Elvadianne Culbertson (Incumbent) Personal: Declined to give her age; B.S. in business administration from Pacific Western University and M.S. in environmental management from Chadwick University; full-time South Palm Beach resident for nearly 14 years. Married, two grown sons and one stepson, one grandchild, four step- grandchildren, three step-greatgrandchildren. Professional: Retired; was a documentation specialist/consultant for the Center of Naval Analyses. Political experience: Has held a seat on the South Palm Beach Town Council for the last three years. Positions on issues: Wants improved fiscal accountability; supports better transparency in town government; favors local government more effectively governing itself rather than the state doing it. Quote: “I think the town is better off with a detail-oriented person such as myself. Having served the town by being on both the Community Activities Advisory Board and the Code Enforcement Board, as well as editing the town newsletter, I was unanimously appointed to serve on the Town Council. I won honorable mention for innovative participation in the Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County’s ‘Read for the Record’ and take part in the Keep Florida Beautiful program that has removed 3 million pounds of debris from Florida roads and has planted 30,000 trees and plants.”

C.W. “Bill” LeRoy (Incumbent) Personal: 66; master’s in English from Bradley University; married, two children; resident of South Palm Beach for three and a half years. Professional: Retired; was a real estate broker for 30 years. Political experience: Has served one year on the South Palm Beach Town Council. Positions on issues: Favors keeping local Police Department in place; wants better signage at the Town Hall; would like to see better management over traffic congestion. Quote: “We have very few issues in our town. It’s a small town. We haven’t had any tax increases. We have a wonderful town and I’d like to see it stay a wonderful town. I don’t want any radical changes made to it. I want to preserve what we have here.”

Candidate profiles compiled by Steven J. Smith

Municipal elections will be held March 12. Polling places will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. For more information visit pbcelections.org

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Personal: 70; B.A. in administrative studies from Nova University and an A.A. in mortuary science from Miami-Dade Junior College; married, six children; resident of South Palm Beach for two and a half years. Professional: Semi-retired; owned a funeral home in South Florida from 1973-1995, sold the business and stayed on for another 12 years as a consultant. Opened more funeral homes in Broward County in 2010 and sold those in 2014. Also has done consultant work for Delray Beach’s city cemetery. Political experience: Former state legislator (2000-2002) and city commissioner of Parkland (1996-2000 and 2006-2016); served on the State League of Cities Environmental Committee; was vice chair of the Elder and Long Term Care Committee in the Florida House. Positions on issues: Supports beach renourishment; favors maintaining first-class emergency medical services, police and fire protection teams; wants to keep millage rates and taxes low. Quote: “My goal is to bring experience to the South Palm Beach Town Council, to protect the beauty and environment of South Palm Beach, as well as the safety and security of all residents in the city.”

Don’t forget to vote

Our reputation

Mark F. Weissman

PBCMV867

Kevin Hall Personal: 58; no college; married, two children; resident of South Palm Beach for eight years. Professional: Currently is property manager of Palm Sea Condominiums. Was self-employed for 35 years in his painting contracting business and ran a construction company with his wife. Political experience: None. Positions on issues: Opposes construction of a new town hall, but wants the old one restored; concerned about the slow speed at which projects, police officers and town officials get approved; concerned about delays on the town’s storm sewer needs; wants to see beach renourishment go forward. Quote: “I’m for a restored town hall, but not a brand new, five-story one. We’ve been waiting about three years for that to happen. We’ve been through yet another town manager and now we have an interim one instead of a new one. Things just take forever to get resolved around here. It took six months to a year to get a new police chief. We still don’t have our storm sewers done. That’s been going on for 2-3 years. We budgeted for two new policemen, but never hired them. Beach renourishment is another issue. If we’re not going to get it passed, I believe we need to move on and come up with a Plan B or just forget about it. We talk about a lot of things, but we do nothing.”


18 News

The COASTAL STAR 

Eau Palm Beach

March 2019

Lantana Park

North

Traditional beach renourishment techniques do not work well with the rocky hard bottom partially visible in this 2017 image of South Palm Beach. The neighboring towns of Lantana and Manalapan to the south are concerned that groins would prevent sand from making its natural migration to their beaches. The Coastal Star/Google Map

BEACH

Continued from page 1 county, which would have to pay 30 percent, and for South Palm Beach, which would owe the remaining 20 percent. Still, the county and Mayor Bonnie Fischer say they would continue to negotiate in an effort to persuade the DEP to take a more favorable view of

the project. Fischer said the town was “exploring other options” but no decisions are at hand. “We’re never going to quit. We’ll keep fighting for our beach.” Stahl told the South Palm Beach Town Council on Feb. 12 that the DEP has made two new permit requirements that will be virtually impossible for the county and town to afford.

Because the groins might do environmental harm to the rocky hard bottom that runs along the South Palm Beach shoreline, the state is requiring the construction of an artificial reef covering close to 8 acres offshore to mitigate any damage. That alone would cost millions. Perhaps more daunting and more expensive, however, is the long-term requirement to keep

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neighbors happy. The town of Manalapan threatened to sue the county and South Palm Beach to stop the project and was joined in the mounting legal offensive by the Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa. The opponents believe the groins would interrupt the natural north-to-south flow of sand and cause erosion of Manalapan’s beaches. Because of Manalapan’s complaints and threats, the state wanted the county and South Palm Beach to commit to repairing potential beach damage south of the town. Stahl said the newly conceived state standard for claiming damage is relatively generous: Any public or private entity with a beach less than 45 feet can make a case for sand replenishment, and the county and South Palm would be on the hook for that. “This is a condition that could result in perpetual placement of sand,” Stahl said. “It gives anyone the right to order a survey and demand corrective action.” The potential legal liability for South Palm Beach could bankrupt the town, officials say. Manalapan Mayor Keith Waters, who said for months he was committed to “taking any means necessary” to stop the project, said the town had to protect its beaches. “We didn’t have a choice,” Waters said after the Feb. 26 Town Commission meeting. “We got specific reaction from the entire community, from the Eau and from people on the ocean. They felt that it was going to have just an immediate impact on their beach.” Waters said his town tried to negotiate with South Palm Beach and the county but was unable to find a solution or dissuade the project’s supporters from moving forward. Threatening to sue was the only option, he said.

Town, county left reeling

“I know it’s not easy for anybody to take this news,” said Deborah Drum, the county’s environmental resources director. “We don’t take it lightly. We’ve all invested a lot of time and resources and funds to get to this point. This isn’t where we wanted to end up.” As for a Plan B for South Palm Beach? There isn’t one. Because of the rocky bottom along the town’s five-eighthsmile shoreline, traditional sand renourishment techniques do not work. Stahl said the county made a half-dozen attempts between 2003 and 2009 to haul in sand and place it on the town’s beach, but with nothing to hold it in place, the wave action washed it away within months. The county also wanted to protect Lantana Municipal Beach, the public access sandwiched between South Palm Beach and Manalapan. The town of Lantana was essentially a silent partner in the county’s plan, with no financial requirements because of its public beach access. After Hurricane Wilma tore up the shoreline in 2005, officials turned to stabilization with groins as a last resort that might hold sand and protect not only the beach but condominium sea walls — and, in the face of sea rise, the condominiums themselves. “Everybody has to understand that we’re dealing with a dynamic medium,” said Fischer. “You’re talking about looking at a beach project over 12 years.” South Palm has a “continuously wet beach,” she said, and issues that are truly unique. Fischer said just as the storms and tides would come and wash sand in and out of the beachfront, the DEP seemed to shift positions constantly. “There were a lot of stipulations and roadblocks, and meanwhile everything (on the beach) is changing every day,” Fischer said. “The county was constantly inundated with requests for additional information. ... This has been a highly regulated issue.” To date, the county has spent a little over $1.3 million on studies and permit applications for the project, and South Palm has paid about $330,000. The number of staff hours invested in the effort is incalculable. Ú


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

News 19

South Palm Beach

Town approves extending hours of construction at 3550 building site

By Mary Thurwachter As work at the luxury condo project at 3550 S. Ocean Blvd. reaches its finishing stages, construction hours have been extended. The South Palm Beach Town Council agreed to the added hours during a special town meeting on Feb. 14 and a workshop meeting. “Kast Construction is requesting to extend hours of operation to help achieve the projected schedule — Sundays 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Monday through Saturdays from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.,” Hector Gomez, construction manager, told the council. Previously, work hours were from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. “All we’re doing is trying to get this project done as soon as possible,” he said. Not everyone was onboard with extra hours at the site of the old Hawaiian Inn hotel. “We have a town rule and that should be our priority,” said Councilwoman Stella Gaddy Jordan. “We should stand as is. I don’t think we need to keep on accommodating issues such as this.” Jordan said she was concerned about noise from electric saws and other machinery. “We are conscious of the neighbors and would limit this work during extended hours to the interior of the units only,” Gomez said. “We are at the finishing stage of the project, so this work will be limited to quieter activities such as painting, grouting, trim out, appliances, cleaning, etc.; in other words, activities that would not affect the neighbors in any way. “We do not anticipate having to do this every day or every week, but when we do work outside of standard hours, we would only limit the work to these types of activities and would not work outside of the condo units.” Mayor Bonnie Fischer said she and interim Town Manager Bob Kellogg had recently visited the project and were impressed with the soundproofing. “I don’t think it’s going to be a noise issue,” Fischer said. “They have much better windows and doors than any building in town.” Council member Bill LeRoy said the project needed to be finished. “I want it to be done. I want everybody to be happy. … Let’s get this done, be over it and talk about something else.” Vice Mayor Robert Gottlieb agreed. “The sooner we can collect taxes the better the town is,” he said. “We would encourage you to finish sooner.” With condo units selling for up to $5 million each, the town’s tax base could rise significantly. Gomez said everybody working on that project “would like to finish earlier and as soon

as possible.” Extended work hours are good through May 1. Jordan also objected to work being done on Sundays, saying residents, especially those who live in buildings on either side of 3550 S. Ocean Blvd., should have one noise-free day. Developed by Manhattanbased DDG real estate investment group, the 30-unit condo building is expected to open this summer. In other business: • The council approved unanimously a contract with Kellogg, whose nine-month probation as interim town manager will end on Sept. 30. Kellogg’s $95,000 annual salary will jump to $100,000 in October, assuming he receives a favorable evaluation. He will not get the $300 monthly car allowance he requested. If terminated without cause after the probationary period,

Kellogg is eligible to receive 20 weeks of severance pay. • By a 4-1 vote, the council approved Police Chief Mark Garrison’s request for a reclassification of a second

sergeant position to lieutenant. “The person chosen will have the experience and knowledge to act on the chief’s behalf in his absence,” Garrison said. This move won’t increase the

budget and is only a title change. He said the position has been posted to receive applications. Jordan cast the dissenting vote. Ú

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The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

News 21

Hypoluxo Island Property Owners Picnic McKinley Park, Lantana — Feb. 24

MEDICAL & COSMETIC DERMATOLOGY I LASER SERVICES I AESTHETICIAN SERVICES

Three-year-old Luke Howard gets a push from his father, Jake, during the Hypoluxo Island property owners annual picnic. They were in town visiting grandparents Diz and Sally Howard of Hypoluxo Island. Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

Lantana

Town retools its traffic-calming policy

By Mary Thurwachter The Town Council made some revisions to its 12-yearold traffic-calming polices and guidelines, even though the old policy had generally provided good guidance, according to Dave Thatcher, Lantana’s development services director. “It was incredibly wordy and confusing,” he said at the Feb. 25 meeting. “The new one is a more user-friendly document and should be easier to understand by the public and easier to use by staff.” Town staff worked with several groups of residents in a variety of situations in adopting the new policies, Thatcher said. Since the guidelines were first adopted in 2007, there were 10 requests for calming projects. Three failed to meet the criteria. Those applying for trafficslowing measures must provide a petition signed by at least 66 percent of area property owners before a traffic study is done. Due to pending litigation, Mayor Dave Stewart handed over the gavel to Vice Mayor Ed Shropshire to preside over the discussion. In October, the Florida Commission on Ethics found probable cause that the mayor violated state statutes after a resident alleged he said he’d “make sure” her neighborhood would get the speed humps for which she petitioned the town if she had sex with him. Stewart is fighting the claim and the case is headed for an evidentiary hearing this year. Stewart voted with the rest of the council in favor of the guidelines. He said the goal was to trim them from 15 pages to 5. The town agreed to take a look at speed bumps already in place on South Lake Drive beside the Old Key Lime House after restaurant owners Wayne

Cordero and his son Ryan said the traffic-calming measures there were not performing well. Ryan Cordero said he had been struck by a car on South Lake and worried about children being hit. Ú


22 6 News News

The COASTAL STAR 

November March2019 2019

Delray Beach

FPL working ‘quickly’ to bring new light to A1A at Atlantic during nesting By Jane Smith

The busy beachside intersection of State Road A1A and Atlantic Avenue faced the prospect of going dark on March 1, the start of turtlenesting season, after Florida Power & Light said it could not install turtle-friendly red LED lights by then. FPL and Florida’s Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission also are working on approving amber lights by summer’s end to quell concerns about darkness on the rest of the 1.1-mile municipal beach. City staff and FPL worked quickly in February on an agreement to replace seven newly installed white LED lights with red ones on poles near the corner of Atlantic and A1A, said Richard Beltran, company spokesman. “The utility has two red LED lights in stock and ordered

the remaining five from the manufacturer,” Beltran said. “It won’t be possible to have the red lights installed by March 1. We are working as quickly as possible.” The red LED lights are considered turtle-friendly and can remain illuminated throughout the year. The white LED lights will be turned off from March 1 through Oct. 31 during sea turtle-nesting season. The FWC approves the lights along the beach to protect sea turtle hatchlings. Once hatched, they are often disoriented by bright lights at the beach, including the glow from white LED lights. The seven lights were chosen by the city and FPL to enable them to be swapped quickly, Beltran said. The city wanted the red LED lights to be installed so that they can remain lit during the turtle-nesting months. Otherwise, the beach would be

These new white LED lights at A1A and Atlantic generate significantly less glow than the old lights, but they’ll be replaced with red LED lights for turtles. Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star dark eight months of the year. But the Beach Property Owners Association members want to see a safer stretch for the entire municipal beach, which has parking spaces on the east side of A1A. “The Delray Beach leadership has now accepted the option to have red lights installed rather than let this area go dark for the eight months of the turtle season,” wrote Bob Victorin, association president. “If a decision was made, as has been suggested, to provide only

seven streetlights covering a few blocks north and south of Atlantic Avenue, that would not be acceptable to us.” The association wants to see “the entire length of A1A from Casuarina Road to the north end of the beach have street lights to provide pedestrian and automobile safety, as well as security and protection for the residents of the many condominiums and home sites located on the west side of A1A,” Victorin wrote. FPL and the FWC agree they

are working to approve amber LED lights. It could be as soon as late August when those lights are installed, Beltran said, which would remove red lights from the discussion. Delray Beach Mayor Shelly Petrolia was not aware that only seven white LED lights would be replaced near the Atlantic Avenue intersection. “I hope that the entire strip of A1A along the city beach could have the amber LED lights,” she said. Jim Smith, a Delray Beach resident who chairs the bike and pedestrian safety advocacy group SAFE, said, “Adequate street lighting remains a major safety and security issue on most streets and neighborhoods throughout Delray.” Delray Beach had its own amber fixtures on FPL poles for many years. Last August, FPL decided it wanted to have its own fixtures on its street lights and asked Delray Beach to choose the lighting type along the beach. The choice was red LED lights that could stay lit throughout the year or white LED lights that would be turned off during nesting season. The City Commission picked white LED lights after staff said the red lights would not provide enough illumination at night. The white LED lights were installed in early January. Ú


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Obituaries 23

Obituaries

Alice Dye By Brian Biggane GULF STREAM — Alice Dye, a golfing icon who built a strong reputation for her charity work in South Palm Beach County, died Feb. 1. She was 91. Dye, who with her husband, Pete, formed a legendary golf course architecture team that designed 145 courses around the world, was named First Lady of Golf by the PGA of America in 2004. She was one of the top female amateur players of her day, winning 11 Indianapolis city titles and nine Indiana state championships. One of her solo designs was the par-3 St. Andrews club course in Delray Beach, which had been planning to honor her at its ladies member-guest event on March 6. “Coming to a golf course that she designed, and getting to meet her, and seeing all the things she has done for women in golf, it was truly an honor,” St. Andrews club pro Amy Carver said. Dye had signed 80 copies of her book, From Birdies to Bunkers, which will be

distributed to all participants in the event. “We asked her permission to do the member-guest [event] in her honor and she thought that was great,” Carver said. “And I asked her if it would be too much to sign these books, and she said she would do it, and she did.” Born Alice Holiday O’Neal in Indianapolis on Jan. 24, 1927, she was a student at Rollins College in Winter Park when she met Pete Dye, who had just returned from serving in World War II. The two were married in 1950 and for much of their time together spent their winters in Gulf Stream and their summers at a home off the 18th green at Crooked Stick Golf Club near Indianapolis. Gulf Stream neighbor Tony Graziano fittingly called the pair “golf royalty” but said, for all they’ve accomplished, their humility sets them apart. “You go in their house and it’s a simple house that any one of us could live in, not pretentious at all,” he said. “The only thing pretentious is the golf memorabilia, which comes from a family life of golf success. “And the personalities that go with them — they are and were absolutely regular folks. They

never changed from being good, solid Midwestern people, no matter how famous they were.” Perhaps the only way Mrs. Dye rode her reputation was in her work for charity. Her brother, the late Perry O’Neal, was a longtime president and board member of the Wayside House, a treatment center for women in Delray Beach. For more than 25 years, the Dyes hosted the Alice & Pete Dye Golf and Bridge Invitational each November at St. Andrews. “For a long time, we had just the golf tournament,” Wayside President Kathryn Leonard said. “But then Alice said some of her friends no longer played golf, but all of them played bridge. So, it was her idea to add the bridge tournament and that brought in 100 more people.” Last year’s tournament raised more than $25,000. In addition to her prowess as a golfer — she won the 1978 North and South Amateur and the U.S. Women’s Senior Amateur in both 1978 and 1989 and was a member of the U.S. Curtis Cup team in 1970 — Mrs. Dye worked tirelessly to help women enjoy the golf experience. She is considered the person most responsible for the advent of ladies tees that typically shorten par-72 courses

Linda Bailey Searle DELRAY BEACH — Linda Bailey Searle died at her home in Delray Beach on Jan. 16. She was 93. Born March 14, 1925, in East Orange, N.J., to Clifford Sherwood Bailey and Ellen Laird Bailey, she grew up in Darien and New Canaan, Conn., and graduated from Ethel Walker School and Finch College. In June 1945, she married John “Jack” Endicott Searle Jr., who was in the Army Air Corps. Upon his discharge, Jack enrolled in MIT and the couple moved to Cambridge, Mass. In late 1947, they moved again to Marblehead, Mass, where they raised their two daughters. Mrs. Searle was very creative and had beautiful style and taste.  The couple bought a home at St. Andrews Club in Delray Beach in 1973, where they became very involved in the club. In particular, Mrs. Searle was very active within St. Andrews and led a number of the club improvement projects. The couple were also members of

nearby Gulf Stream Bath and Tennis, and The Little Club. They maintained a presence in New England, owning a condominium in Beverly Farms, Mass. They were members of Essex County Club in Manchester, Mass. Mrs. Searle was predeceased by her husband in 2012. She is survived by her daughters, Ellen “Kip” Searle Abbott and her husband, John H. Abbott, of Manchester, Mass., and Carol Putnam Searle, and her husband, Andrew J. Ley, of Dedham, Mass. She leaves a granddaughter, Kelsey Searle Abbott, and her husband, Peter T. McDougall, of Osprey. Also surviving her is her sister, Mary Bailey Lumet of New York City. The family is very grateful for the loving care provided by her caregivers Nadine Holloway and Claudette Kirlew Smith. Arrangements will be private. Contributions in her memory may be made to St. Andrews Club, Jack Searle Golf Tournament Fund, 4475 N. Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach, FL 33483. — Obituary submitted by the family

by 1,000 yards or more. She was the first female board member of the PGA of America and the first woman to serve as president of the American Society of Golf Course Architects. It was also her inspiration that brought about one of the most famous holes in golf. Pete had removed so much sand from what was intended to be the par-3 17th hole at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra that he had no idea what to do next, whereupon Alice pulled out a napkin and drew a lake with the green in the middle. That lake has since become home to thousands of errant shots. Other courses designed by the Dyes include Whistling Straits in Wisconsin, which will host the 2020 Ryder Cup matches, The Ocean Course on Kiawah Island in South Carolina and PGA West in California. St. Andrews in Delray was always a favorite of Mrs. Dye, and former greenskeeper Charley Crell recalled what an honor it was to be hired there about eight years ago. “That was part of the reason I took the job,” Crell said. “It’s a smaller golf course, but it’s really special because of the people who are there, in particular the

Dyes. She really enjoyed being at the club, playing bridge and going out and playing. She did a lot for St. Andrews, loaning her expertise to different things. A great lady.” Crell left St. Andrews last year for Reunion Golf and Country Club in Mississippi and said Mrs. Dye played a role in his getting that opportunity. “She put in a good word for me, and it made a difference,” he said. “That meant a lot to me and my family.” Mrs. Dye spent much of her time in recent years caring for Pete, who has Alzheimer’s disease. The Dyes have two sons, Perry Dye of Colorado and Paul Burke Dye of Ohio, who are also golf course architects. Pete Dye along with Perry’s wife, Ann, and Paul’s wife, Jean, are among Mrs. Dye’s survivors. A celebration of life was held at the Gulf Stream Golf Club on Feb. 20. Another celebration of life is planned for 2-5 p.m., May 29, at Crooked Stick Golf Club in Carmel, Ind. Donations can be made to Wayside House, 378 NE Sixth Ave., Delray Beach, FL  33483; waysidehouse.net; or the Indiana Golf Foundation, 2625 Hurricane Road, Franklin, IN 46131.

William Andrew Benton OCEAN RIDGE — William Andrew Benton of Ocean Ridge and Morristown, N.J., died on Feb. 14 in Boynton Beach. He was 86. Mr. Benton was born Jan. 21, 1933, in South Orange, N.J. He attended high school at Blair Academy in Blairstown, N.J. He graduated from Bucknell University in 1958 following two years of Army service during which he was stationed in California in a bomb disposal unit. While at Bucknell, Mr. Benton was a standout wrestler, serving as captain of the wrestling team. His accomplishments on the mat resulted in his induction into the Bucknell Athletic Hall of Fame and later into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame. After graduation, Mr. Benton began his career as a member of the New York Stock Exchange until his retirement in 1990. He served the town of Madison, N.J., as a councilman and was a member of the board of the Madison YMCA. He continued his service in Florida as a supporter of Bethesda Hospital and the Palm Beach Habilitation Center. Mr. Benton was well-known for the size

and strength of his hands, which he used both to rip Manhattan phone books in half and to make beautiful jewelry and stained glass creations that graced his home and the homes of family and friends. He also enjoyed boating, fishing and spending time with his loved ones. Mr. Benton was preceded in death in 2014 by his beloved wife, Marilee (Lee) Fuller Benton, after 59 years of marriage. He was also predeceased by his parents, Thomas Henry and Mary Zimmerman Benton, his brother, Clark, and his sister, Elnora. He is survived by his children: Jeff and Wendy Benton of Madison, N.J.; Karen and Tom Crawley of Sea Girt, N.J.; Tim Benton of Greer, S.C.; Marge Williams of Anderson, S.C.; and Gary and Ann Benton of Madison, N.J. He is also survived by 13 grandchildren and seven greatgrandchildren. A celebration of life was held Feb. 20 at The Little Club in Gulf Stream. A second celebration will be held at a later date in New Jersey. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center at giving.mskcc.org. — Obituary submitted by the family

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24 2 ENews ditor’s Note

The COASTAL STAR 

November March2019 2019

LUCIBELLA

Continued from page 1 sentencing, Lucibella declined to say what he might do next and suggested asking The Palm Beach Post. “I’ve learned that you guys [at The Coastal Star] have a story line that you stick to and the facts sometimes just get in the way. Until that changes, no comment,” he said. At the sentencing, defense attorney Marc Shiner told the judge the “sticking point” of the case “has always been [possibly] paying out the money” to arresting Officer Nubia Plesnik, who is suing Lucibella in civil court, alleging he battered her during the Oct. 22, 2016, arrest. “My client under no way, shape or form is ever going to pay her any money. That’s why we actually had the trial, to be honest with the court,” Shiner told Weiss. The felony charges stemmed from a confrontation in Lucibella’s beachfront backyard. Police went to his home after getting calls to 911 about “shots fired.” Officers confiscated a .40-caliber handgun and found five spent shell casings on the patio. An ensuing scuffle left Lucibella, then 63, handcuffed on the ground with fractured ribs and a cut over his eye. Plesnik and Officer Richard Ermeri both complained of aches and pain afterward and went to an urgent care clinic. Assistant State Attorney Danielle Grundt and Chief Assistant State Attorney Craig Williams called to the witness stand Ocean Ridge resident Sherri Feinstein and David Castello, who was in town visiting his mother, to have them describe the gunfire they heard. Ermeri, Plesnik and sinceretired Sgt. William Hallahan, who also responded that night, told jurors how, in Ermeri’s words, Lucibella was “vulgar, argumentative, aggressive and belligerent” as they investigated. “He was definitely putting up a fight,” Ermeri said. Ermeri testified that Lucibella poked him in the chest, “a forceful poke — like that,” he

Former Police Lt. Steven Wohlfiel (l-r), Richard Lucibella and his girlfriend, Barbara Ceuleers, and his attorneys, Heidi Perlet and Marc Shiner, leave the courthouse after Lucibella’s sentencing hearing. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star said, thumping his police body armor with a finger three or four times. Shiner and co-defense counsel Heidi Perlet pointed out inconsistencies in the officers’ testimony, such as when Ermeri said the backyard gate was approximately 20 feet from Lucibella’s patio while in a pretrial deposition he said 45 feet. Witnesses for the defense were Barbara Ceuleers, Lucibella’s longtime girlfriend; Ocean Ridge Mayor Steve Coz, who said Lucibella was not intoxicated about an hour before the altercation; a doctor who treated Ermeri that night; friend and then-Police Lt. Steven Wohlfiel, who was on the patio with Lucibella during the incident; and Lucibella himself. Ceuleers and Lucibella both painted the officers as the

aggressors. “I was screaming at them to get off him, they were killing him,” Ceuleers testified. Lucibella said before he was taken to the ground, he persisted in trying to get an alcoholic drink to regain some control over the escalating situation. “In hindsight I think it was world-class stupid,” he testified. Lucibella also said Ermeri taunted him after he’d been handcuffed, flexing his neck from side to side like a prizefighter in the ring. Current and former Ocean Ridge mayors sent Weiss glowing letters of support on Lucibella’s behalf. “I do not know if you are aware that after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, Mr. Lucibella personally flew desperately needed supplies to

the ravaged citizens of the island at his own cost,” Coz wrote. “Do not punish Mr. Lucibella further for what can only be described as a night of blunders, not crimes.” Former Mayors Jim Bonfiglio, Geoff Pugh and Ken Kaleel also wrote the judge, urging her to be lenient, as did former Town Clerk Karen Hancsak, close Ocean Ridge neighbors, and bankers and doctors who know Lucibella from his work in the health care industry. Prosecutor Grundt told Weiss that Lucibella “has never been in trouble before” and that probation would serve no purpose. Lucibella and Shiner both said they were happy with the jury’s findings Feb. 1. “I’m pleased with the verdict, very pleased,” Lucibella said.

Shiner said Lucibella’s suing the town over his arrest has “been an option since day one.” The misdemeanor battery could have resulted in up to a year in jail with a $1,000 fine. Each felony charge carried a potential sentence of five years in prison. Originally Lucibella was also charged with firing a weapon while intoxicated, a misdemeanor. But prosecutors dropped that count on the trial’s first day, undercutting Lucibella’s planned defense that he was never given a bloodalcohol or firearms test. Not having a felony conviction on his record allows Lucibella to get back his license for a federal firearms dealership and a concealed weapons permit; it also lets him run for public office again, Shiner said. Ú

Ocean Ridge/Boynton Beach

Woolbright bridge span to reopen to all boats after defective bolts are replaced By Jane Smith

The Woolbright Road Bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway should be open to all marine traffic sometime before March 4, according to Barry Meve, Palm Beach County bridge superintendent. The bridge spans were

locked down on Feb. 18 after defects were found in some bolts. The eastern half of the double-span bridge reopened Feb. 21, Meve said. That allows 90 percent of the marine traffic to get through, he said. “The Woolbright Bridge has a 20-foot clearance, allowing many vessels to pass by

LETTERS: The Coastal Star welcomes letters to the editor about issues of interest in the community. These are subject to editing and must include your name, address and phone number. Preferred length is 200-500 words. Send email to editor@thecoastalstar.com.

underneath it,” Meve said. The county is in charge of the Woolbright Bridge, which connects Boynton Beach with Ocean Ridge. In nearby Delray Beach, state transportation workers found defective bolts and other issues with the Atlantic Avenue bridge in late January. The state then tested all Intracoastal bridges along Florida’s east coast using ultrasonic equipment that can detect defects not apparent in a visual inspection, Meve said. Five of the 32 bolts in the frame of the Woolbright Road drawbridge were found to be

defective, he said. The frame attaches the spans to the fixed piers. Even the spare bolts were tested and one was found to be defective, according to Meve. That meant the molds used to cast the bolts could have defects, he said. The four good spare bolts were used to replace the defective bolts, allowing the eastern half to reopen on Feb. 21, Meve said. The western portion had to wait until the new bolts were made in Miami, Meve said. The closing to marine traffic will not affect vessels

traveling to the Palm Beach International Boat Show, March 28 through 31, said Chuck Collins, executive director of Marine Industries Association of Palm Beach County. Boats and yachts usually motor up the Intracoastal from Fort Lauderdale the week before, said Collins, whose group owns the boat show in West Palm Beach. The vessels are docked on the eastern side of the Lake Worth Lagoon with the Intracoastal Waterway as a navigable channel in the center. Ú


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

News 25

Ocean Ridge

Current and former mayors, neighbors urged judicial leniency for Lucibella

By Steve Plunkett Letters of support from Ocean Ridge mayors, neighbors and business acquaintances seeking leniency for Richard Lucibella also exposed a lack of support for the police officers who went to his home and for the subsequent media coverage. The onetime vice mayor, 65, will spend no time behind bars or under probation for a 2016 backyard altercation with Ocean Ridge police. Instead he paid $675 in court costs. “Simply put, Rich is a wonderful, kind and goodhearted person. He is deserving of your mercy,” former Mayor Ken Kaleel wrote Circuit Judge Daliah Weiss. But, Kaleel added, “He has been wrongly vilified by the press and by those who do not know the facts or [are] unwilling to listen. Rich and his family has suffered enough the past few years just by virtue of the travesty of the situation.” Mayor Steve Coz, who testified that an unimpaired Lucibella did not even finish a “splash of scotch” at a party an hour before the incident, wrote, “I consider the entire arrest and trial of Mr. Lucibella as an uncalled for series of events that already has punished him needlessly for two and a half years.”

Coz’s wife, Valerie Virga, wrote that Lucibella and girlfriend Barbara Ceuleers “have been put through enough punishment and stress already for events that the facts and a jury found did not rise to the level of felonies. And I question whether it even rises to the level of any misdemeanor.” Added Osprey Drive

neighbors Jean and Peter Burling: “We believe as taxpayers that the legal proceeding in your court, and the evening events that led up to it, should have been avoided, and easily could have been had two of the officers present acted in a more professional manner.” West Palm Beach lawyer Rikki Lober Bagatell, who said

BARNARDS

she knows Lucibella from his health care business, said “the treatment that he received by the police and the charges that were filed against him were totally disproportionate to what he deserved.” Not every letter criticized the police and the justice system. Former Mayor Jim Bonfiglio told the judge that Lucibella

helped Hurricane Maria victims in Puerto Rico, which he hoped would “shed some light as to Mr. Lucibella’s character.” Former Mayor Geoff Pugh said he could always count on Lucibella to tell the truth. “Whether or not the truth could be a detriment to himself he never wavered off that fact,” Pugh wrote. Ú

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26

The COASTAL STAR 

THE DORCHESTER $2,550,000

JOHN DUNNING

561-665-1028

THREE SIXT Y CONDO $799,000

LAURA URNESS

561-239-1911

LA PENSEE $549,000

HORST HOHL

WINSTON TR AILS $464,900

JANINE TOMPKINS

CHERYL BARNES

PAT R I C I A N $389,000

P O I N T M A N A L A PA N $2,499,000

DIANE DUFFY

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561-767-0860

BARR TERRACE $639,000

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561-909-5139

March 2019

DORCHESTER $489,900

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LAURA URNESS

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DIANE DUFFY

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OAKMONT VILLAGE $475,000

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THE MOORINGS $394,000

MOORINGS $330,000

561-239-1911

571-276-8960


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

10 Questions

P

atricia Maguire has paintings hanging in the Cornell Art Museum in Delray Beach, the Boca Raton Museum of Art and homes and galleries throughout the country. But the idea that she has ever painted to be a commercial success is one she outright rejects. “My feeling is you paint because something compels you to do it,” said Maguire, 64, who lives with her husband, Steve, in Ocean Ridge. “The time you spend painting is so involving and absorbing that you don’t notice the passage of time. “What I tell people — and I usually get a laugh, even though I don’t mean it that way — is it’s kind of like sex in that you’re so absorbed you don’t know if five minutes have gone by or 40 minutes. “Most painters I know do it because they want to do it. Whether it sells, or whether it’s going to be successful, is a totally different aspect.” She has a studio in downtown Delray Beach in which to work, exhibit and teach classes. Born in Argentina, Maguire spent much of her upbringing in Venezuela and Rio de Janeiro before coming to the Northeast for her education. A resident of Ocean Ridge for two years, she also has a home and studio in the Vail Valley of Colorado. She enjoys volunteering and serving on the boards of several organizations: Old School Square, Plein Air Palm Beach, which promotes outdoor painting, and In The Pines, which is dedicated to the housing and education of agricultural workers. “Giving back to my community is my way of showing gratitude for the incredible opportunities I have been given, and it connects me to a variety of like-minded people,” she said. “I also care deeply for our natural environment, especially the health of our ocean. I joined the Ocean Ridge Garden Club when we moved here in order to learn how to care for our dunes and meet my neighbors. “Nature, education, animals and children are the causes closest to my heart. Painting is how I best express my love for nature and people.” — Brian Biggane Q: Where did you grow up and go to school? How do you think that has influenced you? A: I was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. My father was born in Germany and left in 1938, when life for the German Jewish population became increasingly difficult.  My mother arrived in Argentina in 1946 from Yugoslavia/Hungary. Only she and my grandmother from her family had survived the war. My mother spoke seven languages fluently, although she never had a chance to finish high school.

Meet Your Neighbor 27

MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR: Patricia Maguire

Patricia Maguire, a painter from Ocean Ridge, sits at home in front of a few of her works with her dog Shiloh, a 9-year-old golden retriever. Maguire also has a studio in downtown Delray Beach. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star Buenos Aires is a very international city and at the time there was a large group of young Europeans starting a new life. We spoke German at home, and of course, my brother and I spoke Spanish with our neighborhood friends. We went to a Swiss German school. When I was 9, we moved to Venezuela. At 13, I spent one year at a girls boarding school in Massachusetts. And when I was 14, my mother remarried and we moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Moving around, adapting to different countries, speaking several languages had a huge impact in how I view the world. I learned that although food and humor change from country to country, people are basically the same all over the world.  I consider myself a real American: a blend of cultures with a sense that the world is what we make of it.  I met my husband when I was a high school girl in Rio at the American School and Steve came from college to spend summer vacations with his family after his father had been transferred there by U.S. Steel from Pittsburgh. We became friends and started dating when I was 16.  I went to Skidmore College in upstate New York, and although Steve was in Pittsburgh, our romance continued. Here we are now, still together 47 years after we met. We were transferred to

Venezuela by Steve’s work upon graduation, and I had a wonderful job with American Express. Due to my languages, I traveled quite a bit. I was in my 20s, feeling like a hot shot, with my high heels and briefcase, being sent to Tokyo, Singapore, Paris, Madrid and, of course, New York. I painted on the side. We moved to Florida in 1983. I got my MBA at FAU, while working full-time during the day. In 1988 our eldest daughter was born, and I wanted to raise our kids. I taught international business at FAU as an adjunct professor for about nine years, as a part-time job while our three children were little. Q: What advice do you have for a young person seeking a career today? A: My advice to anyone is the same: Keep your dreams close to your heart and don’t give up. Do your best to play the hand you are dealt with the best attitude. But if you hold on to your dream, and keep trying every chance you get, you will eventually get there. Q: How did you choose to live in Ocean Ridge? A: We lived in Delray Beach for 25 years, in a boating community. Our kids grew up on our boat, swimming and going to the beach. But I’ve always had my eye on Ocean Ridge as a little magical, unspoiled corner of South Florida. When it came to downsizing and an opportunity

to own a home on the beach came along, we jumped at the chance. Q: What is your favorite part about living in Ocean Ridge? A: Our three wonderful children live nearby, and we are proud grandparents. Our kids and grandkids spend part of every weekend swimming and playing on the beach with us. As I said, we are living our dream life! Q: What book are you reading now? A: Where the Crawdads Sing, by Delia Owens. From books I’ve learned about the ways of the world. Books have always been my refuge, my friends. Historical fiction is my favorite genre. Q: What music do you listen to when you want inspiration? When you want to relax? A: While I paint, I listen to music. My playlist is varied: light classical music, classic rock, reggae, Spanish guitar, and West African music (which is similar to Brazilian music). Q: Do you have a favorite quote that inspires your decisions? A: “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrowmindedness,” by Mark Twain.  I’ve lived in different places and found people are people, no matter how rich or poor. We all aspire for the same things for our kids, wanting them to be healthy and happy. When

people are isolated, they think they can only relate to others like them. But when they’re exposed to other cultures, they see that’s not the case. Q: Have you had mentors in your life? Individuals who have inspired your life decisions? A: My parents and my maternal grandmother were my biggest mentors. I learned from them never to give up, even when your whole world has crashed down and you have to start over with nothing. From them I also learned that books will teach you everything, even when you can’t go to school. From my husband I learned about optimism and selfconfidence, and from my children I learned humility, unconditional love and selfsacrifice. Q: If your life were made into a movie, who would play you? A: My husband says Catherine Zeta-Jones. Because I have dark hair and, like her, have a European background. Q: Who/what makes you laugh? A: I laugh a lot at myself. I have a fairly dark sense of humor and a husband with a wonderful sense of humor. I love to laugh at movies. Peter Sellers, all I have to do is to look at his name on the marquee and I start laughing. Kids and dogs also make me laugh.


28 News

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Along the Coast

ABOVE: Atlantic football players join donors who raised money to put them in new blazers for signing day. Macy’s provided the jackets and most of the funding. BELOW: Bob and Janie Souaid of Gulf Stream check out Lincoln Jackson’s initials, embroidered in gold. Photos by Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star

Local donors ensure that athletes have blazers fit for men

By Janis Fontaine

The issues football coach T.J. Jackson deals with at Delray Beach’s Atlantic High School go beyond football and beyond the field. Food insecurity, drug abuse, mental illness, lack of medical care and teenage pregnancy plague a significant part of the local population, and many of Atlantic’s football players live this reality. The chasm that separates Jackson’s players from their affluent neighbors is wider than the Intracoastal Waterway that separates them geographically. Last month, the two groups came together when men and women from Ocean Ridge, Gulf Jackson Stream, Boca Raton and Delray Beach slipped navy blue Ralph Lauren blazers onto the muscular shoulders of 32 football players before a signing day ceremony celebrating a handful of seniors who had earned scholarships for college or for a year at McDougle Preparatory Institute in Deerfield Beach. The blazers, which retail for about $400, were donated in part by Macy’s, but the balance (about $100 per jacket) came from donors in the community, rounded up by Janie Souaid of Gulf Stream, an energetic advocate for and kind-hearted mentor to the young men. Souaid said it took about six hours to raise the $3,200 she needed to pay the balance owed. She said, at first, the people she called couldn’t understand why the students’ families failed to come up with the difference. “One of the players was homeless, and I told them this is a true Blind Side story,” a reference to the 2009 film The Blind Side. When she began to call around again and ask for money to embroider the students’ initials inside in gold thread, her husband, Bob, who had weighed in on the blazers’ style and fabric, said he’d pony up the cash if she “would stop asking people for money.” He was joking and it’s a good thing, because Souaid is not finished asking for money to help them.

Souaid is a motivational speaker and author, and Jackson invited her to speak to his players last year about hard work and excellence. Souaid shared her knowledge with the 150 freshman, JV and varsity players who made up the football program. “I have fallen in love with this team,” she said. At first the players were skeptical, but Souaid, 58, has become someone kids can really talk to. A mother to two grown children, Souaid was an athlete in her youth — she excelled at water polo — and still loves fitness, exercise and eating right. Her background and fitness level give her credibility with the players, whom she calls “gentlemen.”

Coach sets behavior standards

The 32 seniors — the football program has a 100 percent graduation rate — showed up early to mingle with the donors on signing day. Polite, softspoken, but making eye contact, they shook hands and behaved respectfully and responsibly, Jackson’s well-known standards for behavior. Player Jose Bush said, “It’s a gift some people have to connect with other people, and Coach has it.” Jackson gets weekly academic progress reports (A’s and B’s are OK, C’s are not), and players must make the grade if they want to see any time on the field, where Atlantic was unbeaten during the regular

season. The teachers are behind him. Principal Tara Dellegrotti-Ocampo calls Jackson her right-hand man. “I couldn’t do it without him,” she said. “There’s not a day that goes by that he doesn’t ask me what he can do to help.” As much as he has instilled unity and pride in the team, Jackson has brought unity and pride to the school’s 2,300 students. But it hasn’t been easy. Jackson helped the team shoulder a terrible loss last year when a popular player was killed in a dirt bike accident. Marc’Allen Derac was a beloved leader and a shoo-in for a scholarship. Tight end Kamareon Williams dedicated signing day to Marc’Allen, he said, because everyone knew Marc’Allen would have signed, maybe with one of the big dogs: Miami, Florida or Florida State. Kamareon announced his commitment to Florida International University with a touch of sadness. It’s not the first time Jackson has lost a player, someone he loved, and it likely won’t be the last. But he encourages students to keep forging forward, being grateful, and doing the right thing. Jackson knows from experience that education will last after football ends. A ticket to the NFL or a full ride to a Division I school is a great dream, and one worth pursuing, but not a reality for most of his players.

But a college scholarship and a bachelor’s degree? That is within their grasp. This year, thanks to tutoring, hard work and dedication, 85 percent of the team made the honor roll. Quarterback Kalani Ilimaleota’s mom and sister came to see him sign his letter with St. Thomas University. Taking the stage in his pressed white shirt and carved wood necklace, he could have just stepped out of a Ralph Lauren commercial. Kalani’s words, “Thank God for my family,” were echoed by his mother’s: “Thank God for Coach T.J.” Kalani learned discipline and independence from Jackson, but the coach says he doesn’t do it alone. He says his assistant coaches, the athletic department, the administration, teachers and even the food service folks all stand as role models. Neighborhood merchants also step up, Souaid says. Walmart donates Muscle Milk, a high-protein supplement, and the store has hired a handful of players who need work. Carrabba’s provides a hearty game-day meal for the team each week. “People want to help,” Souaid said, “but they don’t know what to do.” She’s happy to tell them.

The importance of giving back

Signing day was emotional for both the donors and the students. Dr. Patti Thrower of Ocean Ridge came to help her player into his jacket. “It made my heart sing,” she said. “There’s a true joy that comes from giving that you can’t get anywhere else. It’s important to give back, not just with money, but by mentoring these kids.” Thrower, who grew up poor in New Jersey, cried as she recalled her own struggles putting herself through college in Pennsylvania, then dental school. “I’m proof that it can happen, that it is attainable: college, a career, a great future,” she said. Through their own hard work and dedication with support from Jackson and the school, the young men now have skills, mental toughness, a winning attitude, discipline and maturity. And thanks to Janie Souaid and their neighbors to the east, they’re dressed to succeed. Ú


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

602 NE 8th Ave., Delray Beach

21 NW 17th Ct., Delray Beach

29

603 N. Federal Hwy., Boynton Beach

Modern meets beach in this spectacular new construction home. Built by Bella Homes, and designed with soaring ceilings, lots of glass, and wood accents. Chef’s kitchen with natural gas Jenn-Air range and appliances, Control 4 smart home, whole house generator. Featuring 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 1st floor master and office, outdoor logia with summer kitchen and pool. Downtown Delray’s Palm Trail Neighborhood. Asking $2,950,000.

Spring 2019 delivery! New construction home with modern features and finishes, built by Bella Homes. Jenn-Air appliance package, 5 bedrooms, 5 ½ baths, open floor plan with 1st floor master, impact glass, resort style heated salt water pool, control 4 smart home. One of a kind modern masterpiece located at the end of a cul-de-sac in the desirable Lake Ida neighborhood. Asking $2,100,000.

Attention Investors - Great value and opportunity to buy large commercial lot with warehouse only blocks from the new thriving downtown Boynton Beach. Perfectly located for major development. Asking $1,700,000.

Steve & Lori Martel, Realtors 561-573-3728 Steve Cell, 561-573-3593 Lori Cell SteveAndLoriMartel@yahoo.com

Steve & Lori Martel, Realtors 561-573-3728 Steve Cell, 561-573-3593 Lori Cell SteveAndLoriMartel@yahoo.com

Greg Lekanides 561-886-7052 Cell Greg@poshflorida.com

UNDER CONTRACT

6110 N. Ocean, Ocean Ridge

357 NE 8th Ave., Delray Beach

Waterfront town home with private dock and views galore. This beach area property boasts privacy plus views, 2 car gar, courtyard entrance. Located in small gated enclave, this 3 bed 2.5 bath home offers ground level and remodeled master suite, guest rooms upstairs, new impact windows, new A/C, newer roof, sky lights, new seawall. Asking $1,195,000.

Incredible opportunity to own a large corner lot with charming open beam cottage. Nestle among multi-million dollar homes in desirable Palm Trail neighborhood. Steps to trendy Atlantic Ave. and short stroll to beach. Asking $995,000.

Jerilyn Walter 561-537-0050 Cell Jerilyn@poshflorida.com

Jerilyn Walter 561-537-0050 Cell Jerilyn@poshflorida.com

2000 S. Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach Beachfront condominium with Ocean views. Tastefully remodeled with impact windows all around, large living room, spacious master suite, double door entry, with private elevator. Steps to sand with deeded beach access. Community pool on intracoastal, with guard gate, garage, and storage. Asking $649,000.

Jerilyn Walter 561-537-0050 Cell Jerilyn@poshflorida.com

MARINA VILLAGE at BOYNTON BEACH – ENJOY THE MARINA & SALT WATER LIFESTYLE! Beverly Mandell 561-302-6196 • Jami Lyn Cauvin 561-517-5712 • Beverly@poshflorida.com

625 Casa Loma Blvd., 708

700 E. Boynton Beach Blvd., 712

700 E. Boynton Beach Blvd., 90t

BOATERS DREAM - Amazing 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo **CAN BE SOLD FURNISHED OR UNFURNISHED** OPTIONAL 30’ PRIVATE DEEDED BOAT DOCK plus extra garage space $45,000, THREE side by side parking spaces and a view of the Marina/Intracoastal and sliver of Ocean! Condo has modern redone kitchen with new appliances, granite counters and bright white cabinetry. Floors are porcelain wood design tile! Come experience the lifestyle! Asking $429,000

PARADISE FOUND! WATCH THE SUN RISE & THE SUN SET IN THIS STELLAR CONDO W/ FLOOR TO CEILING WINDOWS AND MAGNIFICENT VIEWS OF OCEAN, INTRACOASTAL, MANGROVES AND DOWNTOWN BOYNTON BEACH! This spectacular 2 bedroom, 2 full bath, with TWO walk in closets! private end-unit condo has 1329 sq ft under air with golden teak waterproof vinyl flooring, custom crown molding, custom ceiling fans, custom light fixtures, outdoor teak manufactured flooring along a wrap-around balcony. Included is 150 sf storage unit, the largest available, as well as two side by side garage spaces! Asking $349,000

Watch the sunrise from this SOUTHERN EXPOSURE balcony of this charming perfectly maintained one bedroom unit. Stunning views of the Intracoastal and Ocean. Wood grain porcelain floors throughout, charming professionally designed décor. TWO side by side parking spaces! Great for investors – rent 12 times per year. Electric vehicle charging station, fire pit by pool, gym, hot tub, theater room and Marina Cafe onsite. Steps to restaurants, water sports, nightlife. Asking $229,000

Beverly Mandell • 561-302-6196


30 News

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Delray Beach

City examines its response to failures of reclaimed water system of the aquifer helps to fend off saltwater intrusion. Reclaimed water is treated wastewater, not suitable for drinking, cooking or bathing. Reusing that treated wastewater helps the city by reducing demand for drinking water, Craig wrote. In turn, that saves the city millions from seeking new water sources.

By Jane Smith

Ned Wehler had to use a hose in early February to water his flowers and plants. The reclaimed water system was down again in Delray Beach. “I went outside this morning and noticed my flowers were wilted,” Wehler said on Feb. 6. He lives on Ingraham Avenue on the barrier island. After watering his flowers, Wehler went inside to check the city’s website. That’s when he saw a red banner strip across the top that read: “Reclaimed water is unavailable until further notice.” It was the second failure within five weeks. Wehler said he was never notified either time until his flowers started to wilt. His sprinkler system uses reclaimed water. Wehler and other barrier island residents from George Bush Boulevard south to Linton Boulevard are provided reclaimed water for their sprinkler systems. It was part of a settlement that Delray Beach reached with state and federal environmental regulators to

Failures may be linked to work on treatment plant

Ned Wehler had to resort to hand watering when the recycled water system went down. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star stop sending wastewater into the ocean. The wastewater treatment plant that serves Delray Beach sent its last raw sewage discharge into the ocean on April 1, 2009, according to Doug Levine, operations chief at the plant. The plant is still allowed to discharge treated wastewater from heavy rains, from testing its pumps and from “plant

upsets.” Delray Beach received state grants to hook up the residents to the reclaimed water system. Marjorie Craig, Delray Beach’s utilities director, wrote in an email that providing reclaimed water for irrigation helps to reduce demands on the aquifer Delray Beach uses to provide drinking water to its residents. The reduced use

The reclaimed water problem first occurred late last year when the South Central Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant needed the city’s outfall pipe to send treated wastewater out to the ocean. It’s the same pipe Delray Beach uses to supply reclaimed water to its residents. When the treatment plant needs to use the pipe for wastewater discharges, reclaimed water becomes unavailable to customers in Delray Beach. That’s because the treated wastewater might not meet the standards for reclaimed water so it’s not used, Craig said. The joint treatment plant processes wastewater from both Boynton Beach and Delray Beach. City commissioners from the two cities sit as the governing board of the plant. Delray Beach agreed to provide the outfall pipe for dual purposes about 10 years ago because it was in place, already carried treated wastewater and was cheaper than adding another line that would become obsolete in six years. By 2025, the six Southeast Florida cities will be required to stop regular ocean discharges under the Leah Schad Memorial Outfall Ocean Program, signed into state law in 2008. The program was named for Schad, considered the grande dame of Palm Beach County environmentalists, who died earlier that year. Craig, who was not with the city when that dual-purpose decision was made, wrote via email that the treatment plant’s chemistry was knocked out of balance by an unknown cause in February. That’s technically called a “plant upset.” The recent reclaimed water shutdowns mark the first times the treatment plant had to use the outfall pipe for more than two days in about 10 years, Craig wrote. The outfall pipe had been used for a few hours after heavy rains in the past, but this was the first multiday incident, Craig said. She thinks the cause is likely from upgrades in progress at the $20 million treatment plant, which might have disrupted the chemical balance needed to treat wastewater. Delray Beach and Boynton Beach are sharing the upgrade cost. The upgrades cover aerators, headworks where the wastewater first enters and other improvements, Craig said. “The

treatment plant needs aerators to provide air to the bacteria, otherwise the bacteria die,” she said. The major construction at the 40-year-old treatment plant began in October, Craig wrote. “This will continue over the next nine or so months and may take another three to six months afterwards of ensuring correct adjustments,” she wrote.

Long-term plan includes Boynton Beach

That information, though, was not communicated to the city’s reclaimed water customers who are east of the interstate. The western area receives its reclaimed water from another pipe, Craig said. That’s why Wehler and his neighbors became upset when the reclaimed water was not available for their automated irrigation systems. The first failure happened on Dec. 28 and lasted until Jan. 4, according to the city. But Wehler said he noticed the system was down on Dec. 23. The second one started on Feb. 4 and lasted until Feb. 8. “This is getting pretty frustrating, plus my recently transplanted plants are dying as are my flowers,” Wehler wrote Jan. 2 to the Beach Property Owners Association. “And I have been watering by hand daily to keep the plants healthy.” Craig’s staff is trying to improve communications to the city’s reclaimed water users by determining the best way to reach them: emails, automated phone calls, automated text messages or some other method. “We have to figure that out,” she said. The Utilities Department is working on a short-term fix for its reclaimed water system. “When we have final regulatory approval and a design, we will share more details,” Craig wrote. That is expected in 60 days. For the longer term, the city has hired a consultant to look into storage of reclaimed water. “The biggest challenge is the lack of available land for a storage tank or tanks,” Craig wrote. “The barrier island uses about 500,000 gallons per day of reclaimed water, typically overnight.” Within the next two years, when Boynton Beach expands its reclaimed water service to the properties it serves on the barrier island, Craig wants to connect with that system to avoid shutdowns of the Delray Beach system if there’s a need to use the outfall pipe. In that case, Delray could then supply reclaimed water by connecting to the Boynton Beach system. Meanwhile, the treatment plant has to file monthly reports on outfall discharges to the West Palm Beach office of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. January’s report was due Feb. 28. See WATER on page 31


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

News 31

Boynton Beach

Visit us for...

Art Supplies & Tools THE BEST LOCAL SOURCE FOR HIGH QUALITY ART SUPPLIES

The kapok tree to be moved sits just east of the Schoolhouse Children’s Museum on Ocean Avenue. It will be sold or wind up on other city-owned land. Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

City prepares kapok tree for moving By Jane Smith

Boynton Beach will save the kapok tree on Ocean Avenue property that it sold to the Town Square development team. “We always planned to save that tree,” said Colin Groff, assistant city manager in charge of Town Square. To prepare for moving, the roots of the 80-year-old kapok tree were pruned and its canopy was trimmed in mid-February, Groff said. Green Integrity’s Inc. of Deerfield Beach will move the tree. If a buyer can’t be found in the next 60 to 90 days, then Boynton Beach will have the kapok tree moved across Ocean Avenue to city-owned property, Groff said. “The cost will not exceed $35,000 and that cost will be offset because new trees will not be required in that area,” he said. The estimated moving cost for a buyer will depend on how far the buyer wants to move the tree. A taller kapok tree, just west of the historic high school on Ocean Avenue, will remain as part of the Town Square project, a private-public partnership between E2L Real Estate Solutions and Boynton Beach. The 16-acre Town Square will create a downtown for Boynton Beach. The development will feature a combination City Hall and public library building, new

WATER

Continued from page 30 The December report included two days — Dec. 28 and 29 — when the treatment plant exceeded its allowed fecal coliform limit by eight times. On Dec. 29, the discharge of treated wastewater had more than three times the allowable limit of solids. The West Palm Beach office is investigating the discharges, wrote Jill Margolius, the office spokeswoman. She wrote that the department’s first priority is to work with the treatment plant to correct the “plant upset,” then identify any corrective measures needed to prevent this issue from happening again. “Once this is complete,

fire station, a renovated historic high school that will have arts and rec classes on the first floor and banquets on the second floor, amphitheater, playground, downtown energy plant and parking garage. The development team plans to construct apartment buildings, a hotel, retail and restaurant space, and parking garages on land it bought from the city. The private kapok tree sits just east of the Schoolhouse Children’s Museum on Ocean Avenue. Not a Florida native, the kapok tree has withstood hurricanes while providing shade and shelter to those who gathered below it. “As an historian, I support saving this vestige from the past,” said Janet DeVries Naughton, archivist and webmaster for the Boynton Beach Historical Society. “Obviously, it’s not the same as having the tree in its timehonored and familiar place, and that saddens me.” Even so, she recognizes that life involves change. “The tree and her magnificence have been documented and frozen in time through photographs,” DeVries said. “That’s why it’s important to chronicle history. … What came before fades away, unless we share it through written, oral or visual preservation.” Ú the department will then evaluate this from a regulatory perspective,” Margolius wrote. “If ultimately there are any identified violations on the part of the treatment plant, the department will address them as appropriate.” The two discharge days did not coincide with any cautionary notices about water quality at the municipal beach in Delray Beach. The county office of the state Department of Health tests the water quality at beach locations biweekly, according to its Beach Water Sampling webpage. The department reports on the water quality. Then, each locale decides whether to take action, said Alexander Shaw, local Health Department spokesman. Ú

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HAND’S

Celebrating

our

85TH YEAR

Hand’s is the oldest retail store in Delray Beach, Florida. Since 1934, we have served this community and our visitors with an eclectic inventory. We appreciate your continued business.

Join us for First Friday Art Walk

DON’T MISS THE

DOWNTOWN DELRAY PARADE Saturday, March 16th

The 1st Friday of every month 6-9pm

561-276-4194

325 E. Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach (Located one mile west of the beach)

SINCE 1934

www.HandsDelray.com

OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY 9AM-5PM, SUNDAY 11AM-4PM

Offered at S609,000


32 News

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Along the Coast

You’re as young as you dance, Follies members say By Ron Hayes Just think of all the clichés we embrace in trying to slow down time. “You’re as young as you feel!” we tell ourselves. “Age is just a number!” we say. “Eighty is the new 60!” we hope. Now meet two Highland Beach hoofers who believe you’re as young as you dance. Marlene Perlstein, 81, and Jo Schlags, 85, tap, kick, shimmy and strut like they feel about 22 and age is just a chorus line. And they’re not alone. At 1:15 p.m. on Feb. 17, Perlstein, Schlags and 32 other women aged 55 to 95 in nearly identical blond wigs stood in the backstage shadows at the Countess de Hoernle Theatre at Spanish River High School, stretching, bending, twisting, turning and straining to touch the rafters. Warming up. “Reach ’em!” their artistic director, Cheryl Steinthal, demanded. “Reach ’em!” In 45 minutes, that curtain will part and the New Florida Follies will break into “Fascinating Rhythms, 2019.” The New Florida Follies is a reincarnation of the Original Florida Follies, founded in 2000 by Cathy Dooley, the owner of a Margate dance academy. By the time Dooley retired at 89 in 2015, the nonprofit dance troupe had raised more than $825,000 for children’s charities, including Family Central in West Palm Beach and the Children’s Diagnostic & Treatment Center in Fort Lauderdale, which will also benefit from this year’s five shows. “We’re the older generation taking care of the younger generation,” says Emily Adams, the group’s president. Five of the dancers are former Rockettes and most have danced professionally. “We have one woman who’s 95,” Perlstein says. “She doesn’t do much dancing, but she’s up there. And we have a 90-yearold who does a split on stage. They applaud when she goes down, and they applaud even louder when she gets back up.” The 95-year-old is Vivian Jeffers of Deerfield Beach. “I used to race walk, now I do Zumba,” she will tell you. “I had a cancer scare a while back and I never missed a rehearsal.” The 90-year-old is Cindy Trinder of Tamarac, who began dancing after high school in Oklahoma City and joined the Follies in 2006 as a mere 77-year-old. Thirteen years later, she’s still drawing applause with her showstopping splits. “I used to do acrobatics, but I had a little accident and lost the split,” she says. “I got the split back, but now I exercise twice a week and do some yoga when I have the time.”

Marlene Perlstein, 81 (left), and Jo Schlags, 85, both of Highland Beach, flank New Florida Follies partner Cindy Trinder, who at 90 still performs a split in shows. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star

Schlags (left) and Perlstein in the 1950s. Both took up dancing as young girls and have no plans to give it up. Photos provided

If You Go

When: New Florida Follies, 2 p.m. March 24 and 31. Where: Countess de Hoernle Theatre at Spanish River High School, 5100 Jog Road, Boca Raton. Tickets: $30 each, available by calling 305-596-7394, or at newfloridafollies. yapsody.com. Perlstein started dance lessons in Brooklyn. She was 3. “Miss Frances and Miss Syd,” she remembers. “They had a neighborhood dance studio, and I was always a ham. My mother was a knitting instructress and I would come into the store and make everyone stop and see my latest routine.” When she was in high school, the family moved to a chicken farm in Toms River, N.J., and she danced with Dave Rugoff and his Merry Makers. “We got paid,” she says, “once in a while.” She married Morty, had three children, they became grandparents to five — and she never stopped dancing. In 2015, she joined the Follies.

“When I found out about the Florida Follies, I was so excited because there’s not a lot of opportunities for women our age to perform,” she says. “We go out and greet the audience after the show and they all say, ‘You make us feel so good.’” Schlags grew up in suburban Detroit, where her mother would close her beauty salon, pack a lunch and take her and her brother into the city for lessons. By 16 she was dancing with the Civic Light Opera of Detroit. She worked state fairs and club dates with the Miriam Sage Dancers and hit the big time in her 20s, dancing at the fabled Latin Quarter nightclub in Manhattan. In 2001, she and her husband, Harvey, arrived in Highland Beach, the parents of two daughters and grandparents of twins. Widowed in 2010, she joined the Florida Follies and hasn’t missed a season since. “I had a right hip replacement last June 4,” Schlags says, “and I was back with my walker in August, watching and taking notes, learning the routines. Then my right heel started hurting, so I

went to rehearsals with my boot on. Everybody said, ‘You’re crazy,’ but now I’m back.” She smiled. “I love the spotlight.” Now it’s 2 p.m., and the spotlight is about to hit her. Out front, about 450 men and women are patiently waiting, a crowd from the Follies’ generation. Their treasured dancers are Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly, not Mick Jagger and Michael Jackson. Some have parked their walkers and wheelchairs against the side walls, and this is the moment at last. This is why these 34 women have driven to Coral Springs for rehearsals twice a week. This is why they raised $50,000 to buy the costumes and rent the theater. This is — Showtime! Recorded music fills the hall, the curtain parts, the spotlight shines and a chorus line of glittering costumes, hot pink feathers and sparkling smiles kicks off to George Gershwin’s Fascinating Rhythm. Marlene Perlstein taps her way through That’s How Rhythm Was Born, 78 years after she took her first lesson. Jo Schlags dances A Salute to

the Ziegfeld Follies so smoothly you’d never guess that she used a walker not long ago. Shall We Dance is a salute to the six Follies girls who are 80 and over. Vivian Jeffers, 95, doesn’t dance, but she stands surrounded by her colleagues, dressed like the Statue of Liberty with torch — and head — held high. And then Cindy Trinder steps forward to do her split. The crowd applauds when she goes down, and they applaud even louder when she gets back up. Out in the audience, Frank Rock of Boynton Beach is seeing the Florida Follies for the first time. A licensed massage therapist, he’s come to watch one of his clients, Nadine Alperin, 64, of Lake Worth. “I’m just proud to know her,” Rock says. “They have amazing timing and their rhythm is amazing. Especially because of their —” He pauses, frowns, searches for an acceptable word. “Their seniorness.” Two hours later, these old hoofers with young hearts have frolicked through 11 numbers, with Suzi and Steve Cruz, a singing couple, and the Flashback Four, a doowop group, providing the entertainment during costume changes. The finale is another Gershwin tune, and by now the title is obvious. I Got Rhythm. Indeed they do. They got fascinatin’, toe-tappin’, highkickin’, age-defyin’ rhythm. The New Florida Follies have two more shows to go, March 24 and 31, and after the curtain falls on their final show, Cheryl Steinthal will give her dancers a month off. But by the end of April they’ll be back in Coral Springs again, twice a week, rehearsing for the New Florida Follies 2020. Marlene Perlstein and Jo Schlags intend to be there. “I have osteoarthritis in my left knee,” Perlstein says, “and when I thought I might not be able to dance I was very upset. But I take Advil. I would really miss a lot in my life if I couldn’t dance anymore.” Schlags, too. “My kids keep saying, ‘When will you quit?’ And I say ‘Next year.’ But I never do.” And Cindy Trinder vows to keep performing her nonagenarian splits. “I’ll keep dancing until I die, until something stops me,” she says. “I’m not afraid of dying, but I want to feel good while I’m here.”Ú Artistic director Cheryl Steinthal will hold auditions for dancers in April. Applicants need not have worked professionally, but must have experience in tap and/or jazz styles. For info, call 305-596-7394 or email www. newfloridafollies@gmail.com.


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

News 33

SIMMONS

Continued from page 1 where they had a waterfront getaway home. But 15 minutes after leaving the Palm Beach County Park Airport in Lantana with Ken as the pilot, the plane plunged into the Atlantic Ocean. Despite intense search efforts by the U.S. Coast Guard, Federal Aviation Administration and U.S. Air Traffic Control, the plane had yet to be recovered almost a month later. While no one can say for certain what caused the aircraft to go down, there’s a good chance weather was a factor. According to a preliminary report from the National Transportation Safety Board, the plane was cleared to higher altitudes to avoid areas of heavy rain but veered from its assigned headings. After being questioned about that, Simmons told the air traffic control tower that his autopilot “had kicked off” and that “the winds are really weird up here.” He apparently tried to maneuver around the storm cells and later told the controller, “I don’t know what’s going on up here. I’m working on instruments . . . acting really goofy here.” The controller advised him to try to maintain an altitude of 6,000 feet and said it “looks like you are getting pushed up in the air drafts.” Simmons did not reply and there was no further communication. Radar showed the plane rapidly descending and then disappearing off the screen in heavy storms about 15 minutes after it took off. Downdrafts — or microbursts — are one of the biggest threats associated with thunderstorms, said Richard McSpadden, executive director of the Air Safety Institute of the AOPA, a pilots and aircraft owners association. McSpadden speculated that Simmons might have ultimately encountered a downdraft. “Downdrafts can be so severe that they impair your ability to have enough control to overcome them. They push your airplane down like an elevator,” McSpadden said. The NTSB will investigate further, but it could take months or even years before the results are finalized.

Making the world better

What is certain is that Palm Beach County and beyond lost a couple who shared a lifelong mission to make this a better planet for all, including pets. “What I remember most is the simple kindness, his gentle words, his caring about my K9 partner Sabre and the thousands of other dogs and cats who came through his doors,” said Bob Burnell, a retired police officer who operates Sit Means Sit dog training in Boynton Beach. Burnell and his wife, Eileen, first met Dr. Simmons 17 years ago late at night at the Simmons Animal Hospital in Greenacres

Alice Simmons, wearing a black crown, is surrounded by friends, including Lyn Tate (first row, fourth from left), at her 50th birthday party at the Simmons home on Great Guana Cay. Ken Simmons had flown her friends there to surprise her. Photo provided by Lyn Tate

Ken Simmons visits the dog day care at his animal hospital in Greenacres in 2013. He sold the hospital when he retired a few years ago. Coastal Star file photo when their two Akitas got into an altercation that required sutures. “He stitched up the little one and sent us home with some antibiotics,” recalled Bob Burnell. “He called the next day to see how she was. That was the kind of veterinarian he was.” And, on the day Sabre suddenly collapsed on a walk and died, Burnell was devastated, but police policy mandated that a necropsy be performed. “Dr. Ken knew I was upset about having my partner cut apart,” Burnell said. “He spoke gently, kindly, on how he was going to perform this with limited surgery. I could not speak to anyone because I was so devastated. Dr. Ken spent hours on the phone explaining to Eileen, my wife, about what happened, about the tumor on K9 Sabre’s heart, how it took that moment to burst and how Sabre went quickly.” J.J. McDonough, a friend and neighbor, flew often with Dr. Simmons to the Bahamas and said his friend was a good pilot. They enjoyed fishing and diving on these trips. “The guy just attacked life with such tenacity,” McDonough said. “I never really met anyone who just tackled everything — his personal life, his professional life, everything that way. Every time he would go to the Bahamas, he would bring certain vaccinations and things to assist the dog community in Marsh Harbour, which he didn’t have to do and he did it on his own dime. He gave his time and energy in a lot of different ways.” McDonough said beyond Simmons’ work as a veterinarian, he helped

implement a business curriculum in the veterinary school at the University of Florida, after he found that interns who worked for him lacked business knowledge. When he sold his business, Simmons helped found Healthy Aquatics Marine Institute, a notfor-profit on a mission for coral conservation through education, research and restoration. He remained active with the institute in retirement.

Not the sort to give up

And he got the most out of everything he took on. “I remember we were in Abaco and he went free diving on his own one morning out in the reef,” McDonough said. “He speared a couple fish and, on the way back, he had a small reef shark that was after his fish. The first rule of spear fishing in the Bahamas is if you shoot a fish, you usually leave the location you’re at. You don’t stay, because typically there’s a larger fish and typically that fish is a shark that is close by, because the Bahamas are very sharky.   “This small reef shark was after the couple fish that he got and he was trying to fight off this shark not once, but essentially for his whole swim back to shore. The reef was probably 200-300 yards out when he swam back. He probably had to attempt to mitigate this issue with this shark for probably 10 minutes. Most people would just get rid of the fish, give the shark your fish. But he wasn’t going to do that. He was not that type of guy. He wasn’t going to give up the fish.” Rob Martin, a veterinarian who operates the Colonial Animal Hospital in Boynton

Beach, said, “He was a terrific guy who was very innovative. The use of technology in veterinary medicine was very important to him. I also understand his draw to the Bahamas as we take our boat there.” R ich Anderson, executive director and CEO of the Peggy Adams Rescue League in West Palm Beach, credits Ken and Alice Simmons for aiding not only family pets, but also homeless ones at shelters. “The dedication to animals by Ken and Alice Simmons is well known, and as advocates for police dogs, they were probably second to none,” said Anderson. “We will be forever grateful to them. Thousands of abandoned and homeless pets were saved and got the second chances they needed thanks to Ken and Alice.” Alice met Ken, a graduate of Lake Worth High, while both were attending the University of Florida; they married in 1986. She served as the director of business and operations for the Simmons Hospital for decades and is credited with helping its success and expansion. Before they sold the practice and retired a few years ago, they expanded it to make it a one-stop place for pet care and activities with the addition of the Barkers Hotel, the Purrington Inn, plus the swimming pools and lounge areas for dogs being boarded or attending day care.

Active in the community

Alice was an active volunteer with Best Buddies and could often be seen during the day running with her dogs throughout her neighborhood. Lyn Tate and her husband, Rock, were neighbors and friends, too. “She was compassionate and kind and found the best in everyone,” said Lyn Tate about Alice. “She adored her two sons, Chris and Matthew. She loved the outdoors, paddle boarding, kayaking with her beautiful dogs.” Lyn Tate was among friends whom Ken Simmons flew to Guana Cay to surprise Alice on her 50th birthday almost 10 years ago. “I just found the wine glass and bagged sea glass that was our party favor,” Tate said. “It

put a smile on my face, as Alice loved to collect sea glass in Guana.” Ken Simmons served as the Tate family’s veterinarian for more than a decade. Rock Jr. worked for Ken during the summers while in high school and in college. “Ken saved our dog, Queenie, from an autoimmune disease and she managed to live five more years under Ken’s care,” Tate added. Many speak about Ken’s efforts in 2013 to try to save the life of a retired K9 officer named Drake, a German shepherd, who had been shot five times during a home invasion. Dr. Simmons was able to stabilize Drake, but knew he needed more specialized care. He quickly loaded up Drake in his plane and flew him to a veterinary specialist at UF. Drake did not survive his wounds. Dr. Simmons memorialized Drake by hiring artist Jocelyn Russell to create a life-sized bronze sculpture of Drake at his veterinary hospital. The base also contains the inscribed names of service dogs across the country who were killed in the line of duty or who died of natural causes. On Feb. 11, the Lantana Town Council called for a silent moment of prayer to honor Ken and Alice Simmons. Mayor David Stewart, also a neighbor, said, “It’s just a sad situation. Let us remember Ken and Alice, their parents, the two sons, neighbors and friends and the many animals who were their friends.” The couple are survived by their sons, Christopher (Amanda) Simmons and Matthew Simmons; Ken’s mother, Lorraine Simmons; Ken’s siblings, Kathleen (Patrick) Day, Dale (Marian) Simmons and Patrice Antony; and Alice’s siblings, Barbara (Dale) Buzz; Suzanne (Steve) Hurst, Rita (Joe) Sammarco, Patricia (Mark) Dobson and Dennis (Lisette) McCormick. A celebration of life took place Feb. 16. In lieu of flowers, the Simmons and McCormick families ask that donations be made to the Coral Restoration Foundation to honor Ken and Alice Simmons. Details are available at www. coralrestoration.org/donate. Ú


34 News

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Lantana Airport

Frankel finds funds to offset losses from flight restrictions By Rich Pollack

President Donald Trump’s frequent visits to his Mar-aLago retreat in Palm Beach have hurt businesses operating out of the Palm Beach County Park Airport, better known as the Lantana Airport. Now, thanks in large part to U.S. Rep. Lois Frankel, some of those aviation-related businesses may be receiving federal dollars to help cover revenue lost because of Air Force One flights into the area. Frankel announced last month a $3.5 million grant for relief to businesses and aviators at Lantana and at a New Jersey airport affected by temporary flight restrictions when the president visits. The money was included in last month’s government funding bill. “Local businesses and aviators at Lantana Airport have been unfairly impacted by Mr. Trump’s frequent trips to Mar-a-Lago,” Frankel said in a news release. “They will now have an opportunity to receive financial relief.” Frankel, a member of the House Appropriations Committee, estimated that businesses at the Lantana Airport had lost about $1

million in revenue as a result of the temporary flight restrictions in place during presidential visits. Frankel, whose district encompasses much of south Palm Beach County, said the airport has 25 small businesses that support 250 jobs. As a member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Frankel worked with former Rep. Leonard Lance of New Jersey and Sen. Marco Rubio to get funding for the airports included in the transportation appropriations bill. The grants will be administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation, which will determine criteria and put out a notice for businesses in the near future. Frankel’s actions received praise from the chief executive of Stellar Aviation group, which provides services to aircraft owners at Lantana. “She took the time to understand the impacts to the affected business at the airport and worked with both the local and federal government to try and find solutions to alleviate these significant impacts,” Jonathan Miller said in the news release. Ú


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Business Spotlight 35

Business Spotlight

Lord & Taylor chief ‘listening’ in effort to assure Boca store’s future By Mary Hladky

As the venerable retailer Lord & Taylor works to revive its flagging fortunes, its newly installed president, Vanessa LeFebvre, visited the Boca Raton Mizner Park store on Feb. 14 to outline coming changes and to solicit feedback on how the store can improve. But the 20 top Lord & Taylor customers, business people and community leaders invited to attend a luncheon offered no criticisms, and many were ardent fans of the store. They praised the service provided by the store’s employees and lauded store general manager Mindy Horvitz. “We want you to be here for the long haul,” said one invitee. “You are a vital part of the success of Boca Raton.” LeFebvre’s visit was part of a “listening tour” of the company’s 45 stores that she launched shortly after returning to the company in May as president. She began her career as a Lord & Taylor assistant buyer and rose through the ranks before leaving for positions with Macy’s, TJX Cos., Daffy’s and online retailer Stitch Fix. In an interview before the luncheon, LeFebvre did not commit to keeping the Boca Raton store open, saying such promises are impossible to make in today’s difficult retail environment. Although she declined to provide sales figures, LeFebvre described the store as a “top performer” that benefits from having loyal customers in northern states who spend the winter or vacation in South Florida. “We feel really good about being here in Boca,” LeFebvre said. “We knew the brand resonated with the Boca customer who is living here as well as the customer who

Lord & Taylor President Vanessa LeFebvre visits the Mizner Park store last month before hosting a luncheon to outline changes and seek feedback on how the store can improve. She heard no criticisms from the people who spoke. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star is visiting here, so it is a great match.” The tour of stores is one of the ways she hopes to learn about how the company can knit more closely to the communities where the stores are located. “I am here to find that sustainable future for us,” she said. Lord & Taylor stores dotted South Florida in the early 2000s. But the retailer exited the state in 2004, closing stores in Boca’s Town Center mall, the Mall at Wellington Green and the Palm Beach Mall, among others, in the wake of an illfated expansion strategy. As the chain regrouped, Lord & Taylor opened in Mizner Park to much fanfare and rejoicing in 2013, and is its only brick-andmortar store in Florida. More troubles beset the company last year, and it closed 10 stores, including its New

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York City flagship on Fifth Avenue. Lord & Taylor is now trying to right the ship once more under the direction of new leaders. The parent company, Hudson’s Bay Co., brought in Helena Foulkes as its CEO last year, then hired LeFebvre. One big change already underway is Lord & Taylor’s partnership with walmart.com to create an online store that

offers about 125 fashion brands, including Tommy Bahama, Vince Camuto, La La Anthony, H Halston and Effy. It is billed as a “premium” shopping destination, and marries Lord & Taylor’s desire to reach a wider audience and Walmart’s hope to attract more affluent customers by offering higher-end fashion brands. LeFebvre intends to personalize stores to meet the

needs of the community. As an example, she said she visited the Mizner Park store shortly after becoming president. She wanted to buy shorts, but learned they had sold out. That might not have been a big problem in Connecticut at that time of the year, but shorts needed to be available in Boca. Discontinuing swimwear also was under consideration, but no longer. Personalizing stores is one of three tenets the company has set out as it aims for a profitable future. Lord & Taylor also wants to be a “smarter store” that will soon alert customers to which items are “customer favorites” in an effort to help them quickly select the best items for themselves. It’s also emphasizing innovation. That will include new ways of providing personal shopping and virtual personal shopping online and improving the chain’s website to make it easier for customers to find what they want online. The company’s base customers are ages 35 to 75, and LeFebvre wants to add younger people to the mix. But she noted that the oldest millennials are now 38 and have families. “We cater to a female customer who is shopping for her family,” she said. Ú


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November March2019 2019

Business Spotlight

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Builders break ground for Intracoastal fourplex in Delray

ove 4, developed by Seaside Builders, held a Delray Beach groundbreaking ceremony in February at its 344 Venetian Drive location. The building will be a residential fourplex on the Intracoastal Waterway, with prices starting at $3.5 million. Other properties currently being developed by Seaside in the neighborhood include a four-bedroom home priced at $4.395 million at 202 Venetian Drive; a four-bedroom home priced at $4.25 million at 1201 Seaspray Drive; three units at 917 Bucida Drive starting at $2.895 million; four units at 104 Andrews Avenue starting at $2.495 million; and units at 101 and 105 SE Seventh Avenue, each priced at $1.595 million. For information, call Premier Estate Properties broker associates Pascal Liguori at 2780100 and Antonio Liguori at 414-4849.

The Edwards Companies, headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, took out a $94 million loan from Fifth Third Bank for Atlantic Crossing, a fourstory mixed-use complex under construction on a 9-acre site at Atlantic Avenue and Federal Highway in Delray Beach. Financing includes $16 million that the bank lent in 2016, records show. The development will include 83,000 square feet of office space, 73,000 square feet of space for retail stores and restaurants, 261 rental apartments and 82 condominium units. Edwards Cos. filed a lawsuit in 2015 alleging the city deliberately stalled the project, which was first proposed in 2011. The developer and the city settled the lawsuit in 2017. Records show Edwards paid $15.8 million for the land in 2016. Two adjoining office buildings at 5201 Congress

Owners and associates from Seaside Builders and Premier Estate Properties celebrate their teamwork on Cove 4 at 344 Venetian Drive, one of several properties Seaside is developing in the neighborhood. Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star Ave. and 901 W. Yamato Road in Boca Raton sold for $68.35 million. The seller was Mainstreet CV North 40 LLC, a joint venture between Fort Lauderdale-based Mainstreet Capital Partners and Minnesota-based CarVal Investors, and the buyer was PG Mainstreet North Forty LLC, managed by Mainstreet Capital Partners and an unidentified partner. BankUnited provided a $47.58 million mortgage to the buyer. Cross Country Healthcare has its headquarters at 5201 Congress Ave. The 901 W. Yamato Road building has the U.S. headquarters of Biotest Pharmaceuticals Corp. The New York-based real estate investment group InvestCorp sold University View, a 55-unit development at 2190 Northwest Fourth Court in Boca Raton, for $20.8 million in January. The buyer is University View Apartments Funding Company LLC, a

Delaware company, which secured a $14.3 million loan from JP Morgan to make the transaction. InvestCorp purchased the development for $20.25 million in 2016 as part of a $105 million portfolio sale that included two other Palm Beach County multifamily properties. InvestCorp’s parent company is based in Bahrain. Cleveland Clinic Florida purchased 35.4 acres of vacant land west of Lake Worth in January. It paid $4.63 million to the Diocese of Palm Beach for 19.1 acres at 8765 Lake Worth Road, and another $4.63 million to Herbert F. Kahlert for 16.3 acres at the southeast corner of Lyons Road and Cypress Springs Road. Cleveland Clinic spokeswoman Heather Phillips said there are currently no plans for the land. The trust of Ridgway Harding White bought a waterfront home at 1495 Lands

End Road in Manalapan in January for $5.17 million. The sellers, Gregory and Monica Oberting, bought the house in 2015 for $4.115 million, property records show. White is the president and CEO of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, which supports nonprofits throughout Flint, Michigan. His great-grandfather Charles Stewart Mott was the original U.S. partner of General Motors Corp. and later bought the company that became U.S. Sugar, which is now partly owned by the Mott Foundation. Nick Malinosky and his team, The Randy & Nick Team at Douglas Elliman, were selected to lead sales for the Gulf Stream Views townhomes on Old Ocean Boulevard that are in the preconstruction phase in the County Pocket. Gulf Stream Views, offered by NR Living Platinum, will consist of 14 four-bedroom units priced

from $1.495 million to $3.3 million. The build team includes architect Richard Jones, DMR Construction and Carrie Leigh Design. The developer paid $5.4 million for the 2-acre site and scored a $16.5 million loan from Trez Forman for the land and development. Lang Realty recognized its top agents and teams of 2018 at a special awards breakfast at Aberdeen Golf and Country Club in February. In the south county coastal area, a Diamond Award winner was Warren Heeg. Diamond Team Awards winners included Olive Belcher and Brittany Belcher and the Pearl Antonacci Group. A Ruby Award recipient was Julie Giachetti, and a Ruby Team Award was presented to Kathy Pendleton and Phil Metzler. Emerald Award winners included Laura Urness and Robin Winistorfer, and Emerald Team Award winners included Michael Gallacher and Anne Bernet. Palm Beach State College earned national Top 10 rankings from two military publishers for the second consecutive year. Viqtory and Military Times have placed the college fourth and seventh respectively on their lists of the best higher education institutions for veterans, which made the college the highestranking Florida school in its category. Palm Beach State College launched its Innovation Lab at a ceremony in February. The 1,264-square-foot center is in the Technology Center on the Lake Worth campus. “The lab is designed to connect PBSC students with industry, providing students with hands-on experiences that prepare them for placement upon graduation,” said Kimberly Allen, the college’s associate dean for business and computer science.  The Innovation Lab was set in


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

motion by Alireza Fazelpour, a Palm Beach State College computer science professor, and developed through the collaboration of faculty, staff and business partners. Boca Raton-based Gladiator Lacrosse LLC, led by 18-yearold entrepreneur Rachel Zietz, has acquired All Ball Pro, a company headquartered in St. Louis that manufactures and distributes professional-grade balls and rebounders for sports. Zietz, a freshman at Princeton University, founded Gladiator Lacrosse in 2012, when she was 13. At 15, she appeared on ABC’s Shark Tank, and in 2016, she made a deal with Dick’s Sporting Goods to carry her line of products. Discover The Palm Beaches, the tourism marketing organization for Palm Beach County, hosted its third Customer Advisory Board meeting at the Boca Raton Resort and Club in February. Members of the advisory board are professionals representing groups that include SunTrust, National Dental Association, Americans for the Arts and American Society for Microbiology. They serve as volunteers to give feedback on how the marketing organization can better promote the area for conventions and meetings. Jeb Conrad, president and CEO of the Greater Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce, welcomed 120 members and supporters to the Chamber’s annual Membership Luncheon & Installation of Officers in January at the Delray Beach Golf Club. Bill Branning was sworn in as chairman. Named to the Executive Board were Rob Posillico of the Scirocco Group; Noreen Payne of All About Florida Homes/Keller Williams; Cathy Balestriere of Crane’s Beach House & Luxury Villas; Robert Hickok of Hickok Law Firm, P.A.; Alan Goodman of  Nason, Yeager, Gerson, White & Lioce, P.A.; Ron Kaniuk of Kaniuk Law Office, P.A.; and Jim Chard of Human Powered Delray. The Board of Directors includes: David Beale of Law Offices of David A. Beale; Sarah Crane of the HOW Foundation; Mark Denkler of Vince Canning Shoes, Inc.; Evelyn Dobson of Delray Beach Community Land Trust; Charlene Farrington of Spady Cultural Heritage Museum; Jesse Flowers of CenterState Bank; Roger Kirk of Bethesda Hospital; Amanda Perna of The House of Perna; David Schmidt of Law Offices of Simon and Schmidt; Barbara Stark of Milagro Center; Jeff Dash of Dash Travel; Mark Lauzier, Delray Beach city manager; Johnny Mackey of Shamrock Restoration; Steve Mackey of Mack Industrial, Inc.; Manish Mehta of Doughnut Works/PixelGlue; Kristen Noffsinger of Kristen Rose

Business Spotlight 37

Agency; Dan Paulus of GFA International, Inc.; Scott Porten of Porten Companies; and Dr. Marcie Young of Young Dentistry, P.A. Roy Simon was recognized for 60 years of Chamber membership. The Chamber named Payne as director of the year and John Campanola from New York Life as ambassador of the year. Recognized previously were the Delray Beach Elks Club as business of the year; Balestriere as businessperson of the year; and Schmidt as the Crystal Palm Award winner for community service. The Boca Chamber honored Ethel Isaacs Williams as its Diamond Award recipient during its 13th annual Diamond Awards luncheon last month at the Boca Raton Resort and Club. The event recognizes a professional woman in South Palm Beach County who contributes to the vibrancy of the community. Williams, a senior vice president at Kaufman Lynn Construction, serves as immediate past chair of the Chamber’s board of directors, and she is part of several civic and professional associations, including the national and Palm Beach County bar associations. The 2019 Pearl Award recipient was Casey Hill, who designed the Piston Trainer for trumpet players. The award is given to a young woman who is a graduate of the Chamber’s Young Entrepreneurs Academy. Hill, a junior at Boca Raton Community High School, launched her company in August. The Chamber’s Community Cookout will be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 16 at the YMCA of South Palm Beach County, 6631 Palmetto Circle South. There will be hot dogs, hamburgers, veggies, chips and more, as well as games for all ages, with bounce houses, slides and a DJ. Admission is free, and meal tickets can be purchased for $5. To register, visit bocaratonchamber.com/ events. MDG Advertising, a company that sponsors Boca Raton Eco Trail Trekker, put out a call for runners to take part in the Sports, Health and Wellness Expo at Florida Atlantic University’s Boca Raton campus on March 3031. Runners will raise money for charities. For each team entry, organizers will donate 50 percent of money received to Achievement Centers for Children & Families in Delray Beach. For information, visit ecotrailtrekker.com/ boca-raton-team-entry-form/

CATCH IT EVERY TUESDAY– SUNDAY TUE ROCK ‘N’ ROLL NIGHT WITH CRUSH WED FRI SAT RENOWNED SINGER AND PIANIST, ORSON WHITFIELD THU BLUES NIGHT WITH ATLANTIC BLUES BAND SUN SINATRA NIGHT FEATURING MARCO TURO / ACOUSTIC GUITAR

Send business news to Christine Davis at cdavis9797@ gmail.com.

561 .693.3507 theatlanticgrille.com

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2/20/19 10:23 AM


38 News

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Along the Coast

I-95 construction underway to accommodate toll lanes By Steve Plunkett

Construction has begun to replace Interstate 95’s bridge over the Hillsboro Canal, South Palm Beach County’s key high-speed conduit to Deerfield Beach, Fort Lauderdale and points south. Work on the northbound I-95 bridge started Feb. 4, with demolition and dredging expected to last three to four months and construction another eight months. A second phase, for the median in both directions, will follow and also take a year. The third phase, for southbound I-95, will consume most of 2021. The new bridge will not only be wider, to accommodate new express toll lanes in both directions, but also higher, giving watercraft beneath it 12 feet of clearance at mean high water instead of the current 8 feet. The activity is part of a $102 million project to replace the High Occupancy Vehicle lanes from south of Southwest 10th Street in Deerfield Beach to south of Glades Road with two toll lanes in each direction. The overall project includes widening the interstate’s bridges over Camino Real and Palmetto Park Road. In Delray Beach, the north sidewalk on Atlantic Avenue on both sides of the interstate was closed in mid-January for work to improve that interchange. Pedestrians are being routed to the south side of Atlantic until spring 2020; the $5.2 million project will add dedicated turn lanes to northbound I-95 and new turn lanes for westbound Atlantic traffic turning north or south onto Congress Avenue. Andi Pacini, a spokeswoman for the Florida Department of Transportation,

gave the Federation of Boca Raton Homeowner Associations an update on the express lanes Feb. 5. “As you’ve probably noticed, there’s a lot of construction going on the main line, I-95, now,” Pacini said. “The idea is to build a very fast, multimodal commute from Palm Beach County all the way down to Dade. It’s not meant for getting on and getting off. It’s more like a straight shot, fast, take you all the way down approach.” Motorists on the express lanes in Miami-Dade County pay tolls of 50 cents to $10.50, depending on distance, time of day and congestion. The goal is to keep traffic in the express lanes moving at an average speed of 45 to 50 mph, the FDOT says. Craig Fox, president of the federation and owner of an electric vehicle, also noted that EVs travel free in express lanes. The state DOT foresees more and more traffic on I-95 in coming years, growing from 290,000 vehicles a day now to 360,000 daily in 2030, Pacini said. The express lanes connecting Fort Lauderdale to Miami have boosted average speeds 300 percent in the toll lanes and 200 percent in the local lanes, she said. The express lane project will also improve drainage on I-95, lessening the chance of hydroplaning during rain, and use “class 5 anti-graffiti paint” that makes graffiti easy to wash off, Pacini said. A second phase, estimated to cost $130 million, will take the toll lanes from south of Glades north to south of Linton Avenue. Work is planned to begin next year and end in 2024. Ú


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INSIDE:

Paul Taylor Dance Company stays true to legacy of its founder. Page AT11

Philanthropy - Page AT2 Celebrations - Page AT4 Dining - Page AT8 Calendar - Page AT21

March 2019

INSIDE TAKE A LOOK

Eight of Delray Beach’s most beautiful coastal homes will be open to view during annual tour

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omething new has been added to the Delray Beach Home Tour this year — outside art. Plein-air artists will set up easels around the featured homes. “The artists can paint whatever they wish, the houses or people going to look at them,” said event co-chairwoman Kari Shipley. “It really makes for a nice outing.” This is the 18th year for the home tour, which will spotlight eight gorgeous homes in the Seagate neighborhood on March 7. See TOUR on page AT10

The guest quarters of one of the tour homes on Oleander Lane has the luxury feel of a master bedroom and functionality of an apartment. It has an en-suite bathroom and kitchenette.

Our Boat House, which sells home furnishings with nautical themes, did a design in blue and white for this home on Seasage Drive.

This home on Seasage Drive seems built to show off the owner’s collection of artwork, including Yemassee Lounge, a 1990 painting by Jonathan Green. This year’s tour will also feature artists at work outside the homes. Photos by Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

Proud to be an Annual Sponsor of the Achievement Centers For Children & Families Delray Beach Home Tour W E A LT H M A N A G E M E N T •

Stacey Hallberg, CFP Managing Director 561-278-1300 • sh5@ntrs.com


AT2 H4 Health Philanthropy Notes/Calendar Notes/Calendar

The COASTAL STAR 

Philanthropy Calendar

Pay it Forward

Events are current as of 2/25. Please check with organizers for any changes.

November March2019 2019

Philanthropy Notes

Annual Golf Tournament and Cocktail Party The Little Club, Gulf Stream

MARCH

Saturday - 3/2 - Palm Beach Opera’s 2019 Gala, “An Evening with Matthew Polenzani,” at Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa, 100 S. Ocean Blvd., Manalapan. Save the date for a concert by the internationally renowned tenor accompanied by a cocktail reception, gourmet dinner and champagne dessert buffet, all to raise funds for the beloved art form. 6:30 pm. $1,000. 835-7558 or pbopera. org. Wednesday - 3/6 - Paul’s Place After School’s Annual Golf Tournament and Cocktail Party at The Little Club, 100 Little Club Road, Gulf Stream. Support the program’s scholarship fund, which will be named that evening for long-time benefactor Stretch Gardiner. 3 p.m. $200. 289-2320 or paulsplaceafterschool.com. Thursday - 3/7 - Naoma Donnelley Haggin Boys & Girls Club of Delray Beach’s Be Great Celebration Dinner at The Seagate Country Club, 3600 Hamlet Drive, Delray Beach. Laud the achievements of the club’s Youth of the Year, along with a community member who has made an influential impact on the organization, while raising money to support programming for more than 300 children. 6-9 pm. $225. 683-3287 or bgcpbc. org. Sunday 3/10 - American Disabilities Foundation’s Boating & Beach Bash for People with Disabilities at Spanish River Park, 3001 N. Ocean Blvd., Boca Raton. Support two singers who have competed on national television and will headline the event that celebrates caring and humanity and is the nation’s largest for children and adults with special needs. 10 am-3 pm. Free. 715-2622 or boatingbeachbash.com. 3/10 - Zonta Club of Greater Deerfield Beach’s Cabaret Brunch at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Drive, Boca Raton. See who wins the “Heart, Soul & Service Award” while savoring food, bidding in a silent auction, taking a chance in the raffle and listening to live entertainment. 11 am-2 pm. $80. 392-2223 or zontadeerfieldbeach.org. Thursday - 3/14 - Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County’s Love of Literacy Luncheon at Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Enjoy featured speaker Jacquelyn Mitchard, a best-selling author whose books include The Deep End of the Ocean and Two if by Sea. 11 am. $150. 2799103 or literacypbc.org. Sunday - 3/24 - Women’s Circle’s Circle of Hope Gala at Benvenuto, 1730 N. Federal Highway, Boynton Beach. Benefits at-risk and underserved women in Palm Beach County during a black-tie affair with a “Fly Me to the Moon” theme. 5-9 pm. $125. 244-7627 or womenscircle.org. Wednesday - 3/27 - Rotary Club Downtown Boca Raton’s Honor Your Doctor Luncheon at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Drive, Boca Raton. Commemorate this year’s National Doctors’ Day by recognizing physicians and celebrating healthcare excellence while benefiting the Helen M. Babione Medical Scholarship. 11:15 am-1:30 pm. $125. 299-1429 or rotarydowntownbocaraton.org. Saturday - 3/30 - Parkinson’s Foundation South Palm Beach County Chapter’s “Spring Soiree Gala” at Woodfield Country Club, 3650 Club Place, Boca Raton. Experience the nonprofit’s signature event dedicated to celebrating the vision of the foundation to make life better for those living with the disease. 7-11 pm. $250. 962-1702 or parkinson. org

APRIL

Saturday - 4/6 - Lupus Foundation of America, Florida Chapter’s Butterfly Bash at Delray Dunes Golf and Country Club, 12005 Dunes Road, Boynton Beach. Support the nonprofit’s mission by bidding in the silent auction during an evening of dinner, dancing, an open bar and entertainment. 6:30-11 pm. $200. 279-8606 or butterflybash.net. Tuesday - 4/9 - Place of Hope’s Angel Moms Brunch and Benefit at Royal Palm Yacht & Country Club, 2425 W. Maya Palm Drive, Boca Raton. Support programs at The Leighan and David Rinker Campus, a community serving foster children and

Honoree George Elmore (left) with Karen Donnelly, president of the Boy Scouts of America Gulf Stream Council, and Terrence Hamilton, council CEO. Photo provided March 6: Golfers will gather for a day of play followed by sips and nibbles to support Paul’s Place After School scholarship fund. It will be named that evening for longtime benefactor Stretch Gardiner, who died last year. Time is 3 p.m. Cost is $200. Call 289-2320 or visit paulsplaceafterschool.com. ABOVE: (l-r) Committee members Penny McCool, Marti Ely, Linda Smith and Jean Kopp. Photo provided

Be Great Celebration Dinner

The Seagate Country Club, Delray Beach

Gulf Stream standout lauded for work with scouts

Boy Scouts of America Gulf Stream Council executive board member George Elmore has received the 2018 Freedom Enterprise Medal from Palm Beach Atlantic University. The award is presented annually to leaders who celebrate and protect the nation’s free-enterprise system and stand as role models in character, community service and philanthropy. Elmore has committed most of his adult life to those values, and he reflects the scouting movement. His leadership from behind the scenes has positively affected thousands of youths.

Boca Raton Public Library accepts $55,000 donation

March 7: Guests will laud the achievements of the Naoma Donnelley Haggin Boys & Girls Club of Delray Beach’s Youth of the Year, along with a community member who has made an influential impact on the organization. The event will raise money to support programming for more than 300 children. Time is 6 to 9 p.m. Cost is $225. Call 683-3287 or visit bgcpbc.org. ABOVE: (l-r) Sue Ambrecht, Kirsten Stanley, Patsy Randolph and Juliet Warner. Photo provided

Circle of Hope Gala

Benvenuto, Boynton Beach March 24: The annual Women’s Circle event — a black-tie affair with a ‘Fly Me to the Moon’ theme — raises money for at-risk and underserved women in Palm Beach County. Time is 5 to 9 p.m. Cost is $125. Call 244-7627 or visit womenscircle.org. INSET: (l-r, front) Amy Robbins, Sister Lorraine Ryan, Trisha Saffer, (back) Jane Adams, Marge Blanz, Sister Joan Carusillo, Jo-Ann DiLorenzo, Neil Saffer and Michele Poole. Photo provided those who have aged out of the fostercare system. 10:30 am. $150. 483-0962 or placeofhoperinker.org. Friday - 4/12 - 5th Annual Brain Bowl Luncheon at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Drive, Boca Raton. Hear from celebrity guest Marilu Henner at an event raising money for Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s Community Care, Florida Atlantic University’s Louis and Anne Green Memory & Wellness Center and – for the first time – Parkinson’s Foundation’s South Palm Beach County Chapter. 11 am-1:30 pm. $125 in advance, $150 at the door. 496-4222 or 3470440 or brainbowlevents.com. Sunday - 4/14 - Tri-County Animal Rescue’s 17th Annual Doggie & Kittie Ball

at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Drive, Boca Raton. Save canines and felines by attending one of the season’s best parties, featuring a “Casino Saloon” theme with gaming tables, dinner, entertainment and a live auction. 5:30 pm. $325-$350. 482-8110, Ext. 3 or tricountyhumane.org. Wednesday - 4/17 - Impact 100 Palm Beach County’s Eighth Annual Grand Awards Celebration at Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Watch as the women’s charitable organization funds local nonprofit initiatives in South County through high-impact grants in the areas of arts and culture, education, environment, family and health and wellness. 5:30-8 pm. Free for members. 336-4623 or impact100pbc.com.

The Friends of the Boca Raton Public Library gifted nearly $55,000 for youth programs, summer reading and new technology and databases in 2019. “2019 marks the Friends’ 29th anniversary . . . and we thank our members, donors and bookstore customers for their continued financial support of our organization,” said Cyndi Bloom, the Friends group’s president. “Through their contributions, we are able to generously support the library’s mission.” The Friends group raises money through memberships, grants and book sales.

Semifinalists announced for $100,000 grants

Impact 100 Palm Beach County, a women’s philanthropy group, has announced semifinalists for its 2019 grant cycle. The group’s grant committee reviewed 59 letters of inquiry and selected 25 nonprofits to vie for the $100,000 high-impact grant awards within the five focus areas of arts and culture, education, environment, family and health and wellness. Each semifinalist will receive a site visit, with the committee then selecting two finalists in each area. The 10 finalists will be announced April 1. Finalists will then present to the entire Impact 100 Palm Beach County membership April 17, after which a vote will take place and the grant recipients will be announced.

Chile Rescue Coalition event features leader in field

Elizabeth Smart, a child-abduction advocate and author, was the keynote speaker for the Child Rescue Coalition’s annual Eat, Drink and Be Giving Gala last month at the Delray Beach Marriott. Proceeds from the evening will enhance the coalition’s technological developments, increase law-enforcement training and help rescue children from sexual exploitation and abuse. Smart, founder of the Elizabeth Smart Foundation, was abducted and rescued as a young teen. She chronicled her experiences in her books My Story and Where There’s Hope, and she also worked with the Department of Justice to create a survivors’ guide titled “You’re Not Alone: The Journey from Abduction to Empowerment.” The event celebrated law-enforcement officers’ successful implementation of the coalition’s Child Protection System Technology, which is used in the U.S. and 90 countries and has been instrumental in helping to put an end to child sexual abuse.

Battle for Kids Foundation Days

Boca West Children’s Foundation’s “Battle for the Kids Foundation Days” feature a Golf Challenge on April 1 and Concert of the Children on April 2. The events benefit 24 local children’s charities. The concert features two tribute bands: the Fab Four (a Beatles tribute band) and Remember When Rock Was Young (an Elton John tribute). Tickets are $150. Both take place at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Drive, Boca Raton. Call 488-6980 or visit bocawestfoundation.org or foundation@ bocawestcc.org. Send news and notes to Amy Woods at flamywoods@bellsouth.net.


March 2019

The COASTAL STAR

Pay it Forward AT3

Pay it Forward

Boating & Beach Bash gives VIP treatment to those with disabilities By Amy Woods

Some 6,000 special-needs guests attending the Boating & Beach Bash for People with Disabilities on March 10 will soak up the sounds of two celebrity singers facing challenges of their own. Rion Paige, a finalist on The X Factor, has a rare condition called arthrogryposis multiplex congenita and was born with shortened arms and hands that face backward. Boca Raton resident Kechi Okwuchi, a finalist on America’s Got Talent, suffered severe burns in a plane crash. “We’ve got some amazing acts,” said Jay Van Vechten, the event’s director. “Everyone performing has a disability.” New this year is an open mic for anyone who wants to step up to it. “This is their most anticipated event of the year,” Van Vechten said of the oftenoverlooked population. “When they come to us, no one looks at them, no one points at them. It’s really an amazing thing to witness.” The free event features lunch prepared by chefs from the Royal Palm Yacht & Country Club, 400 feet of tented exhibits offering goods and services for the specialneeds community and a Wellness Zone with doctors and nurses. “A lot of our people live in group homes, and when they go to clinics, they have like three minutes and out the door they go,” Van Vechten said. “This is an opportunity for them to ask questions.” There also will be a Kids Fun Zone with activities and games, rides with therapy ponies, wheelchair yoga lessons and costumed superheroes. “They just go crazy with people dancing with them and interacting,” Van Vechten said of the Spider-Man and Superman impersonators. “It’s wonderful to watch.” Always a highlight of the Bash are trips down the Intracoastal Waterway on private yachts and treks to the beach via mobility mats. “For many of these people, they’ve never been in the ocean before,” Van Vechten said. “This is a chance for everyone to get to the water’s edge.” The event runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Spanish River Park. The first 1,000 to arrive will receive The Way We Work: Getting To Know the Amazing Human Body, a book by David Macaulay. VIP lanyards are issued to all. “There’s nothing like this in the nation,” Van Vechten said. “It would be a $200,000 event if we had to pay for everything.” Ú

Paige

Okwuchi

If You Go What: Boating & Beach Bash for People with Disabilities When: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 10 Where: Spanish River Park, 3001 N. Ocean Blvd., Boca Raton Cost: Free Information: Call 715-2622 or visit boatingbeachbash. com Boating & Beach Bash, which is celebrating its 11th anniversary, has grown in size and scope to serve more than 6,000 special-needs guests. Photo provided


AT4 Celebrations

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Celebrations Book It!

Ribbon-cutting ceremony

Polo Club Boca Raton — Jan. 24

Lynn University, Boca Raton — Feb. 7

The Delray Beach Public Library’s luncheon with author India Hicks drew more than 300 attendees, who enjoyed champagne, a raffle with prizes and a meet-and-greet with Hicks. She is a best-selling author, designer and mother of five who also has an eponymous lifestyle brand. Her late father is famed interior decorator David Hicks, and her mother is Lady Pamela Hicks, a British aristocrat. Event chairwomen were Shannon Boueri and Louise Glover. Business chairmen were Brian Cheslack, James Ballerano Jr. and Gary Betensky. ABOVE: Ballerano with Mary Anne Kristel. Photo provided

Palm Beach Wine Auction

Kravis Center, West Palm Beach — Jan. 24

Lynn University unveiled its largest campus project — the Christine E. Lynn University Center — and donors and friends stepped inside the building for the first time. The center is designed with thoughtful details to elevate the student experience — a key priority in the university’s strategic plan. ‘We’ve been planning for and dreaming about this moment and the significant impact it will have on our campus for many years,’ President Kevin Ross said. ‘This is where we connect people, programs and spaces to create a collaborative culture for student success.’ ABOVE: (l-r) Christine Lynn, Donald Ross, Mary Ann Perper, Helen Ross and Etoile Volin. INSET: (l-r) Isabelle Paul, Mary Anna Fowler and Greg Malfitano. Photos provided

Gala Kickoff Reception

Reception

Celebration was in order on Worth Avenue for Palm Beach Opera’s fundraiser, set for March 2. Guests included benefactors whose support enables the gala to showcase a prominent artist over an elegant dinner. The reception featured a performance by Palm Beach Opera’s young artist Sylvia D’Eramo, accompanied by Ksenia Leletkina. At another fete in anticipation of the gala, the opera honored the Gala Host Committee with a performance by apprentice artists. ‘Thanks to the extraordinary leadership of our Gala Host Committee and the commitment of our gala chairs, Lee Ann and Jeffrey Alderton, we will again provide a unique event for our arts-thriving community,’ Managing Director David Walker said. ABOVE: Palm Beach Opera General Director Daniel Biaggi with Marsha Laufer. Photo provided by Coastal Click Photography

More than 120 members of the Chairman’s Council of the Grace Society of Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, along with benefactors of the new Pet Adoption Center, enjoyed an evening compliments of James Berwind and Kevin Clark. The reception honored members’ support for the league’s life-saving work. Board Chairwoman Lesly Smith welcomed guests and said, ‘We are fortunate to be able to help the animals of this county’ and ‘that is what Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League’s Grace Society members are all about.’ Executive Director and CEO Rich Anderson thanked Berwind and Clark for ‘opening your home and your hearts to the league.’ The reception featured adoptable dogs looking for forever homes. ABOVE: Eileen and Robert Hunt. Photo provided by CAPEHART

Escada, Palm Beach — Dec. 19

The decadent event celebrated 12 years of supporting arts-education programs for students by welcoming 230 guests who tasted vintages from around the globe, bid on luxury travel experiences and dined on a five-course meal. Chairman Ted Mandes said that $4 million has been raised during that span. ‘Thanks to your generous support, students can grow their imaginations and expand their cultural horizons through the performing arts,’ he said. The auction capped two months of related events, including the White Truffle Dinner in December and the Sponsors Vintners’ Dinner in January. ABOVE: Shelley and Craig Menin. Photo provided by CAPEHART

Publisher Jerry Lower publisher@thecoastalstar.com

Advertising Executives Mike Mastropietro Jay Nuszer

Executive Editor Mary Kate Leming editor@thecoastalstar.com

News Operations Tracy Allerton Chad Armstrong Sara Babb Kathleen Bell Brad Betker Jodi MacNeal Steve Plunkett Victoria Preuss Michelle Quigley Clare Shore Scott Simmons Michele Smith Margot Street Tom Warnke Amy Woods

Advertising Manager Chris Bellard sales@thecoastalstar.com Managing Editors Henry Fitzgerald henry@thecoastalstar.com Mary Thurwachter maryt@thecoastalstar.com Founding Partners Carolyn & Price Patton

ArtsPaper Editor Greg Stepanich gstepanich@pbartspaper.com www.thecoastalstar.com

The Coastal Star is a monthly newspaper with two editions serving Hypoluxo Island, South Palm Beach, Manalapan, Ocean Ridge, Briny Breezes, Gulf Stream and coastal Delray Beach; Highland Beach and coastal Boca Raton. ©2008-2019

Send letters, opinions and news tips to news@thecoastalstar.com

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Private home, Palm Beach — Jan. 15


March 2019

The COASTAL STAR 

Celebrations AT5

Celebrations Afternoon of food and fun

Café Sapori, West Palm Beach — Jan. 20 Il Circolo, The Italian Cultural Society, celebrated the cuisine of Milano and all things old country during the gathering. Trio Pulcinella, an entertainment group, circled the tables and sang familiar folk songs. More than 110 guests attended. RIGHT: (l-r) Sally Valenti, chef Fabrizio Giorgi, owner Francesco Blanco and Marco Capoccia. Photo provided by Joan Nova

Dinner dance

Kravis Center, West Palm Beach — Dec. 10

Monthly meeting

Arturo’s Ristorante, Boca Raton — Feb. 4

UNICO National President Lee Norelli was the special guest at the Highland Beach chapter’s monthly meeting. Norelli thanked the chapter for all the work it does in Palm Beach County and expressed gratitude for the help it has given UNICO National. ABOVE: (l-r) Milton Armes, the chapter’s sergeant at arms; Frank Todaro, second vice president; Madeline LoRe, chapter president; Norelli; Ralph Gengo, chapter first vice president; and Cleve Guy, treasurer/recording secretary. Photo provided

Members of the Dress Circle — those who donate $1,000 or more annually to the Kravis Center — were honored in front of 400-plus supporters gathered for a special presentation on the Kravis 2020: The Future Is Now campaign. ‘We exceeded last season’s annual fundraising goal of $6 million in great part due to the generosity of our Dress Circle members,’ said Judith Mitchell, the performing arts hall’s CEO. ‘It is heartwarming for me to have the opportunity this evening to say thank you for your continued support.’ ABOVE: Aggie and Jeff Stoops later announced a leadership gift of $1 million. ‘As a longtime patron, supporter and a board member since 2013, we are dedicated to the growth of the Kravis Center,’ Jeff Stoops said. ‘This refresh and expansion of the center will improve the experiences of all visitors and will allow upcoming generations to enjoy the performing arts and arts education in Palm Beach County for years to come.’ Photo provided by CAPEHART

Call to Heart Ball

Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa, Manalapan — Jan. 26

Laugh with the Library

Delray Beach Marriott — Feb. 1

Good humor and laughter were in abundance at the 13th-annual fundraiser, chaired by Chiara Clark and Jennifer Schmuckler. The event, with 400 in attendance, is a perennial favorite for its casual and creative night of cocktails, comedy and dinner-by-the-bite. Cory Kahaney, a well-known stand-up who has appeared on numerous television shows, headlined. More than $140,000 was raised. ABOVE: (l-r) Laugh with the Library committee members Ali Levin, Nynke Henderson, Vanessa Levy, Clark, Ari Kobren, Therese Snyder, Tammy Konrad and Emily Wilson. Photo provided

Annual Gala Dinner & Dance

Royal Palm Yacht Club, Boca Raton — Feb. 9 More than 300 guests celebrated a Florida-inspired evening and showed their support at the Boca Raton Museum of Art affair. Inspired by the museum exhibition Imagining Florida: History and Myth in the Sunshine State, the refined elegance of the venue was accentuated by lush, tropical décor, regional cuisine and live entertainment. By the end of the evening, $460,000plus was raised. ‘The momentum continues to build for the museum to fulfill its destiny as top-of-mind and the cultural centerpiece for Boca Raton,’ said Irvin Lippman, its executive director. RIGHT: (l-r) Co-chairs Paola and Markus Jakobson, Honorary Chair Asa Loof and Cochair Trish Savides. Photo provided

Caridad Center’s annual gala was grand in celebration and generous in display with more than 400 guests raising about $500,000 to fund medical care for the underserved. A recordbreaking event, it more than doubled net proceeds from two years ago. ‘The compassion and generosity of our guests was overwhelming,’ said Connie Berry, who co-founded the center 30 years ago. CEO Laura Kallus agreed, saying, ‘Without you, all of this would not be possible.’ ABOVE: (l-r) Christine and Bob Stiller accept an honor from event chair Sanjiv Sharma. Photo provided by Mitchell Zachs

Hole in one

St. Andrews Club — Jan. 25

Suzanne Pollard, 96, celebrated the first hole in one of her life. She used a nine-iron on the 70-yard seventh hole at the Delray Beach club’s course.


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March 2019

The COASTAL STAR

AT7

7 BEDS, 7.1 BATHS | APPROX. 10,342SF | $4,995,000


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The COASTAL STAR

March 2019

Restaurants serve up favorite dishes during Savor the Avenue

or a decade, Delray Beach has been blocking off Atlantic Avenue in the tastiest of detours. Savor the Avenue, the five-block-long dinner party staged in the center of the street, returns for an 11th year on March 25, with downtown restaurants showcasing their food, wine and elaborate table displays. Sponsored by the Delray Beach Downtown Development Authority and Boca magazine, the event has garnered national attention and spawned several copycats. It’s all flattery for the city, said Laura Simon, executive director of the DDA. “We are thrilled once again to bring the downtown to life and our community together with this experiential event in a very social and very Delray Beach way. The restaurants are excited and have created themes for their table décor from fun to elegant as they compete for Best in Show,” she said. Fourteen restaurants were scheduled to participate, some that have been with the event since the start. Among those are Cabana El Rey, The Office, Caffe Luna Rosa, City Oyster & Sushi Bar, and Vic & Angelo’s. Others set to participate: 50 Ocean, Che, Death or Glory, Lemongrass, Rack’s Fish House and Gary Rack’s Farmhouse

Savor the Avenue has been celebrating Delray Beach restaurants for more than a decade. Photo provided by Delray Beach DDA Kitchen, L’Acqua, Rocco’s Tacos and Salt 7. Nearly all reservations, made directly with each restaurant, were sold out by mid-February, according to the DDA website. Atlantic Avenue will be closed, and long tables for the restaurants will line the middle of the street from Swinton

Avenue to Fifth Avenue, with the railroad tracks the main gap. Each restaurant is responsible for its own table decor, food and paired wines, and service staff. A contest for best table decor brings out elaborate, creative themes. Guests each leave with a gift bag. All restaurants prepare a four-course menu, though

some chefs are known to slide in some extras during the evening. Chef Ernie DeBlasi of Caffe Luna Rosa says it’s a tricky dinner to cater — especially preparing food in a tent as he does. Caffe Luna Rosa, on State Road A1A, is too far away for hot food to travel for 110 diners. “A lot goes into it — more than you would think,” he said. “It’s enough of a feat if you’re cooking four courses for 110 people at once in your own restaurant during service. Doing it in a tent with unfamiliar equipment under unpredictable conditions, it’s definitely more difficult. Any number of things can go wrong, and you just have to be ready.” The restaurants along Atlantic have it easier. “If you’re fortunate enough to have a restaurant that’s on the street with your table nearby, it’s easier,” though still problematic if you’re open for service to other diners, DeBlasi said. From writing the menu, to planning equipment and prep lists, and pulling the staff to work the street dinner (“I get the guy with the pickup truck who can carry our coolers,” he said), details must be checked off far in advance. “You have to get there early and check all your equipment. You don’t want to show up and

find out your pilot light isn’t working,” he said. “Been there, done that.” The tent kitchen must be up to code, so city and fire code compliance officers come to inspect for fire extinguishers and three compartment handand dish-washing sinks. The event attracts hundreds more than it did 11 years ago. “We had 30 people the first year, and this year we’re up to 110,” DeBlasi said. “We sell out early. I’d say 50 percent of the people have been here every year, and the other 50 percent just happen in.” DeBlasi does all this while still running dinner service at the restaurant; a trusted staff helps. “We’re ready to go home at the end,” he said. “It’s a long day.” The dinner starts with walkaround cocktails provided by the restaurants at 5:30 p.m., followed by dinner. A list of the menus and information about the event are at DowntownDelrayBeach.com/ SavortheAvenue. In Boca Raton, they’re preparing for Boca Bacchanal, hailing all things wine and food. It’s April 4-6, with events at the Boca Raton Resort and Club. Team members announced in February the select pairings

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The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

for the vintner dinners, the exclusive hallmarks of the event. They’re held in private homes in Boca. The dinners are designed and executed by noted chefs from around the country. Their four-course menus are paired with a winery whose owner or representative is at the dinner. This year, Barbara and Bobby Campbell have Craggy Range Vineyards of New Zealand, and chefs Lior Lev Sercarz of La Boîte, New York, and Justin Smillie of Upland in New York and Miami. Joyce and Thom DeVita and Joni and Al Goldberg will host representatives of ZD Wines of Napa, with chef Matt Gennuso of Chez Pascal in Providence, Rhode Island. Maria and Todd Roberti host vintners from Darioush, Napa, along with chefs Brian and Shanna O’Hea of Academe at the Kennebunk Inn in Maine. Holly and David Meehan host representatives of Silver Oak/Twomey Cellars of Napa, with chef Russ Aaron Simon of GG’s Waterfront in Hollywood, Florida. Diane and Robert Bok host vintners from Maison Louis Jadot’s Resonance of France and Oregon. Chef Adam Jakins of Hall’s Chophouse in Charleston, South Carolina, will cook. These intimate dinners are the big-ticket event at the festival, at $350 per person with limited seating in each home. Dinners are at 7 p.m. April 5. Other events include the new Bubbles & Burgers, April 4 at the Boca Beach Club at the resort. Guests can mingle with others and meet the chefs of the bacchanal. Specialty burgers and Champagne are on the menu. Tickets are $75 per person. The finale of the weekend is the Grand Tasting, April 6 at the resort. Tickets are $125 per person, with an international representation of wines and winemakers on hand to talk about them. Dozens of chefs from area restaurants will

prepare small bites off their menus in a walk-around setting, and more than 100 lots will be offered for bid in a silent auction. For more information and for tickets to all events, visit bocabacchanal.com. South Florida is getting on the “environment-friendly” train, with cities voting to ban plastic-foam dinnerware and take-out containers, plastic bags and straws. Delray Beach voted in the plastic straw ban in February. Now Boca Raton wants to recognize restaurants and other businesses it deems eco-friendly by giving out star ratings for their efforts. The symbol for the ratings is a starfish. Up to three stars can be awarded to each business, given in the form of a certificate to be posted. The rating will depend on the level of sustainability and eco-friendly practices, such as plant-based menu items. The program is aimed at the reduction of single-use plastics often found on beaches, in waterways and public parks where fish, turtles and birds mistake it for food. With the largest coastline of all cities in the county, Boca Raton has much at stake. It’s an initiative brought to the city by Lindsey Nieratka, the new sustainability manager. She hopes the recognition for some restaurants will lead others to participate in the program. It’s part of a larger Coastal Connection initiative, a more ambitious program teaching and encouraging environmentfriendly practices by businesses as well as restaurants. Restaurants can earn one starfish if they offer plastic straws only by request, use biodegradable takeout containers and offer sustainable menu items such as vegetarian dishes. Two starfish can be achieved if the restaurant adheres to the one-starfish rules and works to conserve water and energy and

recycle within the restaurant. The top rating, three starfish, goes to the restaurants that practice all the above, plus use techniques that reduce light pollution and cut food waste in the kitchen. These top restaurants also will use sustainable seafood (if they serve seafood), and those fish and shellfish on the Seafood Watch list compiled by the Monterey Bay Aquarium. The Seafood Watch program has been around for decades and uses research on sustainability and endangerment of fishes from the aquarium. In brief: A third Beehive Kitchen, a fast-casual bowl restaurant, officially opens this month in Boca Raton at 1914 NE Fifth Ave. The Florida-based restaurant is open for lunch and dinner, serving gluten-free, antibiotic-free, hormone-free menu choices, with an emphasis on vegetables. It’s a cafeteriastyle counter service eatery. Call 341-0496 for information. In a move that has Delray’s food community talking, Bruce Feingold stepped away from the stoves at DaDa after 18 years as chef. He’s moving on to pursue other ventures and spend time with family. The Delray Beach Wine & Seafood Festival returns to downtown Delray Beach and Old School Square on March 9 and 10. Event-goers can sign up for seminars from top chefs or vintners to learn how to pair wine and seafood. The event will feature live music as well as arts and crafts for sale. Admission is free. For the event schedule or to purchase tickets to food and wine pairings, visit WineandSeafoodFest.com. Jan Norris is a food writer who can be reached at nativefla@ gmail.com. Thom Smith is on leave.

The Plate

Mission BBQ does smoked turkey right The Plate: Turkey sandwich The Place: Mission BBQ, 1100 Congress Ave., No. 130, Boynton Beach; 335-1514 or mission-bbq.com. The Price: $6.99 The Skinny: I’m on a quest for the best smoked turkey. Don’t ask why, but I’ve never been a rib man, and brisket does not interest me. To me, there’s nothing more satisfying than finding delicately smoked, tender, juicy turkey sliced thick and served on a fresh roll. Mission BBQ does it beautifully. I came to like Mission’s food when I visited the small chain’s Fort Myers store — the Boynton restaurant is the company’s only location in Palm Beach County. Sides are nice, if not noteworthy — fries are always crisp and clean tasting, and the mac and

Dining AT9

cheese offers oodles of gooey goodness. The collards I tried last visit were earthy and hearty on a rainy night. There’s fine cuisine and there’s good eating. I’ll take good eating any time.

— Scott Simmons

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AT10 Delray Beach Home Tour

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

TOUR

Continued from page AT1 Guests will have a rare glimpse into a variety of designs and architectural styles, from traditional Intracoastal estates to historic Florida cottages to modern tropical chic. One of the homes was built in 1926 and moved to its current location by barge. All the houses are within a walkable, four-block area, but participants may take a trolley from First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach on Gleason Street to the homes. Included in the ticket price are a tranquil catered luncheon on a tented tennis court next to a home on the Intracoastal Waterway, and a chance to bid on auction items and raffles. Last year’s tour drew about 800 visitors and raised more than $130,000 for the Achievement Centers for Children & Families, a Delray Beach-based organization dedicated to serving low-income children and families.  The tour started 18 years ago when Achievement Centers board members Anne Bright and Barbara Murphy came up with the idea to raise money for the nonprofit organization. Since then, the event has raised approximately $1.25 million. Shipley, a board member and longtime supporter of the centers, says this year marks the 50th anniversary of the Achievement Centers for Children & Families. She has been involved with the tours for 17 years and her house was on the tour twice — but not this year. Her co-chairwoman is Noreen Payne. “The home tour has not only become a signature Achievement Centers event, but one the community looks forward to,” Shipley said.

LEFT: The modest-sized dining room area of this home on Bucida Road reflects the scale of the original structure when the home was moved by barge in 1926 to its current location. ABOVE: A 3,500-square-foot expansion in 1978 created this open entertainment area with a vaulted ceiling and fireplace.

18th annual Delray Beach Home Tour

When: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. March 7 Where: Seagate neighborhood Tickets: $125 per person, includes a tour through residences, complimentary parking and trolley service between homes. Info: For tickets, visit DelrayHomeTour. com or call 266-0003. Benefits: Proceeds go to Achievement Centers for Children & Families, AchievementCentersFL.org.

— Mary Thurwachter

A hammock hangs from a pair of palm trees framing a stunning view of the Intracoastal Waterway at this Oleander Lane home. Pink chairs surround a small fire pit.

An open wood and glass staircase leads from the reception area to the second floor of this modern two-story home on Seagate Drive.

This two-story home on Seagate Drive is another example of contemporary design influence in the beach neighborhood. Photos by Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star


The COASTAL STAR

March 2019

ArtsPaper AT11

Must See

palmbeachartspaper.com

Dance

Taylor-made moves

Film

Miami Beach documentary ‘The Last Resort’ gets local play. Page AT14

Theater

Renowned choreographer died last year, but his legacy lives on through his company

Members of the Paul Taylor Dance Company in Dust, which they will perform March 22 and 23 at the Duncan Theatre in Lake Worth as part of a memorial celebration for Taylor, who died last year. Fourth from left in the photo above is Eran Bugge, a Central Florida native. Dust “has a lot of really unique movement to it,” Bugge says. “it’s really in its own little world.” Photo by Paul B. Goode

Was she villain or victim? ‘Blonde Poison’ says both. Page AT15

By Tara Mitton Catao ArtsPaper Dance Writer When the Paul Taylor Dance Company returns to South Florida this month, it will do so for the first time without its founder, a legend of American dance. Paul Taylor, widely considered one of the greatest of all American choreographers, died in August at age 88 of kidney failure. He was a trailblazer, an entertainer and a true master of his craft. The dances he created over a 50-year span were filled with invention, humor and social criticism. Always using a distinctive choice in music, Taylor developed a unique style using

Art

‘Spitfire Grill’ a crowdpleaser at Dramaworks. Page AT20

the Duncan Theatre’s Modern Dance series March 22 and 23, will present three of Taylor’s dances, including his 147th and final work, Concertiana, set to a score by the contemporary American composer and teacher Eric Ewazen. In the days before the shows, there will be other events celebrating Taylor’s life, including a screening March 20 of Dancemaker, a 1998 documentary about Taylor. The screening will be hosted by company rehearsal director Andy LeBeau, who will join a post-screening Q&A hosted by Mark Alexander, director of theaters for Palm Beach State College. See TAYLOR on AT12

Books

Palm Beach Book Festival begins new chapter at FAU

Whimsical, creative jewelry is on display at Flagler Museum. Page AT17

Reviews

natural, everyday movement that made the music come alive onstage. “If there is one thing that I truly, truly, truly love about the Paul Taylor Dance Company, it is how tight-knit we are as a group and how much we trust each other,” said Michael Novak, who took over as artistic director after Taylor’s death. “There really is a pact. These are people who I trust implicitly, and that kind of honesty and openness has been a great asset to this transition — whoever it would have been. I think that the type of culture that Paul Taylor built in his company helped facilitate this process.” The company, which will perform on

By Jan Engoren Contributing Writer Everything good that’s ever happened to Mitch Albom happened in Detroit. Or so the best-selling author of books like Tuesdays with Morrie says. He’s likely to talk about that this month at Florida Atlantic University, when he joins the lineup for the fifth annual Palm Beach Book Festival. The one-day festival, set for March 16 at FAU’s University Theatre, will feature best-selling writers such as Susan Orlean (The Orchid Thief) and Tayari Jones (An American Marriage), as well as Palm Beach resident James Patterson, whose recent thriller, The President Is Missing, was written with former President Bill Clinton. The festival was founded in 2015 by former newspaper reporter and West Palm

Authors appearing at the Palm Beach Book Festival include Susan Orlean, James Patterson, Mitch Albom and Tayari Jones. Photo provided Beach author Lois Cahall. It was held at various venues, including the Norton Museum of Art and Palm Beach County

Convention Center in West Palm Beach, before finding a more permanent home at FAU starting this year. “We promote cultural awareness of the published author by bringing in New York Times-best-selling, and householdname writers,” Cahall said in a prepared statement. “We hope to sustain literacy with our students, educators, and librarians.” The first panel will start at 10 a.m. and will include Jones and Idra Novey (Ways to Disappear). Their conversation will be moderated by Leigh Haber, books editor for Oprah Magazine. Orlean, who has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1992, will be featured in the second panel at 11 a.m., moderated by Christopher Bonanos, city editor for New York magazine. The third panel is at 12:15 p.m. and See BOOK FEST on AT13

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AT12 ArtsPaper/Dance

The COASTAL STAR

TAYLOR

Continued from page 11 The following night, March 21, the theater will host the screening of another documentary about Taylor, Creative Domain (2013). Novak will host the screening and take part in a Q&A with Alexander. Finally, on March 23, one of the company’s Novak principal dancers will conduct a master class for intermediate and advanced dancers. When choreographing, Taylor would often start with one minute of music that he wanted to get through on that

Paul Taylor started his eponymous company in 1954; he died in August. Photo by Maxine Hicks day, which the dancers had received a copy of the day before, Novak said. “He would typically start with the pattern work and the

transitions on and off the stage and from there, Paul would add the actual dance steps. He would often demonstrate different dance steps, and after watching the dancers doing them, he would say ‘I like that’ and ‘I don’t like that,’ or ‘Why don’t you skip here?’ or ‘Jump or chassé there,’” he said. “Later, he added gestures or arm movements but he always had a map planned out of what he wanted and where he wanted it to happen. … The dancers understood and called them their landmarks.” Novak added that Taylor always worked chronologically, starting at the beginning of a score and working straight through to the end, though he was known to vary his rehearsal structure in response to his

Fine Art Shows in Delray Beach March 9–10

March 2–3 & April 6–7

In Veteran’s Park, Atlantic Avenue west of the Intracoastal

At Old School Square grounds at Atlantic Avenue and N.E. 1 Ave. Delray Beach

Visit www.DelrayArtLeague.com for a complete show schedule Delray Art League is a 5013c organization

February 8–March 29 Winter Interlude Exhibit Delray Beach City Hall, 100 NW 1 Ave. Open 9am-5pm Monday-Friday

March 2019

creative impulses. Sometimes he would start a day of new choreography with individuals in solos or duets; other times, he would start with an ensemble section. In his last work, Taylor featured the younger dancers in the troupe by creating a suite of vignettes that included solos, duets and trios among a large ensemble. He used William Ivey Long, a longtime collaborator, for the costume design. Novak will appear in Concertiana along with several other senior company members. “In retrospect, I feel happy that (‘Concertiana’) was the last one,” said company member Eran Bugge, who grew up in Oviedo and studied at what is now the Orlando Ballet School. “The music is so spectacular. It’s just so luscious and beautiful. ... It’s just soaring music and some of my favorite Taylor dances are set to soaring music.” Other works scheduled for the Duncan Theatre’s program are Dust (1977) and Esplanade (1975), one of his most enduringly popular works. Dust was the first Taylor dance Bugge learned “and it has a special place in my heart,” she said. One of Taylor’s darkest works, it was inspired by George Wilson, a deaf-mute who was Taylor’s companion. “Paul was inspired by George and his community and the joy in that community. He didn’t see him as disabled. … It is one of the reasons that Paul was a master of gesture and was very demanding about specificity of gesture. … Everyone in the dance has a moment of physical affliction.” Taylor often increased the physical challenges in his dances, said Bugge, adding that he “enjoyed seeing struggle.” “He would make movement that was almost too difficult to accomplish. It was interesting to watch that, over the years, as dancers got stronger and more technical, he would make it harder. He would change it … because he was interested in seeing the struggle, not in seeing you accomplish it.” Dust, set to the Concert Champêtre of French composer Francis Poulenc, “has a lot of really unique movement to it. It’s really in its own little world — its own little language that I feel he never re-created in another dance.” The costumes — “nude unitards with colorful, handpainted bursts of color that juxtapose malady with beauty,” she said — are as distinctive as the set, which consists of a “giant braided rope that hangs a little offcenter. It’s an obstacle we have to dance around all the time. We never touch it.” The other dance, Esplanade, is choreographed to two violin concertos by J.S. Bach and is generally accepted as one of Taylor’s greatest works and a classic of modern dance. “‘Esplanade’ is just a joy,” Bugge said. “I love dancing it and people love seeing it over and over again. … It doesn’t

If You Go

The Paul Taylor Dance Company will perform Friday, March 22, and Saturday, March 23 at the Duncan Theatre, on the campus of Palm Beach State College in Lake Worth. Both shows are at 8 p.m. Other events: Screening of Dancemaker, 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 20; with Andy LeBeau and Mark Alexander; free admission. Screening of Creative Domain, 7 p.m. Thursday, March 21; with Michael Novak and Mark Alexander; free admission. Open master class for intermediate and advanced dancers, 11 a.m. Saturday, March 23. For tickets and further information, call 868-3309 or visit duncantheatre. com.

have a narrative but it has so many human moments to it that people can make such an emotional connection to it. “Paul said that there isn’t a single dance step in it,” she said. “It is all pedestrian movement, but obviously, it is elevated to a point it seems that no pedestrian could do it.” In 2015, Taylor launched a new challenge for the dancers in his company. He revamped his annual season at New York’s Lincoln Center under the heading of “Paul Taylor American Modern Dance,” presenting not just selections from his vast repertory but also the works of past iconic modern choreographers such as Martha Graham and Ruth St. Denis, together with the work of today’s young choreographers. It was after last year’s season that Taylor called Novak, a nine-year veteran of the company, to come in for a meeting. “Paul was a very quiet man and as an artistic director, he was very selective with his words,” Novak said. “I would almost say that no news was good news with Mr. Taylor. So, when I received a phone call that he wanted to have me over, I had no idea what it was in regards to. I did not expect him to name me his artistic directordesignate at all. No one knew that he was looking. … “And also, he didn’t phrase this as a question, it was a directive — that he had been giving this a lot of thought — and he had decided that I was the one to take over the company once he was gone,” Novak said. “It came completely out of the blue. It took my breath away.” One other thing that Taylor was adamant about: That Novak continue dancing even while running the company. “I intend to fulfill that wish as long as I can, as I am a dancer at heart,” he said.


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

ArtsPaper/Books AT13

BOOK FEST

Continued from page 11

Q: What will you talk about at the Palm Beach Book Festival? A: I’ll tell some funny stories and talk about my career. I’m living proof of John Lennon’s adage, “Life is what happens to you when you’re busy making other plans.” I started my career as a musician with no expectations of ever becoming an author, let alone a successful author and being invited to Palm Beach to talk about my work. I was busy making other plans and none of them involved winding up in Palm Beach talking about books. The theme of The Five People You Meet in Heaven is that our lives are connected in ways we don’t yet understand. When you get to heaven, all that is explained to you and that’s what makes it heaven. You will see the connections and understand how you were living the life you were supposed to live, even if you didn’t understand it at the time. Q: Where do you get your inspiration? A: I’ve never had writer’s

Best-selling author Mitch Albom, who will take part in a panel discussion during the March 16 festival, is a former reporter for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. Photo provided block. Quite the contrary: I hope God grants me enough time to write all the books I have in my head. I have so many more I want to do. Q: Your 2009 book, Have a Little Faith, explores the idea of losing belief and finding it again. How does your faith manifest itself in your life? A: Faith guides a lot of my charitable acts and decisions and how I deal with loss. If you don’t have faith, you will have a difficult time finding comfort. Q: You have said 60 percent of your life is devoted to your charitable endeavors. What does your charitable work mean to you? A: It’s only fitting that my current ambitions are spent helping others a majority of the time. It’s perfectly fine; I made work a priority for many years. It’s nothing special, many people do it, and this is what I choose to do with my life now. I’m perfectly happy. (Albom runs the Have Faith Haiti Mission and Orphanage, which houses 47 orphans. Four of these children, including one named Chika Jeune, came to Detroit for medical treatment and two others are attending college.) Q: What do you know now that you wish you knew 20 years ago? A: I really know firsthand how precious children are and how much I revel in them and my relationships with them. Twenty years ago when I got married, it wasn’t high on my list. We never had our own biological kids. In life’s funny way, now I’m raising 47 kids and loving every minute of it. It’s such a big part of my life. Q: Does luck play a role in your success? A: I prefer to talk about destiny. I believe there is a reason for circumstances to happen the way they did. Initially, I wasn’t so happy about becoming a writer, because I had to give up my musical life, which had been my first love. I always intended to be a musician, but when I finally got there it didn’t happen. I wasn’t succeeding. That’s when I volunteered for the local

If You Go Tickets: $85, includes parking. Lunch will be for sale at the event. Info: For tickets, go to fauevents.com or call 2976124. For more information, see palmbeachbookfestival.com or call 297-2595. newspaper just for something to do. It was nice to be welcomed. They’d call me: “Are you coming in today?” It wasn’t even about the writing. It was more about belonging. That’s how I found my career in writing. Looking back, I see that was the best thing to happen to me. So, I don’t see it so much as luck, but a path that I didn’t understand at the time; but in retrospect, I see it was meant to be. Later, I was working for the Sun-Sentinel and they promoted me from feature writer to columnist. I tried to negotiate a three-year contract and they refused. One month later, I was offered a job at the Detroit Free Press and took it. That’s where I met my wife, got married, launched my career and established my charities. Everything good happened to me in Detroit. That’s destiny. Q: We have to ask: When you get to heaven, who would you most like to see? A: You’re making a big assumption (that I’ll get to heaven). But, seriously, I would like to see Morrie (Schwartz, his sociology professor at Brandeis University and the subject of Tuesdays with Morrie) again. I would ask him what he thinks of everything that has transpired. I have always been curious as to what he would make of this. Of course, I’d hope to see my parents, and see Chika come running towards me. (Chika died of a brain tumor in 2017.) That would mean the world to me. And, like the premise of the two books, which shows how we’re all connected, I’d like to meet some people I didn’t know and see if I had an influence on them and vice versa. I’d like to have made a positive effect to a stranger.

© Nigel Young / Foster + Partners

features Patterson. The moderator will be Rob Scheer, founder of Comfort Cases, which advocates for youth in foster care. Up at 2 p.m. is “Big Bens! Authors in Conversation,” with Ben Fountain, author of Brief Encounters with Che Guevara, and Ben Bradlee Jr., whose book is called The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams. The final panel of the day starts at 3:20 p.m. and features Albom, author of six consecutive No. 1 New York Times bestsellers, including Tuesdays with Morrie. He recently completed his latest work, The Next Person You Meet in Heaven, the sequel to his best-selling 2003 book, The Five People You Meet in Heaven. Albom began his career as a pianist, performing in Europe and America. He became a journalist by accident, volunteering his skills at the Queens Tribune, a weekly paper in New York City. He went on to be an awardwinning sports journalist at the Detroit Free Press and the host of a daily radio show. He has also penned award-winning TV films, stage plays, screenplays, a nationally syndicated newspaper column and a musical. Albom’s books have collectively sold more than 39 million copies in 42 languages. In addition to his literary endeavors, Albom founded and oversees a number of charities, including S.A.Y. Detroit, a consortium of nine charitable operations; created a nonprofit dessert shop and food product line to fund programs for Detroit’s neediest citizens; and operates an orphanage for 47 kids in Haiti. Here are edited excerpts of a conversation Palm Beach ArtsPaper had with Albom:

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AT14 ArtsPaper/Film

Film

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

‘The Last Resort’ has specific focus but universal message

By Hap Erstein ArtsPaper Film Writer     Fresh from its area premiere at the Palm Beach Jewish Film Festival, the documentary The Last Resort has arrived in commercial theaters. Co-directors Dennis Scholl and Kareem Tabsch both grew up in Miami and were longtime friends and filmmakers, but had never worked on a project together. As Scholl recalled, “I asked him what he wanted to make, he told me and I said, ‘That’s what I want to make.’ It was this film.” “Yeah, it couldn’t be better if we had scripted it,” added Tabsch. “It was over dinner that we realized we both had landed on the same thing, Clearly, that meant that we should do it and we should do it together.” The Last Resort tells of the rise, decline and rise again of Miami Beach through the photos of Andy Sweet and Gary Monroe, two enthusiastic selftaught artists who befriended the porch-sitting denizens of what would later be known as South Beach, seniors who could easily be their grandparents.  Like many a documentary, the film they eventually made was not the one they set out to make. “You start down one path, and the process of research and discovery opens up so many

other ones,” explained Scholl. “We realized that while this is a film about Gary and Andy, it also had to be a film about the community that they were photographing. And through that we had to tell the story of a changing city.” Scholl says that juggling all the story lines while keeping a balance proved challenging. “You have to know and be flexible enough to pivot,” he said. “You want to go into the film thinking that you know what the story is, otherwise you’re not prepared. But you have to be receptive to what comes out. The film tells you what it wants to be; you don’t tell it.” From the 1970s, as South Beach real estate was getting expensive and fixed-income retirees were being priced out of their homes, as the ethnic makeup of the neighborhood evolved and crime was on the rise, Miami Beach changed dramatically. “It’s funny, even to this day when you talk to people, they say, ‘Miami Beach? Isn’t that where the old people are?’” Tabsch said. “And it’s hard to tell them, ‘No, that hasn’t existed in almost 40 years.’ I’m 39, so anyone who’s even 10 years younger than me would have no recollection of old Miami Beach. Because they’re all gone. “But you ask people at

screenings and everyone seems to have a connection, one way or another. If it’s not grandma and grandpa, it’s their Uncle Joe.” The Last Resort first met an audience in January 2018, at the Miami Jewish Film Festival, where it won the best documentary award. Since then, it has played at festivals across the country, including DOC NYC, the largest documentary festival in America, and many more Jewish festivals. In post-screening discussions wherever they went, the filmmakers kept hearing about the audiences’ connections to Miami Beach. “That’s the ubiquitous nature of the ’70s in South Beach,” Tabsch said. Although The Last Resort focuses on a specific place and time, Scholl and Tabsch say that the film has universality. “Everybody kind of understands what aging is, and certainly understands the power of community,” noted Scholl. “And we also understand how cities change and how the demographics of cities change. “And there’s really a sense of hope in the film. The idea that you’ve lived a life, you’ve worked hard and you’re able to kind of enjoy the end of your life in camaraderie with your friends and contemporaries. I think that’s something that everybody can relate to. It’s the American dream, absolutely.”

Retirees enjoy the 1970s Miami Beach lifestyle in The Last Resort. Kino Lorber photo

Review

Film is an engrossing look at a bygone Miami Beach ArtsPaper Staff In their award-winning debut The Last Resort, South Florida filmmakers Kareem Tabsch and Dennis Scholl focus on the community that settled in Miami Beach’s 200plus hotels in the halcyon 1970s: Jewish retirees, many of them Holocaust survivors, enjoying second lives in an octogenarian’s nirvana. Bronzed bodies in floral dresses and enormous glasses basked in the sun, exercised on the beach, danced at the clubs and formed communities of faith; one interviewee likens Miami Beach to a shtetl, another to a retirement village. We know this in part because of some grainy video shot during the period; the filmmakers did their diligent homework, amassing and curating vintage clips. But mostly we know it from still images by Andy Sweet and Gary Monroe, the 20-something photographers who captured unsentimental but empathetic scenes of this community in a decadespanning project. As much as The Last Resort is about elderly Jews’ short-lived exodus in a South Florida paradise, it’s equally fascinated with the artists who documented it, especially Sweet, a childhood shutterbug turned keen-eyed photographer from a prominent local family. The novelty of this curly-haired, possibly queer Boomer taking interest in lounging émigrés from the Greatest Generation is rich, but it never overpowers the work, which the filmmakers showcase, with justifiable reverence, as both art and historical record. The Last Resort is a lean but ambitious documentary, exploring in its 70 minutes a changing city, its unique denizens and the artists who encapsulated both.

If You Go The Last Resort, directed by Kareem Tabsch and Dennis Scholl. 70 minutes. NR Theaters: Movies of Lake Worth, Movies of Delray and Living Room Theaters in Boca Raton Tabsch and Scholl keep several narrative plates spinning simultaneously, with help from a handful of smart and gregarious interviewees, from celebrated filmmaker and local native Kelly Reichardt to literary entrepreneur Mitch Kaplan to Andy Sweet’s relatives to Gary Monroe. In one scene, Edna Buchanan offers a trenchant assessment of the Mariel boatlift’s impact on the city: “Castro really flushed his toilets on Miami Beach.” Though not without its humor, The Last Resort is suffused with loss and death — of a sense of a place, of a community, of an artist. As the chic hotels crumble into shabby dereliction, the once-vivacious seniors succumb to their own inevitable die-off. Jewish historian Susan Gladstone offers a heartbreaking account of the elderly residents who outlived their peers in the early 1980s, holing away in a crime-ridden city, loneliness and neglect thick in the humid air. As for Andy Sweet, his journey would meet its own tragic end, further proof that most compelling stories of Miami Beach are true-crime stories. But The Last Resort is imbued with the spirit of a phoenix, and reincarnation awaits for both the island paradise and the photographer’s work. I could have watched another hour of this engrossing portrait, with its multiplicity of stories, its fortunes rising and falling.


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Theater

ArtsPaper/Theater AT15

One-woman show explores ambiguities of the Holocaust

By Hap Erstein ArtsPaper Theater Writer     In searching for plays for Primal Forces’ return to Boca Raton this season, artistic director Keith Garsson wanted to find a Holocaust-themed work, but not the usual downbeat drama in shades of black and white. He has found it in Blonde Poison by Gail Louw, based on the true story of Stella Kubler, who looks back on her younger self in Nazi Germany when she both saved many Jews and condemned others to death. The play, which runs through March 10 at the Sol Theatre in Boca Raton, asks the audience to decide whether Kubler is a villain or a victim. Garsson, who directs this production, expects Blonde Poison to whipsaw audience sympathies. “I hope that there’s murmuring and people turning their heads and saying to each other, ‘Boy, I don’t know what to think.’ Hopefully people will walk out going, ‘I don’t know what I would have done in her place.’ I want that question to be asked. “There is a Machiavellian element to what this character does,” Garsson says. “I think most nights people are going

If You Go Blonde Poison, Primal Forces at Sol Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton, through March 10 Tickets: $30-$35 Info: 866-811-4111 or primalforces.com

Lourelene Snedeker was recommended by several people to star in Gail Luow’s Blonde Poison. Photo provided to say, “I understand what she’s saying, but I don’t think I could go there.’ Does the end justify the means? It depends what the end is.” Louw wrote Blonde Poison as a one-woman performance piece, as Kubler looks back on her life from the perspective of contemporary London, being interviewed by an unseen journalist. This is veteran director Garsson’s first one-person play. “Most of them don’t do it for me, because there’s too much of what I call ‘retrospective remorse,’” he says. “Where the character spends a lot of time staring into space and talking

regretfully and remorsefully about something they did and something that happened to them. I find that very boring. “Secondly, a lot of one-person plays tend to be researched from the Wikipedia page. And third, very few of them go to the psychological depths or are willing to show the flaws of the person.” When he saw that Louw had fallen into none of these traps, he quickly applied for the performance rights. But he knew that casting Kubler would be a critical decision. “You have to have somebody who is fearless in their approach to the stage. They

have to love the opportunity to take this challenge on. Everyone I talked to down here said, ‘Oh, if that’s what you want, there’s only one choice.’” The name they all gave him was Lourelene Snedeker, four-time Carbonell Award winner, a veteran of almost 50 years on the stage. “When you have an actress this talented and this prepared, it really supersedes the problems of a one-person show,” Garsson says. “We have tried to make the characters she describes come to life. Because she’s so vivid and so compelling, the 90 minutes will go by quickly and you’ll go, ‘I guess those other people didn’t show up.’” From Blonde Poison alone, Garsson is very impressed by Louw’s writing skills. “She is an amazing storyteller. I think her strength as a writer is that she gave both sides equal weight, without

losing sight of the evil streak underneath, the insensitivity to human life and how that gets mitigated.” Primal Forces has diverged somewhat from its usual edgy, unconventional plays this season with the recent Having Our Say and the upcoming Neil Simon script, The Gingerbread Lady. But Blonde Poison returns the company to its more offbeat roots. “It’s got the darkness. It’s got the female bent. And it is enhanced by an intimate setting,” notes Garsson. “I’m thinking this will be a nice spin, to put everybody up close and personal with the victim/villain. Right in their face. The other thing that makes it a Primal Forces play is it takes place inside someone’s head.” Despite its dark themes, Garsson believes that theatergoers will find Blonde Poison seductive. “It’s very gradual and it’s subtle as it starts to suck you in. Very often you’ll say, ‘Oh, that poor woman.’ And then you’ll say, ‘How could she do that?’ “Theater has one and only one purpose — entertainment. I think people will find this very entertaining because they’ll be compelled. And hopefully riveted.”


AT16 ArtsPaper/Music

The COASTAL STAR

March 2019

Music

Pink Martini and Nu Deco Ensemble: Bending genres, building community By Christina Wood

You won’t find many places where people of diverse opinions gather peacefully these days. Where young and old sit, amicably, side by side. Where people come together — regardless of labels or affiliations — to celebrate life. With Pink Martini and the Nu Deco Ensemble both performing, this year’s Festival of the Arts Boca might be an exception. Jacomo Bairos, right, leads Miami’s Nu Deco Ensemble, which The festival has been serving will play the Festival of the Arts Boca on March 9. up a smorgasbord of musical performances and speakers at an international hodgepodge That was in 1994, when Mizner Park since 2007, with of musical styles and a diverse people were tuning in to Friends headliners ranging from Joshua assortment of musical genres, on TV and going to the movie Bell, Renee Fleming and Pat Thomas Lauderdale founded theater to see Forrest Gump. Metheny to Edward Albee and Pink Martini 25 years ago “I think the band can best Jeff Greene. with the hope of improving be used these days to bring “We always want to try to on the kind of music usually together people,” Lauderdale bring the audience something played at events designed says now. “These concerts new and exciting,” says Joanna to raise money for libraries, are one of the few places Marie Kaye, director of the public broadcasting, education, where people who don’t agree festival. parks and other causes in his politically end up dancing in the Drawing inspiration from hometown of Portland, Ore. same conga line.” Music, you see, can do what a government shutdown can’t. “The songs are so gorgeous. They have beautiful melodies that are memorable. There’s an older sense of grace and beauty that is largely missing from modern culture. I think that all impacts people who come to see our shows,” Lauderdale says. “We’re going the opposite direction of American pop culture,” he admits. “It’s sort of old-fashioned. There are no electronics other than the microphones. We have real instruments played by real people. The idea is to create a neighborly vibe that is very welcoming and lovely, where people go home feeling inspired and hopeful and uplifted.” That approach has won the band a large and loyal fan base. And, with a repertoire that includes songs in 25 languages, Pink Martini’s is nothing if not diverse. The band’s audiences usually represent a refreshing

Thomas Lauderdale (fourth from left) founded Pink Martini 25 years ago. It plays the festival March 3. Photos provided mix of ages, ethnicities and opinions. You never know who you’ll see at a new Nu Deco Ensemble concert, either. “We’ve been able to tap into a new audience and create a fan base that is very, very, very diverse and eclectic — kind of like the musicians on our stage,” says Sam Hyken, co-founder, artistic director and CEO of the Miami-based orchestra. “While our concerts may be a little bit louder and more boisterous than a typical orchestra concert, (the music) is for everybody.” Like many youngsters (the ensemble played its first concert in 2016), Nu Deco is full of energy and enthusiasm for the future. Billed as “a virtuosic and eclectic chamber orchestra designed for the 21st century,” the group specializes in a genrebending brand of classical music. “We’ve seen amazing things happen with the orchestra and we’ve been able to connect such a diverse group of musicians, a diverse audience — all through

If You Go The Festival of the Arts Boca runs through March 10 at Mizner Park. Pink Martini: 7 p.m. March 3; Nu Deco Ensemble: 7:30 p.m. March 9. For tickets, visit festivalboca.org. music. It’s important because there aren’t that many cultural experiences for everybody, all together,” Hyken says. “What we’ve really discovered with Nu Deco is that the orchestra can be that place of ultimate community connection.” Nu Deco and Pink Martini both excel at blurring the lines — between musical genres as well as social divides. Hyken, who is responsible for a majority of Nu Deco’s arrangements, has created symphonic suites based on the music of Queen, Outkast and Daft Punk, which will be performed at the Festival of the Arts Boca concert on March 9. “We really pride ourselves on valuing any of the music that we play, so even when we’re combining genres, we never look at it as a gimmick. It’s always true to the spirit of the music itself,” Hyken says. Also on the program will be music by Henry Mancini and Nick Omiccioli, a rocker and metalhead with a composition degree, as well as “an arrangement of Duke Ellington’s “Caravan” by Hyken. Many attempts have been made to categorize Pink Martini’s music. Lauderdale describes it best as, “a little bit of ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’ crossed with old-Hollywood symphonic pop, crossed with the United Nations.” When the 12 members of the band take the stage at Mizner Park on March 3, he says you can expect to hear songs in at least 10 different languages – everything from “Je Ne Veux Pas Travailler,” an original song in French the band put out in 1999, to “Amado Mio” from the 1946 film Gilda, starring Rita Hayworth.


The COASTAL STAR 

November March 2019 2019

Art

ArtsPaper/Art

AT17 H5

At the Flagler: When women said ‘me, too’ to jewelry-making

By Gretel Sarmiento If you are blue and don’t know where to go to, head toward the sparkling jewels on view now at the Flagler Museum. Few times has the extravagant gilded-age Whitehall mansion been upstaged by an exhibit running on the second floor. If it feels like the noise levels go up a fair number of decibels when you enter the upstairs galleries, that’s because there are more than 200 conversation pieces of handcrafted art jewelry on display. A Renaissance style pendant (1884-1890) made of gold, amethyst and enamel and featuring a translucent purple hue sets the tone for Maker & Muse: Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry. Elaborate, bold and unapologetically dramatic, the jewelry designs — many featuring semiprecious stones and enamelwork — make their entrance in groups housed inside glass cases assisted by a blue light. The contrast with the bright green walls is such that, more than once, intricate rings, pendants, necklaces, brooches, and tiaras appear as precious glowing fish in fancy, waterless tanks. Not surprisingly, many draw from nature, animals and imagined hybrid creatures. But

If You Go

At left: Octopus Waist Clasp (c. 1900), by Wilhelm Lucas von Cranach; at right: Mermaid on Coral Brooch (c. 1900),by Karl Rothmüller. Photos courtesy Flagler Museum the strongest force inspiring Mrs. Philip Charlotte Newman, intricate shiny wings appears these pieces was often the the first English woman to be the elongated figure of a tunicmaker. acknowledged as a jeweler in wearing angel on a mission. As its name indicates, the the 19th century. Newman It is minimalist compared to show running through May rarely repeated her designs. As most pieces on display but 26 is a celebration of women’s the country’s first professional nevertheless one of the stars multifaceted contributions to woman studio jeweler, she of the show. The wife of a this art form, particularly in encouraged many other female successful merchant, Klapp is France, Austria-Germany, Great artists to venture into this known for her use of Native Britain, New York, and Chicago. predominantly male-dominated American stones, in mounts Their creations sit along those of sphere. Following the death of gold or silver. Although she renowned male artists including of her mentor, jeweler John conceived the designs for her Louis Comfort Tiffany and Brogden, Newman set up her pieces, she had others build René Lalique to convey their own workshop on Savile Row. them. similarities. But it is the Even after managing some The gradual progress in this peculiarities of each individual success, she answered to her recognition road is evidenced artistic voice and the passions husband’s name and stamped by a charming 1922 piece driving their form that make the her creations “Mrs. N.” titled Dancers Pendant (silver, case for a visit. Maker & Muse Mrs. W.H. Elinor Klapp, the cloisonné, and enamel) and wastes no time introducing only American woman featured attributed to Harold and Phoebe us to the anima of jewelry art at the Paris Exhibition of 1900 Stabler. Husband-and-wife making. under her own name in the partnerships such as this one The very first three pieces jewelry category, gifts us an exposed the role women may on view, including that purple exquisite brooch (ca.1895-1914) have been quietly playing all pendant and one aquamarine made of carved moonstone, along. Sharing the credit was a necklace from 1890, are by silver or platinum. Set between place to start, although it didn’t

Maker & Muse runs through May 26 at the Flagler Museum, 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday Admission: $18, $10 children 13-17, $3 children 6-12 Info: 655-2833 or flaglermuseum.us satiate the stronger voices. Among the pieces paying tribute to women as muse is Mermaid on Coral Brooch (ca. 1900), which depicts the long-haired mystical creature reclining on a piece of coral. In design, workmanship and mix of materials (gilded silver, coral, and pearl), the work recalls the style of French Art Nouveau. This piece, however, represents how the Jugendstil (youth style) manifested in Germany and Austria and is by German goldsmith Karl Rothmüller. Walking three rooms filled with out-of-this-world pieces of jewelry does something to the fittingly green color of the walls. If it behaved like one of those mood rings, it would start turning brighter or darker depending on the level of envy. On second thought, it might turn pink.

Kinetic exhibits a moving experience By Ron Hayes

All great art moves the viewer. But not all great art moves. Great kinetic art does both. Over the weekend of Feb. 2-3, nearly 8,000 viewers came to downtown Boynton Beach to be moved by the city’s fourth biennial International Kinetic Art Exhibit & Symposium. They saw jellyfish, fashioned of silk and plastic, dance in the air above their heads. They heard guitar notes played by the sun. They reflected on their “treeness.” In all, they saw 40 art installations in a 40-by-60foot tent at the corner of East Ocean Avenue and Federal Highway, four “interactive art experiences” on the grounds, and a dozen more sculptures situated throughout the city. “We’re the kinetic city,” boasted Debby Coles-Dobay, who as its public art manager has steered the festival since its debut in 2013. “In 2017, we had 4,000 visitors and I’d say we’ve doubled that this year.” The weekend costs about $100,000 to stage, Coles-Dobay said. An ordinance collects a 1 percent fee on development within in the city, of which 30 percent supports public art programs such as this festival. That money is supplemented by grants, sponsorships and in-kind contributions, Coles-

Dobay said. Plus, the 40 tireless volunteers who make it all possible. Kinetic art, from the Greek word kinein, meaning “to move,” is a sculpture or assembly with mechanical parts that can be set in motion. Light Being, by Kimon Fotiadis, for example. Step inside a small tent and watch as oversized jellyfish rise and fall gracefully, while lighting effects and ghostly music complete the illusion. “Jellyfish are 5 percent matter and 95 percent water,” said Fotiadis, who traveled from Brussels, Belgium, after learning about the festival online. “I like to combine art and technology.” Not far away, John Endmark of Stanford, Calif., had viewers bending closer and frowning with puzzled delight. His Aspire Bloom was inspired by cactus and succulents but created by a 3D printer and lit from within. Spinning on a computercontrolled turntable at 900 revolutions per minute beneath a strobe light flashing 40 times a second, the sculpture bloomed and shrank, seemingly alive and certainly kinetic. Bruce Brown of Lake Worth’s Marble Toy #9 is a 6-foot-tall tower of wood and copper wire that, powered by a microchip, sends 32 marbles rolling down and climbing up its height, seemingly by falling into random paths.

“But it’s not really random,” Brown said with a smile. Outside, Craig Colorusso, of Rogers, Ariz., presided over 20 speakers, each powered by the sun and programmed to play a single guitar note. Don Russ of Lake Park was impressed. “With kinetic art, you tend to get a lot of math,” he said, “so you have random notes that blend together and create three-dimensional space.” An engineer with Crossmatch, a Palm Beach Gardens firm that makes fingerprint scanners, Russ never misses the festival. “We put it on the calendar.” Meanwhile, beneath a mammoth banyan tree in nearby Dewey Park, festival regular Elayna Toby Singer asked about 25 men, women and children to contemplate how much they have in common with that glorious tree. Every participant was given a “balance bag,” filled with goodies to help them find that elusive balance between themselves and nature. “Reflect on your treeness,” Singer told them. Then she had each create a “manifestation mobile” of mahogany seed pods strung on nylon fishing line adorned with a quarter-size mirror at one end. “What does a mirror symbolize?” she asked. “Selfreflection and bringing the environment into focus.”

Attendees enjoy Light Being by Kimon Fotiadis at the 2019 International Kinetic Art Exhibit & Symposium. Tim Stepien/ The Coastal Star Next, they wrote their “intentions for balance” on a strip of ribbon and tied it to the mobiles like a kite tail. The mobiles were to be taken home as a reminder to care for both themselves and trees. Judging was by the visitors themselves, who voted for People’s Choice awards after viewing the exhibits. Not surprisingly, Jon Endmark’s Aspire Bloom won

the indoor exhibit award. Craig Colorusso’s Sun Boxes took the “art experience” prize, and Dude a l’eau Dudali, by Beju LeJobart, won the outdoor exhibit prize. And Karen Davis of Boynton Beach gave the festival the finest award of all. “It’s nicer than SunFest because it’s every other year,” she said, “so it leaves you wanting more.”


AT 18 Arts Paper/Arts

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Don’t Miss

For March: Kultur Festival at FAU, ‘Fences’ at Dramaworks

Staff reports

The arts season reaches its peak in South Florida during the first three months of the new year. Here’s a look at some events scheduled for March that you won’t want to miss: My Fair Lady at FAU: Kultur Festival, March 3-6: The 1956 Tony Award-winning Broadway musical will be performed in concert at 2 p.m. March 3 at Florida Atlantic University. The performance features 23 musicians of the Klezmer Company Jazz Orchestra, conducted by Aaron Kula, along with a cast of 19 actors, and will be held in the Carole and Barry Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium on FAU’s Boca Raton campus. Florida Atlantic University Libraries and the Jewish Cultural Society are presenting this special production. It’s the main event of the 10th annual Kultur Festival, a celebration of Jewish music and arts that showcases some of the libraries’ Special Collections materials through concerts. My Fair Lady will be presented in concert format with 42 performers, including a professional orchestra, three professional leading actors performing side-by-side, along with 16 students from FAU’s

The Machito Orchestra, playing the Glen Island Casino in New York in 1947; a scene from The Mamboniks. Photo provided Department of Theatre and Dance and two students from FAU’s Department of Music. The original Broadway production featured Rex Harrison and Julie Andrews in lead roles. In the Kultur Festival performance, Lindsey Corey appears as Eliza, Jim Ballard is Higgins, Wayne LeGette is Alfred Doolittle and Om Jae portrays Col. Pickering. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 561-2976124 or visit fauevents.com. Boca Raton Jewish Film Festival, March 10-31: By the numbers, the third annual Judy Levis Markhoff Boca Raton Jewish Film Festival looks like this: Over 44 international and independent films exploring the global Jewish experience, from more than 19 countries,

screened in three south county venues, March 10-31. While already the largest Jewish film event in Palm Beach County, artistic director Wendy Honig sees the potential to expand. “We will fill the needs of whatever our community wants,” she says. “If that is to grow, we will grow.” Honig is understandably proud of the films she and her screening committee have chosen for this month’s festival. It opens with a dark comedy about death, To Dust, starring Matthew Broderick and Géza Röhrig, who appeared in the 2015 Academy Award winning foreign language film, Son of Saul. It closes with an upbeat documentary, The Mamboniks, which explores the connection between the Jewish people and

the mambo. In between will be such highlights as three Academy Award official entries — Slovakia’s The Interpreter, Austria’s The Waldheim Waltz, and Russia’s Sobibor — as well as Golda’s Balcony, a filmed version of the biographical play of Golda Meir’s career as Israeli prime minister, starring Tovah Feldshuh. The festival’s complete schedule is available at bocajff. org. For tickets or information, call 561-558-2514 or visit the Levis JCC Sandler Center Box Office in Boca Raton. Remembering Jan: March 27, Duncan Theatre, Palm Beach State College: If you’ve been an habitué of classical music concerts hereabouts over the past couple decades, you almost surely ran into Jan Winkler, a real estate man who retired to Florida and became, along with his wife, Hermine Drezner, a tireless and generous advocate for classical music. Winkler died at 80 of cancer last April, and this month, the Duncan Theatre is hosting a concert in his memory that will benefit the Palm Beach State College venue. Pianist David Kaplan will be joined by violinists Yevgeny Kutik and Yuki Numata Resnick, violist Mary Ferrillo and cellist Ashley

Bathgate in the Shostakovich Piano Quintet. The concert is set for 2 p.m. March 27, and tickets are $60. Call 561-8683309 or visit theatreservices@ palmbeachstate.edu. Fences at Palm Beach Dramaworks: March 29-April 21: The West Palm Beach performance venue takes a short breather this month between the March 3 closing of its popular production of The Spitfire Grill, which was extended a week by public demand, and the opening of its next show, Fences, which launches March 29. The show, by playwright August Wilson, focuses on an embittered sanitation worker, a former Negro League baseball star denied a shot at the major leagues because of his skin color. He takes his resentment out on his wife and son, fracturing relationships and thwarting dreams. Directed by William Hayes, the show stars Lester Purry, John Archie, Karen Stephens, Jovon Jacobs, Warren Jackson, Bryant Bentley, Raegan Franklin and Jayla Georges. The Wednesday matinee and the Sunday evening shows include a post-performance talkback. For ticket information contact the box office at 514-4042, or visit palmbeachdramaworks.org.


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Arts Calendar (Note: Events are listed through April 5, 2019, and were current as of Feb. 22. Please check with the presenting agency for any changes. Ticket prices are single sales. Most of the presenting organizations offer subscription plans.)

ART EXHIBITS

Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens: Through May 5: An Eye for Nature: Paintings and Prints by Morton Kaish, works by the American artist and former SUNY professor. Main gardens are open Wed-Sun 10 am to 4 pm. Admission: $15, $10/ seniors, $7/students. 832-5328 or ansg.org. Armory Art Center: Through March 9: Artist-inResidence Exhibition, works by ceramicist Derek Decker, sculptor Nicholas Kakavas and painter Richard Santiago. Open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon-Fri, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sat. $5/ non-members. 832-1776 or armoryart.org. Boca Raton Museum of Art: Through March 24: Imagining Florida: History and Myth in the Sunshine State, a big exhibition of more than 200 works examining how artists over the past three centuries have seen the state; Daniel Faust: Florida Photos from the 1980s, more than 650 images of the New York photographer’s visits to the state in the 1980s; Excuse Me!?! I’m Looking for the Fountain of Youth, videos, photos and installations featuring Mike, an Everyman trying to keep up with contemporary America, by artist Michael Smith. Admission: $12/seniors $10/ children 12 and under, free. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tues, Wed and Fri; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thurs; 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat & Sun. Closed Mondays and holidays. 392-2500 or bocamuseum.org. Cornell Art Museum: Through March 30: Tech Effect, works by numerous artists documenting how technology has influenced contemporary art. Includes augmented reality and interactive works. Museum hours: Tues-Sat, 10 am-5 pm. Closed Sundays, Mondays and holidays. Admission: $8; $5/seniors and students with ID; free/veterans, children under 12, members. 2437922 or oldschoolsquare.org. Cultural Council of Palm Beach County: Through May 18: Modern Love, works by 20 Palm Beach County artists exploring the subject of amour. Through March 23: Solo exhibitions by Michael D’Amato, Philip Butera and Kathryn Carlyle, and Joan Eiley. Galleries at the council offices in Lake Worth are open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tues-Sat; free admission. 471-2901 or palmbeachculture.com. Flagler Museum: Through May 26: Maker and Muse: Women and Early 20th-Century Art Jewelry, a collection of more than 200 pieces of handcrafted jewelry, including by Tiffany and Lalique, that demonstrates the effect women had on their creation, including as designers. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues-Sat, noon to 5 Sun. Closed Mondays and holidays. Admission: $18. 655-2833 or flaglermuseum.us. Lighthouse ArtCenter: Through March 2: Building Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim, videos, sketches and photos related to the construction of the now-iconic New York City art space. March 21-30: Best of the Clubs, art by residents of the area’s exclusive clubs and gated communities. Admission: $10 for adults, free/ members and children 12 and under. 10 am to 4 pm. Mon-Fri, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 746-3101 or lighthousearts.org. Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens: Through March 31: Hard Bodies: Contemporary Japanese Lacquer Sculpture, works by reinterpreters of Japan’s ancient lacquer tradition, who make large-scale sculptures. Museum tickets: $15, $13/seniors, $9/children and college students. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tues-Sun. 495-0233 or morikami.org. NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale: Through May 19: William J. Glackens and Pierre-Auguste Renoir: Affinities and Distinctions, 25 works each by the American and French masters, showing how Renoir’s work influenced Glackens. Admission: $12; hours: 11 am-5 pm Tues-Sat, 11 a-8 pm every first Thursday, noon-5 pm Sun. 954-525-5500 or nsuartmuseum.org. Society of the Four Arts: Through March 31: Portraits of Courage: A Commander in Chief’s Tribute to American Warriors, 66 paintings of American servicemen and women by former President George W. Bush. Tickets: $10, free/ Four Arts members. 10 am to 5 pm Mon-Sat, 1 pm to 5 pm Sunday. 655-7226 or fourarts.org.

CLASSICAL MUSIC

Friday, March 1-Saturday, March 2 Symphonia Boca Raton: On Friday, the orchestra performs in the Festival of the Arts Boca in a screening of the very first Star Wars (1977) film, playing the John Williams soundtrack live; on Saturday, it accompanies jazz pianist and UM music dean Shelley Berg in Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue along with other orchestral favorites. 7:30 pm both nights, Mizner Park Amphitheatre. Tickets $35+. thesymphonia.org or festivalboca.org. Sunday, March 3 Itzhak Perlman: The eminent Israeli-American violinist and longtime musical partner Rohan de Silva return for their annual seasonal recital. 2 pm, Kravis Center. Tickets $39+. 832-7469 or kravis.org. Tuesday, March 5 Thalea String Quartet: The young halfCanadian, half-American quartet, rising stars in

DANCE

the quartet world, offer works by Beethoven, Haydn and Mendelssohn. 7:30 pm, Flagler Museum, Palm Beach. Tickets: $70 (includes postconcert champagne and sweets, plus conversation with the musicians). 655-2833 or flaglermuseum. us. Thursday, March 7 Cantus: The all-male vocal octet that played the Four Arts in January returns with its “Alone Together” program to St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Palm Beach Gardens, featuring music by Steve Sametz, Libby Larsen and David Lang. 7:30 pm, tickets start at $35. 622-0956. Monday, March 11 Brussels Philharmonic: Stéphane Denève leads the orchestra, and is joined by Danish violinist Nikolaj Znaider for the Bruch Violin Concerto along with orchestral works by Guillaume Connesson, Ravel and Roussel’s Bacchus et Ariane. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Tickets $39+. 832-7469 or kravis.org. Wednesday, March 13 Richard Stoltzman: The eminent clarinetist is joined by soprano Sarah Shafer and pianist Anna Polonsky for music of Schubert, Spohr, Schumann and others. 7:30 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $40. 655-7226 or fourarts.org. Atlantic Classical Orchestra: Flamenco dancer Eva Conti and mezzo-soprano Tara Curtis join conductor David Amado for the El Amor Brujo suite of Manuel de Falla; also on the program is the early Symphony in C of Georges Bizet and Rossini’s overture to his opera L’Italiana in Algeri. 7:30 pm, Eissey Campus Theatre, Palm Beach State College, Palm Beach Gardens. Tickets $30+. atlanticclassicalorchestra.com. Sunday, March 17 Scharoun Ensemble: The chamber nonet made up of members of the Berlin Philharmonic presents a program including Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet and the Octet (in F) of Schubert. 3 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $30. 655-7226 or fourarts.org. Monday, March 18 Palm Beach Symphony: Conductor Ramón Tebar leads the orchestra in a program called Cool Winds, featuring three early Haydn symphonies — Morning, Noon and Night — and the Sinfonia Concertante for Four Winds, possibly by Mozart. 7:30 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $40; 281-0145 or palmbeachsymphony. org. Wednesday, March 20 Sinta Saxophone Quartet: The foursome named for the great saxophone educator Donald Sinta performs transcriptions of works by Beethoven, Barber, Dvorak, Grieg and Shostakovich. 7:30 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $40. 655-7226 or www.fourarts.org. Sunday, March 24 Jessica Rivera: The Grammy-winning soprano and pianist Mark Carver present a tribute to the Spanish soprano Victoria de los Angeles with an all-Spanish program of songs by Obradors, Rodrigo, Turina, Granados, Mompou and Torroba. 3 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $30. Call 655-7226 or fourarts.org. Emily Carter: The St. Paul’s Episcopal Church soprano makes her debut recital with songs by Handel, Bach, Bernstein, Rorem and a host of others. 4 pm, St. Paul’s, Delray Beach. Tickets: $20 suggested donation at the door. Visit maspconcerts.org. Wednesday, March 27 Apollo’s Fire: The great Cleveland-based Baroque orchestra presents a concert of virtuoso showpieces by J.S. Bach and Antonio Vivaldi. 7:30 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $40. 655-7226 or fourarts.org. Thursday, March 28 Sitkovetsky Trio: The fine British violinist Alexander Sitkovetsky (nephew of the Russian violinist Dmitri) teams with cellist Isang Enders and pianist Wu Qian for trios by Rachmaninov, Schumann and the American composer Pierre Jalbert. Part of the Chamber Music Society of Palm Beach series. 7 pm, Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach. Tickets: $75; 379-6773 or cmspb.org. Saturday, March 30 Delray String Quartet: Pianist Tao Lin joins the quartet for the Piano Quintet of Shostakovich on a program that also includes music by Smetana and Dinicu. 3 pm, Steinway Piano Gallery, Boca Raton. 808-5084. Sunday, March 31 Leon Fleisher and Katherine Jacobson: Fleisher, the legendary 90-year-old pianist, and his wife, who teaches at the Peabody Institute, play music for four hands. 3 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $30. 655-7226 or fourarts.org. Sunday, March 31-Monday, April 1 Symphonia Boca Raton: The orchestra is joined by bandeon soloist Lidia Kaminska for music of Piazzolla on two concerts led by Alistair Willis that also feature pieces by Golijov and Shostakovich. 3 pm Sunday, St. Andrew’s School, Boca Raton; 7:30 pm Monday, Crest Theatre, Delray Beach. Tickets $50+ on Sunday; $59+ on Monday. 376-3848 or thesymphonia.org. Wednesday, April 3 Goldstein-Peled-Fiterstein Trio: This expert piano trio includes the star cellist Amit Peled. Classical Café, 2 pm, Stage West, Duncan Theatre, Palm Beach State College, Lake Worth. Tickets: $35. 868-3309 or palmbeachstate.edu

Friday, March 1-Saturday, March 2 Momix: Moses Pendelton’s remarkable company returns to Palm Beach County with its Greatest Hits tour. 8 pm both nights, Duncan Theatre, Palm Beach State College, Lake Worth. Tickets: $45. 868-3309 or palmbeachstate.edu. Saturday, March 17 Boca Ballet Theatre: Dan Guin and Jane Tyree’s company teams with new York City Ballet’s Daniel Ulbricht and his Stars of American Ballet troupe for a special performance featuring works by Balanchine, Robbins and Guin. 3 pm, Olympic Heights High School, Boca Raton. Tickets: $40-$50. 995-0709 or www.bocaballet.org. Monday, March 25-Wednesday, March 27 Ballet Palm Beach: Colleen Smith’s Palm Beach Gardens company presents three nights of premieres, showcasing new additions to its repertory, including dances by Balanchine. 7:30 pm all shows. Tickets: $45. 888-718-4253 or balletpalmbeach.org.

FILM

Friday, March 8 Ruben Brandt, Collector: Slovenian animator Milorad Krstic’s first feature is about a man who must steal 13 famous paintings from museums around the world because he believes they are torturing him. Living Room Theaters, Boca Raton. 549-2600 or fau.livingroomtheaters.com. Friday, Feb. 15 Styx: A German ER doctor on a solo sailing trip comes across a sinking ship packed with refugees, and must make an important decision. With Susanne Wolff. Living Room Theaters, Boca Raton. 549-2600 or fau.livingroomtheaters.com. Thirteen Days: Kevin Costner stars in this 2000 film about the Cuban missile crisis of October 1962. 2:30 and 6 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $5. 655-7226 or fourartsorg. Friday, Feb. 22 Maudie: A man hires a housekeeper with crippled hands who is determined to live independently, and also to become a painter. With Ethan Hawke and Sally Hawkins. 2:30 and 6 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $5. 655-7226 or fourartsorg. Friday, March 29 Woman at War: An Icelandic music teacher wages a secret war of sabotage on her country’s aluminum industry until a letter changes everything. With Halldora Geirharosdottir. In Icelandic with English subtitles. Living Room Theaters, Boca Raton. 549-2600 or fau. livingroomtheaters.com.

JAZZ

Tuesday, March 12 Chris Botti: The popular jazz trumpeter (When I Fall in Love) makes his annual seasonal return to South Florida. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Tickets $25+. 832-7469 or kravis.org. Wednesday, March 13 Five Play: The all-woman quintet was formed as an offshoot of the Diva Jazz Orchestra, and plays new arrangements of standards as well as original charts. 7:45 pm, Broward Center for the Performing Arts. Tickets: $55. 954-462-0222 or browardcenter.org. Friday, March 22 Svetlana and the Delancey Five: The New York-based swing combo presents a program called Night at the Movies. 8 pm, Arts Garage, Delray Beach. Tickets: $30-45. 450-6357 or artsgarage.org. Saturday, March 30 Yamit and the Vinyl Blvd: This popular Miami septet performs classic jazz from the 1920s to the 1960s. 8 pm, Arts Garage, Delray Beach. Tickets: $35-45. 450-6357 or artsgarage.org.

OPERA

Saturday, March 16-Sunday, March 31 Frida: This 1991 opera by the American composer Robert Xavier Rodriguez takes a look at the life of the Mexican painter Frida Kahlo. Florida Grand Opera presents it with with Catalina Cuervo as Kahlo and Ricardo Herrera as Diego Rivera. Two performances at the Miramar Cultural Center, three at the Miami-Dade County Auditorium and two at the Parker Playhouse. 800-741-1010 or fgo.org. Friday, March 22-Sunday, March 24 Die Fledermaus: Johann Strauss II’s 1874 operetta about payback at a party for a practical joke involving a bat costume. Stephanie Blythe guests in this English-language version of the proto-musical mounted by Palm Beach Opera. 7:30 pm Fri & Sat, 2 pm Sun, Kravis Center; there is also a children’s matinee Saturday called The Revenge of the Bat. 800-833-7888 (PB Opera), 832-7469 (Kravis Center) or pbopera.org or www. kravis.org.

POPULAR MUSIC

Saturday, March 2 Sarah McLachlan: The beloved Canadian songwriter and activist offers “an intimate evening of songs and storytelling.” With Vanessa Freebairn-Smith. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Tickets $40+. 832-7469 or kravis.org. WIRK Rib Roundup: The country music radio station’s annual festival is an all-day affair that includes headliners such as Kip Moore, Chase Rice and Chris Lane. Lawn tickets: $30, others $41+.

ArtsPaper/Calendar AT19 At Coral Sky Amphitheatre on the South Florida Fairgrounds. For tickets: livenation.com. Gin Blossoms: The Arizona quintet had major hits in the 1990s with songs such as “Hey Jealousy” and “I’ll Follow You Down.” 8 pm, Culture Room, Fort Lauderdale. ticketmaster.com. Sunday, March 3 Tesla: The veteran California quintet is joined on its current tour by Kix. 7 pm, Seminole Hard Rock, Hollywood. Tickets $30-$50. ticketmaster.com or seminolehardrockhollywood.com. Sunday, March 17 Steve Miller Band: The guitarist and songwriter who founded his band in San Francisco in the 1960s was a major presence on radio in the 1970s with songs such as “The Joker,”“Fly Like an Eagle” and “Take the Money and Run.” 7 pm, Seminole Hard Rock, Hollywood. Tickets $45-$105. ticketmaster.com or seminolehardrockhollywood. com. Thursday, March 21 Ella Mai: The rising young singer (“Boo’d Up”) is out on her debut tour, and makes a stop in Fort Lauderdale. 7 pm, Revolution Live. ticketmaster. com. Wednesday, April 3 Jackson Browne: The singer and songwriter who enjoyed fame beginning in the 1970s with songs such as “Doctor, My Eyes.” 8 pm, Kravis Center. Tickets $49.50+. 832-7469 or kravis.org.

THEATER

Opens Friday, March 1 Wait Until Dark: Frederick Knott’s perennially popular 1966 play about a blind housewife who must outwit three determined criminals. Through March 17 at Lake Worth Playhouse. 586-6410 or lakeworthplayhouse.org. Through March 3 The Spitfire Grill: James Valcq and Fred Alley’s 2001 musical about a Wisconsin greasy spoon has become a cult favorite. At Palm Beach

Dramaworks, West Palm Beach. Tickets: $75. 5144042 or palmbeachdramaworks.org. Tuesday, March 5-Sunday, March 10 Waitress: Sara Bareilles’s musical about a small-town waitress and pie expert who tries to find a way out of her dead-end marriage and nowheresville town. From Kravis on Broadway, at the Kravis Center. 832-7469 or kravis.org. Through March 10 Blonde Poison: Lourelene Snedeker stars in Gail Luow’s one-woman show about life of Stella Kubler, a German Jewish refugee in London whose past raises questions. Sol Theatre, Boca Raton. 866-811-4111 or primalforces.com. A Doll’s House, Part 2: Lucas Hnath’s 2017 play picks up where Ibsen’s original left off, with Nora’s return to the house she left 15 years before. At Maltz Jupiter Theatre, Jupiter. 5752233 or jupitertheatre.org. Opens Thursday, March 14 Crazy for You: The 1992 reassembly of a Gershwin musical, largely based on Girl Crazy (1930) and having to do with the adventures of a young man who wants to be part of the Zangler Follies. Through April 14 at the Wick Theatre, Boca Raton. 995-2333 or thewick.org. Opens Friday, March 22 Showtune: The Music of Jerry Herman: A revue of the Broadway composer’s hits from iconic shows such as Hello, Dolly!, Mame and La Cage aux Folles. Through April 7 at Delray Beach Playhouse. Tickets: $30. 272-1281, ext. 4 or delraybeachplayhouse.com. Opens Friday, March 29 Harlowe: The world premiere of a play by Jennifer Lane, workshopped four years ago at FAU, about a woman who suffers a physical trauma and must slowly heal. Through April 14 at FAU Theatre Lab, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton. Tickets: $35. 297-6124 or fau.edu/ artsandletters/theatrelab.


H4 Health AT20 Arts Notes/Calendar Paper/Reviews

The COASTAL STAR 

Florida’s Largest Art Gallery

November March 2019

Reviews

Beautiful Event Venue Charitable Benefits Corporate Events • Fashion Shows Bar/Bat Mitzvahs • Weddings

A scene from The Spitfire Grill, at Dramaworks in West Palm Beach. Photo provided

MICHELE CANCRO

KATHY LINDEN

BONNIE PERLIN

ROCCO T. GRASSO

DENISE FORTE

AMY RESHEFSKY

1440 N. Federal Highway, Delray Beach, FL 33483 561-278-0074 TheHeartOfDelrayGallery.com

Impressive modern dance, impactful play with music Here are excerpts from reviews on the Palm Beach ArtsPaper website. For the full reviews, visit palmbeachartspaper.com. Hubbard Street Dance Chicago (Feb. 2, Duncan Theatre, Lake Worth) The marvelous group of young dancers who make up Hubbard Street Dance Chicago impressed, just as they had three years ago when they first visited. A small work, A Picture of You Falling, launched the performance with exceptional artistic verve. Crystal Pite’s choreography demonstrated both eloquence and pith. Craig D. Black Jr. was mesmerizing as he etched out his yearning and conflicted role in his dark and desolate place. Ana Lopez was his counterpoint, and together they presented a once intimate but now detached relationship. Hubbard Street resident choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo was responsible for the next two works. In LicketySplit, he played with gesture and romance using six dancers who subtly interacted, hinting at the complications that love brings. The lush movement was original and full of surprises. Pacopepepluto, a series of solos, highlighted the highly sculpted physiques of three men. With almost burlesque comic touches, Cerrudo created an unusual visual departure from what one might expect from the songs — Dean Martin’s In The Chapel in the Moonlight and That’s Amore, and Joe Scalissi’s Memories Are Made of This. The program ended with Cloudline, a hodgepodge of sections performed by seven dancers. Choreographed by Robyn Mineko Williams, a former HSDC dancer, and using a concoction of contemporary songs, the work concluded with the not-particularly-interesting manipulation of a huge billowing cloth by the dancers. Unfortunately, the program didn’t flow well. The impact of the first work was so strong that by the time Cloudline ended, the momentum had dissipated. The dancers who performed were all outstanding and only represented half of the

company. Hubbard Street excels in presenting exciting new modern dance works created by the best known young choreographers. If this is what you want to experience, it is easy to become a fan of Hubbard Street Dance. — Tara Mitton Catao The Spitfire Grill (through March 3, Palm Beach Dramaworks, West Palm Beach) Small-scale but big-hearted, The Spitfire Grill tells the tale of an atrophying Wisconsin town and an ex-convict who arrives and becomes the catalyst for the village’s turnaround and the redemption of its residents. It is taking nothing away from the evocative, countrified score by James Valcq and the late Fred Alley to say that The Spitfire Grill feels more like a play with music than a fullblown musical. It is a first-rate example of a musical for those who do not like musicals, yet it is both smart and emotional enough to possibly convert them to the genre. And when you factor in the understated, but potent Dramaworks production, directed with a vigilance against sentimentality by Bruce Linser, with a fine cast of sweet, twangy singers, artistic success was all but inevitable. So join the journey of Percy Talbott (Ashley Rose). Newly released from prison, she makes a beeline for Gilead, Wis., where Sheriff Joe (Blake Price) helps her get a job assisting feistybut-aging Hannah Ferguson (Elizabeth Dimon), the owner of Gilead’s only restaurant. The locals — Hannah’s nephew Caleb (Johnbarry Green), embittered about losing his job at the local quarry, his mousy wife Shelby (Amy Miller Brennan), town busybody and postmistress Effy (Patti Gardner) — do not take easily to strangers, but gradually Percy endears herself to most of them. The Spitfire Grill is character-driven with souls brimming with yearnings and secrets. It has been a fixture on the regional theater circuit and around the world. But it is hard to imagine it being done much better than it is currently at Dramaworks, or how one could see it and remain resistant to musicals. — Hap Erstein


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Community Calendar Note: Events are current as of 2/22. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 2

Saturday - 3/2 - Pickleball at Delray Beach Tennis Center, 210 W Atlantic Ave. M-F 8 am-9 pm; Sat 8 am-6 pm. $3/resident; $4/nonresident; $1/add for night play lights. Monthly passes available. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com 3/2 - Lawn Bowling at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Takes skill/practice. Age 18 & up. M/W/F/Sat 9 am-noon. Annual fee $15/resident; $20/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/2 - VITA TAX Program at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Free tax preparation service provided by United Way. Runs through 4/15. M/T 9 am-1 pm; T/W 5:15-8:15 pm; Sat 9 am-1 pm. Free. Call 211; mydelraybeach.com 3/2 - League of Women Voters Cool Topic: Problems & Needs Faced by the Public Defender’s Office at South Florida Science Center STEM Education Center, 4802 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Guest speaker Carey Haughwout, Palm Beach County Public Defender. 9:30-11 am. Free. RSVP: lwvpbc.org 3/2 - Poured Paint! Go With The Flow at Creative Arts School, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. All levels. 9:30 am-3:30 pm. $165. 2437922; oldschoolsquare.org 3/2 - Adult Freestyle Saturdays at Intracoastal Park, 2240 N Federal Hwy, Boynton Beach. Improve techniques, methods w/ nationally recognized artist. Every Sat 10 am-12:30 pm. Per class $29/resident; $35/nonresident. 742-6650; boynton-beach.org 3/2 - The Writer’s Studio at Delray Beach Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Every Sat 10 am. Free. 638-7251; delraylibrary.org 3/2 - Workshop: Introduction to Illustrator at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. Held again 4 /5. 10:30 am-1 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/2 - A Gilded Age Style Lunch in Café des Beaux-Arts at Flagler Museum Kenan Pavilion, One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Delicacies/ refreshments reminiscent of the elegance of entertaining during the Gilded Age. Runs through 4/21. T-Sat 11:30 am-2:30 pm; Sun noon-3 pm. $22/museum member includes tax/ gratuity; $40/non-member includes museum admission/tax/gratuity. Advance purchase recommended: 655-2833; flaglermuseum.us 3/2 - Pickleball at Pompey Park Community Center, 1101 NW 2nd St. M-F 9-11 am; F 6-8:30 pm; Sat 1-4 pm. $3/resident; $4/non-resident; $1/add for night play lights. Monthly passes available. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com 3/2 - Tea Ceremony Workshop at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens Seishin-an Teahouse, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Learn basics of sado Tea Ceremony necessary to know in order to learn more about the aesthetics of sado or better understand, fully enjoy the tea ceremony itself. Workshop is a prerequisite to study sado at Morikami.

Community Calendar AT21 3/3 - Concert: Choral Evensong for the Last Sunday of Epiphany at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 5 pm. Free will offering. 276-4541; music. stpaulsdelray.org 3/3 - Church Boy Gangsta at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $15-$25. 4506357; artsgarage.org 3/3 - Pink Martini at Mizner Park Amphitheatre, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Part of Festival of the Arts Boca. 7 pm. Tickets start at $25. 866-571-2787; festivalboca.org 3/3 - The Gutfeld Monologues Live: Classic Rants from The Five Greg Gutfeld at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 8 pm. Tickets start at $29. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/3-4/28 - Exhibition: The World, My Lens, and I at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Photographic exhibit by Diane DeQuevedo Klein. Regular library hours. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org Monday - 3/4 - Pickleball at Ezell Hester, Jr. Community Center, 1901 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Combines badminton & tennis. Adults. T/Th 10 am-1 pm; M/W/F 9 am-noon. $5/person; $50/30 visit pass. 742-6550; boynton-beach.org 3/4 - Intro to Online Research at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 10 am-noon. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/4 - Socrates Cafe at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Every M 10 am. Free. 2785455; highlandbeach.us 3/4 - Senior Bingo at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Adults age 50 & up. M/W 10:30 am-noon. Free. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com 3/4 - Friends of the Museum Auxiliary General Meeting at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 590 Plaza Real. Membership meeting. Learn about upcoming events. Meeting, coffee, pastries, film and/or speaker. 10:30 am-1 pm. Free. RSVP: 392-2500 x213; bocamuseum.org 3/4 - Poetry Discussion at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30 amnoon. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/4 - Empowerment Zone at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Resume/job/ computer assistance. Every M/Th 1-4:30 pm. Free. 266-0798; delraylibrary.org 3/4 - Beginner’s Infographics at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1:30-3 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/4 - Advanced Squares at Ezell Hester, Jr. Community Center, 1901 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Age 18 & up. Every M 2-4 pm. $6/person. 731-3119; boynton-beach.org 3/4 -Scene Study Class for Adults at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. Focus on listening/responding, work with a scene partner on a scene of your choosing. Start reading some plays, find a scene, bring it to class. Age 21+ (memorization required). Every M through 4/22 5:15-6:45 pm. $225/session. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/4 - Itzhak: A film & Q&A with Itzhak Perlman at The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four

Municipal Meetings

1-3 pm. $40. Registration: 495-0233 x237; morikami.org 3/2 - The Writing on the Wall: A Poetry Workshop Facilitated by Freesia McKee at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 1 pm. $10. 2437922; oldschoolsquare.org 3/2 - Vintage Reflections at Kings Point Theatre, 7000 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. 2 pm. $46-$79. 800-716-6975; spanishriverconcerts.com 3/2 - Bending the Arc at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Part of Festival of the Arts. 4 pm. $15. 866-571-2787; festivalboca.org 3/2 - Reception: Betty Wilson, Artist Extraordinaire at Artisans on the Ave Gallery, 630 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Meet the artist, refreshments. 6-9 pm reception; 7 pm glass fusion demo. 762-8162; artgallerypalmbeach. com 3/2 - Spotlight Event: Gone to Dust by Matt Goldman at Mandel JCC, 8500 Jog Rd, Boynton Beach. Part of Donald M. Ephraim Palm Beach Jewish Film Festival. 7 pm. $15/member; $18/ guest. 877-318-0071; bb.jcconline.com 3/2 - Rhapsody in Blue: An Evening of Orchestral Favorites at Mizner Park Amphitheatre, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Part of Festival of the Arts. 7:30 pm. Tickets start at $35. 866-571-2787; festivalboca.org 3/2 - An Evening with Steve Ross at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $35-$45. 450-6357; artsgarage.org 3/2 - Classic Albums Live: The Eagles at The Pavilion at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Classic albums recreated live, on stage, note for note, cut for cut. 8-10 pm. $20-$75. 243-7922; oldschoolsquare.org 3/2 - Laura Hodos & Shelley Keelor sing The Great American Songbook Collection with Musical Director Caryl Fantel at The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St. 8 pm. $75/VIP w/reception; $35/general admission. 272-1281; delraybeachplayhouse.com 3/2-3 - Artists in the Park presented by Delray Beach Art League at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave. Held again 4/6-7. Sat 8:30 am-4:30 pm; Sun 11 am-4:30 pm. Free. 8432311; delrayartleague.com 3/2-3 - Midnight Sun Festival at Bryant Park, Lake Ave & Golfview, Lake Worth. Celebrating Finnish Culture & Lake Worth’s Heritage. Sat 11 am-10 pm; Sun 10 am-5 pm. $5/ general admission, free/children under 4’ tall. midnightsunfestival.org 3/2-3 - Capitol Steps: Make America Grin Again at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Runs through 3/17. T-Sat 7:30 pm; Sat/Sun 1:30 pm. $40. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/2-3 - Back Home Again: A Tribute to John Denver at The Wick Theatre and Costume Museum, 7901 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. Sat 8 pm, $40-$85; Sun 2 pm. $75. 995-2333; thewick.org

3/4 & 4/1 - Ocean Ridge - First Monday at Ocean Ridge Town Hall, 6450 N Ocean Blvd. 6 pm. Agenda: oceanridgeflorida.com 3/5 & 19 - Boynton Beach - First and third Tuesday at Boynton Beach City Hall, 100 E Boynton Beach Blvd. 6:30 pm. Agenda: boynton-beach.org 3/5 & 4/2 - Highland Beach - First Tuesday at Highland Beach Town Hall, 3614 S Ocean Blvd. 1:30 pm. Agenda: highlandbeach.us 3/8 - Gulf Stream - Second Friday at Gulf Stream Town Hall, 100 Sea Rd. 9 am. Agenda: gulfstream.org 3/11 & 25 - Lantana - Second & fourth Mondays at Lantana Town Hall, 500 Greynolds Cir. 7 pm. Agenda: lantana.org 3 /12 - Delray Beach - First & third Tuesdays at Delray Beach City Hall, 100 NW 1st Ave. 4 pm. Agenda: delraybeachfl.gov 3/12 & 26 - Boca Raton - Second & fourth Tuesday at Boca Raton City Hall, 201 W Palmetto Park Rd. 6 pm. Agenda: myboca.us 3/19 - South Palm Beach - Second Tuesday at the South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7 pm. Agenda: southpalmbeach.com 3/26 - Manalapan - Fourth Tuesday at Manalapan Town Hall, 600 S Ocean Blvd. 10 am. Agenda: manalapan.org 3/28 - Briny Breezes - Fourth Thursday at Briny Breezes Town Hall, 4802 N Ocean Blvd. 4 pm. Agenda: townofbrinybreezes-fl.com 3/2-3 - Daddy Issues (PG-13) presented by The Playgroup LLC at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Held again 3/8-10. F/Sat 8 pm; Sat/Sun 2 pm. $35. 3473948; willowtheatre.org 3/2-9 - Promises, Promises at Levis JCC Sandler Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Check website for schedule/times. $40/VIP reserved; $30/general admission; $25/gold member. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 3/2-10 - 2019 Festival of the Arts Boca at Mizner Park Amphitheater, 501 Plaza Real & Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real. Check website for schedule, tickets. 866-5712797; festivalboca.org 3/2-21 - Exhibition at Gold Coast Down Syndrome Organization Resource Center, 915 S Federal Hwy, Boynton Beach. Celebrates World Down Syndrome Day 3/21. All art is the work of adults attending art class at Gold Coast Down Syndrome Organization. Paintings available for purchase. M-F 10 am-4 pm. Free/admission; $5/ painting. 752-3383; goldcoastdownsyndrome. org

MARCH 3-9

Sunday - 3/3 - Autism Speaks Walk at Meyer Amphitheatre, 105 Evernia St, West Palm Beach. 9 am registration; 10 am opening ceremonies. Free/raise funds. 465-0054; autismspeaks.org 3/3 - Practical Transcendence with Martha Creek at Unity of Delray Beach Church, 101 NW 22nd St. 9:25 & 11 am services; 1 pm workshop. Free-will offering. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 3/3 - All-Day Book Fair at Mandel JCC, 8500 Jog Rd, Boynton Beach. 7 authors, 3 sessions, 1 keynote speaker. Part of Donald M. Ephraim Palm Beach Jewish Film Festival. 10 am. Tickets start at $10. 877-318-0071; bb.jcconline.com 3/3 - Sado: Tea Ceremony Beginners Class at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach.

Opportunity to study the traditional art of Sado. Tea Ceremony Workshop is required for those who have never taken a Tea Ceremony Class. 2 lessons/month; individual appointments begin at 10:15 am. $50/member; $55/non-member. Registration: 495-0233 x210; morikami.org 3/3 - Free museum admission at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Noon-5 pm. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/3 - Bridge Duplicate at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Sanctioned A.C.B.L. duplicate bridge game for the experienced player. Light lunch served. Partners available for singles. Every Sun through 4/28 12:30-4 pm. $10/at the door. Reservations or partners: 338-2995; myboca.us 3/3 - ACBL Sanctioned Duplicate Bridge at Temple Sinai of Palm Beach County, 2475 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. M-Th 12:30 pm; F 12:15 pm; Sun 1 pm. $12/includes lunch. 2768071; templesinaipbc.org 3/3 - My Fair Lady in Concert at Florida Atlantic University Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 2 pm. $27-$52. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/3 - Friends Music Series: Sonny & Perley at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 3-4 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/3 - Lecture: Rainbow’s End: The Crash of 1929 with Maury Klein at Flagler Museum, 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. 3 pm. $28/nonmember; $10/individual, family & life member; includes museum admission. 655-2833; flaglermuseum.us 3/3 - The Music and Times of Johnny Mercer at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Part of American Songbook Series. 4 pm. $30-$50. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/3 - Jeffrey Rosen: The Constitution in the 21st Century at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Part of Festival of the Arts. 4 pm. $30. 866-571-2787; festivalboca.org

SHOP GREEN

Delray Beach a project of the Delray Beach CRA

March 9th – Market relocates to City Hall March 16th – Market closes for St. Patrick’s Day Parade March 23rd – Market is back in OSS Park

E V E RY S AT U R DAY | O L D S C H O O L S Q UA R E | 9 A M - 2 P M Shop with 60 of South Florida’s premier farmers, bakers, and culinary artists! Located one block North of Atlantic Ave on NE 2nd Ave | Downtown (561) 276-7511 • DelrayGreenMarket.com


AT22 Community Calendar Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 5:30 pm. $5/adult. 6557227; fourarts.org 3/4 - Microsoft Excel Class 1 at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/4 - Scotty Dog Squares Dance Club at Boynton Beach Senior Center, 1021 S Federal Hwy. All skill levels welcome. Age 18 & up. Every M 7-9 pm. $6/person. 865-2611; boyntonbeach.org 3/4 - Improv Drop In at Improv U, 105 NW 5th Ave, Delray Beach. Fun games/exercises designed for newcomers/advanced players. Great for actors, artists, stand-up comedians, accountants, everyone in between. Every M Improv Drop In; every W Improv Games Drop In 7-9 pm. $10. 844-561-4242; theimprovu.com 3/4 - Global Public Health Today and Tomorrow at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Part of Festival of the Arts Boca. 7 pm. $30. 866-571-2787; festivalboca.org 3/4 - Standing at the Gates of Janus by Tony Finstrom at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Part of Jan McArt New Play Reading Series. 7:30 pm. $10. 237-9000; lynn.edu/events 3/4 - Playwright’s Forum with Jennifer Lane: To Fall in Love… at Florida Atlantic University Theatre Lab, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $20. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/4 - Vintage Reflections at Spanish River Church, 2400 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 8 pm. $46-$79. 800-716-6975; spanishriverconcerts. com 3/4-5 - Jeremy Jordan at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $60-$90. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare. org 3/4-6 - Tax Preparation at Boynton Beach Senior Center, 1021 S Federal Hwy. M/T/W through 4/10 8:30 am-noon. Free. 742-6570; boynton-beach.org Tuesday - 3/5 - The Russian Mafia with Robert G. Rabil at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/5 - Monday Morning Muffins & Mysteries: Sunburn by Laura Lippman at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30-11:30 am. Free. 393-7906; bocalibrary.org 3/5 - Blogs 101 at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org

The COASTAL STAR  3/5 - Introduction to Mah Jongg at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 2019 National Mah Jongg League playing card needed for class. Every T through 4/23 10:30 am-12:30 pm. $97/resident; $121/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/5 - Ikebana Flower Arrangement: Ikenobo School at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Traditional flower arranging using fresh flowers. Every T through 3/26. Beginners 11 am-1 pm; Intermediate 1-3 pm. $70/member; $80/non-member; + $80/flower fee. Registration: 495-0233; morikami.org 3/5 - Chess Club at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Knowledge of the game necessary. Age 18 & up. Every T/F noon-4:30 pm. Free. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/5 - Boca Raton Noon Toastmasters at Train Depot, 747 S Dixie Hwy. Improve public speaking, leadership abilities. Every T 12:15-1:15 pm. Free. 251-4164; toastmastersclub.org 3/5 - The Remarkable Story of Two Thousand Years of Jewish Culture in India with Wes Ervin at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 1-2:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/5 - Modern Line Dance Class at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Enhance quality of life through modern music, dance. Age 50 & up. Every T 1:30-2:30 pm. Per class $5/resident; $6/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/5 - Beginner’s Laptop & Internet at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1:30-3 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/5 – Socrates Café at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Philosophical discussions. Every T 1:30-3 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/5 - A Spot of Tea and a Bit of Gossip at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 2-3 pm. Free. Registration: 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/5 - Word Basics at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 2-4 pm. Free. Registration: 266-0196; delraylibrary.org 3/5 - American Regional Theatre: Live Interview part of Dramalogue Talking Theatre series at Palm Beach Dramaworks, 201 Clematis St, West Palm Beach. Conversations with/about the artists who create the magic. 2 & 7 pm. $25. 514-4042; palmbeachdramaworks.org 3/5 - Literary Afternoons: Cherise Wolas at Levis JCC Sandler Center Beifield Auditorium,

March 2019

Green Markets Boca Raton GreenMarket every Saturday, City Hall, 201 W Palmetto Park Rd, 8 am-1 pm. Free. downtownboca.org; 299-8684; elilly707@aol.com Lake Worth Farmers Market every Saturday, Old Bridge Park, 10 S Ocean Blvd, Lake Worth. 9 am-1 pm. Free. 547-3100; lakeworthfarmersmarket.com Delray Beach GreenMarket every Saturday, Old School Square Park, 50 NE 2nd Ave, one block north of Atlantic Ave. Fresh local produce, baked goods, gourmet food items, plants, live music, children’s activities. 9am-2pm. 276-7511; delraycra.org 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Part of Greetings from the Catskills Series. 2:30 pm. $25. 5582520; levisjcc.org 3/5 - Jonah Goldberg: Suicide of the West at The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Part of Esther B. O’Keeffe Speaker Series. 3 pm. $35/person. 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/5 - Vladimir Putin and the Rise of Russia: Repeat Presentation with Stephen Berk at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 3:30-5 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/ non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/5 - Dramabook Club: Parting the Waters: America in the King Years 1954-1963 by Taylor Branch at Palm Beach Dramaworks, 201 Clematis St, West Palm Beach. Discussion focus on Chapters 1-10. 4-6 pm. $5/guild member; $10/non-member. 514-4042 x2; palmbeachdramaworks.org 3/5 - Second Bloom: Cathy Graham’s Art of the Table Presentation at Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens, 253 Barcelona Rd, West Palm Beach. 5:30-7 pm. 832-5328; ansg.org 3/5 - Fat Tuesday Mardi Gras Party with It Takes Two at The Pavilion Grille, 301 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 6 pm dinner; 8 pm dancing. $10/includes first house drink. 912-0000; paviliongrille.com 3/5 - Beginner’s Italian 1: Night Session at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. Every M 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7906; bocalibrary.org 3/5 - Pinochle at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Every T/Th 6-9 pm. Free. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/5 - Adult International Folk Dance at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Every T (except 2nd T) 6:30-9:30 pm. Per class $5/resident; $6/non-resident. 913-475-1112; mydelraybeach.com 3/5 - Art Salon: Jeanne Jaffe (Delray Beach): Unraveling the Knot:

Reexamining Myths, History and Narratives at Armory Art Center, 811 Park Place, West Palm Beach. 6:30-8:30 pm. $10/ donation. 832-1776; armoryart.org 3/5 - The Birth of the Great American Songbook: Irving Berlin and Jerome Kern with Harvey Granat at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 7-8:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/5 – Open Play Basketball 30 & Over at Delray Beach Community Center, 50 NW 1st Ave. Every T 7-8 pm. Free. 243-7000 x5001; mydelraybeach.com 3/5 - Robert Pinsky: PoemJazz at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Part of Festival of the Arts Boca. 7 pm. $30. 866-571-2787; festivalboca.org 3/5 - Adult U: Ron Feinman: Presidents & Moral Courage at Levis JCC Sandler Center Beifield Auditorium, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Part of Greetings from the Catskills Series. 7:30 pm. $18. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 3/5 - Sarina Zhang at Spanish River Church, 2400 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 8 pm. $49-$84. 800-716-6975; spanishriverconcerts.com Wednesday - 3/6 - YMCA of South Palm Beach County 17th Annual Inspiration Breakfast at Office Depot Global Headquarters, 6600 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Keynote speaker Dara Torres. 7:30-10:30 am. Call for tickets: 300-3238; ymcaspbc.org 3/6 - BookBinder Workshop at Art-Sea Living, 112 S Federal Hwy #7, Boynton Beach. 9-11 am. $35. 737-2600; artsealiving.com 3/6 - Adult Watercolor Painting Workshop at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Lesson/lecture, emphasis on composition/ drawing, then a painting demo. Remainder of class time is one-on-one instruction, finishing w/class critique. Age 18 & up. W 9 am-noon or 1-4 pm. Monthly $35/resident; $38/nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/6 - Google Applications at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 10 am-noon. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/6 - Alliance of Delray: All About Old School Square with Matthew Farmer at South County Civic Center, 16700 Jog Rd, Delray Beach. Program, refreshments. 9 am doors open; 9:30 am meeting. Free. 859-383; allianceofdelray.com 3/6 - The Balfour Declaration: An Essential Document that Led to the Establishment of Israel or to Conflicts in the Region - or Both? with Ralph Nurnberger at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $30/ advance member; $35/non-member & onetime guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/6 - Great Decisions 2019 at First Presbyterian Church Boynton Beach, 235 SW 6th Ave. Every W 10 am-noon. Free. 732-3774; fpcboynton.com 3/6 - Moving Beyond Grief and Loss at Unity of Delray Beach Church, 101 NW 22nd St. 12-week grief recovery series facilitated by Rev. Ytonna Dyess Finnegan, CSE. The Grief Recovery Handbook available for purchase. 10 am-1 pm or 7:15-8:30 pm. Free-will offering. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 3/6 - Beginner’s Italian 1: Day Session at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. Every W 10:30 am-noon. Free. 3937906; bocalibrary.org 3/6 - Socrates Cafe at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Philosophical discussions. Every W 11:30 am-1 pm. Free. 2660194; delraylibrary.org 3/6- Palm Beach Poetry Festival: Bards of a Feather at Green Cay Wetlands, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Open-mic, roundrobin poetry reading; bring up to 4 poems, original or not, to share. 1 pm. Free. 966-7000, palmbeachpoetryfestival.org 3/6 - Murder, Mayhem, Music, and Moods in Nashville, Tennessee with Taylor Hagood at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 1-2:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/ non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/6 - Coloring Club for Adults at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Every W 1 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us

3/6 - Beginner’s Spanish 1 Day Session at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. Every W 1:30-3 pm. Free. 393-7906; bocalibrary.org 3/6 - Excel Basics at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 2-4 pm. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/6 - Introduction to Canasta at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Basic techniques: how to count points, keep score, play of the hand. Every W through 4/10 2-4 pm. $90/resident; $113/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/6 - Contemporary Global Hotspots with Al Biegel, Colonel, U.S. Army (Ret.) at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Institute. Every W through 3/27 2-3:30 pm. $60. 266-9490; delraylibrary. org 3/6 - Walter Willett’s Food Fight with Walter Willett at The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Book signing follows. 2:30 pm. $20/person. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/6 - The Great Jewish Comedians: From Burlesque and Vaudeville to the Borscht Belt and YouTube with Al Kustanowitz at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 3:30-5 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/ non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/6 - Bingo at Temple Sinai Palm Beach County, 2475 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. $2,500 in prizes every week. Every W 5 pm doors open; 6 pm early bird; 6:30 pm first game. $15. 276-6161 x128; templesinaipbc.org 3/6 - Creative Cloud Lab: Premiere Level 1 at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 5:30-7 pm. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/6 - Ocean Ridge Book Club: Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston at Ocean Ridge Town Hall, 6450 N Ocean Blvd. 5:45 pm. Free. lbsorenson@bellsouth.net 3/6 - Ash Wednesday & Potluck Dinner at First Presbyterian Church Boynton Beach, 235 SW 6th Ave. 6 pm. Free. 732-3774; fpcboynton. com 3/6 - A New Pompey Park: Community Input Meeting at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Parks and Recreation department public meeting to receive community input for the selected master plan. 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. 243-7250; delraybeachfl. gov 3/6 - The Songs of Johnny Mercer: Music Americana with Rod MacDonald and the Humdingers at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 7-9 pm. $60/ annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/6 - Bernstein in Song at Florida Atlantic University Wimberly Library, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $20. 297-6124; fauevents. com 3/6 - David Sanger: Cyber Conflict: A New Era of War, Sabotage, and Fear at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Part of Festival of the Arts Boca. 7 pm. $30. 866-571-2787; festivalboca.org 3/6 - LA Theatre Works: Steel Magnolias at The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 7:30 pm. $40/person; free/ member. 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/6 - Tammy McCann presents The Legendary Ladies of Jazz: Ella, Sarah, Dinah and Billie at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Part of Cabaret Series. 7:30 pm. $40. 237-9000; lynn.edu/events 3/6 - Finding Humor in the News with Frank Cerabino part of Lecture Series at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7:30 pm. $15/single-event ticket. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/6 - Musicworks: Broken Arrow: The Music of Neil Young at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $47-$380. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org Thursday - 3/7 - Watercolor Workshop at Art-Sea Living, 112 S Federal Hwy #7, Boynton Beach. 9-11 am. $35. 737-2600; artsealiving. com 3/7 - Quilters meet at Boynton Beach City Library, 115 N Federal Hwy. Share quilting information, perpetuate quilting as a cultural and artistic form. Every Th 9-11:30 am. Free. 742-6886; boyntonlibrary.org 3/7 - Senior Health Fair at Ezell Hester, Jr. Community Center, 1901 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 9-11:30 am. Free. 742-6570; boynton-beach.org 3/7 - 18th Annual Delray Beach Home Tour in the Seagate Neighborhood. Benefits Achievement Centers for Children and Families. Wide variety of architectural styles/design elements. 10 am-4 pm. $100. 276-0520; achievementcentersfl.org


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019 3/7 - First Thursday Site Tours at Cornell Art Museum at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave. History of Delray Beach slide show, tour of the historic site. Held again 4/4. 11 am & 1 pm. $8/at door. 403-2956; oldschoolsquare.org 3/7 - Senior Bridge at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Experienced players welcome. Partners not needed. Every Th Noon-4 pm. Annual fee $15/resident + $1/ game; $25/non-resident + $2/game. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/7 - Adult Acrylics Art Class at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Local instructor teaches basic acrylic painting techniques to beginners; available for instruction to advanced painters. Call for list of supplies needed. Age 18 & up. Every Th noon-3 pm. Per class $10/resident; $12/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/7 - Lunch with Liz at the Library at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Join author, writer, radio talk show host Liz Sterling for discussion. Noon-1:30 pm. Free. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/7 - Israeli-Indian Relations with Ralph Nurnberger at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 1-2:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/7 - Holiday: The Best Travel Magazine That Ever Was with Pamela Fiori at Kravis Center Cohen Pavilion, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Part of ArtSmart Lecture Series. 1:30 pm. $25. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/7 - Lecture: The Waters of Rome by Katherine Rinne at Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach, 311 Peruvian Ave, Palm Beach. 2-3 pm. Free. 832-0731 x111; palmbeachpreservation.org 3/7 - Password Managers at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. Held again 2-3:30 pm 3/26. 10 am-noon. Free. 2660194; delraylibrary.org 3/7 - Great Trials in American History with Rabbi Richard Polirer at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Institute. Every Th through 3/21 2-3:30 pm. $55. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/7 - FAU Research in Action Discussion Series at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 2-3 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/7 - The Steroids Scandal: Its Impact on Society and the Future of Baseball with Stanley Teitelbaum at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 3:30-5 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/7 - Dmitry Kouzov & Yulia Fedeseeva Performance at J. turner Moore Memorial Library, 1330 Lands End Rd, Manalapan. Refreshments follow. 6 pm. Free/member. 3832541; manalapan.org 3/7 - In Full Flight: A Story of Africa and Atonement with John Heminway at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. Book signing follows. 6 pm. $20/ person. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/7 - Introduction to Music Technologies at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary. org 3/7 - Latin Night at The Pavilion Grille, 301 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 6 pm dinner; 8 pm music. $15/includes first house drink. 912-0000; paviliongrille.com 3/7 - Microsoft Excel Class 2 at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/7 - James Grippando & Harriet Tyce speak and sign their books The Girl in the Glass Box and Blood Orange at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 7 pm. Free. 279-7790; murderonthebeach.com 3/7 - Adult Tango Dance at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Every Th 7:50-10:50 pm. $15/resident; $16/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com Friday - 3/8 - Sugar Land Tour meets at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Pumping station, fields, environmental impact, juicing, plant, sugar mill refinery, more. Lunch included. 7:15-7:45 am pick-up; 4:30 pm return. Free. Register: 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/8 - Clay Sculpting Class at Art-Sea Living, 112 S Federal Hwy #7, Boynton Beach. All levels. Held again 3/15 9-11 am. $135/class. 737-2600; artsealiving.com 3/8 - Supervised Bridge Play at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. John Black. Partners not needed. Adults. Every F 10 am-noon. $10/person. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/8 - The Science of the Proven Secrets to Happiness: I Feel You: Communicating Empathetically with Cyndi Stein-Rubin at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part

of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/ non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/8 - The Download: Digital Library Services: Internet Archive at The Society of the Four Arts King Library, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Monthly group dedicated to teaching patrons about useful resources in the online world. No devices necessary. Topic changes monthly. 10:30 am. Free. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/8 - Balkan by the Beach: International Folk Dance at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Benefit of exercise, pleasure of dancing to beautiful music. No experience or partner needed. Age 50 & up. Every F 10:45 am1:15 pm. Per class $5/resident; $6/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/8 - Bill Gove Golden Gavel Toastmasters Club at Duffy’s Sports Grill, 4746 N Congress Ave, Boynton Beach. Every F noon-1 pm. $12/ lunch or $5/soft drink; cash only. 742-2121; billgovetoastmastersclub.com 3/8 - Volcanoes: Pulse of the Planet with Felicia Survis at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 1-2:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/8 - Adult Coloring Club at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Every 2nd F 1:30 pm. Free. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/8 - Steel Magnolias (PG 1989) at The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30 & 6 pm. $5/adult. 655-7227; fourarts.org 3/8 - Mysteries in the Lives of our Beloved Composers: Music by Mozart, Salieri, Beethoven, Chopin, and Brahms with Sofiya Uryvayeva Martin at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 3:30-5 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/8 - Art After Dark at Norton Museum of Art, 1450 S Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. 5-10 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton.org 3/8 - Lake Ave Block Party on Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Live music, vendors, car & bike show. Held again 4/5. 6-10 pm. Free. 586-1600; lakeworth.org 3/8 - Buck Buchanan speaks and signs his book The Secret Files of Hugo & Victoria at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 7 pm. Free. 279-7790; murderonthebeach.com 3/8 - Movies at the Beach: Jumanji Welcome to the Jungle at Lantana Municipal Beach, 131 Ocean Blvd, Manalapan. 7 pm. Free. 540-5000; lantana.org 3/8 - Laser Shows at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. 2nd F 7 pm. $10/advance; $12/at the door. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org 3/8 - Arts Leader Lecture Series: Nick Cave: A Conversation at Norton Museum of Art, 1450 S Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. 7-8:30 pm. Free w/museum admission. 832-5196; norton. org 3/8 - A Celebration of Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme at Lake Worth Playhouse Stonzek

Theatre, 713 Lake Ave. 7:30 pm. $25. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/8 - Jenny Scheinman’s Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait at Kravis Center Persson Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 7:30 pm. $35. 832-7469; kravis.org 3 /8 - An Evening of Russian Music and Ballet at Mizner Park Amphitheatre, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Part of Festival of the Arts Boca. 7:30 pm. Tickets start at $35. 866-5712787; festivalboca.org 3/8 - Kevin Maines and the Volts at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $20-$30. 450-6357; artsgarage.org 3 /8-9 - Dollhouse Miniatures Show and Sale at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 NW Crawford Blvd. Presented by Les Petits Collecteurs of South Florida. A percentage of proceeds benefits AVDA and Kids in Distress. F workshops 9 am-5 pm; Sat show 9 am-3:30 pm. $5/adult; $2/child 12 & under. sites.google. com/site/lespetitsclub 3/8-9 - Expressive Abstract: Large Scale Painting: Intermediate/Advanced Acrylic Workshop at Old School Square Fieldhouse, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Intermediate (2-5 years art experience) through advanced levels (5 years experience through professional artist). 9:30 am-4:30 pm. $450. 243-7922; oldschoolsquare.org Saturday - 3/9 - Community Spirit Race at FAU Stadium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Portion benefits Rotary Club Downtown Boca Raton. 5K run/walk, 1 mile run/walk, fun run & kidzone, nonprofit/vendor expo. 6:30 am registration; 7:30 am race. $30/5k: $20/1 mile. 385-0144; spiritofgivingnetwork.com 3/9 - Treasure Mapping/Vision Board Workshop at Unity of Delray Beach Church, 101 NW 22nd St. Bring bag lunch, glue stick, poster board, magazines. 9 am-3 pm. Free-will offering. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 3/9 - Men’s Breakfast and Spiritual Conversation at First Presbyterian Church Boynton Beach, 235 SW 6th Ave. Every Sat 9 am. Free. 732-3774; fpcboynton.com 3/9 - Shibori Indigo Workshop: Shibori Scarf at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. 10 am-4 pm. $50/person + $20/material fee. Registration: 495-0233 x210; morikami.org 3/9 - Ride & Remember Bus Tour departs from Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NW 5th Ave, Delray Beach. 2-hour tour; focus on 5 historic districts. 2nd Sat 10 am-noon. $35. Reservations: 279-8883; spadymuseum.com 3/9 - 3D Printing Project at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10 am-noon. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/9 - Taste History Culinary Tours of Historic Lake Worth & Lantana conducted by Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History departs from Macy’s (outside East Entrance) Boynton Beach Mall, 801 N Congress Ave. 4-hour tour includes bus/walking tour, food sampling, visits to historical/cultural sites. 2nd Sat year-round, rain or shine. Reservations required: check website for available dates. 11 am. $51-$60/adult & senior citizen; free/ child under 18. Reservations: 638-8277; tastehistoryculinarytours.org 3/9 - A Walk in the Park Art Workshop: Stitch a Nature Journal at Sugar Sand Park Community Center, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Adults 19+. Noon-2:30 pm. $10/ materials fee + $30/resident, $37.50/nonresident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org

Community Calendar AT23 3/9 - Panel Discussion: Barnes, Gardner, Norton, and Phillips: American Collectors and Their Museums at Norton Museum of Art, 1450 S Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. 2-4 pm. Free. Registration: 832-5196; norton.org 3/9 - Hold Fast Your Dreams! presented by The Robert Sharon Chorale at DeSantis Chapel, 300 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 3 pm. $20/adult; $5/student w/ID; free/ child under 12. 687-4245; rschorale.com 3/9 - Evening on Antique Row, 3300-3900 Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. Benefits Historical Society of Palm Beach County. Food trucks, musicians, entertainment, antique shop showcases. 6-9 pm; 8-11 pm after party. $40$100/advance; $65-$125/at the door; $10/valet parking. 832-4164 x106; hspbc.org 3/9 - Nu Deco Ensemble at Mizner Park Amphitheatre, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Part of Festival of the Arts Boca. 7:30 pm. Tickets start at $25. 866-571-2787; festivalboca.org 3/9 - Hotel California: Tribute to the Eagles at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $35-$45. 450-6357; artsgarage.org 3/9 - First Nighters at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hobnob w/performers; have your photo taken w/the stars. Follows performance of William Close and the Earth Harp Collective. 9 pm. $20. 237-7750; lynn.tix.com 3/9-10 - Artists in the Park presented by Delray Beach Art League at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St. Fine art exhibition/sales. 10 am-4:30 pm. Free. 843-2311; delrayartleague.com 3/9-10 - Delray Beach Wine & Seafood Festival at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Sat 11 am-11 pm; Sun 11 am-6 pm. Free. wineandseafoodfest.com 3/9-10 - William Close and the Earth Harp Collective at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Part of Live at Lynn Theatre Series. Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 4 pm. $50-$70. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com

MARCH 10-16

Sunday - 3/10 - Daylight Savings Time begins 3/10 - 11th Annual Boating & Beach Bash for People with Disabilities at Spanish River Park, 3001 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Largest free fun-day event in America for children & adults with special needs. Boat rides on the Intracoastal Waterway, music, BBQ lunch, games, more. 10 am-3 pm. Free. 715-2622; boatingbeachbash.com 3/10 - Nihongo: Introduction to Japanese at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Each level has 3 parts which should be taken sequentially before you can move on to the next level. Introduction of the Japanese language and culture. Every Sun through 5/5. Level I 10:15-11:25 am; Level II 11:25 am-12:35 pm; Level III 12:40-1:50 pm; Level IV 1:50-3 pm. $90/member; $100/non-member. Registration: 495-0233; morikami.org 3/10 - Hanley Foundation 2019 Family Picnic at National Croquet Center, 700 Florida Mango Rd, West Palm Beach. Benefits the Foundation’s substance abuse prevention programming throughout Florida. Games, activities, silent auction, lunch. 11 am-2 pm. $195/adult (18+); $50/child (4-17); free/child 3 & under. 268-2355; hanleyfoundation.org 3/10 - A.N.T.H.U.M. Jazz Band Dance at Boynton Beach Senior Center, 1021 S Federal Hwy. Standards, pop, big band swing, jazz.

Every Th 1-3 pm. $2/non-member. 742-6570; boynton-beach.org 3/10 - Art Show at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 2-4 pm. Free. 5888889; southpalmbeach.com 3/10 - Photography Exhibit at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Features Dr. Carol Marinas and Ms. Tristen Garrison. Light refreshments. 2-4 pm. Free. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/10 - Live! At the Norton: Conrad Tao at Norton Museum of Art, 1450 S Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. 2:30 pm doors open; 3 pm show. $15/member; $20/non-member. 832-5196; norton.org 3/10 - Friends Historic Reenactment: Hear My Voice at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Part of Friends Music Series. Adults. 3-4:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/10 - Boca Talk: Florida’s Literature and History at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 3-4 pm. $15/non-member. RSVP: 392-2500 x213; bocamuseum.org 3/10 - Arturo Sandoval and Band at Mizner Park Amphitheatre, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Part of Festival of the Arts. 7 pm. Tickets start at $25. 866-571-2787; festivalboca.org 3/10-12 - Ballet Palm Beach Presents Wonderland at The King’s Academy Center for Performing Arts, 8401 Belvedere Rd, West Palm Beach. Th/F/Sat 7 pm; Sat 1 pm; Sun 4 pm. $30-$45. 686-4244; Balletpalmbeach.org 3/10 - The Renditions of South Florida at Temple Sinai, 2475 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Doo Wop songs from the 50s & 60s. 7 pm. $18-$25. 276-6161 x128; templesinaipb.org 3/10 - Ruben Caban Septet at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 7 pm. $30-$40. 450-6357; artsgarage.org 3/10-31 - Boca Raton Jewish Film Festival at multiple locations. Jewish-themed films from around the globe; guest speakers, filmmakers, actors; special events; more. Check website for schedule, locations, tickets. 9618002; bocajff.org Monday - 3/11 - Dirty Politics in American History with Myrna Goldberger at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every M through 4/1 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/ non-member, $20/one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/11 - Create a Gmail Account at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 10 am-noon. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/11 - Mosaic Class at Art-Sea Living, 112 S Federal Hwy #7, Boynton Beach. 11 am. $120$195. 737-2600; artsealiving.com 3/11 - The Young Irelanders Wild Atlantic Way Tour at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 11 am & 2 pm. $29. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/11 - Nazi Art Theft and its Consequences with Dr. Nina Zimmer at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. 2:30 pm. $20. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/11 - Electrified!: From Artificial Light to Artificial Brain with Stephen Kowel at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every M through 4/1 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance


AT24 Community Calendar member; $65/non-member; $20/one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/11 - Culture & Cocktails: Art Attack: A Conversation with Art Collector Christine Aylward and Daphne Nikolopoulos at The Colony Palm Beach, 155 Hammon Ave. 5-7 pm. $75/advance; $85/at the door. 472-3330; palmbeachculture.com 3/11 - Choral Workshop with Dr. Donna Plasket and Phillip Bergmann at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. Every M through 4/8 5:30-7 pm. Free. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/11-12 - Four Best Men at Spanish River Church, 2400 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Held again 3/18-19 & 25. 8 pm. $46-$79. 800-7166975; spanishriverconcerts.com Tuesday - 3/12 - Uniform Municipal Election at multiple locations; check website for locations/sample ballots. 7 am-7 pm. pbcelections.org 3/12 - NOSH! You Don’t Have to be Irish to Love This Food at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 10-11 am. Free. Registration: 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/12 - Gmail Basics at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 10 amnoon. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/12 - Palm Beach Watercolor Society Paint-In With a Model at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Held again 3/26. 10 am-12:45 pm. 885-4199; palmbeachwatercolorsociety.org 3/12 - US-Russian Relations: Implications for World Stability with Robert G. Rabil at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every T through 4/2 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/non-member; $20/one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/12 - Community in Crisis: The Jews of France from Enlightenment to Macron with Arnold Ages at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every T through 4/2 12:30-2 pm. $60/annual membership; $60/advance member; $65/ non-member; $20/one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/12 - Taste of the Town with Roberta Sabban: Beef and Veal at Meat Market, 191 Bradley Pl, Palm Beach. Noon-2 pm. $125/ lunch. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/12 - A Salute and Tribute to the Life and Musical Performances of Frank Sinatra & Friends with Dr. Roni Stein-Loreti at Kravis Center Cohen Pavilion, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Part of ArtSmart Lecture Series. 1:30 pm. $25. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/12 - Guided Tour of the Historic Boca Raton Resort & Club at 501 E Camino Real. Presented by Boca Raton Historical Society & Museum. 1.5-hour walking tour includes Addison Mizner’s story, his architectural inspirations. Not recommended for children under 12. 2nd & 4th T 2-3:30 pm through May. $15/non-member; $10/BRHS member. Reservations: 395-6766; bocahistory.org 3/12 - Jewish Mysticism with Andy Greenberg at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Institute. Held again 3/19 2-3:30 pm. $50. 2669490; delraylibrary.org 3/12 - Richard Russo: The Destiny Thief at The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Part of Esther B. O’Keeffe Speaker Series. 3 pm. $35/person. 805-8562; fourarts. org 3/12 - Never Underestimate the Power of a Woman with Terryl Lawrence at Florida

The COASTAL STAR Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every T through 4/2 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/ non-member; $20/one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/12 - Ukulele Workshop and Jam at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Teens & adults. Held again 3/26. 5-7:30 pm. Free. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/12 - Student Recital: Omar Lawand, trombone at Lynn University AmarnickGoldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 5:30 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/12 - Interactive Acoustic Music and Art In The Park at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. All ages. 2nd T 6-9 pm. Free. 2437350; mydelraybeach.com 3/12 - Foreign Film Series: The Great Beauty (NR) at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6:30-9 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/12 - Adult U: Dam Hudak: When Oscar Gets It Wrong! at Levis JCC Sandler Center Beifield Auditorium, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Part of Greetings from the Catskills Series. 7:30 pm. $18. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 3/12 - Student Recital: Nalin Myoung, violin at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/12 - All Arts Open Mic Night at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 2nd T 8-10 pm. $5. 450-6357; artsgarage.org Wednesday - 3/13 - Objection! Current, Contentious and Confusing Legal Battles with Irving Labovitz at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every W through 4/3 9-10:30 am. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/ non-member; $20/one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/13 - Embroidery Workshop at Art-Sea Living, 112 S Federal Hwy #7, Boynton Beach. Held again 4/3 9-11 am. $35. 737-2600; artsealiving.com 3/13 - Guest Speaker: The Iconic Isaac Mizrahi In Person at Levis JCC Sandler Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 10 am VIP reception; 11 am program. $100/VIP; $36/ general admission. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 3/13 - GFWC Women’s Club of Delray Beach Inc. at 505 Teen Center, 505 SE 5th Ave, Delray Beach. 2nd W. 10:30 am. Free. 843-6821; mydelraybeach.com 3/13 - Surfrider Foundation presents Rise Above Plastic at Delray Beach Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Presented by Grass River Garden Club. 10:30 am. Free. 203-610-2519; cbenisch@ aol.com 3/13 - Movies that Address Significant Societal Issues with Burton Atkins at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every W through 4/3 11:15 am-12:45 pm. $60/annual membership; $60/ advance member; $65/non-member; $20/onetime guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/13 - Gold Coast Tiger Bay Club at City Fish Market, 7940 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Maria Sachs speaks about Human Trafficking in South Florida 11:30 am-1:30 pm. $35/member or first-time guest; $55/non-member. 620-8888; goldcoasttigerbayclub.com 3/13 - Institute for Learning in Retirement: Meet the Instructors at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. 1 pm. Free. 833-0999; iliretirement.org 3/13 - Ikebana: Flower Arrangement

Sogetsu Class at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens Oki Education Center, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Contemporary flower arranging using fresh flowers. Every W through 3/27 1:30-3:30 pm. $45/member; $52.50/non-member; $45/flower fee. Registration: 495-0233 x237; morikami.org 3/13 - Silver Science Days at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Special afternoon for adults/ retirees. Age 60 & up. 2nd W 2-5 pm. $10. 8321988; sfsciencecenter.org 3/13 - Signs to the Sacred Garden: How Art Can Help Us Rediscover Hope in Our Time with Alexander Newley at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. 2:30-4:30 pm. Free. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/13 - Jerusalem: The World’s Most Contested City with Hank Savitch at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every W through 4/3 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/ non-member; $20/one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/13 - Wine Glass Painting Class at Art-Sea Living, 112 S Fed Hwy #7, Boynton Beach. 6-8 pm. $25/person, $40/2 people. 737-2600; artsealiving.com 3/13 - Writers’ Corner at Boynton Beach City Library, 115 N Federal Hwy. Manuscript critiquing by published authors. 2nd W 6:30-8 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/13 - Author Talk at West Boynton Branch Library, 9451 Jog Rd. Author Margaret Wrinkle discusses her book Wash. Presented by Women’s National Book Association. 6:30 pm. Free. 734-5556 3/13 - Jewish Film Festival: Bombshell: The Hedy Lamar Story at Congregation B’nai Israel VIP Lounge, 2200 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $10 per film/non-member. 243-1484; cbiboca.org 3/13 - An Evening of Storytelling with Frank Cerabino at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 7-8:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/13 - Bringing the Great Concert Hall Music To The People with Anton Del Forno part of Music Series at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7 pm doors open; 7:30 pm performance. $15/single-event ticket. 5888889; southpalmbeach.com 3/13 - Civil War Round Table Palm Beach Meeting at Atlantis Council Chambers, 260 Orange Tree. 2nd W 7 pm. Free. civilwarroundtablepalmbeach.org 3/13 - Tony Sands Presents: It Was A Very Good Year at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. Musical tribute to Frank Sinatra. 7:30 pm. $25. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/13 - Musicworks: Stephen Bishop at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $57-$460. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/13 - Michael Feinstein Conducts the Kravis Center Pops Orchestra: Seasons of Sinatra: A Life in Music: Liza Minnelli, Executive Producer at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 8 pm. Tickets start at $35. 832-7469; kravis.org Thursday - 3/14 - Adult Day Trip: Flamingo Gardens meets at Patch Reef Park, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Trip includes a narrated guided tour, lunch and round-trip motor coach transportation to and from Patch Reef Park. Check in by 8:30 am; 9 am-2:45 pm. $51/person.

March 2019 367-7035; myboca.us 3/14 - Collage Workshop at Art-Sea Living, 112 S Federal Hwy #7, Boynton Beach. Held again 4/4 9-11 am. $35. 737-2600; artsealiving. com 3/14 - The Next Big War with Andrew Kahn at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every Th through 4/4 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $50/ advance member; $65/non-member; $20/ one-time guest pass at the door. 297-3171; fau. edu/lls 3/14 - Great Decisions Discussion Group at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Held again 3/28 10-11:30 am. Free. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/14 - Online Shopping at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 10 am-noon. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/14 - Knit ‘N Purl at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Rotating facilitators. Held again 2/28. 10:30 am. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/14 - Kravis Film & Literary Club: Sabrina at Kravis Center Persson Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Includes water & boxed lunch from Catering by The Breakers. 11 am. $49. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/14 - 28th Annual Love of Literacy Luncheon at Kravis Center Cohen Pavilion, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Benefits Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County. Featured speaker author Will Schwalbe. 11 am registration; 11:30 am luncheon/program. $150/individual; $300/patron. 279-9103; literacypbc.org 3/14 - Lunch & Learn: Die Fledermaus presented by Palm Beach Opera at The National Croquet Center, 700 Florida Mango Rd, West Palm Beach. Noon-2 pm. $89. 833-7888; pbopera.org 3/14 - Advancements in Artificial Intelligence: Technology, Risks, Applications and Implications with Oge Marques at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 12:30-2 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/14 - Lecture & Book Signing: Havana Living Today by Hermes Mallea at Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach, 311 Peruvian Ave, Palm Beach. 2-3 pm. $30/ non-member. Reservations: 832-0731 x111; palmbeachpreservation.org 3/14 - Story Central: This Is Your Life: The Art & Science of Storytelling at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. Every Th 2-4 pm. Free. 544-8585; bocalibrary.org 3/14 - The Art of Crafting the Memoir: Session I for Beginners with Myles Ludwig at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. Every Th through 4/18 2-4 pm. $225/session. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/14 - What’s So Funny? With Jenny Allen at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. Book signing follows. 2:30 pm. $20. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/14 - Exhibition Lecture: Makes & Muse: Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry by Elyse Zorn Karlin at Flagler Museum, One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. 3 pm. Free. Registration: 655-2833; flaglermuseum.us 3/14 - Enjoying Modern Jazz with Mark Gridley at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong

Learning Institute. Every Th through 4/4 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/non-member; $20/one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/14 - Concert: Yoko Kothari, Classical Piano at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. 5 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/14 - Trunk Show: Italianissimo Jewelry at Boca Raton Museum of Art Store, 501 Plaza Real. 5-8 pm. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/14 - Night Line Dancing Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Every Th through 4/25. Beginner 6-7 pm; Beginner & High Beginner 6-8 pm; High Beginner 7-8 pm; High Beginner & Intermediate 7-9 pm; Intermediate 8-9 pm. $44-$70/resident; $55-$88/non-resident. 3677035; myboca.us 3/14 - Adobe Photoshop 1 at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. Held again 4/4 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/14 - The Next Generation Road Rascals Car Show at Lake Worth Casino Building & Beach Complex, 10 S Ocean Blvd. 2nd Th 6-9 pm. rstarr2010@gmail.com 3/14 - Open Readings at Creative Arts School, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Come to listen or sign up to read from an original work (published or unpublished). All levels welcome. Participants read for 10-15 minutes, followed by a short open discussion. Every 2nd Th 6:308:30 pm. Free. 742-3244; oldschoolsquare.org 3/14 - The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Part of Unbound World Book Club. Adults. 7-8 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/14 - Jazz in the Gallery: The Marshall Turkin Classic Jazz Ensemble at Boca Raton Museum of Art Outdoor Sculpture Garden, 501 Plaza Real. 7-8:30 pm. Free w/paid admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/14 - Better than the Original: Cinematic Remakes that were Better than the Originals with Kurt F. Stone at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every Th through 4/4 7-9 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/ non-member; $20/one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/14 - The Atlantic City Boys at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $35. 844-672-2849; miznerparkculturalcenter.com 3/14 - South Florida Symphony Orchestra: Masterworks III at Spanish River Worship Center, 2400 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $45-$75. 954-522-8445; southfloridasymphony. org 3/14 - Mostly Music: Schubert at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Conservatory’s artist-faculty & students; actors bring composers to life through reading their letters. 7:30 pm. $20. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/14-24 - Crossing Delancey at Levis JCC Sandler Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Check website for schedule/times. $40/VIP reserved; $30/general admission. 558-2520; levisjcc.org Friday - 3/15 - The South: Exploring an American Idea with Stephen Engle at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/ non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/15 - Adult U: Dialogue with a Doc Diseases of the Lung at Levis JCC Sandler


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019 Center Beifield Auditorium, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Part of Greetings from the Catskills Series. 10:30 am. $10. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 3/15 - Nonviolent Resistance in Modern History with Doug McGetchin at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every F through 4/5 12:30-2 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/ non-member; $20/one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/15 - St. Patrick’s Day Party at Boynton Beach Senior Center, 1021 S Federal Hwy. 1-3 pm. $3/advance; $5/at the door. 742-6570; boynton-beach.org 3/15 - Student Recital: Suhao Bai, piano at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 2 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/15 - Student Recital: Yingpeng Wang, piano at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 3 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/15 - Art Boca Raton: Art After Dark at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real, Mizner Park. 5-8 pm. Free/Art Boca Raton VIPs; $10/one- & multi-day pass holder; $12/general admission. 392-2500; Bocamuseum.org 3/15 - Box on Polka Band at Ellie’s 50’s Diner, 2410 N Federal Hwy, Delray Beach. Buffet dinner, cash bar. 6 pm doors open. $38. 2761570; elliescatering.com 3/15 - Cretaceous Cocktails at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Interactive happy hour event/exploration of Dinosaur Invasion exhibit. Age 21+. 6-9 pm. $18/advance & member; $20/ at the door. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org 3/15 - Exhibition Opening: All Student & Armory Faculty Show at Armory Art Center, 811 Park Place, West Palm Beach. Runs through 4/12. 6 pm. $5/non-member. 832-1776; armoryart.org 3/15 - Outstanding Young Owls Ceremony & Reception at FAU Tech Runway, 901 NW 35th St, Boca Raton. Presented by Florida Atlantic University Alumni Association; celebrates achievements of exceptional young alumni from 8 FAU colleges. 6-8 pm. $10. 3282586; faualumni.org/2019oyo 3/15 - Ruth E. Carter Oscar-Winning Costume Designer at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Part of American Songbook Series. 7:30 pm. $20-$25. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/15 - Messages in Harmony: The Story and Songs of Peter, Paul & Mary at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Part of Nostalgia Concert Series Featuring The Pink Slip Duo. 7:30 pm. $35. 844672-2849; miznerparkculturalcenter.com 3/15 - Dante Vargas & the Cat Band at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $35-$45. 450-6357; artsgarage.org 3/15 - Pablo Cruise at The Pavilion at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8-10 pm. $20-$75. 243-7922; oldschoolsquare. org 3/15 - Comedian Jimmy Shubert at Mizner Park Comedy Club, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Age 18+. 8 pm. Tickets start at $20. 786-5642291; miznerparkcomedyclub.com 3/15-16 - St. Patrick’s Day Festival & Parade begins at Delray Beach Tennis Center, 201 W Atlantic Ave. Check website for events, parking, more. Festival F 5-10 pm & Sat 10 am-6 pm; parade Sat 2 pm. Free. 862-3461; specialevents@mydelraybeach.com 3/15-17 - Last Of The Red Hot Lovers (PG) presented by Curtain Call Playhouse at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. F/Sat 8 pm; Sat/Sun 2 pm. $25. 347-3948; willowtheatre.org Saturday - 3/16 - Wellington Barn Tour on luxury busses. Benefits Semper Fi Fund. Includes bus transport, hospitality at several barns, gift bags, ticket to Grand Champions polo game. Tours start at 8 am. $55. Popoamerica.com 3/16 - Historical Walking Tour meets at Palm Beach County History Museum, 300 N Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. 90-minute guided tour showcases the evolution of downtown West Palm Beach buildings/landmarks. Tours begin by the Banyan Tree at 101 N Clematis St, end at Palm Beach County History Museum, 300 N Dixie Hwy. 10 am. $10/person. Registration: 832-4164 x100; hspbc.org 3/16 - FAU/Palm Beach Book Festival at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 10 am-4 pm. $85. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/16 - iMovie Magic: Adding Sound at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/16 - Taste History Culinary Tours of Historic Delray Beach & Boynton Beach conducted by Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History departs from Macy’s (outside East Entrance) Boynton Beach Mall, 801 N Congress Ave. 4-hour tour includes bus/walking tour, food sampling, visits to historical/cultural sites. 3rd & 4th Sat Year-round, rain or shine.

11 am. $51-$60/adult & senior citizen; free/ child under 18. Reservations: 638-8277; tastehistoryculinarytours.org 3/16 - Book Club at Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NW 5th Ave, Delray Beach. Noon2 pm. $40. 279-8883; spadymuseum.com 3/16 - Lecture: ICONTEMPORARY: The Icon Tradition in Russia at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Part of Icons in Transformation. 1-2 pm. $10. 2764541; stpaulsdelray.org 3/16 - The Way of Tea: Sado Demonstration at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Observe Japanese sado, an ever-changing tea ceremony demonstration rich in sensational subtleties. Noon, 1:30 pm & 3 pm. $5 w/paid museum admission. 495-0233 x210; morikami.org 3/16 - Travel: Ireland (and Europe!) at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1:30-3 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/16 - Artist at Work Series: Sibel Kocabasi: Multimedia at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Demonstration, discussion w/ the artist about process, materials, concepts of creating art. 3-4 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/16 - Boynton Beach Blarney Bash at 100 E 4th St, Boynton Beach. Presented by Boynton CRA. Live music, costume contests, cocktails/ craft beer/food for purchase, kids activities, leprechauns, more. 4-9 pm. Free. 600-9093; catchboynton.com 3/16 - Art Walk and Open Mic Night at Boynton Beach Art District, 410-422 W Industrial Ave. 6 pm. Free. 786-521-1199; boyntonbeachartdistrict.com 3/16 - Palm Beach Dramaworks 19th Anniversary Gala: 1940s Radio Days at Kravis Center Cohen Pavilion, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 1940s attire; jackets for men, tie optional. Cocktails, dinner, dancing, entertainment. 6:30 pm. $600. 514-4042 x108; palmbeachdramaworks.org 3/16 - Duo Gillis Cunningham Contemporary Electro-Acoustic Compositions at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $20. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/16 - John Oliveira String Competition Finals at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/16 - Mike Marino: Make America Italian Again Tour at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center Rrazz Room, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $35-$45. 844-672-2849; miznerparkculturalcenter.com 3/16 - Sean Chambers Band at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $35-$45. 450-6357; artsgarage.org 3/16-17 - Kickball 365 Palm Beach Open at Lake Lytal Park, 3645 Gun Club Rd, West Palm Beach. Co-ed Tournament Sat 9 am; Women’s Tournament Sun 9 am. kickball365.com 3/16-17 - Briny Breezes Art League Show & Sale at 5000 N Ocean Blvd. All work done by artists from Briny Breezes, variety of mediums; meet the artists, view their work, purchase favorites. 10 am-4 pm. 274-9931; harleytramp@rogers.com

Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 2 pm. Free. RSVP: 237-9000; lynn.tix. com 3/18 - The Russians Are Coming: Contemporary Soviet Cinema with Shelly Isaacs at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every M through 4/8 7-9 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/non-member; $20/one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/18 - Spotlight Event: Springfield Confidential by Mike Reiss at City Place Improv, 550 S Rosemary Ave, #250, West Palm Beach. Part of Donald M. Ephraim Palm Beach Jewish Film Festival. 7 pm. $30/member; $36/ guest. 877-318-0071; bb.jcconline.com 3/18 - Argus Quartet at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 7:30 pm. $30. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/18-19 - John Lloyd Young at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $60-$90. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org Tuesday - 3/19 - The Culture of YouTube at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 393-7906; bocalibrary.org 3/19 - Dialogues: Pathways to Peace: A Spiritual Journey at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Noon. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/19 - Adult U: Ira Epstein: The Israeli Philharmonic at Levis JCC Sandler Center Beifield Auditorium, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Part of Greetings from the Catskills Series. 2:30 pm. $18. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 3/19 - Marlene Strauss: Madame Helena Rubinstein: Cosmetic Empress, Collector Extraordinaire at The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Part of Esther B. O’Keeffe Speaker Series. 3 pm. $35/person. 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/19 - How to be Certified as a Disadvantaged, Minority or WomanOwned Business at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 4-6 pm. Free. Registration: 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/19 - My Kids Don’t Want My Art: What Next? Boca Talk: Florida’s Literature and History at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 5:30-7:30 pm. $40/person. RSVP: 392-2500 x212; bocamuseum.org 3/19 - Student Recital: Chase DeCarlo, french horn at Lynn University AmarnickGoldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca

Community Calendar AT25 Raton. 5:30 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/19 - Visiting Master Artist Workshop Lectures: Ying Li at Armory Art Center, 811 Park Pl, West Palm Beach. 5:30-6:30 pm. Free. 832-1776; armoryart.org 3/19 - Pianist David Crohan at Harriet Himmel Theater, 700 S Rosemary Ave, West Palm Beach. Part of Kretzer Piano Music Foundation’s Music for the Mind Concert Series. 6 pm VIP reception $50/person; 7 pm show $15/ adult, $5/student. 866-449-2489; kretzerpiano. com/kpmf 3/19 - An Evening with Jane Goodall at Florida Atlantic University Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 6:30 pm. $35-$75. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/19 - FAU Astronomical Observatory public viewing day at Florida Atlantic University Science & Engineering Building 4th floor, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 1st F & 3rd T 7 pm. Free. 297-STAR; physics.fau.edu/observatory 3/19 - Student Recital: Nikita Solberg, french horn at Lynn University AmarnickGoldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com Wednesday - 3/20 - League of Women Voters Hot Topic Luncheon at Atlantis Country Club, 190 Atlantis Blvd. Speaker Terryl Lawrence, EdD: Josephine Baker, Brave Advocate, Singer and Dancer. 11 am doors open; 11:30 am lunch/program. $25 before 3/13; $35 after 3/13. RSVP: 968-4123; lwvpbc.org 3/20 - Bagels & Books: Button Man by Andrew Gross at Mandel JCC, 8500 Jog Rd, Boynton Beach. Part of Donald M. Ephraim Palm Beach Jewish Film Festival. 10 am. $13/member; $15/guest. 877-318-0071; bb.jcconline.com 3/20 - Sewing Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Group project class, teacher on hand for assistance. Come prepared to work the first day; bring fabric, pattern, scissors, pins, thread, sewing machine. All levels welcome. Every W through 5/22 noon-2 pm. $120/resident; $150/non-resident. 3937807; myboca.us 3/20 - Lara St. John, violin and Martin Kennedy, piano at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre,4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 2 pm. $45. 86-3309; duncantheatre.org 3/20 - Natalie Clein, Cello at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 2 pm. $39.75. 868-3309; duncantheatre.org 3/20 - Zonta Club of Boca Raton at Pavilion Grille, 301 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 3nd W 5:30 pm. $30. 482-1013; zontabocaraton.org 3/20 - J. Reuben Appelman speaks and signs

his book The Kill Jar at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 7 pm. Free. 279-7790; murderonthebeach.com 3/20 - Looking Back 50 Years: A Retrospective on Politics and Culture of the Late 60s for Clues Facing Contemporary America with Dr. Burton Atkins part of Lecture Series at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7:30 pm. $15/single-event ticket. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/20 - Community Cabaret at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Calling all singers, dancers, musicians, stand-up comedians; performers must register in advance. 7:30 pm. $5. 347-3900; willowtheatre.org 3/20 - Musicworks: Joan Osborne at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $57-$460. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/20-21 - Four Best Men at Kings Point Theatre, 7000 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Held again 2 pm 3/23. 8 pm. $46-$79. 800-7166975; spanishriverconcerts.com 3/20-24 - The Gingerbread Lady by Neil Simon presented by Primal Forces at Sol Theatre, 3333 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. Runs through 4/14. Preview W & Th 8 pm ($25-$30); Regular show F/Sat 8 pm; Sun 2 pm. $30-$35. 866-811-4111; primalforces.com Thursday - 3/21 - Shell Chic Designs with Robin Grubman: Nantucket Bags at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. 10 am-noon. $150. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/21 - Boynton Woman’s Club Luncheon: Guest Speaker from Police Department at First Baptist Church, 301 N Seacrest Blvd. 11:30 am. 369-2300; boyntonwomansclub.com 3/21 - Lunch & Learn: Textiles & Fiber Artist Talk & Live Demos at Armory Art Center, 811 Park Place, West Palm Beach. Bring lunch, learn about art. 12:45-1:30 pm. Free. 832-1776; armoryart.org 3/21 - Lecture: The Eclectic Interior: Living Today with Historical Design by Charlie Ferrer at Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach, 311 Peruvian Ave, Palm Beach. 2-3 pm. Free. 832-0731 x111; palmbeachpreservation. org 3/21 - The Gardens of Dawnridge with Hutton Wilkinson at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. Book signing follows. 2:30 pm. $20/person. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/21 - Third Thursdays @ 3 presents Sara Ayers-Rigsby, Director, Southwest

MARCH 17-23

Sunday - 3/17 - St. Patrick’s Day 3/17 - Sunday Breakfast: Anything Goes, Remember the Jazz Era! At Temple Sinai, 2475 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. 9:30 am. $8. 276-6161 x133; templesinaipbc.org 3/17 - Ice Cream Social at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 2-4 pm. Free. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/17 - Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade on Lake Avenue, Lake Worth. Parade lineup begins on M St next to TooJay’s, travels west on Lake Avenue. Benefits Wheels for Kids. 2 pm. wheelsforkids.org 3/17 - Boca Ballet Theatre Dinner with the Stars at The Seagate Country Club, 3600 Hamlet Dr, Delray Beach. Performance of Stars of American Ballet in concert with Boca Ballet Theatre; cocktails/dinner follow. 6-9 pm. $175. 995-0709; bocaballet.org Monday - 3/18 - From A Woman’s Perspective Book Group: Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Presented by Karen Kurzer. 10 am. Free. 266-0798; delraylibrary.org 3/18 - Exhibition Opening: Boys & Girls Club of Palm Beach County: Annual Imagemakers Exhibition at Florida Atlantic University Ritter Art Gallery, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Runs through 3/23. T-F 1-4 pm; Sat 1-5 pm. Free. 297-2661; fau.edu/galleries 3/18 - America in Russia with Stephen R. De Angelis at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. 3 lectures: 1763-1918 - Washington & Catherine the Great to Wilson & Nicholas II M 11 am; 1993-1999 FDR & Stalin to Clinton & Yeltsin M 2:30 pm; 2000 to Present 11 am W (3/20). $20/lecture. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/18 - Alexander Wasserman Recital/ Master Class at Lynn University Amarnick-

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AT26 Community Calendar and Southeast Regions, Florida Public Archaeology Network: The Long Lens of History: Recent Excavations at the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse Outstanding Natural Area at Palm Beach County History Museum, 300 N Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. 3 pm. Free. Reservations: 832-4164, x100; hspbc.org 3/21 - Weeki Wachee: City of Mermaids at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Part of Florida Humanities Speaker Series. 3-4 pm. Free w/museum admission. RSVP: 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/21 - Concert: Anthony Oro Jazz Quintet at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. 5 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/21 - Mac that Photo App at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/21 - A Tribute to the Beach Boys featuring The Beach Buoys at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $35. 844-672-2849; miznerparkculturalcenter.com 3/21 - Student Recital: Melanie Riordan, violin at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com Friday - 3/22 - Facebook 101 at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/22 - The Regency Book Club: Jane Austen at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1-2:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary. org 3/22 - Mar-a-Lago: From Cereal Heiress to Winter White House with Richard Rene Silvin at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Part of ArtSmart Lecture Series. 1:30 pm. $25. 8327469; kravis.org 3/22 - Bolshoi Ballet: The Sleeping Beauty at The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. All performances live unless otherwise noted. 2 pm. $25/adult; $15/student w/ID. 655-7226; fourarts.org 3/22 - Exhibition Opening Reception: Jill Enfield: The New Americans at Palm Beach Photographic Centre, 415 Clematis St, West Palm Beach. Runs through 5/25. 6-8 pm. Free. 253-2600; workshop.org 3/22 - Nesting Starfish Trays Ceramic Class at Art-Sea Living, 112 S Fed Hwy #7, Boynton Beach. 6:30-8:30 pm. $50. 737-2600; artsealiving.com 3/22 - Morikami Film Series: The Tale of The Princess Kaguya (2013-PG Animation) at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens Theater, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. 7 pm. $5/member; $7/non-member. 495-0233, x237; morikami.org 3/22 - Student Piano Gala at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $10. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/22 - Open Mic Night at Improv U, 105 NW 5th Ave, Delray Beach. 4th F 8-9:30 pm. $5. 844-561-4242; theimprovu.com 3/22-23 - Paul Taylor Dance Company at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 8 pm. $49.75. 8683309; duncantheatre.org 3/22-23 - Bette Babs & Beyond at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $55-$65. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/22-24 - Wiesenthal Starring Tom Duggan at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 2 & 7:30 pm. $35-$49. 844672-2849; miznerparkculturalcenter.com Saturday - 3/23 - Something in the Water by Catherine Steadman at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Page Turners Saturday morning book discussion. Adults. 10:30-11:30 am. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/23 - Tranquility Yoga with Chamber Ensemble at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 11 am & 2 pm. $20. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/23 - 2019 South Florida Police K9 Competition hosted by Boynton Beach Police Department at Boynton Beach High School, 4975 Park Ridge Blvd. Food vendors, rock climbing wall, prizes, more. No pets allowed. 2-8 pm. Free. 742-6191; sflpolicek9competition.com 3/23 - Mini Writers’ Retreat: Focus on Fiction at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W

The COASTAL STAR  Atlantic Ave. Writing exercises; critiques/tips facilitated by published authors of Boca Raton Branch of Pen Women. Adults. Noon-3 pm. $10. Registration: 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/23 - Introduction to Podcasting at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1-2:30 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/23 - Flamenco Voices (G) presented by Flamenco Puro Dance Company at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. 2 pm. $25. 347-3948; willowtheatre.org 3/23 - Story Central: Baba Lyons at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 4-5:30 pm. Free. 544-8585; bocalibrary.org 3/23 - Georgina Dieter Dennis Scholarship Winners Recital at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $10. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/23 - Pop, Rock & Doo Wopp Live! at Florida Atlantic University Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $39-$79. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/23 - Carol J. Bufford at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $35-$45. 4506357; artsgarage.org 3/23 - Send in the Queens at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. 8 pm. $35. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/23-24 - Paint Your Wagon at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Part of Theatre Series. Sat 2 & 7:30 pm; Sun 4 pm. $50-$70. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com

MARCH 24-30

Sunday - 3/24 - The Mari Bell Septet at Boca Raton Shrine Club, 601 Clint Moore Rd. Presented by Hot Jazz & Alligator Gumbo Society (HAGS); featured band Robert McGowan’s Riverside Jazz Band. 1-4 pm. $5/member; $10/non-member. 651-0970; hagsjazz.com 3/24 – Sunday Musical Matinee Series: The Lubben Brothers at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. 2 pm. $25. 2660194; delraylibrary.org 3/24 - Concert: Ah! Je Veux Vivre part of Music at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 2:30 pm preconcert lecture; 3 pm concert. $20/person; free/ age 18 & under. 276-4541; music.stpaulsdelray. org 3/24 - The Sunday Sleuths Book Group: Under My Skin by Lisa Unger at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 3 pm. Free. 279-7790; murderonthebeach.com 3/24 - Florida Intergenerational Orchestra Concert: Musical Tribute to America at Our Lady of Lourdes Church O’Shea Auditorium, 22094 Lyons Rd, Boca Raton. 2:30 pm doors open, pre-concert talk/meet & greet; 3 pm concert. $10/adult; free/child under 12. 4828206; flioa.org 3/24 - Friends Speaker Series: Maria Nhambu at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Part of Friends Music Series. Adults. 3-4 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/24 - Friends of the Uffizi Lectures: Renaissance Artist Grows Old with Dr. Emily Fenichel at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Presented by Friends of the Uffizi Gallery. Speaker Dr. Karen Rose Mathews. 3-4 pm. $15/non-member. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/24 - Sundays at Sinai at Temple Sinai, 2475 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Speakers from National Council of Jewish Women Advocacy Group: The Dangers of Human Trafficking. 3 pm. $5/member; $8/non-member. 276-6161; templesinaipb.org 3/24 - Art in the Alley Opening Reception Block Party at SE 2nd St between SE 3rd & SE 4th Avenues, Delray Beach. 4 pm. 276-9925; artinthealley.org 3/24 - Badfish: Tribute to Sublime at The Pavilion at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 7-10 pm. $20-$40. 243-7922; oldschoolsquare.org 3/24 - Cece Teneal at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 7 pm. $35-$45. 450-6357; artsgarage.org Monday - 3/25 - The Institute for Learning in Retirement at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Class choices

March 2019

include Current Events, Poetry, Film Club, Writing, Spanish, The Arts, Buddhism & Meditation, Living Well/Health/Aging, Science & Technology, Jewish studies, Florida issues. Classes led by university professors, retired professors, community activists, professionals committed to sharing their knowledge. Sign up for as many per semester as you want. Check website for times, course descriptions; call for brochure. M/Th 9:45 am-4 pm & W 9:45 am12:30 pm. Session runs through 5/3. M/W/Th course: $95/6 weeks. 883-0999; iliretirement. org 3/25 - Unlocking Representation: Discovering the Key to Vitality in Art with Alexander Newley at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. Every M/W/F through 4/5 10 am-noon instruction time; 1 pm open studio time. $395/6 classes. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/25 - Pachinko by Min Jin Lee part of Afternoon Book Group at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. 1 pm. Free. 2660194; delraylibrary.org 3/25 - The Wild Wild West? Myths, Legends, and Realities with Rabbi Richard Polirer at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Institute. Every M through 4/15 2-3:30 pm. $60. 2669490; delraylibrary.org 3/25 - Noel Coward, Poet? With Barry Day at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. 2:30 pm. Free. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/25 - 2019 Palm Beach County Sports Hall of Fame Induction Banquet & Silent Auction at Palm Beach County Convention Center, 650 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 5 pm. $95. 233-3180; amiller@ palmbeachsports.com 3/25 - 11th Anniversary Savor The Avenue on Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Healthier Delray Beach receives proceeds; each guest reservation includes a $3 contribution. Make reservations w/individual restaurant. See website for restaurant list/details. 5:30-9 pm. 243-1077; downtowndelraybeach.com/savortheave 3/25 - Grape Stomp Wine Tasting with Howard Freedland: Grave vs. Grain at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. Every F through 2/1 6-7:30 pm. $65. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/25 - Sir James Galway, Flute at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Concert Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 8 pm. Tickets start at $25. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/25-26 - Auditions for God of Carnage at The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St. 7:30 pm. 272-1281 x4; delraybeachplayhouse. com 3/25-26 - DaVinci & Michelangelo: The Titans Experience at The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St. 7:30 pm. $45. 2721281; delraybeachplayhouse.com Tuesday - 3/26 - Drawing with Charcoal and Pastel: For the True Beginner at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Every T through 4/23 9:30-11:30 am. $110/ resident; $137.50/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/26 - Book Club: The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah by Friends of the Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/26 - Search Engine Optimization 1-2-3 at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/26 - Getting Started with Facebook Groups & Pages at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1:30-3 pm. Free. 3937852; bocalibrary.org 3/26 - Gun Control According to the Jewish Point of View with Andy Greenberg at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Institute. 2-3:30 pm. $25. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/26 - Henry Kissinger: How the Enlightenment Ends at The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Part of Esther B. O’Keeffe Speaker Series. 3 pm. $35/ person. 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/26 - Student Recital: Yordan Tenev, violin at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 5:30 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/26 - Student Recital: Zongjun Li, violin

at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com Wednesday - 3/27 - Gulfstream Race Track & Casino Day meets at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 10:15 am pick-up; 4 pm return. $26. Register: 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/27 - Artist Talk with Gino Miles at Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens, 253 Barcelona Rd, West Palm Beach. 11 am-noon. $15/adult; $10/ age 65+; $7/child 5+; free/child under 5. 8325328; ansg.org 3/27 - 21st Annual Honor Your Doctor Luncheon at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca W Dr. Benefits Helen M. Babione Medical Scholarship. 11:15 am welcome reception; noon program. Tickets start at $150. 299-1429; rotarydowntownbocaraton.org/honor-yourdoctor/ 3/27 - How to Stop RoboCalls and Scams from Flooding Your Cell Phone at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 2-3:30 pm. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/27 - Feelin’ Groovy - Four Strong Winds: Celebrating Canadian Artists of the 60s at The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St. 2 pm. $25. 272-1281; delraybeachplayhouse.com 3/27 - David Kaplan & Friends at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 2 pm. $64.75. 868-3309; duncantheatre.org 3/27 - Forgotten History: 4 Books: 4 Surprising Stories with Dr. Robert Watson at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Institute. Every W through 4/17 2-3:30 pm. $60. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/27 - Beginner & Intermediate Drawing Series with Charcoal and Pastel: Intense Color & Light at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Every W through 4/24 2-4 pm. $110/resident; $137.50/nonresident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/27 - Lenten Night; Taize Worship & Contemplative Prayer at First Presbyterian Church Boynton Beach, 235 SW 6th Ave. 6 pm. Free. 732-3774; fpcboynton.com 3/27 - Introduction to Tinkercad at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/27 - Studio 201: Fences by August Wilson at Palm Beach Dramaworks, 201 Clematis St, West Palm Beach. Join professionals for a social mixer/performance. 6:30 pm. $25. 514-4042; palmbeachdramaworks.org 3/27 - Voices of Pride: The Gay Men’s Chorus of the Palm Beaches part of Music Series at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7 pm doors open, 7:30 pm performance. $15/single-event ticket. 5888889; southpalmbeach.com 3/27 - Palm Beach Symphony: Viennese Dreams - 3rd Movement at Harriet Himmel Theater, 700 S Rosemary Ave, West Palm Beach. 7 pm. Tickets start at $35. 281-0145; palmbeachsymphony.org 3/27 - Musicworks: Seals & Crofts 2 at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $47-$380. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/27-28 - Celebrating Puccini with Saul Lilienstein at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. 3 lectures: Love at First Sight - From Wagner to Puccini W 11 am; Madama Butterfly W 4 pm; Turandot Th 2:30 pm. $20/lecture. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/27-31 - Fences at Palm Beach Dramaworks, 201 Clematis St, West Palm Beach. Runs W-Sun through 4/21. Times vary, check website. $55/ preview nights; $90/opening night; $75/regular admission. 514-4042; palmbeachdramaworks. org 3/27-31/19 - School of Rock Kravis Center Dreyfoos Concert Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. W/Sat/Sun 2 pm; T-Sat 8 pm. Tickets start at $28. 832-7469; kravis.org Thursday - 3/28 - Job Searching at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 10 am-noon. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/28 - Dramawise Series: Fences by August Willson at Palm Beach Dramaworks, 201 Clematis St, West Palm Beach. Attend all or a portion of the program. Act 1 10-11:30 am;

Intermission (lunch at a downtown West Palm Beach restaurant) 11:45 am-12:45 pm; Act 2 1-2 pm. $50-$60/Acts 1 & 2 & Intermission; $40-$45/Intermission & Act 2; $15-$20/Act 2. 514-4042 x2; palmbeachdramaworks.org 3/28 - US Intelligence and Democracy: Now More Important than Ever with James Bruce at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 12:30-2 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/28 - Romeo and Harriette at The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St. Part of Interactive Studio Theatre Series. 2 pm. $25. 272-1281 x4; delraybeachplayhouse.com 3/28 - Lecture: Why Resilience Matters: Preserving Property and Community Values in Palm Beach by Lisa Craig at Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach, 311 Peruvian Ave, Palm Beach. 2-3 pm. Free. 832-0731 x111; palmbeachpreservation.org 3/28 - Sacred Sites of the Ancient World with Marion Dolan at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Institute. Every Th through 4/18 2-3:30 pm. $60. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/28 - Transitional and Transformative Presidents from James K. Polk to Gerald Ford with Ronald Feinman at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Institute. Every Th through 4/18 2-3:30 pm. $60. 266-9490; delraylibrary. org 3/28 - Liederabend presented by Palm Beach Opera at The Royal Poinciana Chapel, 60 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. Special evening of song features talented Apprentice Artists. 6:30 pm. $25. 833-7888; pbopera.org 3/28 - Exhibition Opening: Annual Juried Student Exhibition at Florida Atlantic University Ritter Art Gallery, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Runs through 4/12. 6:30 pm. Free. 297-2661; fau.edu/galleries 3/28 - Catch a Rising Star Comedy: Good Times Stars John Amos and Jimmie Walker at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $49-$400. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/28 - Love Is A Rose: Celebrating the Music of Linda Ronstadt at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 8 pm. $39.75. 868-3309; duncantheatre.org 3/28-29 - Davinci & Michelangelo: The Titans Experience at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $50. 844-672-2849; miznerparkculturalcenter. com Friday - 3/29 - Student Recital: Katherine Baloff, violin at Lynn University AmarnickGoldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 2 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/29 - Joe Posa as Joan Rivers at Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St. 2 pm. $35. 272-1281; delraybeachplayhouse.com 3/29 - Their Finest (R-2017) at The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30 & 6 pm. $5/adult. 655-7227; fourarts.org 3/29 - Yale Whiffenpoofs presented by Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach at Pan’s Garden, 386 Hibiscus Ave, Palm Beach. 4-5 pm. Free, rain or shine. 832-0731 x111; palmbeachpreservation.org 3/29 - Historical Walking Tour meets at Palm Beach County History Museum, 300 N Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. 1-hour guided tour showcases the evolution of downtown West Palm Beach buildings/landmarks; includes historical urban design overview through recent area development. Held again 4/5. 4-5:30 pm. $10/person. Registration: 8324164 x100; hspbc.org 3/29 - Artists Guild Gallery Opening Reception at the Artists’ Guild Gallery, 2910 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. Hors d’oeuvres/ refreshments. 6-8 pm. Free. 278-7877; bocaguild.co 3/29 - Adult Ballroom Dance Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Instructor Lee Fox. Singles & couples welcome. Every F through 5/10. Beginner (Quickstep) 6:30-7:30 pm; Intermediate (Hustle) 7:45-8:45 pm. $60/resident; $75/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us

ALL PERFORMANCES HELD IN ELLIE'S FLAMINGO BALLROOM!!!

FRIDAY, MARCH 15TH Box On Polka Band • Doors Open at 6pm • $38pp

CORNED BEEF & CABBAGE

FRIDAY, APRIL 12TH Beatles Tribute Band • Back by popular demand!! Doors Open at 6pm • $45pp

AVAILABLE FOR LUNCH & DINNER! March 12th – 18th

All shows include buffet dinner, dessert, coffee & cash bar!

Info, Reservations & Showtimes 561.276.1570

Dinner includes: Corned Beef & Cabbage, Boiled Potatoes, Honey Glazed Carrots, Rye Bread & Butter

2410 North Federal Hwy. • Delray Beach, FL


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019 3/29 - Courtney Jones: Conceptual Ideologies at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $20. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/29 - West Coast Swing Dance Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Instructor John Grassia. Singles & couples welcome. Every F through 5/9. 7:30-9 pm. $50/resident; $63/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/29 - Biscuit Miller & The Mix at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $35-$45. 450-6357; artsgarage.org 3/29 - Josh Young Sings Andrew Lloyd Webber at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 8 pm. $49.75. 868-3309; duncantheatre.org 3/29-30 - Catherine Russell at Kravis Center Persson Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. F/Sat 7:30 pm. $39. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/29-30 - Lucky Plus Productions Rooming House at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Held again 4 /5-6. F/Sat 7:30 pm; Sat 1:30 pm. $35. 8327469; kravis.org 3/29-30 & 4/1 - Norton Cinema: Women Painting at Norton Museum of Art, 1450 S Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. F at Art After Dark 5-10 pm; Sat & M 2 pm. Free w/museum admission. 832-5196; norton.org Saturday - 3/30 - Cut the Cord: Current State of the Market at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10-11:30 am. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/30 - Japanese Traditional Music: Koto Demonstration at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Learn basics of how this instrument is played; receive a music sheet of the most famous Japanese song, Sakura, Cherry Blossom. Noon, 1:30 & 3 pm. $5 w/paid admission. 495-0233 x210; morikami.org 3/30 - Demystify Medical/Hospital Bills and Insurance Company Communication at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. Noon-1:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/30 - Boca Ballet Theatre Annual Cocktail & Underwriting Party: An Evening of Art, Cocktails & Hors d’oeuvres at Meridian Art Experience Gallery, 170 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 6-8 pm. $50. 995-0709; bocaballet.org 3/30 - Association of Performing Arts of India: Tradition at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $20. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/30 - Cosmic Sounds of Drupad with the Gundecha Brothers at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $20. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/30 - Chris McDonald’s Jukebox Memories at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $37.50-$44. 844672-2849; miznerparkculturalcenter.com 3/30 - Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches Screen & State Spectacular at Duncan Theatre, 4200 S Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 7:30 pm. $20. 832-3115; symphonicband.org 3/30 - First Nighters at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hobnob w/performers; have your photo taken w/the stars. Follows performance of Christine Andreas in Piaf - No Regrets. 9 pm. $20. 237-7750; lynn.tix.com 3/30-31 - Can’t Live Without You (PG-13) presented by The Playgroup LLC at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Held again 4/5-7. F/Sat 8 pm; Sat/ Sun 2 pm. $25. 347-3948; willowtheatre.org 3/30-31 - Christine Andreas: Piaf - No Regrets at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 4 pm. $50-$70. 237-9000; lynn. tix.com 3/30-31 - Boca Raton Eco Trail Trekker at Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Benefits local charities. 5K/10K/30K; teams of 4. Check website for details. $50-$75/ person. ecotrailtrekker.com/boca-raton-home

MARCH 31-APRIL 6

Sunday - 3/31 - First Annual Pedal for People Charity Bicycle Ride starts at South County Regional Park, 20405 Amphitheater Cr, Boca Raton. Benefits Diabetes Research Institute Foundation and Florida Impact Foundation. 30- or 50-mile escorted ride, commemorative t-shirt; food/drink, entertainment. 7:30 am. Register: $59/advance; $69/at the door. Pedalforpeople.org 3/31 - Sado: Tea Ceremony Beginners Class at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens Seishin-an Teahouse, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Unique opportunity to study the traditional art of Sado. Tea Ceremony Workshop is required for those who have never taken a Tea Ceremony Class but wish to start studying Sado. 2 lessons/month; individual appointments begin at 10:15 am. $50/member; $55/non-member. Registration: 495-0233 x210; morikami.org 3/31 - Sunday Jazz Brunch at Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton.

Food/beverage available for purchase. 11 am-3 pm. Free. 393-7890; mizneramp.com 3/31 - Jeepers Creepers, It’s Johnny Mercer! Starring Marty Henne at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center Black Box Theater, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 2 pm. $35. 844-6722849; miznerparkculturalcenter.com 3/31 - Florida Youth Orchestra: Concert in the Park at Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 4 pm doors open; 5 pm show. Free. 954-962-5666; floridayouthorchestra.org Monday - 4/1 - Online and Mobile Banking at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 10 am-noon. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 4/1 - Friends of the Museum Auxiliary General Meeting at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 590 Plaza Real. Membership meeting. Learn about upcoming events. Meeting, coffee, pastries, film and/or speaker. 10:30 am-1 pm. Free. RSVP: 392-2500 x213; bocamuseum.org 4/1 - The World of Musicals at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 11 am & 2 pm. $29. 832-7469; kravis.org 4/1 - Lunch & Learn: Raku Beads Demo: Mark Walnock at Armory Art Center, 811 Park Place, West Palm Beach. Bring lunch. 12:45-1:30 pm. Free. 832-1776; armoryart.org 4/1 - National Poetry Month Film Series: A Quiet Passion at Lynn University AmarnickGoldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 4/1 - 4th Biennial Palm Beach Navy SEAL Evening of Tribute at Mar-a-Lago, 1100 S County Rd, Palm Beach. Honors Navy SEALs, benefits Navy SEAL Foundation & Navy SEAL Museum. 5:45 pm doors open; 7-10 pm dinner. Tickets start at $750. 459-6999; PBNSEveningoftribute@gmail.com 4/1 - Danzon Symphonia! at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 7:30 pm. $59-$69. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 4/1 - Guest Speaker: Ralph Nurnberger, Ph.D.: Raoul Wallenberg: Holocaust Hero Who Vanished Without A Trace at Levis JCC Sandler Center Zinman Hall, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $25/general admission; $20/gold member. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 4/1 - Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra Kravis Center Dreyfoos Concert Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 8 pm. Tickets start at $35. 832-7469; kravis.org 4/1-2 - Boca West Children’s Foundation 7th Annual Golf Tournament, Gala, and Concert at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Dr. Benefits 24 children’s agencies. Golf Challenge on 4/1 8 am golf, cocktails, dinner live auction $650; Concert of the Children on 4/ 2. Features two tribute bands: the Fab Four (a Beatles tribute band) and Remember When Rock Was Young (an Elton John tribute).6 pm concert $150. 488-6980; bocawestfoundation.org 4/1-19 - I Believe In You! at The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St. Runs through 4/11. M-Th 2 & 8 pm. $35. 272-1281; delraybeachplayhouse.com Tuesday - 4/2 - Digital Library at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 10 am-noon. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 4/2 - Monday Morning Muffins & Mysteries: Miss Blaine’s Perfect and the Golden Samovar by Olga Wojtas at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30-11:30 am. Free. 393-7906; bocalibrary. org 4/2 - Beginner’s Coding for Adults Part 1 at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 4/2 - Ikebana Flower Arrangement: Ikenobo School at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Traditional flower arranging using fresh flowers. Every T through 4/23. Beginners 11 am-1 pm; Intermediate 1-3 pm. $70/member; $80/non-member; + $80/flower fee. Registration: 495-0233; morikami.org 4/2 - Savor Our City: Boca on a Budget at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1:30-3 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary. org 4/2 - PowerPoint Basics at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 2-4 pm. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 4/2 - Jewish Influences on the World and Anti-Semitism with Andy Greenberg at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Institute. Every T through 4/16 2-3:30 pm. $55. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 4/2 - PowerPoint Basics at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. 2-4 pm. Free. Registration: 266-0196; delraylibrary.org 4/2 - Literary Afternoons: Susie Schnall at Levis JCC Sandler Center Beifield Auditorium, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Part of Greetings from the Catskills Series. 2:30 pm. $25. 5582520; levisjcc.org 4/2 - How Did I Lose 40-50% in the Stock Market & How to Avoid It at Boca Raton

Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 4-5:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 4/2 - Hank & Jim by Scott Eyman part of The Talk of Kings Book Discussion Group at The Society of the Four Arts King Library, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 5:30-6:30 pm. Free. 655-2766; fourarts.org 4/2 - Student Recital: Changhyun Paek, viola at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 5:30 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 4/2 - 11 Steps to the Good Life at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6:30-8 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 4/2 - Linda Fairstein speaks and signs her book Blood Oath at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 7 pm. Free. 279-7790; murderonthebeach.com 4/2 - Student Recital: Guzal Isametdinova collaborative piano at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. Free. 2379000; lynn.tix.com Wednesday - 4/3 - Streaming Videos at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Appy Hour class series. 10 am-noon. Free. Registration: 266-0196; delraylibrary.org 4/3 - Senses of Cinema Films for Thought Class at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 18+. Every W through 5/1 10 am-12:45 pm. Per class $12/resident, $15/ non-resident; full session $50/resident, $62.50/ non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 4/3 - Ikebana: Flower Arrangement: Sogetsu Class at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Contemporary flower arranging using fresh flowers. Every W through 4/24 1:30-3:30 pm. $60/member; $70/non-member; $60/flower fee. Registration: 495-0233 x237; morikami.org 4/3 - Canva Easy Infographic Design at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1:30-3 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 4/3 - Word Basics at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. 2-4 pm. Free. Registration: 266-0196; delraylibrary.org 4/3 - The Art and Life of Richard Burton with John Pohanka at The Society of the Four Arts, 240 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. 2:30 pm. $20/person. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts. org 4/3 - Creative Cloud Lab: Making Music with Garage Band at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 5:30-7 pm. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 4/3 - Concentration Domination at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 4/3 - The New Reality in Our Retirement at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-8:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary. org 4/3 - Cole Porter After Dark starring Mark Nadler at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Part of Cabaret Series. 7:30 pm. $40. 237-9000; lynn. edu/events 4/3 - Musicworks: John Waite at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $57-$460. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org Thursday - 4/4 - Streaming Music at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Appy Hour class series. 10 am-noon. Free. Registration: 266-0196; delraylibrary.org 4/4 - Lunch with Liz at the Library at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Join author, writer, radio talk show host Liz Sterling for discussion. Noon-1:30 pm. Free. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 4/4 - Words … Alive presents The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah: A Reading and Discussion at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of One-Time Event Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 12:30-2 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/non-member & one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 4/4 - Adult U: Margery Marcus: Jewish Detective Novels at Levis JCC Sandler Center Beifield Auditorium, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Part of Greetings from the Catskills Series. 2:30 pm. $18. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 4/4 - Lesly S. Smith Landscape Award and Presentation at Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach, 311 Peruvian Ave, Palm Beach. 6-8 pm. $50/non-member. 832-0731 x111; palmbeachpreservation.org 4/4 - Millennials & Money at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org

Community Calendar AT27

4/4 - Jazz Band: A Tribute to the Greats at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $10. 2976124; fauevents.com 4/4 - Visiting Poet Brynn Saito: Following the Brush: Japanese Poetic Poems, Then & Now at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens Theatre, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. 7 pm. $7/members, $10/non-members. 495-0233; morikami.org 4/4-6 - 17th Annual Grand Tasting & Boca Bacchanal at Boca Beach Club, private homes, Boca Raton Resort & Club. Benefits Boca Raton Historical Society & Museum. Fine wine, food, live/silent auctions, more. Check website for events, schedule, tickets. $75-$200. Bocabacchanal.com Friday - 4/5 - The Power of Saving Money at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 9-10:30 am. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 4/5 - Sumi-e Ink Painting Class at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Every F through 4/26. Floral 10:30 am-12:30 pm; Landscape 1:303:30 pm. $55/member; $60/non-member. Registration: 495-0233; morikami.org 4/5 - Food Truck Friday at Wildflower Park, 551 E Palmetto Park Rd, Boca Raton. 11 am-2 pm. Free. 367-7073; myboca.us 4/5 - iPad Basics at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 1-1:30 pm. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 4/5 - Year by the Sea (NR 2017) at The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30 & 6 pm. $5/adult. 655-7227; fourarts.org 4/5 - Exhibit Opening Reception: Seeing Is Believing at Artist’s Eye Gallery Boutique, 604 Lucerne Ave, Lake Worth. Runs through 4/28. 6-8 pm. Free. 586-8666; lwartleague.org 4/5 - Be the Change at Florida Atlantic University Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. An evening of conversation and storytelling with Glennon Doyle, Abby Wambach, Brittany Packnett, Barb Schmidt, Michelle Maros and more. 5:30 pm/ wellness fair, 6:30 pm/presentations. $50-$100. 297-6124; fauevents.com 4/5 - Fifth Annual Student Composition Concert at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $10. 2976124; fauevents.com 4/5 - Outstage Night: Fences at Palm Beach Dramaworks, 201 Clematis St, West Palm Beach. Includes pre-show reception, production, post-show reception w/the actors. 8 pm. Call box office to purchase tickets: 5144042; palmbeachdramaworks.org 4/5-6 - Mountainfilm On Tour at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. F/Sat 7:30 pm, $20; Family fare Sat 10:30 am, $5. 832-7469; kravis.org 4/5-6 - My Big Gay Italian Wedding at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $65-$450. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 4/5-6 - Stanley Jordan at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $45-$55. 4506357; artsgarage.org 4/5-7 - King Solomon and His 700 Wives starring Sheba Mason at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 2 & 7:30 pm. $29-$39. 844-672-2849; miznerparkculturalcenter.com Saturday - 4/6 - VITA TAX Program at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Free tax preparation service provided by United Way. Runs through 4/15. M/T 9 am-1 pm; T/W 5:15-8:15 pm; Sat 9 am-1 pm. Free. Call 211; mydelraybeach.com 4/6 - Lawn Bowling at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Takes skill/practice. Age 18 & up. M/W/F/Sat 9 am-noon. Annual fee $15/resident; $20/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com

4/6 SpringFest at Spanish River Park, 3001 N State Rd A1A, Boca Raton. Egg hunt, face painting, balloon twisting, arts/crafts, photos w/the Easter Bunny; market w/fresh produce, flowers, locally made products. 10 am-3 pm. Free excluding food/vendor purchases. 367-7073; myboca.us 4/6 - On Ekphrastic Poetry: Workshop & Lecture about Ludmila Pawlowska at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 1 pm. $10. 276-4541; stpaulsdelray.org 4/6 - Mail Chimp vs. Constant Contact: Send eNewsletters like a Pro at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1:30-3 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 4/6 - 14th Annual Bluegrass in the Pavilion at Flagler Museum, One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver, Michael Cleveland & Flamekeeper. Benefits the Museum’s children’s education programs. 2:30 pm doors open; 3 pm concert. $35. 655-2833; flaglermuseum.us 4/6 - Brew at the Zoo 2019 at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Sampling from 25+ breweries, food for purchase, live music. Adults only. 6-10 pm. $53.74/general; $85.39/VIP; $11.54/ designated driver: all fees include added service charge. Advance tickets required: 547-9453; palmbeachzoo.org 4/6 - Commercial Music Ensembles at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $10. 297-6124; fauevents. com 4/6 - Delray Beach Chorale & Chamber Ensemble Spring Concert: A Symphony of Songs and Words at Olympic Heights Performing Arts Theater, 20101 Lyons Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. 800-984-7282; delraybeachchorale.org 4/6 - FAU President’s Gala 2019 at Florida Atlantic University Stadium Foundation Tower, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Benefits FAU student scholarships & support. Gourmet dining, open bar, fireworks, live entertainment, complimentary valet parking. 7 pm. $300. Gala. fau.edu 4/6 - Yevgeny Dokshansky at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $20. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 4/6-7 - Annual Hatsume Fair: A One-OfA-Kind Celebration of Spring at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Celebrates first bud of spring. Taiko, live Japanese music, Samurai sword fighting performances, contests, workshops, panels, demonstrations, kids activities, food/beverages. 10 am-5 pm. At the gate $15/adult; $10/child (age 4-10); free/child under 3. 495-0233 x200; morikami.org 4/6-7 - 9th Annual Downtown West Palm Beach Art Festival at 700 S Rosemary Ave, West Palm Beach. 10 am-5 pm. Free. 746-6615; artfestival.com


AT28

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019


Health & Harmony

March 2019

Inside

Health

Adult treats on tap at a Delray pharmacy. Page H5

On the Water

Searching for treasures from the sea. Page H14

Larry Okun, Eric Adams and Ron Simon (l-r), volunteers from Temple Sinai, and Chris Bentley, whose company bought the four-stall shower truck, take a selfie in front of it at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church. Photos by Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star

Secret Garden

Mobile showers in Delray reflect push to help homeless

Mesmerizing stickworks built at Mounts. Page H16

Refreshed and empowered

Kathleen Megan of St. Paul’s Episcopal works checkin at the showers, which are open each Friday for homeless people who sign up. They leave with donated items such as clean clothes.

By Jane Smith

House of the Month Idyllic island-like home in Manalapan. Page H23

On a brisk Friday morning earlier this year, Judy Fenney and Kathleen Megan awaited the start of the mobile shower program in Delray Beach. The two volunteers, wearing pink pullover sweaters and blue jeans, checked in 14 homeless people who had signed up for showers. The shower truck is parked in a lot behind St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church.

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H2 H4 Health Notes/Calendar

The COASTAL STAR 

November March2019 2019


March 2019

The COASTAL STAR 

H3


H4

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Health & Harmony H5

Health & Harmony

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Delray Shores Pharmacy offering hemp-infused treats

he Delray Shores Pharmacy and Soda Fountain on Northeast Fifth Avenue is a bright, cheerful family affair owned and operated by second-generation pharmacist T.J. Dildine. Inside the Art Deco-style building, Dildine greets pharmacy patrons by name while his wife, Rhyan, helms the old-timey soda fountain. Together their goal is to serve customers by offering the best of the old and the new. That vision has come into focus at the lunch counter, where diners can choose a traditional tuna salad sandwich, or a cannabidiol-infused ice cream treat, soda or brownie from the “Adulting” menu — just for the 21-and-older set. The store carries a curated selection of traditional drugstore items, while on the pharmacy counter, CBD gummies, salves and tinctures from brands like Ananda Professional and Funky Farms await interested customers. “Ask us about CBD!” a sign says. The Delray Beach pharmacy is one of a growing number of retail and online businesses selling the hemp derivative to consumers who have heard CBD may provide relief for ailments ranging from anxiety to pain. Now that the 2018 Farm Bill has recognized hemp as an agricultural commodity, and delisted it as a controlled substance, some experts predict CBD is on its way to becoming a $22 billion industry. However, health departments in some municipalities, like New York City, have ordered restaurants to stop selling CBD-infused foods. “This is just getting started,” affirms CBD enthusiast Josh Hoffman, who with business partner Sal Mirtalebi owns and operates Health Synergy, a Boca Raton-based company that offers a full line of CBD products from its storefront

if they want to increase the dose after a period of time, or incorporate a daytime dose as well, we certainly can do that. It’s very individualized.” Hoffman says a month’s supply averages $80, but it varies by customer. “And that’s not to say this is like a miracle silver bullet, you know, a one size fits all. It’s an adjunct. You’ve got to be eating healthy, you’ve got to have enough sleep. It’s never one thing. But in conjunction with other things, it can be pretty powerful.” The Farm Bill that legalized hemp recognized the FDA as the regulatory body for products containing CBD, and the next few years are likely to be lively as boundaries are defined and tested. Today, many working in the CBD space cite “gray areas.” But there is at least one nongray area: The FDA prohibits manufacturers from making health claims about CBD products. “This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease” is common terminology on the websites of CBD purveyors. “The FDA has sent warning letters in the past to companies illegally selling CBD products that claimed to prevent, diagnose, treat, or cure serious diseases, such as cancer,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said in a statement. As Funky Farms explains on its website: “We are not allowed to make medical claims regarding CBD, but encourage you to do your own research and reading online and offline to find the answer. What we can tell you is that CBD is a very interesting discovery, indeed.” Joyce Reingold writes about health and healthy living. Send column ideas to joyce. reingold@ yahoo.com.

LEFT: Rhyan and T.J. Dildine at the Delray Shores Pharmacy and Soda Fountain. RIGHT: It takes just a few drops of CBD to top an adult float. Photos by Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star on North Federal Highway. “Cannabis is the new everything. “These oils will be in every single product that you use, from your beverages to your makeup, to your shampoo, to your soap to your pet products, to your vitamins, to every single thing under the sun.” CBD is a cannabinoid found in hemp and marijuana, both of which come from the Cannabis sativa family. Hemp has a high concentration of CBD and, unlike its cousin marijuana, has low levels of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the psychoactive agent that causes euphoria. Hemp’s THC concentration is .3 percent or less. “That’s what keeps these products legal” says Hoffman. “Marijuana, it could be up to 30 percent.” Hoffman and Mirtalebi also operate ALLleaf, a medical cannabis education and certification center. At Delray Shores, T.J. Dildine says customers curious about CBD often are dealing with “chronic pain, anything inflammatory in nature, arthritis, autoimmune

conditions, fibromyalgia, insomnia, anxiety. Those are certainly the most common conditions where we see patients looking for an alternative option.” In research, CBD has shown promise in treating seizures, leading to U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of Epidiolex (cannabidiol), a medication for patients with two rare forms of epilepsy. Other small-scale studies have suggested CBD may have anti-anxiety properties and the ability to reduce inflammation. More research is ongoing for the CBD-curious, and much more research is needed. And it’s always a good idea to check with your pharmacist or physician. Lynn, a Boynton Beach resident in her 30s, did just that. With her doctor’s OK, she added CBD to the mix of medications she takes for inflammation, fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis and pain. “The first night I took it, I was able to get a good night’s sleep. When I woke up, I wasn’t groggy and had relief,” she says. (We’re using Lynn’s first name only, for privacy reasons.)

Now she takes CBD nightly and says she has decreased her prescription drug use. “It’s helped with pain and inflammation, and it’s helped me with sleep and anxiety.” CBD comes in different strengths, formulations and forms, but if you plan to try it, before deciding between oil or a capsule, Hoffman says there’s a more important place to start. “The first question you should always ask: Does this product have a third-party lab analysis? If it doesn’t, conversation’s over because you don’t know what’s in it.” Health Synergy’s products are third-party tested twice, he says. The entire Delray Shores CBD lineup is third-party tested as well. Dildine begins conversations with new customers by explaining the formulations. “I think the oils, the tinctures, have a lot more flexibility with dosing,” he says. “We tend to recommend a starting dose of 10 to 15 milligrams a day in the evening, just to kind of see how their body responds. And depending on what they’re using it for,

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H6 Health Notes

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Health Notes

$10M gift from Greens moves Boca Hospital closer to $250M goal

B

oca Raton Regional Hospital has received a $10 million gift from Louis B. and Anne W. Green for Keeping the Promise … the Campaign for Boca Raton Regional Hospital. The Greens’ gift is one of six eight-figure gifts received by the campaign, which has raised at least $118 million toward its $250 million goal. The redesigned hospital lobby will be named the Louis B. and Anne W. Green Lobby in recognition of the gift. “I am honored to have served on Boca Raton Regional Hospital’s Corporate and Foundation Boards of Trustees for many years and privileged to be part of a leadership team that has helped guide us to become one of the area’s premier medical centers,” said Louis Green. “We are steadfastly committed to the promise made more than 50 years ago

credentials and training, expert opinion, student excellence, and services and technologies provided at online degree-granting programs at regionally accredited institutions.

Louis B. and Anne W. Green made the drive’s sixth gift of at least $10 million. Their names will grace the lobby. Photo provided by Gloria Drummond, and know, though we have come so far, there is so much yet to accomplish.” The campaign officially launched in January. A main component of the project includes a patient tower with surgical suites, lobby, and three floors set aside for future growth. Florida Atlantic University’s Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, College of Business and College of Education were listed in the January 2019 U.S. News & World Report national rankings for Best Online Graduate Programs.   The College of Nursing climbed from the No. 39 spot in 2018 to the No. 23 spot nationwide among the 2019 Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs. The College of Business is ranked No. 51 among the Best Online MBA Programs, and No. 43 among the Best Online Business Programs, non-MBA. The College of Education is ranked No. 77 among Best Online Education Programs. The university’s online graduate nursing programs, online MBA programs and online business programs, non-MBA, are all listed on the Best Online Programs for Veterans 2019. The Best Online Programs methodologies are based on factors that include engagement, faculty

Dr. David G. Forcione was appointed as Boca Raton Regional Hospital’s medical director of advanced therapeutic endoscopy of The Center for Advanced Therapeutic Endoscopy Forcione and BocaCare Physician Network. Forcione specializes in interventional endoscopy, including disorders of the pancreas and bile ducts, early gastrointestinal malignancies and minimally invasive endoscopic therapies. Boca Raton Regional Hospital’s Toppel Family Place now offers nitrous oxide as a pain management tool to women during labor. It is selfadministered and can be used during all stages of labor. “We are continuously focused on making sure our new mothers are comfortable and have access to the latest innovations during labor,” said Karen Edlington, RN, BSc, director of Toppel Family Place. Using nitrous oxide does not interfere with the mother’s labor progress and can be used at any time during labor right up to the point of birth. Delray Medical Center achieved the Healthgrades 2019 America’s 50 Best Hospitals Award for the 17th straight year. The distinction places the hospital in the top 1 percent of more than 4,500 hospitals assessed nationwide for its consistently superior clinical performance. Dr. Pedro J. Greer Jr. delivered the keynote speech during the recent 12th annual Future of Medicine Summit in West Palm Beach. The event was presented by the Palm Beach County Medical Society. Greer, from Florida International University’s Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine in Miami, has received numerous awards, including a 2009 Presidential Medal of Freedom and a MacArthur Foundation

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“Genius Grant” Fellow. At FIU he is professor of medicine, founding chairman of the Department of Humanities, Health and Society, and associate dean for community engagement. The Palm Beach County Medical Society Excellence in Medicine Award was given to Dr. James Goldenberg, medical director for a regional, clinically integrated network representing more than 1,700 physicians. The winners of the annual James J. Brynes, MD Poster Symposium and Memorial Fund for Medical Education and Physician Wellness, were: In the Vignette Category, Shayne Polley, Sameer Gupta and Christina Mesoraco, with Evan Stuchin receiving honorable mention. In the Research Category, winners were Danielle Steinberg, Nicole Lin and Matthew Stankard, with Dr. Peter Edemekong receiving an honorable mention. FAU Internal Medicine Residency 2019 won the inaugural medical challenge. The team included Drs. Kevin Almerico, Wayne Fluss and Elizabeth Hidlebaugh. The Eugene M. & Christine E. Lynn Cancer Institute at Boca Raton Regional Hospital has created image enhancement programs for patients undergoing cancer treatment. The Be U Tiful for women and Him II for men programs teach techniques on coping with skin changes, hair loss, hand and nail care, scar camouflage and other cancer treatment-related conditions. The programs are open to anyone in active treatment up to one year post-treatment.

VITAS Healthcare, a provider of end-of-life care, is offering an orientation class for new volunteers in Palm Beach County. The next trainings will be held March 28, May 4 and June 6. The local VITAS office is at 1901 South Congress Ave., Suite 420, Boynton Beach. To RSVP for orientation, call Gayle Stevens at 733-6332 or email Gayle.Stevens@Vitas. com, or Patricia Powell at 7316203 or Pat.Powell@vitas.com. For information about becoming a VITAS volunteer, visit vitas.com/volunteer. Send health news to Christine Davis at cdavis9797@gmail.com.

The next edition of The Coastal Star will be distributed the weekend of April 5


March 2019

The COASTAL STAR 

H7


H8 Health Calendar

Health Calendar Note: Events are current as of 2/22. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 2

Saturday - 3/2 - Kemetic Yoga at Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NE 5th Ave, Delray Beach. Calming, therapeutic yoga. Bring yoga mat, water; wear comfortable clothing. Every Sat 9:30-11 am. $10/person. 279-8883; spadymuseum.com 3/2 - Yoga Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Every M-Sat 9:30-11 am. 5 classes $75/resident, $94/non-resident; 10 classes $130/resident, $162.50/non-resident; 20 classes $240/resident, $300/non-resident. 477-8727; myboca.us 3/2 - Adult Tai Chi Class at Delray Beach Community Center, 50 NW 1st Ave. Every Sat

The COASTAL STAR  intermediate 9:30-10:30 am; beginner 10:4511:45 am. Per class $15/resident; $17/nonresident. 243-7000 x5001; mydelraybeach.com 3/2 - Yoga at the Beach at Red Reef Park West (Intracoastal side), 1400 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Register/get parking pass at Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Classes held on grass overlooking the Intracoastal. No cash accepted on-site. Before 3/10: W 6:30 pm; 1st & 3rd Sat 10 am; After 3/10: 1st & 3rd Sat 10 am. $10/ class; 60-day membership (unlimited classes) $65/resident, $81.25/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/2 - Judo Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Warm-up, instruction, practice, tournament training. W 6:30-8 pm mixed ages & ranks, 8-9 pm advanced; Sat 10 am-noon all groups. Per month $21.50/resident; $27/non-resident. 3937807; myboca.us 3/2 - Aikido Class at Boca Raton Community

Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Explore effective, non-violent methods of conflict resolution. Every Sat 12:30-2:30 pm. Per month $25/ resident; $31.25/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/2 - Chair Yoga at Unity of Delray Beach, 101 NW 22nd St. Every Sat 1 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 3/2 - Safe Baby: Prepare, Prevent & Respond Prenatal Class at Bethesda Memorial Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Increase awareness of safe practices, what to do in the event of an emergency. Held again 4/6 2:30-4:30 pm. $10/ couple. Payment due before class date. 3692229; publicrelations@BHInc.org 3/2 - CA (Cocaine Anonymous) at Unity of Delray Beach, 101 NW 22nd St. Every Sat 6 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 3/2-3 - Yoga Class at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Every Sat/Sun 9:30

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March 2019 am & Sat 10:30-11:30 am. $5/class. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com

MARCH 3-9

Sunday - 3/3 - Yoga in the Park (Gazebo) Class at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. All ages. Every Sun 10-11 am. Per class: $10/resident; $11/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/3 - Childbirth Express: A Day Full of Fun & Learning at Bethesda Memorial Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 10 am-5 pm. $50/couple. Payment due before class date. 369-2229; publicrelations@BHInc.org 3/3 - CODA (Codependents Anonymous) at Unity of Delray Beach, 101 NW 22nd St. Sun 6 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 3/3 - Yoga at the Beach at Red Reef Park East, 1400 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Register/ get parking pass at Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. No cash accepted on-site. Before 3/10 Sun 4:30 pm; After 3/10 W/Sun 6:30 pm. $10/class; 60-day membership (unlimited classes) $65/resident, $81.25/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us Monday - 3/4 - Circuit Training at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Circuit-based workout targets multiple muscle groups to build lean muscles. M/T/Th 8:30-9:20 am or 9:30-10:20 am. 1 class $12-$15; 4 classes $40-$50; 8 classes $70-$88; 12 classes $100-$125, 15 classes $125-$156. 306-6985; fitmomboca@aol.com 3/4 - Life Issues: A Support Group for Adults at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. W 6-7:30 pm or M 10-11:30 am. $5/session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 3/4 - Baby Care Basics: Newborn Care and Comfort at Bethesda Memorial Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Diapering, feeding, bathing, soothing baby. 6-8:30 pm. $10/couple. Registration: 369-2229; publicrelations@BHInc.org 3/4 - Men’s Issues Support Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every M 6:30-8 pm. $5/session. 4835300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org Tuesday - 3/5 - Yoga Class at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Every T 9 am. $5/class. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/5 - Women’s Issues Support Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every T 10-11:30 am. $5/session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 3/5 - Health Research at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Adults. 10 amnoon. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 3/5 - Lunch & Learn: Medical Ethics via Responsa with Rabbi Lawrence Kotok at Temple Beth El Schaefer Family Campus, 333 SW 4th Ave, Boca Raton. Bring lunch, drinks provided. Every T through 3/26 noon-1 pm. Free. 391-8900; tbeboca.org 3/5 - Zumba Gold at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Age 50+. Th/F 9:30-10:30 am, T 3-4 pm. Per class $5/resident; $6/nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/5 – Breastfeeding Support Group at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, 800 Meadows Rd. Every T Noon-1:30 pm. Free. 955-5415; brrh.com 3/5 - The Effects of Sleep Deprivation on the Body at Bethesda Hospital East, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Presented by Beth Boggs, RPSGT, CRT, Manager Sleep Lab/ EEG; part of Ask the Physician Lecture Series.

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4:30 pm. Free. 731-2273; publicrelations@ bhinc.org 3/5 - LGBTQ+ Support Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Joint program w/Ruth & Norman Rales Jewish Family Services. Three separate groups: Adults support group; Teen support group & Family, Friends & Allies support group - held simultaneously. Every T 6-7 pm. Free. Registration: 483-5300 x116; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 3/5 - Zumba at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Adults. Every T 6-7 pm. $50/12 classes. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com 3/5 - Tai Chi Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Moving meditation for focus, concentration, release of stress, attention skills. Every T Beginners 5:30-6:30 pm; Intermediate 6-7 pm; Advanced 6:30-7:30 pm. 8 classes $48/resident, $60/ non-resident; 12 classes $66/resident, $82/ non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/5 - Al-Anon 12-Step Study at Unity of Delray Beach, 101 NW 22nd St. Every T 7 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org Wednesday - 3/6 - Tai Chi Class at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Every W 9-10 am. $5/class. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/6 - Yoga Class at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Ages 18 & up. Every W 9-10:30 am. Per class: $10/resident; $15/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/6 - Family and Friends at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, 800 Meadows Rd. Basics of infant, child and adult CPR, relief of choking, child and infant one-person CPR. Includes course book, completion certification. Held again 3/13, 20, 30 (9-11 am) & 4/3. 6-8 pm. $25. Registration: 955-4468; brrh.com 3/6 - Moving Forward for Widows & Widowers: Support and Discussion Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every W 1-2:30 pm. $5/session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 3/6 - AA Big Book Study at Unity of Delray Beach, 101 NW 22nd St. Every W 5:30 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 3/6 - Divorced and Separated Support Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every W 6-7:30 pm. $5/session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 3/6 - AA Meeting at Unity of Delray Beach, 101 NW 22nd St. Every W 7:30 pm LGBTQ; 8 pm Men’s meeting. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org Thursday - 3/7 - Joint Journey at Bethesda Heart Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Learn what to expect before, during, after surgery for total joint replacement. Every Th 10 am. Free. 737-7733; aadams@bhinc.org 3/7 - Yoga Class at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Every Th 2-3 pm. $5/ class. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com Friday - 3/8 - Zumba Gold Class at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Every F 10-11 am. $5/class. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/8 – Breastfeeding Support Group at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, 800 Meadows Rd. Every F 1-3:30 pm. Free. 955-5415; brrh.com 3/8 - Open AA Meeting at Unity of Delray Beach, 101 NW 22nd St. Every F 7:30 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org Saturday - 3/9 - Family Fitness Day at Intracoastal Park, 2240 N Federal Hwy, Boynton Beach. Hosted by Community Caring Center; family fun features health screenings, exercise/ fitness activities, healthy food, prizes, walks, runs, music/dance. 8 am race begins $10-$35/ person registration; 10 am family event begins. 8-10:30 am Secret Garden Breakfast $5/person. Free. 742-6641; boynton-beach.org 3/9 - Yoga re-stART at Arts Warehouse, 313 NE 3rd St, Delray Beach. Age 16+. 10:30-11:30 am. $15. 330-9614; artswarehouse.org 3/9 - Family Yoga at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Breathing exercises, relaxation techniques, yoga, poses for concentration, balance, flexibility, meditation, lessons in self-acceptance, positive thinking. Open to extended family & caregivers. Every Sat through 3/30 11:15 am-12:15 pm. $60/resident; $75/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/9 - 2019 SUD (Substance Use Disorder) Talks: Beacon of Hope at Florida Atlantic University Theater, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Presented by/benefits The Delray Beach Drug Task Force with FAU Phyllis and Harvey Sandler School of Social Work. Open to students, faculty, staff, the South Florida Community. Q&A follows speakers/presentations. 3-5:30 pm. $20. sudtalks.com

MARCH 10-16

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Monday - 3/11 - Surgical Weight Loss: The Next Step to a Healthier You at Bethesda Heart Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 2nd M 5:30 pm. Free. 853-1600; publicrelations@bhinc.org Tuesday - 3/12 - Big & Loud: Parkinson’s Disease Exercise Program at Bethesda Heart


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019 Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Held again 3/26. 10:30-11:30 am. Free. 2924950; RLatino@BHInc.org 3/12 - Breastfeeding: Health Benefits for Mom and Baby at Bethesda Heart Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Certified lactation consultant teaches expectant parents about benefits of breastfeeding. 6-8:30 pm. Free. 369-2229; publicrelations@bhinc.org Friday - 3/15 - Your Genes and Your Health with Toby Rossman at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Every F through 4/5 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/ non-member; $20/one-time guest at the door. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls Saturday - 3/16 - Boot Camp for New Dads Class at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, 800 Meadows Rd. 9 am-noon. $25. Registration: 955-4468; brrh.com

MARCH 17-23

Wednesday - 3/20 - Childbirth: Preparing for Your Birth Experience at Bethesda Memorial Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 2-week series held again 3/27. 5:30-8:30 pm. $50/couple; Registration: 3692229; publicrelations@BHInc.org Thursday - 3/21 - Project COPE: A Forum Series for Families in the Opioid Crisis at Pompey Park Community Center, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Presented by Hanley Foundation, Project COPE (Connect for Overdose Prevention and Education) designed to connect people in our community who share the experience of a loved one who has died of opioid overdose, survived an overdose, or are at a high risk for overdose. Every 3rd Th 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. 268-2357; hanleyfoundation.org/ project-c4ope Saturday - 3/23 - MindBody Expo at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 10 am-4 pm. Free. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org

MARCH 24-30

Tuesday – 3/26 - Skin Cancer Prevention and Treatment at West Boynton Branch Library, 9451 S Jog Rd, Boynton Beach. Presented by Elana Aharonoff, MMS, PA-C; part of Bethesda Hospital East Be Healthy, Be Well Program. 2 pm. Free. 734-5556; publicrelations@bhinc.org 3/26 - Back Pain, Spinal Stenosis and Spondylolisthesis at Bethesda Hospital East, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Presented

by Daniel Baluch, M.D., Spine Surgeon; part of Ask the Physician Lecture Series. 4:30 pm. Free. 731-2273; publicrelations@bhinc.org Friday - 3/29 - Coaching the Mature Driver at St. Mark Church, 643 St. Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Designed for insurance reduction. Bring lunch/beverage. 9 am-3 pm. $20 payable to DOTS. 732-1416; stmarkboynton.com Saturday - 3/30 - Annual Health and Wellness Experience at Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Presented by WPEC CBS 12 & WTVX CW34, hosted by City of Boca Raton. Healthy cooking demonstrations, free health screenings, fitness demonstrations, activities for all ages. Free parking at City Hall & Downtown Library w/complimentary trolley service to Mizner Park. 10 am-3 pm. Free. 881-0702; thewellnessexperience.org

MARCH 31-APRIL 6

Monday - 4/1 - Zumba Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd, Boca Raton. Every M through 6/10 (no class 5/27) 7-8 pm. $50/10 weeks. 393-7807; myboca.us Thursday – 4/4 - Hearing Loss, Hearing Aids and Tinnitus at Bethesda Hospital East, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Presented by Shelley W. Minsky, AuD, FAA, Audiologist; part of Ask the Physician Lecture Series. 4:305:30 pm. Free. 731-2273; publicrelations@ bhinc.org Saturday - 4/6 - Adult Tai Chi Class at Delray Beach Community Center, 50 NW 1st Ave. Every Sat intermediate 9:30-10:30 am; beginner 10:45-11:45 am. Per class $15/resident; $17/ non-resident. 243-7000 x5001; mydelraybeach. com 4/6 - Welcome New Baby! Sibling Class at Bethesda Heart Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Learn about their new role, the new baby joining their family. Decorate a onesie for new little brother or sister, celebrate with a birthday cupcake. Age 2-6; must be accompanied by parent. 10-11:30 am. $10/ parent & child; additional siblings $5/each. Payment due before class date. 369-2229; publicrelations@bhinc.org 4/6 - Family Yoga at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Breathing exercises, relaxation techniques, yoga, concentration, balance, flexibility, meditation, lessons in self-acceptance, positive thinking. Open to extended family and caregivers. Every Sat through 4/28 11:15 am-12:15 pm. $60/resident; $75/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us

Thank You

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100 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach

Health Calendar H9


H10 Finding Faith

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

SHOWERS

Continued from page 1 The women handed each person a toiletry kit, a towel, new socks and underwear. Men each received a new T-shirt and women got new bras. That Friday was the first day of the six-month pilot program, which gained city commissioners’ blessing in December. The showers are offered on Fridays during lunchtime and limited to people who eat at the Caring Kitchen meal sites, at St. Matthew’s, Cason United Methodist Church and, effective Feb. 28, First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach on the barrier island. People also can request showers through Ariana Ciancio, the special populations advocate in the Police Department. The City Commission wants to make sure the program serves only the homeless population of Delray Beach. “We started two years ago on the transition committee for the Caring Kitchen,” Megan said of the CROS Ministries program. “It’s been an amazing journey.” Ezra Krieg, who chairs the city’s Homeless Task Force, called Fenney and Megan “superstars” for their efforts to bring the mobile shower truck to Delray Beach. He praised the Rev. Marcia Beam, pastor of St. Matthew’s, for allowing the shower truck to sit on church land behind the sanctuary at 404 SW Third St. And he commended Ciancio for her soft touch with homeless people. “Our mission is to try positive solutions,” Krieg said. “We can’t arrest our way out of the homeless problem.” In 2017, the City Commission wanted the Caring Kitchen to move from a city-owned location on Northwest Eighth Avenue where it had prepared and served meals, offered clothing and shoes, and provided social services. The neighbors had complained

TOP: Chris Bentley (center) and volunteer Judy Fenney check in people to use the showers parked at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Delray Beach. BELOW: A client heads in to take a shower, which is scheduled for up to 15 minutes. Photos by Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star about litter and disturbances on their properties. CROS Ministries decided to have the Caring Kitchen focus on providing free meals. Ruth Mageria, executive director of CROS, asked Fenney and Megan, longtime Caring Kitchen volunteers, to offer the social services the organization could no longer provide. The two women, members of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, became co-chairwomen of the Delray Beach Interfaith

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March 3 - Communion Sunday 11am March 6 – Ash Wednesday and Pot Luck Dinner 6pm March10 – Family Sunday and First Sunday in Lent 11am March 17 - Guest Minster – Rev Dr Skip Bush and Green Fellowship 11am March 24 & 31 – Worship and Fresh Traditional Music 11am

Special Events Great Decisions 2019 • Wed. 10am – Noon • March 6th -27th Lenten Night – Taizé Worship & Contemplative Prayer – March 27th 6pm Men’s Breakfast and Spiritual Conversation • Saturdays @ 9am Mar 9th w/Rev Dr. Skip Bush & Mar 23 w/ Rev. Dr. James Goldsmith Reserve your space – Call 561-732-3774 www.fpcboynton.com 235 SW 6th Ave., Boynton Beach – 561-732-3774 East of 95 between Woolbright and Boynton Beach Blvd Church, small chapel available for weddings & special events

Committee for Social Services. They’ve started the process of the committee’s filing to become an official charity. That would allow the committee to apply for grants and allow it to accept direct donations, instead of the donors’ making out checks to St. Paul’s and writing shower program on the memo lines. The committee meets monthly at St. Paul’s to talk about its needs, such as backpacks to give to showertakers with tattered packs, Fenney said at the February meeting. The program also needs bras. The committee started with a handful of churches, she said. Now it has members from 12 churches, a Jewish temple, local nonprofits and the city. “Because it involves churches, we have a different quality of volunteers,” Fenney said. “It is very much the ministry of the churches to feed the hungry and provide services.” Patti Alexander, who sits on the CROS board and is a member of Cason United Methodist, said the church trustees offered Cason as a serving site when they heard the Caring Kitchen had to move. “Then, the trustees agreed to allow the food to be prepared at Cason,” she said. “It snowballed from there.” The initial six-month contract expired Feb. 1 and was renewed for another year, with options, Alexander said. That allows CROS Ministries

time to search for a countywide site for its food distribution offerings, Mageria said. Cason also serves lunch on Tuesdays and Thursdays. First Presbyterian Church was starting an eight-week trial with a Thursday meal, said Wally Hartung, the church’s Caring Kitchen representative. As part of the effort to help homeless people, college interns from Family Promise of South Palm Beach County staff two sessions weekly at the Delray Beach Public Library. They help people apply for birth certificates and get ID cards. “Each appointment takes at least 90 minutes and can take up to two and a half hours,” said Jennifer Raymond, executive director of the Family Promise branch. The social work students also do mental health assessments and referrals. More than 270 people have been served, Raymond said. “Many are repeat clients because homeless people often lose their IDs or are robbed of their belongings,” she said. “You can’t do anything these days without an ID,” said Jackie Ermola, president of the St. Vincent Ferrer Catholic Church Care Ministry. “Even for a county bus pass, you need a photo ID.” The St. Vincent group uses donations from church members to purchase the toiletry kits, socks and underwear in bulk for distribution on shower day. It also pays to launder the towels. The shower truck has become

the most visible sign of the interfaith committee’s social services role. Chris Bentley, founder of Live Fresh Inc., said he got the idea for a mobile shower program when he was enrolled in a master’s program at Columbia University in New York City. “The homeless there often came into the coffee shops,” Bentley said. “But no one wanted to sit next to them because they smelled.” Bentley says that when he felt low, he could “take a shower and get a haircut” and feel better. But homeless people could not do that easily, he said. He received a $100,000 grant from Impact 100 of the Palm Beaches to purchase the first mobile shower, which has six stalls and is in Fort Lauderdale. Later, his company bought a four-stall unit that is parked at St. Matthew’s. “I feel great,” one man said after his shower in early January. Wearing a feather in his cap, he came out of the unit holding his socks and shoes. He said he didn’t want to take up more than his allotted time. He also said, “They need a garbage can in the units.” The truck has two propane tanks to heat the water, lessening the financial demand on St. Matthew’s, Bentley said. Even so, the Rev. Beam said her governing board was willing to let the unit hook up to the church’s water. “That’s what churches should do,” Beam said. Temple Sinai congregants also volunteer on shower day. Eric Adams, an interfaith committee member, said the congregants look for opportunities to help others. On the first day, Adams, Ron Simon and Larry Okun took turns timing the showers. Each person is allowed 15 minutes and receives a warning after 13 minutes. Showers are sanitized after each person is finished. Ciancio, the special populations advocate, told city commissioners on Feb. 12 that no incidents required police response at the shower site. Her dream is to have everything come together for a homeless person in a short period of time, from visiting the city’s Career Cottage to finding a suitable job interview. She hopes that interview would take place on a Friday afternoon. That would allow the homeless person to get a shower, eat lunch at St. Matthew’s and select business clothes from her stash to wear to the interview. “I feel like a million bucks when I’m clean, food is in my belly and I have new clothes to wear,” Ciancio said. She mentioned one success story about a homeless man who now works on Atlantic Avenue. Soon, she said, he will have saved enough money to get into housing. Through mid-February, 63 people had taken advantage of the mobile shower program, Fenney said. That translates to 12 to 14 people each Friday. She said many are repeat clients who find the showers refreshing and empowering. Ú


March 2019

The COASTAL STAR 

H11


H12 Religion Notes/Calendar

Religion Notes Marla Schaefer, the former co-CEO and co-chairwoman of the board of Claire’s Stores, Inc., will speak at the second annual Lewis Katz Industry Icon Series on March 14 in Schaefer Zinman Hall at the Jewish Federation of South Palm Beach County campus, 9901 Donna Klein Blvd. in Boca Raton. Schaefer sold Claire’s, the largest accessory retailer in the world, to private equity in 2007. She has established herself as a philanthropist whose causes include Teachers College at Columbia University, and she

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Former Claire’s CEO to speak in Icon Series is a national and international board member of the American Committee for the Weizmann Institute of Science. Networking will begin at 6 p.m. over cocktails and hors d’oeuvres (dietary laws observed), and the program will start at 6:30. Tickets are $36. To RSVP, visit jewishboca.org/ icon. For more information, contact Sonni Simon at 852-3128 or email sonnis@bocafed.org.

Introducing SmartLab

St. Joseph’s Episcopal School in Boynton Beach cut the ribbon for its STREAM SmartLab on Jan. 23. STREAM, like STEM and STEAM, focuses on the subjects science, mathematics, engineering, art and technology,

but it includes an “r” for religion, a vital part of education at St. Joe’s. SmartLab programs teach practical skills as well as problem-solving and critical thinking, facilitator Carol Cunningham said. The ribbon cutting included a demonstration for parents showing how kids are using advanced technology for more than texting and watching YouTube. St. Joseph’s invites groups and organizations to tour SmartLab and to learn more about its STREAM philosophy. Parents who want to learn more about St. Joseph’s school can set up a tour of the campus. Have you been looking

for a space for meetings and gatherings? The STREAM SmartLab can accommodate small groups. Call Mary Aperavich at 732-2045 or email MAperavich@sjsonline.org.

Icons in Transformation

The Icons in Transformation Preview Party on Jan. 27 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church drew a crowd eager to meet artist Ludmila Pawlowska and see her 150 works on display. The abstract expressionist was welcomed by special guest speaker Bishop Chip Stokes of New Jersey, who spoke about the history of iconography and the vital connection among art, creativity and the spiritual life. Art critic Dave Hickey says a

Religion Calendar Note: Events are current as of 2/22. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 2

Saturday - 3/2 – Catholic Grandparents Meeting at Ascension Church, 7250 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. All welcome. 1st Sat 10-11:30 am. Free. 289-2640; diocesepb.org 3/2 - Ckids: Chabad Kids Club at Chabad of East Boca Raton, 120 NE 1st Ave. Age 3-12. Every Sat 10:30 am-noon. 394-9770; bocabeachchabad.org

MARCH 3-9

The next edition of The Coastal Star will be distributed the weekend of April 5

Monday - 3/4 - Legion of Mary at St. Mark Catholic Church, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Follows 8 am Mass every M. Free. 734-9330; stmarkboynton.com 3/4 - Monday Morning Women’s Bible Study at First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach, 33 Gleason St. Every M 10-11:30 am. Free. 276-6338; firstdelray.com 3/4 - Women’s Bible Study at Seacrest Presbyterian Church, 2703 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Every M 10 am. Free. 276-5633; seacrestchurch.com 3/4 - Christology at St. Vincent Ferrer Catholic Church, 840 George Bush Blvd, Delray Beach. Year 1, Course 4 of The School of Christian Formation/Diocese of Palm Beach. Adults. Every M through 4/8 7-9 pm. $10/course; $10-$20/ textbook per course. 276-6892; stvincentferrer. com 3/4 - Rosary for Peace at St Vincent Ferrer, 840 George Bush Blvd, Delray Beach. Every M 7 pm. Free. 276-6892; stvincentferrer.com Tuesday - 3/5 - Lectio Divina (Divine Prayer) at St Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Traditional Benedictine practice of scriptural reading, meditation, prayer. Every T 9-10 am. Free. 2764541; stpaulsdelray.org 3/5 - St Mark Bible Study at St Mark Catholic Church, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Every T 7-8 pm. Nominal fee/free-will offering for study guide. Register: 734-9330; stmarkboynton.com 3/5 - Crime and Consequence at Chabad of East Boca Raton, 120 NE 1st Ave. New 6-session course from Rohr Jewish Learning Institute. Every T through 3/12 7:30-9 pm. $79/full course. 394-9770; bocabeachchabad.org Wednesday - 3/6 - St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Bible Study at Panera, 1701 S Federal Hwy, Delray Beach. Read, discuss upcoming Lesson & Gospel readings. Every W 8-9 am. Free. 276-4541; stpaulsdelray.org 3/6 - Basic Catholicism with Fr. Dan at St. Mark Catholic Church, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Every W after 8 am Mass. Free. 7349330; stmarkboynton.com 3/6 - Centering Prayer at St. Joseph’s Episcopal Church, 3300A S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Every W 9:30 am. Free. 7323060; stjoesweb.org 3/6 - Bible Study at First United Methodist Church, 101 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Every W 11 am. Free. 732-3435; fumcbb.com 3/6 - Wonderful Wednesdays at First Presbyterian Church, 33 Gleason St, Delray Beach. All ages. Every W 5:45 pm dinner; 6:30 pm program. $7/adult; $5/child; $20/max per family. Reservations: 276-6338; firstdelray.com 3/6 - Rector’s Bible Study at St Gregory’s Episcopal Church, 100 NE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. Every W 6 pm supper (soup/salad,

donation requested); 7 pm Bible study (free). 395-8285; stgregorysepiscopal.org 3/6 - The Bishop’s Bible Study at St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church, 101 Homewood Blvd, Delray Beach. Every W 7:15 pm. Free. 265-1960; stmaryanglican.com 3/6 - Larger Than Life: Whistle While You Work: The Balancing Act at Chabad of East Boca Raton, 120 NE 1st Ave. New monthly course for women from Rosh Chodesh Society. 7:30 pm. $20/class + book fee. 394-9770; bocabeachchabad.org Thursday - 3/7 - Prayer Circle at Trinity Lutheran Church, 400 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Every Th 8:05 am. 278-1737; trinitydelray.org 3/7 - Men’s Fellowship at First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach, 33 Gleason St. Every Th 8:30 am. Free. 276-6338; firstdelray.com 3/7 - Women’s Bible Study Group at First United Methodist Church Boca Raton, 625 NE Mizner Blvd. Childcare available upon request. Every Th 9:30 am-noon. Free. 395-1244; fumcbocaraton.org 3/7 - Mommy Minya: Judaica Paint Night at Congregation B’nai Israel, 2200 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Group for moms of young children. 7:15 pm. $35. 241-1484; cbiboca.org Friday - 3/8 - Women’s Bible Study Group at St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church, 266 NE 2nd St, Boca Raton. Every F 9:15 am. Free. 395-8285; stgregorysepiscopal.org 3/8 - Couples’ Bible Study Group at First United Methodist Church Boca Raton, 625 NE Mizner Blvd. Childcare available upon request. Every F 6-9 pm. Free. 395-1244; fumcbocaraton. org 3/8 - Erev Shabbat Service at Temple Sinai Palm Beach County, 2475 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Every F 7:30 pm. 276-6161; templesinaipbc.org

MARCH 10-16

Sunday - 3/10 - 2nd Annual CommunityWide Purim Carnival at Jewish Federation of South Palm Beach County, 9901 Donna Klein Blvd, Boca Raton. Rides, games, food available for purchase. Noon-4 pm. $10/child; maximum $50/family. michellear@bocafed.org Tuesday - 3/12 - Methods of Prayer with Greg Barrette at Unity of Delray Beach Church, 101 NW 22nd St. 7-8:15 pm. Free-will offering. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org Thursday - 3/14 - Immigration in America: An Interfaith Conversation on Context, Community, and Conscience presented by Boca Raton Interfaith Clergy Association at St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church, 100 NE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. 7-9 pm. 391-8900 Friday - 3/15 - Parents of St. Gregory’s at St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church, 100 NE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. Potluck dinner, topic discussion (targeted to young parents w/children age 2-13), group feedback, childcare available. 3rd F 6-8 pm. Free. 395-8285; stgregorysepiscopal. org

MARCH 17-23

Sunday - 3/17-20 - Traditional Icon Workshop at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Part of Icons in Transformation. Hands-on workshop, prayer, contemplation. Sun 2:30-5:30 pm, M/T/W 9 am-4 pm. Lunch/materials included. Class size limited. $350. Register: 276-4541;

masterpiece is a work of visual art that is eternally relevant. Art critic Tanya Hartman said of Pawlowska’s masterpieces: “Allow them to guide you towards your truest and best self.” The exhibit will be on display through April 7. Guided tours are offered on Sundays (no tours March 3 and 24), Mondays and first Fridays and Saturdays. Tours are $10, free for ages 16 and younger. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church is at 188 S. Swinton Avenue, Delray Beach. Call 2764541 or visit stpaulsdelray.org for a complete schedule.

Janis Fontaine writes about people of faith, their congregations, causes and community events. Contact her at janisfontaine@ outlook.com.

stpaulsdelray.org 3/17 - Introduction to Judaism at Temple Beth El Schaefer Family Campus, 333 SW 4th Ave, Boca Raton. Taught by clergy, other experts in the community. Every W through 4/3 7:30-9 pm. Free. 391-8900; tbeboca.org Tuesday - 3/19 - How to Let Things Go with Greg Barrette at Unity of Delray Beach Church, 101 NW 22nd St. 7-8:15 pm. Free-will offering. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 3/19 - Civil Discourse Series: Part 2: Immigration at Temple Beth El Schaefer Family Campus, 333 SW 4th Ave, Boca Raton. 7:30-9 pm. Free. 391-8900; tbeboca.org Wednesday - 3/20 - Purim Dinner and Spiel: Esther Mia: Here We Go Again at Temple Beth El Schaefer Family Campus, 333 SW 4th Ave, Boca Raton. Pizza, pasta, salad dinner catered by Chez Gourmet. 5:30 pm dinner; 6:30 pm service. Dinner $16-$18/adult; $12-$14/child age 4-12. 391-8900; tbeboca.org/ special-events 3/20 - Queen Purim Shpiel at Congregation B’nai Israel Cohen/Friedkin Sanctuary, 2200 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 5L30 pm dinner; 6:30 pm Shpiel; 7:30 pm Hamantashen Oneg. $18/ non-member. Registration: 243-1484; cbiboca. org/queen Thursday - 3/21 - Purim in Japan presented by Chabad of East Boca Raton at Pavilion Grille, 301 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 5:30 pm. $25/ adult; $12/child under 12. RSVP: 394-9770; bocabeachchabad.com/purim 3/21 - First United Methodist Church of Boca Raton Pub Theology at Barrel of Monks, 1141 S Rogers Circle #5. Conversation, fellowship, open discussion. 3rd Th 7 pm. 3951244; fumcbocaraton.org 3/21 - Interfaith Cafe at South County Civic Center, 16700 Jog Rd, Delray Beach. Speaker Fritz Aufdencamp. 7-9 pm. Free. meetup.com/ Interfaith-Café

MARCH 31-APRIL 6

Sunday - 3/31 - 11th Annual Cantor Stephen Dubov z’l Memorial Concert featuring Craig Taubman and Mostly Kosher at Congregation B’nai Israel, 2200 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 3 pm. $100/reserved benefactor; $36/preferred; $18/general; $10/ student. 241-8118; chiboca.org/dubov Tuesday - 4/2 - Lunch & Learn: Unknown Insights in Christian Jewish Relations with Dr. Samuel Edelman and Rabbi Jessica Spitalnic Mates at Temple Beth El Schaefer Family Campus, 333 SW 4th Ave, Boca Raton. Bring lunch, drinks provided. Every T through 4/30 (no class 4/23) noon-1 pm. Free. 391-8900; tbeboca.org Wednesday - 4/3 - Larger Than Life: Cause and Effect: A Soul-Ar Panel On Social Activism at Chabad of East Boca Raton, 120 NE 1st Ave. New monthly course for women from Rosh Chodesh Society. 7:30 pm. $20/class + book fee. 394-9770; bocabeachchabad.org Saturday - 4/6 - Beth El Bash: Celebrating 10 Years of the Beck Family Campus, honoring Susan & Barry Podolsky at Temple Beth El Beck Family Campus, 9800 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 6:30 pm. $200. Registration: 3918900; tbeboca.org 4/6 - Here Comes The Sun: Eat, Drink, Bid and Party Like It’s A Hard Day’s Night at Congregation B’nai Israel VIP Lounge, 2200 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $70/online; $90/at the door. 243-1484; cbiboca.org


March 2019

The COASTAL STAR 

H13


H14 Outdoors

The COASTAL STAR

March 2019

On the Water

S

Gumbo Limbo beachcombing walks offer entertainment, education

cavenging the wrack zone for shells and sea beans can fill collectors’ baskets and pique the curiosity of anyone interested in the origins of things deposited on the sand. To learn a bit more about the many things that wash ashore, I attended one of the free Beach Treasures outings offered by Gumbo Limbo Nature Center. Our beach guide and instructor, Debbie Wilson, began our session with a classroom talk at Gumbo Limbo to give us some idea of what to look for before we hit the beach. Wilson showed us several types of seashells and the marine animals that live in them, as well as corals, sponges, sea stars, volcanic rock, sandstone, sea glass and “sea beans” or seed pods from plants, many from far-away places. After Wilson’s classroom talk, we drove to Red Reef Park — where we did not have to pay for parking — and headed onto the beach, where we found strong wind, piles of decaying Sargasso weed and purple Portuguese men-of-war, which we avoided after being warned about their venomous tentacles. Our eager group found several golf ball beans — round, brown seed pods — as well as lighter colored tropical almonds. (Check them out on seabean. com.) A flip-flop on the sand was covered in gooseneck barnacles, a sign that it had been drifting for a while. Some members of our group were rewarded with treasures, such as the shells of the purple sea snail and the lightning whelk. “It’s really good for the kids to be out here,” said Jennifer Longinos of Delray Beach, whose son found a purple sea snail. Allison McCarrick, a winter resident of Lake Worth, used a stick to sift through decaying

Beachcombers enjoy the breeze, sand and surf during a guided outing at Red Reef Park.

boats and accessories on display as well as fishing seminars for adults and children — is set for March 28-31 along Flagler Drive in downtown West Palm Beach. Hook the Future will present free fishing clinics for kids on March 30 and 31. Experts with the IGFA School of Sportfishing will offer adult fishing seminars, free with admission, throughout the show. Admission: $28 for adults and $18 for ages 6-15. There’s no admission charge for children younger than 6. For information on tickets, parking and transportation maps, visit PBBoatshow.com.

Fishing tournament to benefit Navy SEALs

TOP LEFT: The purple sea snail shell is a real find for beachcombers. TOP RIGHT: The lightning whelk gets its name from bolt-like streaks on its shell. BOTTOM LEFT: Walk leader Debbie Wilson displays a bowl containing golf ball beans, tropical almonds and mangrove seedlings. BOTTOM RIGHT: The sea heart, a seed pod from trees growing in South America and Africa, is carried to Florida beaches by current and wind. Photos by Willie Howard/The Coastal Star mats of Sargasso weed to find a sea heart — a handsome, darkbrown seed pod shaped like a heart. Impossible to ignore was the rubbish on the beach, including plastic bags, baby shoes, flipflops, drink bottles, shards of plastic and a tiny glass ampule containing something, possibly perfume. We left the beach with bags of trash to throw away and with a few natural treasures to take home. Gumbo Limbo Nature Center offers free Beach Treasures talks

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and walks twice a month. This month’s schedule is 3 p.m. March 6 and 20. Find more and sign up online at gumbolimbo.org.

FWC approves shore-based shark fishing rules

Anglers fishing for sharks from Florida beaches will be required to take a class and obtain a free shore-based shark fishing permit under rules approved Feb. 20 by the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission. The new FWC rules, effective July 1, follow months of public workshops held to address growing concerns that shark fishing from the beach endangers swimmers and harms sharks that are sometimes dragged onto beaches for photos before being released. Some of the new rules apply to anglers targeting sharks from boats as well as from beaches. In addition to mandatory education to obtain a shorebased shark fishing permit, the new rules will: • Prohibit chumming from beaches. • Require the use of nonoffset, non-stainless steel circle hooks when targeting sharks — from land or from a boat. • Require anglers to cut the leader, line or hook to prevent the delayed release of sharks that are protected from harvest. Twenty-six species of sharks, such as hammerhead, lemon and Caribbean reef sharks, cannot be possessed or harvested in Florida. • Require anglers to keep protected sharks in the water

while releasing them from land or from a boat. • Require anglers targeting sharks, from land or from a boat, to carry a device that can quickly cut a hook or leader to release a shark. The shore-based shark fishing permit requirement will apply to anglers younger than 16, unless they are fishing with an adult who holds a permit. Florida anglers older than 65 (who are exempt from the fishing license requirement) also will be required to take a class and obtain the free shore-based shark fishing permit if they plan to fish for sharks from land. Also on Feb. 20, FWC commissioners banned the harvest of live fish and invertebrates for aquariums from the Blue Heron Bridge dive site near Phil Foster Park, effective April 1. Jessica McCawley, director of the FWC’s Division of Marine Fisheries Management, said the Blue Heron Bridge dive site north of Peanut Island has become an internationally recognized diving destination. The ban on live harvest of marine life does not affect hookand-line fishing, cast netting or the legal harvest of spiny lobster in the Blue Heron Bridge area. Boaters carrying live fish legally taken from other areas will be allowed to transport them through the sanctuary.

Palm Beach boat show set for March 28-31

The 34th annual Palm Beach International Boat show — featuring $1.2 billion worth of

The Naked Warrior Project and 26 North Yachts will host a fishing tournament March 9 to raise money to memorialize fallen Navy SEALs and to help injured SEALs and their families. The inaugural Naked Warrior Project Fishing Tournament for kingfish, dolphin, wahoo, tuna and cobia will be based at Sands Harbor Resort and Marina, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. The captains meeting and kickoff party is scheduled for 6 p.m. March 7 at Sands Harbor Resort and Marina. The entry fee is $500 per boat. Fishing teams can register and pay online at nakedwarriorproject.org or at 26 North Yachts, 2525 Marina Bay Drive in Fort Lauderdale. The nonprofit Naked Warrior Project was founded by John Owens, whose brother, Ryan, a Navy SEAL, was killed in action in 2017.

Report encounters with diseased lionfish, FWC asks

Invasive lionfish with ulcers have been found in Florida waters as far south as Fort Pierce, and state researchers are asking anyone who encounters a diseased lionfish to report it. Lionfish have been found with ulcers that expose muscle tissue. Anyone who finds such a lionfish is being asked to note the number of fish affected and the location. Take photographs if possible. Reports can be submitted through the FWC Reporter smartphone app or by calling the Fish Kill Hotline at 800636-0511.

Coming events

March 2: Basic boating safety class offered by Coast Guard Auxiliary, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the headquarters building at Spanish River Park, 3939 N. Ocean Blvd., Boca Raton. Fee $35 ($5 for ages 12-19). Register at the door. Bring lunch. Call 391-3600 and leave a message. March 5: Boynton Beach Fishing Club meets, 7 p.m. at classroom building next to the boat ramps, Harvey E. Oyer Jr.


The COASTAL STAR

March 2019

Outdoors Calendar Note: Events are current as of 2/22. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 2

The Happy Day Today crew, including honeymooning couple Mike and Brooke Hayes of Indiana, celebrates the 97.8-pound kingfish that Mike Hayes caught while fishing off Fort Lauderdale Jan. 20. Toasting with the couple are Capt. J.B. Sirgany, in yellow coveralls, and mate Troy McDonald. Photo provided Park, 2010 N. Federal Highway, Boynton Beach. Free. bifc.org. March 23: Basic boating safety class offered by Coast Guard Auxiliary, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the classroom building next to the boat ramps, Harvey E. Oyer Jr. Park, 2010 N. Federal Highway, Boynton Beach. Fee $20. Register at the door. Call 704-7440. March 29-30: REEF’s Winter Lionfish Derby. Final registration and captains meeting 5:30 p.m., March 29, at REEF headquarters, 98300 Overseas Highway, Key Largo. Lionfish diving March 30. Lionfish will be taken to the docks at Sharkey’s Pub for scoring. Entry fee $120 per team of two to four divers. Call 305852-0030 or visit reef.org.

Nearly 100-pound kingfish caught off Fort Lauderdale

Mike and Brooke Hayes were visiting Fort Lauderdale during their honeymoon in January when they decided to take a half-day fishing trip aboard the Happy Day Today charter boat. Fishing with Capt. J.B. Sirgany and mate Troy McDonald, Mike Hayes caught a kingfish so big it could have broken a 20-year-old world record — if it had been caught on different tackle. Jack Vitek, chief of staff for the International Game Fish Association, which verifies world records, said the IGFA would not consider the kingfish for world-record status because IGFA rules prohibit the use of treble hooks when fishing with live bait. The owner of the charter boat, Capt. Thomas Zsak, said Mike Hayes caught the kingfish using 30-pound-test tackle after it hit a small, live “bullet” bonito. The Happy Day Today crew was fishing a drop-off along the

coast of Fort Lauderdale. Mike Hayes fought the fish for an hour and 53 minutes. The kingfish weighed 97.8 pounds. It measured 67 inches to the fork of the tail and had a girth of 31.75 inches. The all-tackle world record for king mackerel, better known as kingfish, is 93 pounds. Steve Graulau caught that kingfish in April 1999 off San Juan, Puerto Rico. The Florida record kingfish — 90 pounds — was caught in 1976 by Norton Thomton off Key West.

Tip of the month

Want to fish spring tournaments for kingfish, dolphin and wahoo? If so, start planning. The KDW tournament season kicks off April 6 with the Boynton Beach Firefighters Fishing Tournament and Firehouse Chili Cookoff. (Visit boyntonbeachfirefighters. com). The Lantana Fishing Derby is set for May 4. (Visit lantanafishingderby.com). Discounts apply for early entry. Willie Howard is a freelance writer and licensed boat captain. Reach him at tiowillie@ bellsouth.net.

Saturday - 3/2 - Boardwalk Tours at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Docent-guided tour of wetlands. All ages. Times vary, call for details. Free. 966-7000; pbcnature.com 3/2 - Sand Sifters Beach Clean Up at Oceanfront Park, 6415 N Ocean Blvd, Ocean Ridge. Meet at pavilion in lower parking lot. Held again 3/2. 8-10:15 am. Free. jefflev02@ gmail.com 3/2 - Sea Turtle Day Festival 2019 at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Family fun day, environmental education, live animal presentations, face painting, aquarium feedings, children’s theater, guided boardwalk tours, kids crafts, booths, more. All ages; children under age 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 9 am-4 pm. Free/ donations appreciated; some activities require additional fee. 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org 3/2 - Tram Tours of the Marsh at Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, 10216 Lee Rd, Boynton Beach. M/W/Th 1-2:30 pm; M/W/Th/Sat 10-11:30 am. $5/automobile; $1/pedestrian. Reservations: 733-0192; loxahatcheefriends.com/events/events.shtml 3/2 - Coral Reef Shark, Alligator & Stingray Feedings at Sandoway Discovery Center, 142 S Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach. Shark T-Sat 10:30 am, Sun 1:30 pm; Alligator W/Sat 1 pm; Stingray T-Sat 2:45 pm. Free w/$5 admission. 274-7263; sandowayhouse.org 3/2 - Outdoor Marine Aquarium Feedings at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. All ages; children must be accompanied by an adult. Daily 12:30 pm. Free. 544-8605; gumbolimbo.org 3/2 - Sea Turtle Talk at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. All ages; children must be accompanied by an adult. Daily 2 pm. Free. 544-8605; gumbolimbo.org 3/2 - Opossum, Snake, Owl & Alligator Feedings at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Opossum W; Snake Th; Owl F; Alligator Sat. 3:15-3:30 pm. Free. 629-8760; pbcnature.com

MARCH 3-9

Tuesday - 3/5 - Guided Nature Walk at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. 1/4-mile natural trail winds through the butterfly garden, coastal hammock, mangroves, to a sandy beach by the Intracoastal. All ages; children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Every T/Th 11 amnoon. Free. 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org 3/5 - Audubon Everglades at Pine Jog Environmental Education Center, 6301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Spring Migration, a Parade of Colorful Birds by Paddy Cunningham, Biologist, Expert Guide and Instructor for Birding Adventures. 1st T 6:30 pm doors open/ light refreshments; 7 pm program. Free. auduboneverglades.org 3/5 - Boynton Beach Fishing Club at Harvey E. Oyer, Jr. Park, 2010 N Federal Hwy. Join other fishermen, discuss hot topics, learn new tricks. 1st T 7-9 pm. Free. 703-5638; bifc.org Wednesday – 3/6 - Beach Treasures at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Learn about seashells, the animals that make them. Caravan to Red Reef Park, 1400 N State Rd A1A, to search for ocean treasures. All ages; children must be accompanied by an adult. Held again 3/20 & 4/3. 3-4:30 pm. Free. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org 3/6 - West Palm Beach Fishing Club at 201 5th St. Matt George: Springtime Snook & Tarpon Techniques. 7 pm. Free. 832-6780; westpalmbeachfishingclub.org Friday – 3/8 - Wetlands & Wildlife at Wakodahatchee Wetlands, 13026 Jog Rd, Delray Beach. ¾-mile guided boardwalk tour. Bring camera, binoculars. Age 7 to adult; children must be accompanied by an adult. Held again 3-5 pm 3/22. 8:30-10:30 am. Free. Reservations:

Outdoors/Calendar H15 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org 3/8 - Night Hike at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Walk through wetlands, call for owls, shine for gators! Bring bug spray, flashlight. All ages. 6:30 pm. $5. Reservations: 629-8760; pbcnature.com Saturday - 3/9 - Birds & Breakfast at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Coffee, refreshments, 1-hour walking tour w/a naturalist. Age 9+. 9 am. $3. Reservations: 966-7000; pbcnature.com

MARCH 10-16

Sunday - 3/10 - Intracoastal Adventures: Stand Up Paddleboarding at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Short talks about South Florida’s unique animals/ecosystems. Age 12-adult; children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Held again 3/30 9-11 am. $20/member; $30/ non-member. 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org Wednesday - 3/13 - Lantana Beach Cleanup at 100 N Ocean Blvd. Gloves/ bags provided. 2nd W 9-10 am. 585-8664; nshawah@lantana.org Saturday - 3/16 - Seining the Lagoon at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Explore grasses and flats of the Intracoastal Waterway behind Gumbo Limbo. Participants catch/release a variety of fish, shrimp, crabs, marine life. Wear clothes that can get wet. No flip-flops or sandals. Old Sneakers or water shoes only. Age 10 to adult; children must be accompanied by an adult. 1:30-3 pm. $7/member; $10/non-member. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org

MARCH 17-23

Tuesday – 3/19 - Eco-Watch Lecture Series: Richard Emory: Mitigating the Coming Climate Catastrophe at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Light refreshments, opportunity to talk with the speaker follow. Age 14+; children under age 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 7-8:30 pm. $5/suggested donation. Reservations accepted/ not required: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org Saturday - 3/23 - Geocaching by Bike at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11200 Park Access Rd., Boca Raton. Bring your bike, get outside, participate in the worldwide scavenger hunt called geocaching. Learn to use a GPS handheld unit or bring your own smartphone w/free Geocaching Intro app installed. Age 8+. 10:30 am. $5. Reservations: 629-8760; pbcnature.com

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Monday Brogues Burger $7.99 Tuesday $2 Taco’s Wednesday Wings 10 for $7.99 Thursday Turkey Dinner $10.99 Friday Fish & Chips $12.99 Saturday Guinness Beef Stew $12.99 Sunday Mom’s Pot Roast $10.99 St Patrick’s Day March 17th Live Bands & Parade

3/23 - Intracoastal Adventures: Canoeing at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Short talks about South Florida’s unique animals/ecosystems. Age 6-adult; children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 12:30-2 pm. $15/ member; $22/non-member. 544-8605; gumbolimbo.org

MARCH 24-30

Thursday - 3/28 - West Palm Beach Fishing Club at 201 5th St. Capt. RJ Boyle: How to Catch a Daytime Swordfish. 7 pm. Free. 832-6780; westpalmbeachfishingclub.org 3/28 - The Night Stalkers at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Join a Naturalist on a boardwalk tour looking at nature from the point of view of its nocturnal residents. Age 9+. 7:30 pm. $5/person. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcnature.com 3/28-31 - 34th Annual Palm Beach International Boat Show on the West Palm Beach waterfront along Flagler Drive. Th 12-7 pm; F/Sat 10 am-7 pm; Sun 10 am-6 pm. $52/ adult 2-day; $28/adult; $18/child 6-15; free/ child under 6. pbboatshow.com Saturday - 3/30 - Sea Angels Beach Cleanup at Ocean Inlet Park, 6990 N Ocean Blvd, Ocean Ridge. Last Sat 8-10:30 am. 3695501; seaangels.org 3/30 - Dip Netting at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Find out what creatures naturally live in the water of our wetlands. Wear closed-toed shoes that can get wet/dirty. Ages 8+. 10:30 am. $10. Reservations: 629-8760; pbcnature.com

MARCH 31-APRIL 6

Sunday - 3/31 - Intracoastal Adventures: Kayaking at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Short talks about South Florida’s unique animals/ ecosystems. Age 6-adult; children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 9-11 am. $20/member; $30/non-member. 544-8605; gumbolimbo.org Tuesday - 4/2 - Audubon Everglades at Pine Jog Environmental Education Center, 6301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. The study of the Florida Scrub-Jay: a 50 year perspective by Reed Bowman, Ph.D., Director, Avian Ecology Program, Archbold Biological Station. 1st T 6:30 pm doors open/light refreshments; 7 pm program. Free. auduboneverglades.org

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H16 H4 Health Secret Garden Notes/Calendar

The COASTAL STAR 

November March2019 2019

Secret Garden

Mounts’ stickwork sculpture connects visitors with earth, childhood

A

s you turn onto the Great Lawn of Mounts Botanical Garden in West Palm Beach, you may be in for a surprise. There, in the near distance, you’ll see what looks to be a fort or a maze. But instead of being made out of local coral stone or other rock, it’s made of sticks. Like many visitors we talked to, you may ask who put it there and, seeing an entry into the structure, you might even wonder if you can enter it. Welcome to Cutting Corners, a stickwork created by Patrick Dougherty, a North Carolina artist whose medium is, yes, sticks. It’s named in part for its five rooms with interlocking corners. The rooms range in size from about 14-by-10 feet to a 12-foot square, and the walls stand about 16 feet tall. Dougherty created his first stickwork in 1982, when he used his carpentry skills and love of nature to create a small piece displayed on a pedestal. Today his creations tend to be like this one — big enough so people are welcome to step inside and walk through his sculpture for an experience that can lead to an emotional connection with his art. During the past 30 years, he has built more than 250 stickworks from Scotland to Japan to Sweden, and all over

If You Go

Where: Mounts Botanical Garden, 531 N. Military Trail, West Palm Beach Information: Call 233-1757 or visit mounts.org. For more information about artist Patrick Dougherty, visit stickwork.net Hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily Cost: $10 (nonmembers); free (members); $5 (children 5-12); $5 (students with ID/RAP card; active military with ID) Tickets: Available online or at Mounts Botanical Garden’s main gate

Artist Patrick Dougherty puts the finishing touches on his massive stickwork structure at Mounts Botanical Garden. The exhibit, which has five rooms, was built from 30,000 pounds of willow saplings and the help of more than 100 volunteers. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star the United States, including Miami and Vero Beach. “This is the first site-specific construction of an artwork in which we’ve ever invested,” says Rochelle Wolberg, curatordirector of Mounts. She was introduced to Dougherty’s art in 2004

while attending a conference in Portland, Oregon. “I was mesmerized with his work and never forgot him,” she says. In fact, she was the impetus behind Dougherty’s bringing his creative talents to South Florida this year. To create a work that would be well-suited

to what Dougherty calls this “gem of a garden,” he came for a site visit last summer and stayed for 48 hours. That was time enough for him to roughly sketch his ideas on the outside of a manila folder. And that’s all he carried into the field when he returned in January to begin construction of a work that covers about 3,500 square feet. “I think a detailed drawing can overwhelm reality because it becomes a fixed guide that may not reflect what’s really out there when you start to work. The biggest need on site is to maximize your resources and solve problems as you go,” he says. And there can be problems when working with more than 100 volunteers divided into teams that work two, fourhour shifts a day for about three weeks, totaling 632 volunteer hours in 159 shifts. Dougherty likes working with volunteers because it takes some of the enigma out of his art. After all, if volunteers can help create his work, it must be approachable, he says. The volunteers helped him fashion his work from 30,000 pounds of willow saplings brought by flatbed truck from a nursery in upstate New York. And before you ask, they cost about $8,000 plus $4,500 for delivery.

The building process began with Dougherty and his son, Sam, creating a framework of thicker willow pieces set upright in 2-foot-deep holes around the perimeter of the structure. Then Dougherty showed the volunteers how to weave the thinner saplings onto this framework to cover the uprights and add grace and flow to his work. He designated each volunteer a small area on which to use his or her own creativity to complete the sculpture. “I think of applying the saplings as drawing. I do with sticks what another artist might do with the marks of a pencil,” says Dougherty. He also believes that many adults played with sticks as children, so his art conjures up those and other childhood memories, providing a starting point for them to comprehend and connect with his work. The structure is roofless so that it can better withstand hurricanes. After all, Dougherty’s work is expected to be on view for about two years before it self-destructs and is “gracefully disposed of” without leaving a carbon footprint, explains Wolberg. Until then, Dougherty hopes that his stick art will resonate with visitors. “I think my sculptures tap into the viewers’ fantasies and imagination,” he says. “They see a doorway, the start of a path, and wonder what’s around the corner.”

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The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Garden Calendar

Garden Calendar H17

Tree planting

Oceanfront Park, Boynton Beach — Feb. 8

Note: Events are current as of 2/22. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 2

Saturday - 3/2 - Mother Goose: National Garden Club Standard Flower Show at Boca Raton Garden Club, 42841 NW 3rd Ave. Outstanding horticulture, spectacular floral designs, whimsical botanical arts, entries from talented youth, educational exhibits. 9 am-3 pm. Free. 395-9376; bocaratongardenclub.org

MARCH 3-9

Tuesday – 3/9 - Tropical Fruit Tree & Edible Plant Sale presented by Palm Beach Chapter of the Rare Fruit Council International, Inc. at South Florida Fairgrounds, 9067 Southern Blvd, West Palm Beach. 9 am-2 pm. Free admission & parking. 855-732-7273; pbrarefruitcouncil.org 3/5 - Boca Raton Garden Club: Art in the Garden at 4281 NW 3rd Ave. Speaker Joyce Roselli from Brilliant Blooms: Glass Art for Your Garden. 1st T 1 pm. Free. 395-9376; bocaratongardenclub.org

MARCH 10-16

Wednesday – 3/13 - Delray Beach Orchid Society at Veterans Park Recreation Center, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. 2nd W 6:30 pm. Free. 573-2422; delraybeachorchidsociety.com

MARCH 17-23

3/18 - Lecture: The Impact of Butterfly and Pollinator Gardens by Jaret Daniels, Ph.D. at Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach, 311 Peruvian Ave. 2-3 pm. Free.832-0731 x111; palmbeachpreservation.org Tuesday - 3/19 - Florida Native Plant Society at Mounts Botanical Garden, 531 N Military Tr, West Palm Beach. Foraging Natives. 3rd T 7 pm. Free. palmbeach.fnpschapters.org

Sixteen members of Cub Scout Pack 241 from ImagineChancellor, a Florida charter school in Boynton Beach, helped city staff in the planting of native, salt-tolerant sea grape trees at Oceanfront Park near the newly completed playground. The other tree species planted were silver buttonwood and clusia. Photo provided WE ARE YOUR NEIGHBORS! WITH OUR HOME IN OCEAN RIDGE SINCE 2016 & DELRAY BEACH 1997-2016. PAINTING / PRESSURE CLEANING / TREE TRIMMING DRIVEWAYS

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H18 Pets

The COASTAL STAR

March 2019

Paws Up for Pets

I

Good vets like good word of mouth

confess. I do have health insurance, but do not have a personal physician. I know, I know. I need to get a physical exam once a year. But I do have a strong connection with the “physician” for my four-legged family members. In fact, Bujeau, Mikey, Kona, Casey, Cleo and Mort regularly go to the veterinary clinic for wellness exams, vaccinations, flea and tick preventives and the occasional illness or injury. My pets range in age from 4 to 17 years old. I am betting I am not alone in booking more appointments for my pets in a calendar year than for myself. Agree? Because our pets can’t talk to tell veterinarians what’s bothering them medically or emotionally, it is up to us as pet parents to do our homework and find a veterinarian and staff to whom we can relate and feel comfortable that our pets are receiving the best possible care. I bring this up because when I lived in the Lantana and Lake Worth area for nine years, my go-to veterinarian was the remarkable Ken Simmons, who owned and operated

Simmons Veterinary Hospital in Greenacres. Tragically, he and his wife, Alice, and their golden retrievers, Lily and Bailey, were aboard the private plane he piloted that crashed into the Atlantic Ocean on Feb. 1. Despite intense search efforts, the plane had yet to be found nearly a month later. (See the tribute to Ken and Alice Simmons on Page 1.) Even though I am barely 5-foot-2 and Dr. Simmons towered over me at 6-foot8, I never felt intimidated or overwhelmed by him. He patiently addressed my questions, educated me on what was happening to my then cats, Callie, Little Guy and Murphy, and always seemed to find a way to make them purr and feel comfortable during their examinations. I felt lucky to have found a great veterinarian in him. Today, my veterinarian answers to the name of Debora Charles. Like Simmons, she has a way of explaining medical terms easily and putting my pets at ease. And, as a bonus, whenever I walk into the front door of the Casa Linda Animal

Clinic, even her staffers at the front door greet me and my pets by name. Now, there are oodles of designated days, weeks and months to salute various people and causes, such as National Beer Day, Polar Bear Plunge Day, Fruitcake Toss Day, Clean Off Your Desk Day and even Wear Pajamas to Work Day. But until recently, there were no nationally known days to honor veterinarians. Patricia McConnell, a renowned expert in animal behavior and an adjunct associate professor in zoology, simply declared Thank Your Veterinarian Day on April 9, 2018. I sincerely hope this holiday gains attention. Marty Becker, DVM, best known as America’s Family Veterinarian, applauds her efforts. He is a best-selling author who helped launch the fast-growing Fear Free Pet movement designed to give veterinarians, other pet professionals and pet parents the skills and knowledge to handle pets in ways to reduce fear, anxiety and stress. (Learn more at fearfreepets.com.) “Veterinarians are pet lovers just like you,” says Becker, who

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The late Ken Simmons’ love of animals made it easy for him to put pets at ease. Coastal Star 2013 file photo personally has cats, dogs and horses at his home in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. “Veterinary medicine is an extremely challenging profession, and we certainly do not choose this medical profession for the money. The hours are long, the pay is low, the stress is high. Most MDs now focus on one organ, whereas veterinarians must know internal medicine, surgery, radiology, pharmacy, behavior and pediatrics to geriatrics.” McConnell and Becker offer these ideas to officially thank your veterinarian: • Send money to a veterinary clinic to be used for a client who cannot afford to pay for a procedure. • Bring in cookies to the veterinary staff about 3 p.m. in the middle of the week. • Write a positive review of your experience online. • Write and mail a greeting card to the veterinary staff when your dog aced his wellness exam or your cat remained calm while getting vaccinations. • Refer the veterinarian to your friends and colleagues who have pets, using face-to-face conversations. Word-of-mouth referrals are still powerful in this age of tweets and Facebook posts.

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Rob Martin, DVM, who practices at the Colonial Animal Hospital in Boynton Beach, is a fan of the final idea listed. He has been a veterinarian for three decades and at the end of the workday, he enjoys coming home to what he describes playfully as “an army of dogs and cats.” “The most important way to find a veterinarian is to find a referral from someone you trust,” says Martin. “A lot of reviews on Yelp or Google are hurtful or not accurate. Seek referrals from people who have a good relationship of say four or five years or more with a veterinarian. A veterinarian they believe does right for them and for your pets.” I am thinking about getting a T-shirt or bumper sticker that reads: Paws up to veterinarians! Arden Moore, founder of FourLeggedLife.com, is an animal behavior consultant, author, speaker and master certified pet first-aid instructor. She hosts the Oh Behave! show on PetLifeRadio. com. Learn more by visiting ardenmoore. com.

Pet Calendar Note: Events are current as of 2/22. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 3-9

Saturday - 3/9 - 26th Annual Worth Avenue Pet Parade and Contest at Via Amore, Worth Ave, Palm Beach. Costumes/ embellishments required for stage competition. 9 am registration; 10 am contest. 655-1996; worth-avenue.com 3/9 - Pups on the Plaza at Plaza Del Mar, 262 S Ocean Blvd, Manalapan. After-party for 26th annual Worth Avenue Pet Parade. One dog per handler, no retractable/flexi leads, no puppies under 4 months old, no females in season. Must pick up after your pet. Family fare. 3-6 pm. $15/VIP includes doggy bag, auction entry, pup pageant/ costume contest entry; free/general admission. 582-5338; pupsontheplaza/ eventbrite.com

MARCH 10-16

Monday - 3/11 - Dog Obedience Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Every M through 4/15. Beginner 6-7 pm; intermediate/games 7-8 pm. $95/resident; $117/non-resident. 3937807; myboca.us


The COASTAL STAR

March 2019

Tots & Teens H19

Tots & Teens

St. John Paul II student raises funds to honor dad, fight cancer

School event this month comes amid recognition from lymphoma society By Janis Fontaine Just 17 years old, Madison Nolan of Delray Beach is dealing with a tremendous loss by doing something positive. Last April 5, Madison lost her father, Ed Nolan, to nonHodgkin lymphoma. NHL is the most common form of blood cancer — sometimes called liquid cancer — with more than 70,000 cases diagnosed each year in the United States. The disease forms in the bloodstream or lymph system, which carries diseasefighting white blood cells throughout the body. Madison, a senior at Saint John Paul II Academy in Boca Raton, has been nominated to be one of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s students of the year. The title is awarded to the candidate in each community who raises the most in donations during a seven-week competition, which this year ends March 8. Go to Tinyurl.com/MadisonLLS to donate. Student of the Year is a philanthropic leadership development program for exemplary high school students. Participants build professional skills such as entrepreneurship, marketing and project management while raising money to fight liquid cancers. Saint John Paul II Academy requires students to wear school uniforms. The chance to wear jeans and non-school colors is enticing, so charity-driven “dress-down days” are effective fundraisers. But for Madison, her March 5 event will also be a way to honor her father. “I want everyone to see his smiling face,” Madison said. “He was one of the good guys.”

Madison Nolan hopes to raise $50,000 by March 8 for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society in honor of her father, Ed Nolan, who died in April after battling lymphoma. On March 5 she wants fellow students to donate $3 each and wear lime green, the LLS color. Photo provided Madison asks participants to make $3 donations and to wear lime green shirts and jeans to school. Lime green is the color of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. Her goal is to raise $50,000 by March 8, but she admits that while the money is important, what she really wants is to see her school dressed in lime green as a tribute to the man who always had a smile and a kind word. “It’s only been 10 months,” Madison said, “so it’s going to be hard, but I’m super-excited to be making a memory for him.” Madison says her best friends have really stepped up for her. “It’s easy to talk about him. I want to talk about him, and they understand that.” Madison was about 5 years old when her father was diagnosed in 2006. “He had a PET scan and it lit up like a Christmas tree,” Madison said. He was treated with

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chemotherapy, and Madison remembers when she visited him at treatment, he was the guy who was walking around, laughing and joking and cheering everyone else up. “Nothing ever affected him.” Ed Nolan was doing well as 2017 drew to a close. He’d made so much progress that doctors thought he was in remission, and the family had a party to celebrate his being cancer-free.

In December, he needed a little minor surgery and he didn’t recover from anesthesia well. Things got worse. The cancer had metastasized to his brain, an unexpected and dire development. “We didn’t think the cancer could do that,” Madison said. “He’d always pulled through before.” But at the beginning of April, Madison was taking a history test when someone called her

to the front office. The staff told her to bring her books. A woman in the office was in tears. “She told me things were bad,” Madison said. Her mom’s sister had flown in from Alaska to help, and she took Madison to the hospital. It’s still hard for Madison to believe her father is gone. She misses his sarcasm and his jokes, and riding in his Jeep down to the beach. Her father was a 36-year employee of FPL and “he loved his job and he had a group of guys he loved, his FPL guys,” Madison said. Her mother, Kathleen Nolan, is supportive and proud of her daughter’s efforts to honor her father. Madison also finds comfort with her dog, Bella, a black Lab mix she and her dad rescued. “She sleeps under the covers,” she said. Madison wants to go to college, but isn’t quite ready to leave home yet. She wants to become a physician’s assistant. “I’ve always loved anything medical,” she said. “I’m interested in holistic medicine and how we can treat people using herbs and supplements or acupuncture, as alternatives or in addition to chemo drugs.” The LLS says that its students of the year have an important responsibility: “We call on those strong enough to fight for others. We need standouts who can stand up to cancer.” Ú


H20 Tots & Teens Calendar

The COASTAL STAR

Spring Break Calendar Note: Events are current as of 2/22. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 17-23

3/18-22 - Ocean Adventure Sea Program at Red Reef Park, 1400 N State Road A1A, Boca Raton. Jr. Marine Biologists experience hands-on, feet-wet approach to Marine Science; learn/master new watersports including snorkeling, boogie boarding, skim boarding, surfing, paddle boarding, fishing, sailing, more. Age 5-15. 9 am-3 pm; after care 3-5 pm $20/day. Week $325/resident, $406/ non-resident; daily $79/resident, $91/non-

Tots & Teens Calendar

resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/18-22 - Surf School at Red Reef Park, 1400 N State Road A1A, Boca Raton. No previous surfing experience necessary; participants must be able to swim. Equipment provided. Age 5-15. 9 am-3 pm; after care 3-5 pm $20/ day. Week $329/resident, $379/non-resident; daily $89/resident, $99/non-resident. 3937807; myboca.us 3/18-22 - Boca Riding Club Camp at 16489 Winners Circle Dr Barn 4, Delray Beach. Ride daily, participate in horse care, grooming, feeding. No experience necessary. Bring lunch, beverages. Age 8-14. 9 am-2 pm. $85/1

Summer Camp Guide April 2018

2018

NOTE: With in our area, so many summ The COA STAL between we selected er camps offere STAR d of Palm the Boca Raton those located Artist for Beach. We Inlet and east of I-95, Communitya Day: Suga the Port kept Not all summbut there areour listing mostl Raton. Age Center, 300 r Sand Park y set. Pleas er camp scheda few exceptions. creations, 5-12 Ceram S Military Tr, $180/week Boca ic paint Summer for addit e check www.thecoules have been foundationclay hand build ing, fabric $1240/8-we, 3D Digital Camp Animation available.ional information astalstar.co M-F Craft s of drawing. ing, canvas eks, week. 9 Guide am-4 pmBand Camp $250/ missing Also refer to listedas it becomes m age 9-12 y Kids age 5-10 8:30 am-1 pmart, H17 week inform First Unite M-Th . Befor 8/6-10. organizatio ation such websites for 3900; sugar $250-$3126/4-8. Art Studi 4-5:30 pm e-/af ter-ca 6/4-7/26. $155/ Overnigh d Methodist send detai n offers a campas pricing. If .50/week. o ArtsCamp sandpark.o palmbeach available for re 7-9 am & your Methodist t Camp: Warre Boca rg 347: Kravis gmail.com ls to thecoastals not listed, pleas a fee. state 2nd 868-4145; Cente floor, .edu Grades Summer Camp n Willis Unite tarcalendar e Beach. Age 4-12. Beau Palm Beach701 Okeechober Cohen Pavili d in Leesb @ divided conditionin 8-13. Balle into age-s tiful camp on urg. dance, music. Age 9-11. e Blvd, West on CHURCH Advent g for dance t, modern, jazz, small Explo Lake lunch pecifi Henderson ACADEM ADVE group re actin Griffi vocal music al theater, NTure Club and Lutheran tap, swimming s, ropes coursc areas. Worship, n am-1 . $60-$210 + g, IC Program: Summer $25 regispointe. Bring performan , culminatin technical theat pm Raton. AgeSchool, 300 E :  Advent Enrichme by Amer , arts/crafts, e, archery, Hend tration camps M-F 6/4-22. 803-2 Florida 2-13. Varie Yamato Rd, order appli ce. Interviewsg in an original er, ican Camp more. Accre fee. both Atlantic erson University nt with 403; pba.e 9 youn Boca Summer ty ing Rd, Boca traine dited University, M-F 6/4-2 cations receiv scheduled in Schoo K-8th gradeg learners age of activities for du/ FUMC Boca d/certified Association; staffe 777 Glade l, IntensivesDance Class camps M-FRaton. Grade college 1 camp 2. $650/3-we ed. 9 am-4 pmthe d outdoor . Weekly them2-4 & students s s fumcbocar week 7/16stude T-shirt. 1203 Knuth : Southern es & Dance Program: 6/4-29. MornK-6. Two 4-we 21. 395-1 nts. additional After-careek session includ 5/29-8/3.activities. 7:30 es, indoor & programs/ aton.org/catego 244; Princess Rd, BoyntonDance Theatre, social studiskills in langu ing Enrichmentek am-5:30 4366; kravi cost. Enrollmen available for es 3631; advenCall/check webs Camp age ry/summe Beach. Princ pm M-F First Unite groovemen pm $440 es/science, age arts, readi 3-5 rProject s.org/artscamp t limited: 651e Camp Kesh tschoolboc ite for price. School: d Methodist Fashion: Mini Danc t 5-6 pm T/Thballet, tap, jazz, & Recreation/4-weeks. Aftermath 8:15 am-1 ng, 395Community Center at et: Taubm a.org Suga of Boca First United Meth Vacation Bible jazz, hip e Camp age 6/19-7/26 $180. an Early education, Program: swimnoon Arts & 2:30 Raton, 625 Raton. Age Center, 300 r Sand Park 6-8 odist Churc 6261 SW B’nai Torah Cong Child (potty traine Summer hop 5-7 pm T/Th ballet, tap, NE Mizn movement computer enric ming, physi 18th St, h regation, hood who want 8-15. For younS Military Tr, Train Fun er d) cal Boca 6/19pm Blvd. to 4th grade Boca Dance Camp ed tap, jazz, 6/117/26 $335. $440/4-we , cultural arts. hment, music Age 3 own cloth to learn to desigg fashionista designedspecialists lead Raton. Age 2-6. .9 395-1244;15. $35 advan s leaps & modern, acro, age 9-12 balle $830/4 eks. Full-day 12:30-5:30 pm / n, sew activities ce; $45 am-12:30 students es. Different turns 9 social, creatto develop physi musical week t, Seacrest fumcbocaraton. after 5/1. projects their to enha sessio am-3 care (7:30 s, $275/1-we(both camps) theat cal, am-1 ive n. pm allow Chris nce their er, swimming Summer skills. Sport pm Seacrest tian Scho org 11-18 interm 297-3970; am-8:15 am) ek all day. Early Inten M-F 7/16-27 6/4-8 & M-F. Young Fashi skill levels. Blvd, crafts, yoga,, Shabbat, arts, s, ol: ediate and sive Program $525/ 8:30 by audit crafts, scienDelray Beach 2703 N Summer adhus.fau.edu$50. Enroll by onist 7/16-20. 7/23-27; Twee age M-F 6/11- cooking, more 4/27: $290-$362 ns & Teensas age 8-12 program ion only 9 am-3 advanced dance 6/4-8/3. ce. 8:30 am-3. Age 2-8. Arts, State CollegYouth Colle sugarsandp . 8/10 (close29, 7/2-7/20, .50/week. age 11-15 age 9-18 7/2-27 $1,000; pm M-F: 4-we rs full day Half day (8:30 :30 pm M-F Raton. Age e, 3000 St. ge: Palm Beach FAU TOPS ark.org 347-3900; (half days d 7/4) 9 am-37/23ek -11:30 6/25-7/13 3-week intermediat Lunch availa8-14. Stude Lucie Ave, Boca morningor 3 full days (M/W am), progr $825 Atlantic Summer Arts 3-, 6-, or available for pm nts choos ble M-F 7/30- e & advanced. Dancer’s Tuneam care 3:30- care 7:45-8:30 /F). Free own. 9 e classe Building,University Arts Camps: Florid after-care9-week sessio age 2-4) am-4 for purch 8:30-9 am;8/3 $185/week 5:30-8:30 pm Up 7/4). Many pm M-Th ase or bring s. week + 5:30 pm $5/ho am. AfterGrades 777 Glades Rd, & Humanities a cost. Regis available for ns. Before-/ $15/w ur. K-12. Call theat after-care 3-5 . Free before-car once a weekclasses $75 6/18-7/27 (closeyour 5552; seacr eek activity $88-$195/ am-4 pm Piano, creat Boca Raton. deposit, tration fee, additional fee. southerndare audition date/pm $25/week. e care availa for 6 week(each class 2 hoursd & 7/9-1 M-F. Grades ive writing. 9 St. Josepestchurch.com 2765/1. $695& security due s). Befor ncetheatre time. 736-9 3. K-5 862-4730; ble. Check webs e-/af Auditions Grades 6-12 6/11-6/25-29, 7/2-6 Vacation h’s Episcopal .com 9665; bnait-$4,380. 750097; palmbeach ite for detaiterrequi , Scho 15 & scholarship red for ol Seacrest Church Cam camp-kesh orahecc.org state.edu/ EQUEST ls. new TOPS 6/18-22. Boca p: 3300 ANIMA / Blvd, syc/BR website auditions take RIAN Camp Meceet campers; S Lane. Summer Hors Age 4-11, Boynton Beach for date/ Environm LS & ENV 6/11-15, non-refund Age 6-14. e Camp: time. $290place TBD; check . 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List your camp in our April issue. Please submit: • Dates • Camp name • Camp location • Age restrictions • Cost/fees • Contact information • A short description Email your listing to: thecoastalstarcalendar@gmail.com *Listing deadline: March 20, 2019

ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES 1/8 page: $375 1/4 page: $650 For larger sizes or more specifics, call Chris Bellard, 561-901-7717

*Ad deadline: March 25, 2019

day; $225/3 days; $350/5 days. 935-4938; bocaridingclub.com 3/18-22 - Performing Arts Spring Break Camp: Hamilton at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Learn songs, scenes, choreography from the movie. Performance on 3/23. Age 6+. Core program 9 am-3 pm. $325; extended hours 8-9 am $10 & 3-6 pm $5/hour. Friday lunch buffet $7. Registration fee $40/new student; $25/returning student. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com 3/18-22 - Spring Break Blast Camp at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Exploration, experiments, games, more. Grades 1-5. M-F 9 am-1 pm. Full week $107/resident, $134/non-resident; daily $25/ resident, $31.25/non-resident. Registration: 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 3/18-22 - Spring Break Camp: A Broadway Cabaret at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. Age 8-14. Performance 11 am 3/23. 9 am-3 pm. $200/student; $180/additional sibling. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/18-22 - Spring Break Camps at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. 9 am-4 pm. Surf Science Camp age 4-12 $230-$255; Laser Craze Camp age 7-14 $280-$305. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org 3/18-22 & 25 - Spring Break Zoo Camp at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Animal encounters, tours, group projects, games, crafts, more. Age 5-10. 9 am-4 pm. $275/member; $305/non-member; lunch (optional) $54/week; before care 8:15-9 am $20; after care 4-5:30 pm $50; before/ after care package $65. 533-0887, x229; palmbeachzoo.org 3/18-22 - Spring Break Camp: Best of Broadway Cabaret at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. Grades K-5. Performance 11 am 3/23. 9 am-3 pm. $200/student; $180/sibling. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/18-22 - Spring Break Art-Sea Camp at 112 S Federal Highway #7, Boynton Beach. 2 to 3 projects a day. Pottery painting, decoupage, canvas painting, watercolor, jewelry making, mosaic, more. 10:30 am-2:30 pm. Held again 3/25-29. $235/week camp; $55/one-day camp. Reservations: 737-2600; artsealiving.com

www.unityschool.com

Teaching the ‘whole’ child...

Now enrolling Preschool to 8th Grade

Rigorous Academics

Our Unity graduates are developed in a nurturing, high-performing environment.

Amazing Fine Arts Program

With band, jazz band chorus, visual arts and a drama program.

March 2019

Character Development

Comprehensive Athletic Program All students participate in athletics as they desire with no cuts.

With emphasis on leadership, community service and family involvement.

Preparing future global leaders for the world they will live in!

Private, not-for-profit, fully accredited, non-denominational school loyally serving the community since 1964.

Call Today For A Personal Tour 561-276-4414 101 NW 22nd Street, Delray Beach, FL 33444 • unityschool.com • info@unityschool.com

Note: Events are current as of 2/22. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 2

Saturday - 3/2 - Sensory Saturdays: Special Exploration Hours at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. For families affected by autism spectrum disorder. No heavy crowds; softened general lighting, decreased noise level/visual stimulation on interactive exhibits wherever possible. 1st Sat 8-10 am. $8.50/adult; $7.50/ senior; $6.50/child 3-12; free/child under 3. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org 3/2 - Lil Sluggers Baseball at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Specially designed to introduce children to baseball. Every Sat through 4/27 (no class 4/6). Age 4-5 8:15-9 am; age 2 9:15-10 am; age 3 10:15-11 am; age 3.5-4 11:15 am-noon. $144/resident; $180/ non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/2 - Sensory Saturday at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Explore the museum in sensory modified setting with sound/light adjustments. 1st Sat 9-10 am. Free. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 3/2 - Diamonds & Pearls Dance Team at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Community dance team program prides itself on passion, dedication, excellence, respect; participates in local and collegiate homecoming parades, statewide special events. Middle/ high school/college students. T/Th 6-8 pm; Sat 9 am-1 pm. Yearly $30/resident; $40/nonresident. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com 3/2 - Diaper League Sports at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Fundamentals of various sports w/guidance of recreation staff: T-ball, football, basketball, soccer. Mandatory parent participation. Age 3-5. Every M/Th 6-7 pm & Sat 9-10 am. $20/8-week session. 2437356; mydelraybeach.com 3/2 - Tiny Toes Ballet/Tap Class at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Age 3-7. Every Sat 9:30-10 am. $10. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com 3/2 - Little Wonders at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Hike, crafts, stories. Age 3-4. Children must be accompanied by an adult. 1st Sat 10-11 am. $5/ member; $8/non-member. Reservations: 5448615; gumbolimbo.org 3/2 - Seuss-a-bration at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Stories, animated movie shorts, music, games. Children and adults encouraged to wear silly costumes, mismatched socks, backwards clothing, silly colors. All ages. 10-11:30 am. Free. Registration: 266-0197; delraylibrary.org 3/2 - Kidz On Stage Class: Mary Poppins at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Children audition, act, sing, dance, perform. Age 3-7. Performance date 5/18. Every Sat through 5/18 10-11 am. $300. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com 3/2 - Wildlife Explorers at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Created by National Recreation & Parks Association; 6-week program gives children an opportunity to connect w/nature in local parks. Guided outdoor activity, dress accordingly. Age 5-11 w/parent/guardian. Every Sat through 3/16 10 am-noon; 3/9 & 16 classes meet at Gumbo Limbo. Free. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 3/2 - Drop-In Story Time at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Music, stories, fingerplays, action songs. Children all ages accompanied by an adult. Every Sat 10-10:30 am. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/2 - Drop-in Craft at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. All ages. Every Sat 10:30-11:30 am. Free w/paid admission. Registration: 7426780; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/2 - Early Literacy Playtime at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age walkers to 4 yrs. Every Th/Sat 10:30 am-12:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/2 - Family Studio at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Children w/adult partner tour the current special exhibition, then create their own artwork. Age 5-12 w/parents. Every Sat 10:30 am-12:30 pm. $1/materials fee payable at the door. Registration: 832-5196 x1138; norton.org 3/2 - Spanish for Kids at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Age 5-12. Every Sat through 4/6 10:3011:30 am. $105/resident; $131/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/2 - Story Time at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Stories, songs, fingerplays parents and children enjoy together. All ages. T-Sat 11 am. Free w/paid admission. 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/2 - Acro Class at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Age 3-7. Every Sat 11-11:30 am. $10. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com

3/2 - Science Stories at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hear science inspired stories. Age 5+. Every Sat 11:30 am. Free. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 3/2 - Singing Starz Group Voice Class at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Age 4-7. Every Sat 11:30 am-noon. $10. 394-2626; showtimeboca. com 3/2 - Nature Detectives at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. New mystery each month. Age 5-7 w/an adult. 1st Sat 11:30 am-12:30 pm. $5/member; $8/non-member. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org 3/2 - Annual Family Book Club Brunch at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 9+. 11:30 am-1:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/2 - Family Fun: Hinamatsuri at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Hinamatsuri, Doll’s Day, is a holiday held each spring in Japan to bring health/happiness to girls. Create a kirigami papercut decoration to celebrate. Noon-3 pm. Free w/paid admission. 495-0233; morikami.org 3/2 - Realistic Drawing/Painting Instruction Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Basic techniques essential to quality, realistic paintings. Every Sat through 3/23. Adult class 12:30-2:30 pm $65/resident, $81/non-resident; Child age 7-12 class 2:30-4:30 pm. $40/resident; $50/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/2 - Patch Reef Jr. Tennis Tournament at Patch Reef Park Tennis Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Rain makeup date 3/9. 1 pm. $35/ resident; $43.75/non-resident. Entries due 2 days before each tournament begins: 367-7090; patchreefpark.org 3/2 - Rhythmic Gymnastics at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Every Sat through 3/30. Beginner 2 age 5-6 2-3 pm $100-$125; Intermediate age 7-12 2-3:30 pm $125-$156.25. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/2 - Jr. Shark Biologist at Sandoway Discovery Center, 142 S Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach. Age 5-12. W/Sun 3:15 pm. Free w/$5 admission. 274-7263; sandowayhouse.org 3/2 - Annie Warbucks at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. Every Sat through 4/6 4 pm. $20.50/adult; $15.50/student. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com

MARCH 3-9

Sunday – 3/3 - Science Make & Takes at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Learn about science concepts by making a fun craft to take home. Age 5+. Every Sat 11:30 am. $5. 347-3912; scienceexplorium. org Monday - 3/4 - Early Fitness Curriculum at Catherine Strong Park, 1500 SW 6th St, Delray Beach. Parks & Recreation staff coaching 30-minute fitness programs for children. Ages 2-6. Ongoing during school year M-F 10 am-1 pm. Free. 243-7194; mydelraybeach.com 3/4 - Oh Baby at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Pre-literacy class: music, stories, rhymes, lap bounces. Age 3 months to not-yet-walking. Every M 10 am. Free. 2660197; delraylibrary.org 3/4 - Tales for Tadpoles at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Music/ movement rhymes. Age walking-24 months. Every M 10:45 am. Free. 266-0197; delraylibrary.org 3/4 - Children’s Fitness Classes/Gymnastics at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Build confidence/coordination. Every M through 2/21. Age 3-4 40-minute class 1:15, 2 & 2:45 pm; age 5-6 55-minute class 3:45 pm; age 7 & up 55-minute class 4:45 pm. 40-minute class $54/resident, $67.50/nonresident; 55-minute class $78/resident, $97.50/ non-resident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/4 - Homework Assistance at Catherine Strong Park, 1500 SW 6th St, Delray Beach. Grades K-12. Every M-F during school year 2-5 pm. Free. 243-7194; mydelraybeach.com 3/4 - Rhythmic Gymnastics: Beginner 2 at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 5-6. Every M/W through 3/27, 3-4 pm. M only $80/resident, $100/nonresident; M/W $130/resident, $162.50/nonresident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/4 - Take a Bite Out of Science at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Participants will engage in exciting, interactive and educational hands-on activities that instill a clearer understanding of science and how it affects the world around them, all while having fun. Ages 6-11. Every M through 4/29. 5-6 pm. $165/resident, $206.25/non-resident. 3473900; sugarsandpark.org 3/4 - Brain BITS: Build-Innovate-Tinker at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Hands-on family time filled with creativity,


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019 collaboration, play in 3D printing lab. Age 5+. Every M 6 pm. Free. 266-0197; delraylibrary.org 3/4 - Anime Club at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 9-14. Held again 4/1 6-7:30 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/4 - Delray Divas Step Teams at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Organized, structured step team performs at local events & statewide competitions. Program reinforces role of youth as positive members of the community. Grades K-12. Every M/W 6-8:30 pm. Yearly $30/resident; $40/non-resident. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com Tuesday - 3/5 - Turtle Tales at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Age 2-3, must be accompanied by an adult. Every T 10 am. Free. 266-0197; delraylibrary.org 3/5 - Mother Nature & Me: Fishy Friends at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Experience exciting nature topics through stories, puppets, games, role play, nature walks, crafts. Age 2-5 w/guardian. 10:30 am. $4/child. Reservations: 629-8760; pbcnature.com 3/5 - S.T.E.A.M. Experiences at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. All ages welcome; adult supervision required. T-Sat. 11:30 am. $3/member; $5/non-member. 3686875; cmboca.org 3/5 - Home School Science K-Grade 2 at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Every T through 4/9 2-2:45 pm. Registration: 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/5 - Spanish Storytime at Delray Beach Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Age 0-5. Every T 3:30 pm. Free. Registration: 266-0197; delraylibrary.org 3/5 - USCA Cheerleading at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Tiny Stars age 4-6. Every T through 3/26 (no class 3/19) 4:30-5:30 pm. $30/resident; $37.50/nonresident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/5 - BeTeen the Lines: A Readers Club at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Age 13+. 1st & 3rd T 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. 2660197; delraylibrary.org 3/5 - Fundamentals of 3D Computer Modeling at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 9-17. Every T through 4/30 (no class 3/19) 5-6 pm. $300/resident; $375/nonresident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/5 - Girls Who Code Club at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 1317. Every T 6-7 pm. Free. Enroll: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/5-6 - Sensational Story ‘n More at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Children’s books come to life through interactive performance, singing, movement, props. Age 2-5. Every T 10:30 am & W 2 pm. Free w/paid admission. 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/5-6 - Explorium Science Squad: Fly, Glide & Slide at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Kids explore, experiment, try something new every month. T age 5-6 w/parent; W age 7-9. Both days 4-5 pm. $10/resident; $12.50/non-resident. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org Wednesday - 3/6 - Tiny Tots Storytime at Sandoway Discovery Center, 142 S Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach. Age 0-4. Every W 11-11:30 am. Free. 274-7263; sandowayhouse.org 3/6 - Children’s Fitness Classes/Gymnastics at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Build confidence/ coordination. Every W through 4/17 (no class 3/20). Age 2-3 40-minute class 1:15-1:55 pm; age 3-4 40-minute class 2 & 2:45 pm; age 5-6 55-minute class 3:45 pm; age 7 & up 55-minute class 4:45 pm. 40-minute class $54/resident, $67.50/non-resident; 55-minute class $78/ resident, $97.50/non-resident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/6 - Rhythmic Gymnastics at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 5-6. Every W through 3/27. Beginner 2, age 5-6, 3-4 pm $80-$100; Intermediate, age 7-12, 4-5:30 pm, $100-$125. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/6 - Lil’ Explorers: Super Sensory Messy Play at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Explore, develop important readiness skills. Age 2-5 yrs. Every W 3-3:45 pm. Per class $4/member; $5/non-member + admission. 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/6 - Manners & Etiquette Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Explore different interactive skills/processes of good manners. Age 6-12. Every W through 3/27. 5-6 pm. $65/resident; $81/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/6 - Tween Explorers: Krathong Craft at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 9-12. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary. org Thursday - 3/7 - Drop-In Story Time at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Music,

stories, fingerplays, action songs. Children all ages; 8 & younger must be accompanied by an adult. Every Th 10-10:30 am. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/7 - The Art of the Story at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. One author/ illustrator at each class; children create their own art in the style of the featured book. Age 3-7 yrs. Every Th through 3/21 2-2:45 pm. Free w/paid admission. 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/7 - Knitting Club at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Age 7 to adult. Every Th 3:30-4:30 pm. Free w/museum admission. 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/7 - Rhythmic Gymnastics: Beginner 1 at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 4-5. Every Th through 3/28 3:30-4:30 pm $80/resident; $100/non-resident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/7 - Little Makers: Osmo at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 6-8. 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/7 - Musical Theatre Experience: The Lion King at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Children audition, act, sing, dance, perform. Age 5-12. Performance date 5/23. Every Th through 5/23 3:30-5 pm. $360. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com 3/7 - Hack Shack Tech Club: CAD Creations at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium Stiles-Nicholson STEM Education Center, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Experiment w/ computer programming, design video games. Signed liability waiver required. Grades 5-8. 1st Th 5-7 pm. $15/member; $20/non-member. Registration: 832-2026; sfsciencecenter.org 3/7 - Chess for Kids at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Learn about the pieces, how to set them up, move them, interrelate them, do check/checkmate moves. Age 4-12. Every Th through 3/28 5:306:30 pm. $95/resident; $119/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/7 - Taylored Athletes Basketball Class at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. High-quality instruction for aspiring young professional athletes. Elite training age 9-14; Fundamentals age 5-8. Every Th through 3/28. 5:30-6:30 pm. $75/ resident; $93.75/non-resident. 347-3950; tayloredathletes.com 3/7 - Bright & Smart Robotics Engineering Skills for Kids at Sugar Sand Park Community Center, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Work in teams, build and program robots using special edition Lego bricks & specially developed curriculum. Age 7-14. Every Th through 5/2 (no class 3/21) 5:30-6:30 pm. $20/materials fee due to instructor at first class: $165/ resident; $206.25/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/7 - Teen Tech Week 2019: VR Program at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 9-17. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Registration: 3937968; bocalibrary.org 3/7-8 - Karate/Martial Arts Classes at Delray Beach Community Center, 50 NW 1st Ave. Karate & blend of other combat martial arts. Age 9 to adult. Every Th/F 6-7 pm. Per month $10/resident; $12/non-resident; $25/one-time uniform fee. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com Friday - 3/8 - Tot Time at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Enjoy crafts, snacks, indoor play stations. Drop in anytime during the program. Age 2-5. 10 am-noon. $5/ child. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/8 - Yoga Fun for Everyone at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. All ages. Every F through 4/12 11:30 am-12:15 pm. Free w/paid admission. 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/8 - Home School Science Grades 3-4 at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Every F through 4/12 1:30-2:15 pm. Registration: 7426780; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/8 - Animal Encounters at Sandoway Discovery Center, 142 S Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach. All ages. Every F 3 pm. Free. 274-7263; sandowayhouse.org 3/8 - College Admissions: What to Look for and How to Get In at Hagen Ranch Road Library, 14350 Hagen Ranch Rd, Delray Beach. Speaker: Andy Greenspan, Director of College Counseling, International College Counselors. 4-5:30 pm. Free. 954-414-9986; burtona@ pbclibrary.org 3/8 - Catherine Strong Girls Club at Catherine Strong Park, 1500 SW 6th St, Delray Beach. Designed to boost confidence, morale, provide positive guidance. Program provides volunteer opportunities, etiquette, personal hygiene training, open discussions, educational guest speakers, health & fitness awareness, arts & crafts, excursions, refreshments. Age 6-18. 2nd F 5:30-6:30 pm. Free. 243-7194; mydelraybeach.com 3/8 - Friday Night at the Museum at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military

Tr, Boca Raton. A night out without your parents! Wear comfy clothes, hang out in the Explorium after hours, watch a movie, do a fun experiment. Age 7-12. 6-9:30 pm. $20/resident; $25/non-resident. 347-3912; scienceexplorium. org Saturday - 3/9 - Expedition: Science Playground at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Put on your thinking caps, join us for a closer look at the scientific principles found within our inclusive Science Playground. Age 5+ with parent/ guardian. 2nd Sat 9-10 am. Free. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 3/9 - DinoFest 2019 at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Hunt for dinosaur eggs ($3.50/ child), dig for fossils, get hands-on with paleontology labs, plus face painting, animal encounters, more. 10 am-4 pm. $17.95/adult; $15.95/seniors 60+; $13.95/child 3-12; free/ child under 3. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org 3/9 - Thai Bilingual Drop-In Story Time at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Music, stories, fingerplays, action songs. Children all ages accompanied by an adult. 1010:30 am. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/9 - Little Wonders at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Hike, crafts, stories. Age 3-4. Children must be accompanied by an adult. 10-11 am. $5/ member; $8/non-member. Reservations: 5448615; gumbolimbo.org 3/9 - Playground Playdate at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Get info about upcoming programs, enjoy free kids’ activities. 11 am-12:30 pm. Free. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/9 - Nature Detectives at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. New mystery each month. Age 5-7 w/an adult. 11:30 am-12:30 pm. $5/member; $8/nonmember. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo. org

MARCH 10-16

Monday - 3/11 - Baby Bookworm at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Storytime for infants accompanied by an adult. Age 3 months to walking. Every M 11-11:30 am. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/11 - Early Afternoon Explorers: Hovercrafts at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 6-9 1-2 pm; age 10-12 2-3 pm. $10/resident; $12.50/nonresident. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 3/11 - Bright & Smart Robotics for Homeschoolers at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 10-12 1-2 pm; age 7-9 2-3 pm. $15-$18.75/day. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/11 - Floral Design with Vickie Denton at The Society of The Four Arts Children’s Library, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Kindergarten & up. 3-4 pm. Free. Reservations: 655-2776; fourarts.org 3/11 - Adventures in Reading at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Children attend independently. Age 4-6. Every M 3:30-4 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/11 - Beginning Coding for 7-10s at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Every M 3:30-4:15 pm. Free. Enrollment: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/11 - Sunflowers Art Workshop at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Grades K-5. 4:15-5:15 pm. Free. Registration: 266-0197; delraylibrary.org Tuesday - 3/12 - Globe Trottin’ Toddlers at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age walking to 35 months. Every T 10-10:30 am. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/12 - Intermediate Coding for 7-10s at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Students must have been in a previous Beginning Coding class to enroll. Every T 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. Enrollment: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/12 - Spinner Art Snap Circuits at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Age 7+. 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. Registration: 266-0197; delraylibrary.org 3/12 - TAB (Teen Advisory Board) Meeting at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. 266-0197; delraylibrary.org 3/12 - They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera part of Teen Book Club at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 13-17. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org Wednesday - 3/13 - Reading & Rhythm for 2-3s at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Literacy enrichment class: stories, music, movement. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Every W 10-10:30 am. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/13 - City Mouse & Country Mouse at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. Grades K-5. 11 am & 4 pm. For tickets call: 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/13 - Booktastic Around the World: Flat Stanley’s Worldwide Adventures: The

Tots & Teens Calendar H21 Amazing Mexican Secret by Josh Greenhut at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Free copy of book upon registration. Age 7-8. Child attends independently. 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org Thursday - 3/14 - Edible Art Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Create art you eat! Every Th through 4/4. Age 3-5. 10-11 am. $65/resident; $81/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/14 - Mori Stories: Kamishibai Folktales: Princess Kaguya at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. 2nd Th through May 11 am & 1 pm. Free w/museum admission. 495-0233; morikami.org 3/14 - Fun Chefs with Stacy Stolman at The Society of The Four Arts Children’s Library, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30 or 3:30 pm. Free. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/14 - Create It @ Your Library: Teen Paint Night at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Grades 6-12. 6-7 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org Friday – 3/15 - Fabulous Fun Friday: Leprechaun Fun at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. All ages. 10:30-11:15 am. $4/member; $5/non-member + admission. Registration: 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum. org 3/15 - Daggerwing Visits the Library: Snakes at West Boca Branch Library, 18685 N State Rd 7. Live animal ambassadors. Age 5+. 3:30 pm. Free. RSVP: 470-1600; pbcnature.com 3/15 - Eyes to the Skies with professionalgrade 16-inch Meade LX Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Informal event held in the parking lot weather permitting. Telescope is out for at least one hour after scheduled start time; stars must be visible for telescope to align. Age 8+ (under 18 must be accompanied by an adult). 8:30 pm. Free. 3473912; scienceexplorium.org Saturday - 3/16 - Touch a Truck! At Spanish River Library, 1501 NW Spanish River Blvd, Boca Raton. In partnership w/City of Boca Raton Municipal Services, Recreation Services, Police and Fire Departments. Fire engine, sanitation truck, aerial bucket truck, beach tractor, dump truck, rescue boat, more. Rain or shine; food available for purchase. Family fare. 9:30 amnoon. Free. 544-8584; bocalibrary.org 3/16 - Family Stories in the Garden at Children’s Garden, 137 SW 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. Listen to stories at different stations, both in English and Haitian Creole. Families all ages welcome. 10 am-noon. Free. 266-0197; delraylibrary.org 3/16 - Family Art Day at Florida Atlantic University Schmidt Center, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Children and families participate in fun/ interactive tours of exhibitions; experience art/ create your own works of art. 1-4 pm. Free. 297-2661; fau.edu/galleries 3/16-17 - Science Demonstrations at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hear favorite science-inspired stories. Age 7 & up. 3:30 pm. Free. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org

MARCH 17-23

Monday - 3/18 - Introduction to Computer Animation at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 9-17. 8:30 am-1 pm. $75/ resident; $93.75/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/18 - Fun & Fitness at Sugar Sand P6tark, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 5-11. Held again 3/21 8:30 am-5:30 pm. Per day: $65/resident; $81.25/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark. org 3/18 - Circle of Friends at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 4-15. 9 am-1 pm. $60/resident; $75/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/18 - Stuffed Animal Sleepover at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Dress in pajamas, bring a stuffed animal friend for a special story time. Ages 4+. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Registration: 266-0197; delraylibrary.org Tuesday - 3/19 - Archery 101 at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. USA Archery certified instructor. Learn basics of archery, indoor demonstration followed by outdoor target practice. Equipment provided, wear closed-toe shoes, bring sunscreen. Age 9+. 10 am. $10/person/session. RSVP required: 966-7000; pbcnature.com 3/19 - Children’s Spring Fair at Patch Reef Park, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Games, arts/crafts, entertainment. Age 2-12. 10 am-3 pm. Free/entrance to event; $20/ride all day bracelet; $5/ride ticket. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/19 - Mother Nature & Me: Turtle Time at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Experience exciting nature topics through stories, puppets, games, role play, nature walks, crafts. Age 2-5 w/guardian. 10:30 am. $4/child. Reservations: 629-8760; pbcnature.com

3/19 - The Great Space Caper (G) presented by Madcap Puppets at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. 11 am & 2 pm. $8/adult; $6/child 12 & under. 3473948; willowtheatre.org 3/19 - Puppets-On-The-Run at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 4-10. 12:30-1:30 pm. $10/resident, $12.50/nonresident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/19 - 3D Printing Club at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Age 7 & up. 3rd Th 3:30 pm. Free. Registration: 266-0798; delraylibrary.org 3/19-20 - Kidzart at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 5-12. 8:30 am-1 pm. Per day: $55/resident; $68.75/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/19-21 - Animal Adventure Day Camp at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Games, crafts, educational activities instructors teach young conservationists about the importance of caring for/protecting sea turtles, other marine life. Experience close encounters w/resident sea turtles, visit a local nesting beach. Grades 1-3. 8:30 am-noon. Per day $25/member; $30/nonmember. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo. org Wednesday - 3/20 - Bird Banding Lab at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Learn why scientists band birds, how they do it by taking part in a mock bird banding laboratory activity. No live birds are used. Age 9-14. 10 am. $10. RSVP: 9667000; pbcnature.com 3/20 - Ceramic Painting at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 4-12. 2-3:30 pm. $10/resident; $12.50/non-resident. 3473900; sugarsandpark.org 3/20 - Tween Explorers: Video Game Day at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 9-12. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/20-22 - Bright & Smart Coding, Robotics, & Engineering at Sugar Sand Park Community Center, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Design, create, code to communicate with computers to program animations. Different focus each day. Age 7-14 8:30 am-3 pm. $5/materials fee for 3D Printing (3/21) class; 3 days $210-$266.50; 2 days $145-$182.50; 1 day $75-$93.75. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/20-22 - Drama Kids at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 6-13. 8:30 am-3 pm. 3 days: $180/resident; $225/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org Thursday - 3/21 - Survivalism Class at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Wear closed-toe shoes. Age 9+. 10 am-noon. $10/person. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcnature.com 3/21 - Animal Keeper for a Day at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Work behind the scenes with animal care staff & volunteers. Learn what it really means to care for these special animal ambassadors. Kids may get messy. Age 8+. 10:30 am. $10. Reservations: 629-8760; pbcnature.com 3/21 - Ready Player One (PG-13) part of Teen Movie Night at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 13-17. 6-8:15 pm. Free. 3937968; bocalibrary.org Friday - 3/22 - Starlab at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 6-12. 2-3 pm. $10/resident; $12.50/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org Saturday – 3/23 - 2019 South Florida Police K9 Competition hosted by Boynton Beach Police Department at Boynton Beach High School, 4975 Park Ridge Blvd. Food vendors, rock climbing wall, prizes, more. No pets allowed. 2-8 pm. Free. 742-6191; sflpolicek9competition.com 3/23 - Children’s Performance: The Revenge of the Bat presented by Palm Beach Opera at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Sensory friendly integrated performance. 11:30 am education stations open; 1 pm show. $10/adult; $5/child. 833-7888; pbopera.org

MARCH 24-30

Sunday - 3/24 - First Step Basketball at Catherine Strong Park, 1500 SW 6th St, Delray Beach. Age 3-6. Every Sat through 4/21 10:3011:30 am. Per session $10/resident; $15/nonresident. 243-7194; mydelraybeach.com 3/24 - Sunday Family Movie: Up at Sugar Sand Park Community Center, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. 11 am; 2 pm sensoryfriendly show. $1 admission includes popcorn/ beverage. 347-3948; sugarsandpark.org 3/24 - S’more Science at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Campfire program in the garden amphitheater w/a yummy treat. Different topic each month. All ages; children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 5-6 pm. $3/member; $5/non-member. 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org Monday - 3/25 - One-Day Camp: RoboTown


H22 Tots & Teens Calendar at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Age 7-14. 9 am-4 pm. $55-$60. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter. org 3/25 - Summer Camp Open House at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Meet camp counselors, beat the summer rush by registering early. Games, food trucks, bounce houses, prizes, giveaways, more. Enter to win a voucher towards camp of your choice! Noon-4 pm. 393-7807; myboca.us Tuesday - 3/26 - Dance Trends Youth Dance Program at Boynton Beach Senior Center, 1021 S Federal Hwy. Learn discipline, art of dance. T/W/Th/Sat through 6/1. Class times/prices vary by age/style. 542-0215; dancetrendsboynton.com 3/26 - Kangaroo Kids Programs at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Educational developmental class. Every T through 4/23. Age 2-3 years 10-10:45 am; age 3-5 years 11-11:45 am. $75/ resident; $94/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca. us 3/26 - COBRA Minis Basketball at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 3-5. Every T through 5/7 3:30-4:15 pm. $80/resident; $100/non-resident. 347-3916; sugarsandpark.org/cobra 3/26 - GEMS Club: Molecular Gastronomy at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Empower young girls to explore STEM fields. Girls grades 3-8. High school girls can volunteer to be mentors. 5-7 pm. $7/advance; $9/at the door. Registration: 370-7710; sfsciencecenter.org/ gem Wednesday - 3/27 - Music Together at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach.

Age birth-5 yrs. Every W through 5/29 10:3011:30 am. $100/member; $120/non-member. Registration: 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum. org 3/27-28 - Music Together at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Variety of age groups fosters natural, family-style learning. Any caregiver can bring the child. Age 0-5. Every W & Th through 5/23 9:30-10:15 am, 10:30-11:15 am or 11:30 am-12:15 pm. $50/ materials fee due to instructor at first class; $157.50/resident, $118.12/2nd child; $196.87/ non-resident, $147.65/2nd child. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org Thursday - 3/28 - COBRA Minis Soccer at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 3-5. Every Th through 5/9 3:30-4:15 pm. $80/resident; $100/non-resident. 347-3916; sugarsandpark.org 3/28 - Project Fashion and Sewing at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 8-16. Every Th through 5/16 5-6:30 pm. $200/resident, $250/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org Friday - 3/29 - Maker Zone Night At The Museum at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Science crafts, activities, entertainment, exhibits, planetarium shows, a chance to view the night sky. 6-9 pm. $14.95/adult; $12.95/ senior; $10.95/child (3-12); $6/adult member; free/child member & kids under 3. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org Saturday - 3/30 - 3D Printing Workshop at Stiles-Nicholson STEM Education Center (across the parking lot from the South Florida Science Center), 4800 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Age 8-15 9 am-noon. $45/per session. Registration: 832-2026; sfsciencecenter.org 3/30 - Brain Blitz: Hands-On Science for

The COASTAL STAR  Kids at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. 9 am-1 pm. $18/advance & members; $20/at the door. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org 3/30 - Gymnastics at Ezell Hester, Jr. Community Center, 1901 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Develop strength, flexibility, coordination; classes designed for introductory skill development on vault, bars, beams, floor. Every Sat through 5/4. Age 4-7 9-10 am $75$94; age 8-12 10-11 am $108-$135. 742-6550; boynton-beach.org 3/30 - Story Time with Nature at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Discover nature through crafts, stories about animals, other nature-related themes. Age 4-10. 10 am. $2. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcnature.com 3/30 - Kids in the Kitchen at Mounts Botanical Garden, Hutcheson Portico (back of the garden), 531 N Military Tr, West Palm Beach. Annual Junior League of the Palm Beaches initiative focused on family nutrition, healthy lifestyles for children. Age 4-9 & their parents. 10 am-1 pm. Free/member; $10/adult non-member; $5/child age 5-12 non-member. 233-1757; mounts.org 3/30 - Virtual Reality Explorers: Incell VR at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Bring a Smartphone, download/use VR apps, games, videos. Cardboards support most Smartphones w/screen sizes 4-6”. Grades 6-12. 1-2 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/30-31 - Rent School Edition at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. Every Sat/Sun through 4/14 Sat 8 pm; Sun 2 pm. $25.50/adult; $15.50/student. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com

March 2019

MARCH 31-APRIL 6

Monday – 4/1 - Rhythmic Gymnastics: Beginner 2 at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 5-6. Every M through 4/29 3-4 pm. M only $100/resident, $117.50; M/W $146.25/resident, $182.85/nonresident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org Tuesday - 4/2 - Acting for Teens at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 6-week acting workshop; varying skill levels. Students age 15-18. Every T/Th through 5/7 4-5:30 pm. $100, scholarships available. 450-6357; artsgarage.org 4/2 - USCA Cheerleading at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Tiny Stars age 4-6. Every T through 4/30 4:30-5:30 pm. $50/resident; $62.50/non-resident. 3473950; sugarsandpark.org 4/2-3 - Explorium Science Squad: Swamp Science at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Kids explore, experiment, try something new every month. T age 5-6 w/parent; W age 7-9. Both days 4-5 pm. $10/resident; $12.50/non-resident. 3473912; scienceexplorium.org Wednesday – 4/3 - Rhythmic Gymnastics at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 5-6. Every W through 4/24. Beginner 2 age 5-6 3-4 pm $80-$100; Intermediate age 7-12,4-5:30 pm $100-$125. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 4/3 - Tween Explorers: DIY Bath Bombs at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 9-12. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org Thursday – 4/4 - Rhythmic Gymnastics: Beginner 1 at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 4-5. Every Th/F through 4/26. Th 3:30-4:30 pm & F 3-4 pm $130/resident, $162.50/non-resident; Th only

3:30-4:30 pm $80/resident, $100/non-resident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 4/4 - Hack Shack Tech Club: Soldering at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium Stiles-Nicholson STEM Education Center, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Experiment w/ computer programming, design video games. Signed liability waiver required. Grades 5-8. 1st Th 5-7 pm. $15/member; $20/non-member. Registration: 832-2026; sfsciencecenter.org 4/4 - Chess for Kids at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Learn about the pieces, how to set them up, move them, interrelate them, do check/checkmate moves. Age 4-12. Every Th through 4/25 5:306:30 pm. $95/resident; $119/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 4/4 - Taylored Athletes Basketball Class at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. High-quality instruction for aspiring young professional athletes. Elite training age 9-14; Fundamentals age 5-8. Every Th through 4/25 5:30-6:30 pm. $100/resident; $125/non-resident. 347-3950; tayloredathletes. com 4/4 - Pokemon Card Game Night at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 8-14. 6-8 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org Friday - 4/5 - First Fridays Preschool Program: My First Little Wonders presented by Gumbo Limbo Nature Center at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Get ideas, create characters, find new stories to tell. Age 3-5. 10-10:30 am. Free. Registration: 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 4/5 - Fabulous Fun Friday: Rubber Ducky Day at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. All ages. 10:30-11:15 am. $4/member; $5/non-member + admission. Registration: 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 4/5 - Rhythmic Gymnastics at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Every F through 4/26. Mini Stars age 3-4 2:15-3 pm $75-$93.75; Beginner 1 age 4-5 3-4 pm $80-$93.75; Intermediate age 7-12 4-5:30 pm $100-$125. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org Saturday – 4/6 - Sensory Saturday at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Explore the museum in sensory modified setting with sound/light adjustments. 1st Sat 9-10 am. Free. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 4/6 - Little Wonders at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Hike, crafts, stories. Age 3-4. Children must be accompanied by an adult. 10-11 am. $5/ member; $8/non-member. Reservations: 5448615; gumbolimbo.org 4/6 - Nature Detectives at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. New mystery each month. Age 5-7 w/an adult. 11:30 am-12:30 pm. $5/member; $8/nonmember. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo. org 4/6 - Science Stories at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hear favorite science inspired stories. Age 5+. Every Sat 11:30 am. Free. 347-3912; scienceexplorium. org 4/6 - Realistic Drawing/Painting Instruction Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Basic techniques essential to quality, realistic paintings. Every Sat through 4/27. Adult class 12:30-2:30 pm $65/resident, $81/non-resident; Child age 7-12 class 2:30-4:30 pm. $40/resident; $50/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 4/6 - Rhythmic Gymnastics at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Every Sat through 4/27. Beginner 2 age 5-6 2-3 pm $80-$100; Intermediate age 7-12, 2-3:30 pm $100-$125. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org

Educate Advocate Volunteer www.delraychild.org


The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

House of the Month H23

House of the Month

On 258 +/- feet of waterfront, this home on Audubon Causeway in Manalapan has boat dockage and panoramic water views.

The bright, airy living room opens to a waterside terrace.

Brazilian granite countertops and sink surrounds make a strong visual impact in the chef’s kitchen, which has professional-grade appliances.

Idyllic island-like setting in Manalapan

T

his Bermuda-inspired courtyard estate gives long-range views of the Intracoastal Waterway. It was originally built for the renowned 20thcentury modern artist Orville Bulman, as conceived by Palm Beach architect John Volk. The home is picture perfect after a 2003 renovation by award-winning Perez Design, and stylish updates were added in 2016. The home is entered from the beautiful motor court on carefully groomed grounds with LED landscape lighting. Comfortably proportioned in lightfilled wings, the grand total space of 7,373 +/- square feet in this home contains six bedrooms, with an office and yoga studio, five full and two half baths, walk-in closets and a two-bay garage. Amenities include impact-rated windows and exterior doors and a full-house generator. The home has imported marble and granite finishes throughout along with furniture-grade custom cabinetry within both floors of the estate. $4,995,000. Offered at $4,995,000. Contact Pascal Liguori & Son, Premier Estate Properties, 561-278-0100 or pascal@ premierestateproperties.com

The walled garden courtyard encompasses the outdoor entertainment area, which features a summer kitchen/bar. Each month, The Coastal Star features a house for sale in our community. The House of the Month is presented as a service to our advertisers and provides readers with a peek inside one of our houses.


H24

The COASTAL STAR 

March 2019

Profile for The Coastal Star

The Coastal Star March 2019  

Serving Coastal Delray Beach and north to Hypoluxo Island

The Coastal Star March 2019  

Serving Coastal Delray Beach and north to Hypoluxo Island

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