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INSIDE: Know your candidates PAGES 10-11, 16-18, 25

March 2017

Serving Hypoluxo Island, South Palm Beach, Manalapan, Ocean Ridge, Briny Breezes, Gulf Stream and Coastal Delray Beach

Volume 10 Issue 3

Along the Coast

Concealed-carry permits and gun background checks rise

By Rich Pollack and Michelle Quigley

It was just a few months ago, following high-profile mass shootings across the country and deadly confrontations in which civilians or law enforcement officers were shot, that police officers in Ocean Ridge began noticing something they hadn’t seen

South Palm Beach

before. “We encountered more people who were carrying a weapon following those events,” Police Chief Hal Hutchins said. “It wasn’t any one thing. It was a culmination of several things.” Hutchins says the number of times his officers encounter individuals with firearms, either in their cars or on their person, seems to be winding down as

Delray Beach

Town facing tight deadline to start beach project

fewer national incidents that might instill insecurity are reported. His observations, however, raise questions about whether more people in Palm Beach County are in possession of firearms than just a few years ago and, if so, what impact that increase might have, both positive and negative. The bottom line is that there’s really

no way of knowing for certain if there are more people with weapons in our communities. That’s largely because Florida does not require gun owners to register their weapons. In fact, state lawmakers — influenced by a strong gun lobby — have made it clear they want to keep it that way. See GUNS on page 28

Bench plaques may be scrapped in beach updates

By Dan Moffett South Palm Beach’s long-awaited beach stabilization project will become longer awaited still — unless the town is able to close an easement deal with oceanfront homeowners very soon. The town has until March 8 to persuade a dozen property owners to sign a letter allowing contractors access to a five-eighths-mile stretch of beach so construction has at least a chance of beginning this fall. Town Manager Bob Vitas says this is the absolute last in a series of deadlines that have come and gone as the property owners balked at getting onboard. He remains confident they will endorse the plan. “I think we’re good,” Vitas said. “We’re going to get it done.” Project manager Kimberly Miranda of the county’s Department of Environmental Resources Management concedes that starting construction this year is a long shot. She says the bureaucratic hurdles ahead are daunting, even if South Palm Beach gets its easements approvals soon. “Providing exact construction windows is difficult at this point since we are still in the process of obtaining permits,” Miranda said. A more reasonable starting date is November 2018, she said. But even that could be pushed back if South Palm Beach can’t convince property owners to cooperate. Vitas and Mayor Bonnie Fischer have gone door-to-door for the last See BEACH on page 23

Jay and Alice Finst relax on the bench they donated at the north end of Delray Beach. It bears a plaque (top) that Alice says reflects the beach ambiance and reminds the couple of watching their sons surf there. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star

Future of markers in doubt as Delray Beach begins master plan for shore By Jane Smith They bought benches and brass plaques beside the city’s public beach as timeless remembrances of family members who so enjoyed their time by the sea. Many of the 50 or so markers are dedicated to departed loved ones. But that might end in April. That’s when Delray Beach will begin

work on its $3 million beach master plan, a project in the works for over eight years. The 1.25-mile promenade west of the dunes will have wider sidewalks and similarly designed shower poles, benches, trash/recycling containers and signs to replace the current hodgepodge of styles. The city plans to honor the marker memorials, said John Morgan,

Inside By the seaside, in style

Take a tour of 10 notable Delray Beach homes. Page H1

‘Glasstress’ in Boca

These glass artists aren’t playing it safe anymore. Page AT13

iPic asks for additional incentives Page 29

Boynton’s 500 Ocean project delayed Page 33

head of the Environmental Services Department. The names will be carved into brick pavers forming the flagpole base near Atlantic Avenue and the benches returned to those who paid for them. Some longtime residents think the plaques should be left in place, or incorporated into the new beachscape. “The beach is saturated with sun lovers and requires no additional enticements,” longtime Delray resident Alice Finst said at the Feb. See DELRAY on page 23

Shopping (and dining) Ocean Avenue Lantana’s main street has something for everyone. Page AT21


2 Editor’s Note/Coastal Star

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Coastal Star Publisher Jerry Lower publisher@thecoastalstar.com

Advertising Executives Mike Mastropietro Jay Nuszer

Executive Editor Mary Kate Leming editor@thecoastalstar.com

News Operations Tracy Allerton Chad Armstrong Brad Betker Chris Felker Steve Plunkett Victoria Preuss Michelle Quigley Clare Shore Scott Simmons Michele Smith Margot Street Tom Warnke Amy Woods

Advertising Manager Chris Bellard sales@thecoastalstar.com Managing Editors Henry Fitzgerald henry@thecoastalstar.com Mary Thurwachter maryt@thecoastalstar.com Founding Partners Carolyn & Price Patton

www.thecoastalstar.com

The Coastal Star is a monthly newspaper with two editions serving Hypoluxo Island, South Palm Beach, Manalapan, Ocean Ridge, Briny Breezes, Gulf Stream and coastal Delray Beach; Highland Beach and coastal Boca Raton. ©2008-2017

Send letters, opinions and news tips to news@thecoastalstar.com The Coastal Star 5114 N Ocean Blvd. Ocean Ridge, FL 33435 561-337-1553

Editor’s Note

Why municipal elections can have huge impact

T

hree votes is all it takes to change the course of history in most of our coastal towns. Think about it: Riverwalk Plaza in Boynton Beach, iPic and Atlantic Crossing in Delray Beach, the termination of a police chief in Ocean Ridge and Briny Breezes’ switch from Ocean Ridge to Boynton Beach police service. These all happened on a 3-2 vote. I’m thinking a lot about this vote count as we gear up for the March 14 municipal elections. With the exception of Manalapan, which has seven commissioners, it takes only three votes to change (or protect) our way of life on the island. Granted, cities like Boca Raton seem to be keen on unanimous votes and towns like Gulf Stream and Highland Beach rarely split their votes. Still, all it takes is one election to change things. And not just on the national stage. One election can force extremely local changes as well. Keep this in mind as you attend candidate forums and talk with your neighbors this month. What issues are at the heart of why you love

where you live? Maybe it’s the beach and maintaining our shoreline. Maybe it’s assuring levels of emergency service to the island. Maybe it’s making sure house sizes don’t destroy the ambiance of our neighborhoods. Or maybe it’s overdevelopment or traffic or sober homes in residential neighborhoods. All of these things — and more — will be on the ballot March 14. How candidates stand on these issues matters far more than which clubs they belong to or with whom they are friends or how they look. It’s not a popularity contest. We are voting for people who will represent our concerns. Ask hard questions. Educate yourself on the impact of zoning issues and comprehensive plans and changes to town charters. These are at the heart of preserving, creating or destroying the way we want to live along the coast. And keep in mind that all it takes is a 3-2 vote. — Mary Kate Leming, Editor

Shades of Ireland September 13-22, 2017

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Linda Geller-Schwartz, shown here in her office, was recognized by the county chapter of the National Organization for Women for her community service. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star

Boca woman recognized as advocate for human rights

By Rich Pollack Linda Geller-Schwartz has made standing up for those who can’t stand up for themselves her life’s work. An advocate of causes ranging from protecting victims of human trafficking to the push for equal pay for men and women, Geller-Schwartz tirelessly fights against injustice. “If I see something that upsets me, I have to do something about it,” she says. For her work in the community, including her efforts as the Florida state policy advocate for the National Council of Jewish Women, Geller-Schwartz, of Boca Raton, last month was named the recipient of the 44th annual Susan B. Anthony Feminist of the Year Award by the Palm Beach County Chapter of the National Organization for Women. “Linda is an advocate against every injustice — social or political — in our state,” says Arlene Ustin, president of the local NOW chapter. “She is a role model of advocacy and activism and she’s my hero.” Geller-Schwartz’s volunteer work on behalf of the nonprofit National Council of Jewish Women focuses on advocating for women, children and families and often overlaps with the core issues identified by NOW nationally. “Everyone knows that she’s at the forefront of all the issues we

NOMINATE SOMEONE TO BE A COASTAL STAR Send a note to news@thecoastalstar. com or call 337-1553. advocate,” Ustin said of GellerSchwartz, who’s a member of the local NOW chapter. “You name any issue of urgency or importance and she’s not only a voice, she’s a leader.” That leadership, Ustin said, played a big part in GellerSchwartz’s selection for the award, presented during the NOW chapter’s Susan B. Anthony Luncheon last month. As state policy advocate for the NCJW, Geller-Schwartz often teams with leaders of other organizations to persuade lawmakers to support certain issues and not support others. “We’re working with legislators trying to get good legislation passed and bad legislation stopped,” she says. Geller-Schwartz, who is married and has one son, has frequently reached out to the staffs of state lawmakers — and to lawmakers themselves — to speak in favor of voting rights and against legislation that treads on women’s reproductive rights. Her efforts have had the most visible impact in the arena of supporting efforts to stop human trafficking in Florida,

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raise awareness and improve advocacy for the issue. As the former leader of Partner Organizations Against Sex Trafficking, and as an advisory board member for 1HTC, a Southeast Florida antihuman trafficking consortium, Geller-Schwartz has worked to get legislation passed that requires the posting of the human trafficking hotline number in public places. That number is 888-373-7888. Geller-Schwartz, who did not wish to share her age, has advocated for education in schools about the human trafficking problem in the state. While contacting legislators is a big part of GellerSchwartz’s advocacy efforts, so is communicating with others and encouraging them to write letters or otherwise show their support of causes. She writes an electronic newsletter, distributed to other members of the National Council of Jewish Women in Florida, keeping them informed on important issues in Tallahassee and Washington. For Geller-Schwartz, who has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Toronto, working on behalf of the rights of women and children has been an important part of her life. Before moving to Florida two decades ago, she was director general of the Women’s Bureau in the federal Department of Labor in Canada, and a senior policy adviser in the government. In Palm Beach County, she served as an adjunct professor at Florida Atlantic University in the Women’s Studies Center and the Department of Sociology until her retirement. “It’s been in different roles, but the issue of equality has always been central in my life,” she says. “We’ll all be better off in a society where equal rights are available to everyone.” Ú


March 2017

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March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Ocean Ridge

Fired police lieutenant wants right to cross-examine witnesses

By Dan Moffett Former police Lt. Steve Wohlfiel wants Ocean Ridge to reconsider his firing with an appeal hearing that includes testimony from witnesses who may be reluctant to come forward. In a declaratory judgment complaint to Palm Beach County Circuit Court, Wohlfiel’s attorney, Ralph King, says that the town is not following the employee rules in its charter by denying his client a hearing during which he could “present and confront witnesses and other evidence.” But Brian Shutt, an attorney for the town, says Ocean Ridge hasn’t conducted appeals that way before, and it’s up to the Town Commission to decide the format. “In the past the process followed is one where the person appealing can present their case and if they have some witnesses, who agree to testify, then they may present them,” Schutt told King in an email. “There was no crossexamination or calling of witnesses that do not agree to testify, as this is an appeal.” Commissioners decided to postpone a February hearing for Wohlfiel after King, an attorney with the Palm Beach County Police Benevolent Association, filed suit, charging the town had violated his rights and denied him due process. The commission voted unanimously to fire the veteran officer in January over his alleged involvement in an October shooting incident at the home of former Vice Mayor Richard Lucibella. Town police said they found the two men “obviously intoxicated” in the backyard after neighbors called to report gunshots. Lucibella resigned his seat after county prosecutors charged him with felony battery on an officer and resisting an officer with violence, as well as a misdemeanor firearms offense. Wohlfiel, who was off-duty at the home, was not charged, but an internal affairs report was critical of his behavior, citing the sworn testimony of two witnesses who claimed he admitted firing the shots. Commissioners agreed to take no action on Wohlfiel’s appeal until the court rules on the disputed process. Ú LETTERS: The Coastal Star welcomes letters to the editor about issues of interest in the community. These are subject to editing and must include your name, address and phone number. Preferred length is 200-500 words. Send email to editor@ thecoastalstar.com.

Former Ocean Ridge police Lt. Steve Wohlfiel talks with his attorney, Ralph King, at a special commission meeting called to confirm Wohlfiel’s firing. Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

News 7


8 News

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Ocean Ridge

Prosecutor, defense subpoena witnesses in Lucibella criminal case By Steve Plunkett Neighbors of former Vice Mayor Richard Lucibella who answered police questions the night of his arrest and then answered questions for an Ocean Ridge police internal investigation are finding they will spend more time answering still more questions. Marc Shiner, Lucibella’s defense attorney, scheduled 17

depositions in late February and early March of witnesses listed in officers Richard Ermeri and Nubia Plesnik’s initial Lucibella reports of the Oct. 22 shooting incident at Lucibella’s oceanfront home. Besides neighbors and passersby, those deposed

included the Boynton Beach Fire Rescue team that was summoned to the scene, Boynton Beach’s fire chief and the MD Now doctors who treated Ermeri and Plesnik after Lucibella’s arrest. Lucibella, 63, is charged with felony battery on a police officer and resisting the officer with violence. He also faces a misdemeanor count of using a firearm while under the influence of alcohol. He has pleaded not guilty. Prosecutor Danielle Grundt issued subpoenas to the same group of witnesses plus Ocean Ridge Police Chief Hal Hutchins and a third MD Now physician to be at the courthouse in West Palm Beach for the jury trial, which is set to start at 9:30 a.m. April 10. Circuit Judge Charles Burton has blocked off four weeks for the proceedings, the subpoenas say. “Failure to appear will subject you to contempt of court. This subpoena is binding day-to-day and week-to-week until the case is closed,” Grundt says in the subpoenas. Jerry Lower, publisher of The Coastal Star, went to Lucibella’s house that night to photograph the incident for the newspaper and is fighting subpoenas for a defense deposition and the trial. Lower’s motion to quash the subpoenas says that under state law, case law and the First Amendment, a professional journalist has a qualified privilege “to not be a witness or disclose information the journalist has obtained while gathering news.” Town police went to Lucibella’s home after neighbors reported hearing gunfire and said they found the vice mayor and one of their supervisors, Lt. Steven Wohlfiel, “obviously intoxicated” on the patio. They confiscated a .40-caliber Glock handgun and found five spent shell casings on the patio. Police also took a semiautomatic pistol they said Lucibella had in his back pocket. According to their reports, when Ermeri and Plesnik tried to block Lucibella from entering his house, he resisted. They wrestled him to the pavercovered ground and handcuffed him. Lucibella needed treatment for facial injuries, they said, though he declined help from the Boynton Beach paramedics at the scene. Lucibella claims he is the victim of police overreaction. Through Shiner, he has said that the officers should not have entered his backyard and that they used excessive force, cracking three of his ribs. Lucibella resigned his posts as vice mayor and town commissioner Dec. 7, the same day the State Attorney’s Office filed formal charges against him. Ú


The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

News 9

Along the Coast

Mail-in votes play increasing role in election results

By Jane Smith South County election mavens will be watching the role mail-in ballots play in this month’s municipal elections. Some groups have learned how to win local elections by asking voters to use mail-in ballots and collecting them, saving voters the postage cost. Previously called absentee ballots, the mail-in ballots were the deciding factor in three South County municipal races in the past 10 years. Last year, in the Boynton Beach City Commission Seat 3 race, incumbent Mike Fitzpatrick thought he was headed to a runoff election. Then, after mail-in ballots were counted, newcomer Christina Romelus was the winner. In 2015, Gail Adams Aaskov won her Ocean Ridge commission seat despite having the fewest in-person votes on Election Day. She had the highest mail-in votes at 35, making her the top vote-getter and knocking out challenger Ed Brookes. Geoff Pugh was second and secured the other open commission seat. Al Jacquet won his 2014 Delray Beach City Commission seat by setting a record of the most mail-in votes by a commission candidate. He bested challenger Chris Davey, who had more in-person votes. “Jacquet put a huge amount of time into the HaitianAmerican community,” Davey said. “It’s not unusual for a candidate to target a racial or an ethnic group they belong to.” Born in St. Martin, Jacquet moved to Delray Beach when he was 10. He went on to become a lawyer and sit on the city’s Planning and Zoning Board. During his commission election in 2012, he won at the polls and was the leader in mail-in ballots at 318. Two years later, he collected nearly triple that number, but his votes at the polls trailed Davey’s by 429. “I absolutely thought I would win when the poll results were counted,” said Davey, a real estate broker who has served on the city’s Planning and Zoning Board. “Most prognosticators said I won. … The absentee ballot count came in late that evening.” Jacquet won the seat by 265 votes. He could not be reached to explain how he pulled off the stunning victory. At the first City Commission meeting last September, Jacquet spoke out against allegations of voter fraud in his August win to be state representative. Nearly half of his votes were mail-ins. His opponents raised questions about voter fraud in the Haitian-American neighborhoods in Delray Beach and Boynton Beach. The questions prompted Palm Beach County Sheriff’s deputies to show up at the doors of HaitianAmerican residents in Delray Beach, Jacquet said.

“Black folks are voting too much, something must be wrong,” he said sarcastically. Davey said the signatures on the absentee ballot envelopes cannot be compared to the ones on the voter registration card during a challenge. But Susan Bucher, Palm Beach County supervisor of elections, said they can be compared, but her office has to charge for staff time to do it. The first 30 minutes is free, but any ballot envelopes reviewed over that time would be charged $100 per hour, she said. Vote by mail now accounts for one-third of how ballots are cast in general elections, Bucher said. The other two methods are early voting or in-person voting on Election Day. Cities and towns have opted out of early voting, Bucher said. The vote-by-mail application is valid for two general election cycles or four years. Condo dwellers, church groups and Haitian-American voters use the vote-by-mail option more frequently, Bucher said. The candidates go doorto-door asking for the person’s vote, she said. The ballots have to be returned to the main elections office by 7 p.m. on Election Day, according to state law. Branch offices close at 5 p.m. on Election Day. By state law, a person collecting ballots cannot be paid. That law was enacted in 1998 in Florida. Before then, ballot brokering was popular. Collecting the ballots saves the voter postage. It costs about $1.21 to mail a ballot back to her office, Bucher said. When Fitzpatrick ran for reelection in Boynton, he thought he would win as the incumbent or head to a runoff. A retired city firefighter, he spoke in his first term of the need to reform the police and fire departments’ pension plans. The Boynton Beach Firefighters and Paramedics union then donated $1,000 to Romelus. Fitzpatrick also said he was part of Boynton’s Sister City delegation that went to Haiti. Romelus had promised in the summer of 2015 to be his interface with the Haitian-American community, Fitzpatrick said. That September, she invited Fitzpatrick to her house to hear a pitch about a home business she was running with her husband. He declined, saying his wife handles those decisions. The next thing he heard was that she had filed to run against him for the District 3 seat. Romelus, who was born in Haiti, used Jacquet as her campaign manager. Jacquet donated $250 to the Romelus election campaign. She sent this response via email, “I choose not to comment at this time” to a series questions about her upset victory. In Ocean Ridge, Brookes said Aaskov was helpful in 2011 when he first ran for

the commission, taking him around the condominiums she manages and introducing him. But in 2015, she was on the same slate as Brookes and Pugh. Aaskov said she was too busy to discuss her strategy then. “Gail is the property manager for condo associations. People who live there may not be here during the election,”

said Brookes, a self-employed, furniture sales representative. “They look to Gail for info about who to vote for. “Snowbirds listen to one voice, it’s the easiest path.” Ocean Ridge has about 1,100 registered voters, enough for one precinct. Since the elections office recounts one precinct in each town, “I didn’t have to ask

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10 News

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Gulf Stream

Seven candidates contend for five commission seats

Voters in Gulf Stream will elect all five members of the Town Commission on March 14. Commissioners each serve a three-year term and this is an at-large election. The top five vote getters will win the seats, with no runoffs. Once elected, the commissioners will appoint a mayor and vice mayor. Paul A. Lyons Jr. (incumbent) Personal: 70; graduate of Georgetown University with a B.S. in business administration; resident of Gulf Stream for 13 years; married, two children, five grandchildren. Professional: Financial services specialist working 16 years with Irving Trust Co., five years with Mitsubishi Trust & Banking; participated in private equity businesses in Denver and Vail, Colo., since 1992; retired last year. Political experience: Member of the Gulf Stream Town Commission since 2014; former chairman of the Gulf Stream Architectural Review and Planning Board for four years. Positions on issues: Selection of a new town manager; maintaining the architectural integrity of the districts within the town; focusing on a comprehensive plan regarding town infrastructure; maintaining financial oversight. Quote: “The town government needs to be responsive and consumer friendly to its constituents. I want people loving to come to Town Hall and feeling that any question they have is a good one and any way we can possibly help them, we will.”

Julio M. Martinez Personal: 57; graduate of the University of Miami with a degree in general studies; resident of Gulf Stream for 14 years; married, two children. Professional: Retired from medical sales position with Pfizer Pharmaceuticals in 2015 after 24 years; currently works for pharmaceutical company Depomed in its oncology division. Political experience: None. Positions on issues: Wants town government to be accountable to its citizens; streamline government. Quote: “I was former president of the Place Au Soleil homeowners association for four years, so I have experience as a leader. If I’m elected, I want to make sure everybody’s voice is heard. If we face challenges, I want to be sure we focus on solving them. I want to cut down on the red tape and get things accomplished in a very harmonious way. I want anyone walking into Town Hall to go in there with good thoughts.”

Scott Morgan (incumbent) Personal: 59; graduate of Pennsylvania State University with a B.A. in general art/science; graduate of the Dickinson School of Law with a J.D.; resident of Gulf Stream for over 20 years; married, three children. Professional: Practiced law in Pennsylvania for 25 years; started Humidifirst Co., a manufacturing company in Florida, 12 years ago. Political experience: Mayor of Gulf Stream for the last three years; former chairman of Gulf Stream Architectural Review and Planning Board. Positions on issues: Improving the roads in Place au Soleil and the core town areas; enlarging an outdated Town Hall to improve service to town residents; concluding the remaining public records lawsuits; achieving a timely completion of the utilities burial project. Quote: “Over the last three years, I spearheaded Gulf Stream’s legal strategy that achieved significant judicial success toward concluding the onslaught of litigation filed against the town, as well as stopping the filing of new public records lawsuits. In addition, our commission has built Gulf Stream’s financial reserves up to historically high levels and can now focus on the road and building projects requested by our residents. My goal is to continue working with our residents to preserve the special quality of life that defines the town of Gulf Stream.”

Martin E. O’Boyle Personal: 65; Completed the 11th grade then left school to start a business and help his parents. Later obtained a G.E.D. ; Gulf Stream resident for 36 years; married, six children, 11 grandchildren.

Joan Orthwein (incumbent) Personal: 61; graduated from the University of Missouri in Columbia with a B.S. degree in civil engineering; Gulf Stream resident for 33 years; married, three children.

Professional: Owner of Commerce Group, Inc.; has been a shopping center developer for the last 48 years; has owned over 200 shopping centers in every state except Alaska, Hawaii, Montana and Wyoming.

Professional: Civil engineer with York, Pa., division of manufacturing firm BorgWarner for a year, then five years with Southwestern Bell. Retired in 1984.

Political experience: Ran for Gulf Stream commission in 2014. Positions on issues: Concerned with the current litigation going on in town; wants to reduce the legal budget. Quote: “I offer a voice with a different view. My No. 1 goal is to end the unnecessary and economically wasteful and distasteful litigation that is now going on. Also, currently the town allows you to speak for three minutes. They refuse to answer questions. My next goal would be to answer those questions and when the meeting is over, to convince the commission to stay overtime if necessary and answer any and all questions that any and all residents have — and do my best to assist them. I also want to bring the legal budget down from $1 million per year to $5,000 per year. It used to be $3,400 per year. If I’m elected — and I don’t think I will be, because the civic association runs the town — all votes will be 5-0 or 4-1. They’ll be 5-0 if I think they’re doing the right thing, 4-1 if I don’t.”

Political experience: 20 years as Gulf Stream town commissioner; also served as head of the Architectural Review Board. Past mayor. Positions on issues: Focused on the completion of the utilities burial project; overseeing the timely management of public records requests; replacing the town manager. Quote: “I think everything is running well in Gulf Stream. If reelected, my focus will be on keeping Gulf Stream great as the well-rounded, beautiful town it is. We have a great community and a great community sense. We have a wonderful mix of older and younger people and we want to keep it that way.”

Town, neighbors unite to block plan for 3-story garage By Steve Plunkett Town commissioners promised their Place Au Soleil constituents they would throw their weight behind an effort to block Gunther Volvo from building a three-story garage

next to them in neighboring Delray Beach. “We are extremely concerned about the effect on our community of a vertical, heavy-commercial, vehicular traffic garage,” Chet Snavely, president

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of the neighborhood’s homeowner association, told commissioners at their Feb. 10 meeting. “It’s clearly an inappropriate proposal.” Snavely said the homeowners will be happiest if Gunther relocated the garage to the west side of Federal Highway, where it would back up to railroad tracks instead of abutting a residential area. But the dealership could also reposition the structure elsewhere on its property and perhaps make it two stories instead of three, he said. Another major concern of Place Au Soleil is a proposed water retention pond with a bottom at 10 feet of elevation

surrounded by a 5-foot berm, Snavely said. The floors in the closest house to the dealership are 12 feet above sea level. “One of the three cardinal rules of plumbing, I believe, is that water flows downhill. And 15 feet to 12 feet is downhill,” Snavely said. The homeowners group met with Volvo representatives Jan. 23 to get information about the project before deciding to strongly oppose it. Also attending were Mayor Scott Morgan, Town Manager William Thrasher and the town’s staff attorney, Trey Nazzaro. “Very tall parking garage, lighting on top — no way that

could be screened. That was most obvious,” Morgan said at the commission meeting. “The Volvo people said they could screen it some way. They talked about putting plants up the side of the parking garage to look more aesthetically pleasing, but it was pretty obvious it would have a terrible impact.” Commissioners voted unanimously to authorize Morgan to send a “strong” letter of opposition to Delray Beach planning officials, who are reviewing the plans, and to confer with Delray Beach Mayor Cary Glickstein and others in hopes of a regional solution. Ú


The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Gulf Stream Thomas Stanley (incumbent)

Donna S. White (incumbent)

Personal: 39; graduate of Princeton with a B.A. in history; J.D. degree from Florida State University; resident of Gulf Stream for seven years; married, no children.

Personal: 69; graduated from Catholic University with degrees in psychology and English; Gulf Stream resident for 15 years; widow; two children, two stepchildren.

Professional: Attorney specializing in trusts, estates and real estate with the law firm MacMillan and Stanley since 2002.

Professional: Office manager for McDonnell Douglas Aircraft Corp. for five years; purchasing agent then assistant manager for EMBRAE Air; currently retired.

Political experience: Town commissioner from 2012-present; member of the Gulf Stream Architectural Review Board for one year (2012); served on the Delray Beach Historic Preservation Board from 2007-2012. Currently vice mayor.

Political experience: Town commissioner from 2013-present; Architectural Review and Planning Board member from 2006-2010. Also a current board member of the of the Place Au Soleil homeowners association.

Positions on issues: Improving infrastructure and public works projects; continuing to protect the town and its employees from frivolous public records lawsuits; supporting the town and its districts in their needs relating to neighboring development.

Positions on issues: Concerned with potentially invasive redevelopment plans Gunther Volvo has in town; achieving a timely completion of the utilities burial project; renovation of Town Hall and hiring additional in-house staff for currently outsourced work.

Quote: “The biggest thing looking forward is to continue working on a longrange plan for a phased repair and replacement of our water system. We’ve been bogged down with other issues and I’m really interested in turning our attention to infrastructure improvements — especially the water system.”

Quote: “I want to continue to generate a sense of respect and cooperation between Place Au Soleil, the barrier island, the town staff and the Police Department. We’re all one town, working for the common good of everyone. Positive solutions are based on positive communication.”

News 11

Five incumbents, two challengers vie for five commission seats

By Steve Plunkett

Martin O’Boyle, who has plastered Gulf Stream with public-records requests and lawsuits over the past four years, is running a second time for a seat on the Town Commission. O’Boyle, whose entry in 2014 made that election the town’s first contested one in 21 years, will be joined on the March 14 ballot by Julio Martinez, former president of the Place Au Soleil Homeowners Association. Martinez’s candidacy, along with incumbent Donna White’s, means voters for the first time can choose two commissioners from among the 93 homes on the town’s west side of the Intracoastal Waterway. The four other incumbents — Paul Lyons, Scott Morgan, Joan Orthwein and Thomas Stanley — also qualified to run for office. It is the first time Lyons has stood for election. Commissioners chose the then-chairman of

the Architectural Review and Planning Board in August to fill the seat of Vice Mayor Robert Ganger, who resigned for health reasons. Each voter will choose up to five of the seven candidates. Commissioners are unpaid; their terms last three years. O’Boyle and fellow resident Chris O’Hare have filed thousands of public-records requests and dozens of lawsuits against Gulf Stream since spring 2013 after O’Boyle was denied variances for a remodeling project on his Hidden Harbour home. “I entered this election to win and effect change, and with the help of the people, I accomplished all goals,” O’Boyle wrote his supporters after his 2014 loss. He got 122 votes that year; the winners received vote totals ranging from 313 to 325. Martinez said all the incumbents were doing a good job, but he became a candidate to offer voters a choice. Ú

Candidate profiles compiled by Steven J. Smith

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12 News

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Art unveiling

Mayfair House, South Palm Beach – Feb. 24 Penny Davidson, known around South Palm Beach as the town’s unofficial artist-inresidence, unveiled her latest mosaic on Feb. 24. Davidson has created dozens of public art pieces installed throughout the town over the years and says this one depicts ‘the warmth and friendliness of our wonderful town.’ The Town Council honored her with a resolution recognizing her contributions on Feb. 28. Dan Moffett/The Coastal Star

South Palm Beach

SPB council increases its pay

By Dan Moffett A divided South Palm Beach Town Council grudgingly voted to give itself a modest pay raise on Feb. 28, ending months of vacillation and often spirited debate. With final approval of the new ordinance, council members will see their pay rise from $250 to $300 a month and the mayor’s position from $250 to $500. The vote was 3-2, with Vice Mayor Joe Flagello and Robert Gottlieb opposing the measure, largely on procedural grounds. Flagello and Gottlieb said the council should take up the raises in workshops during the next budget cycle and then implement them next fiscal year.

Mayor Bonnie Fischer, at the council’s urging, has changed the mayor’s position to one that is more interactive with other agencies and communities. Fischer has represented the town’s interests as member of an exploratory group looking at coastal fire-rescue systems and also spearheaded the town’s beach stabilization project, working with state, county and local governments. “She certainly deserves a pay raise because of how hard she works — countless hours,” Councilwoman Stella Gaddy Jordan said. The council’s salaries have been frozen since the town went into an economic tailspin during the last recession.

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In other business: • Town Manager Bob Vitas told the council that he expects an architect’s report on the condition of Town Hall by midMarch and then the council will have to consider one of two courses to take: either develop a plan to renovate the existing building, or demolish it and build a new structure from the ground up. Vitas said he told architect Steven Knight that the town will need some time to make that choice. “I told him that I haven’t put a hard brake on this project but I have put a soft brake on it,” the manager said. Council members plan to discuss Knight’s findings at the March 28 town meeting. • For more than a year, council members have put off deciding whether to give a new contract to Town Attorney Brad Biggs. They passed on the issue again during the February meeting, but at least decided on a format for the attorney’s evaluation form. Council members said they would schedule a workshop — time and date to be determined — to evaluate Biggs’ performance and discuss renewing his contract. Biggs has been caught in an administrative and political limbo with the town since early last year when Jordan criticized his performance. She said he was slow to respond to the council’s questions and wasn’t aggressive enough in defending the town’s interests during discussions with developers. Flagello, however, called Biggs’ work “outstanding” and disputed Jordan’s claim that he was unresponsive. As part of a new contract proposal, Biggs offered to work out of an office in Town Hall to allow the council more access. He has asked for a raise from $170 an hour to $180. • There will be no election in South Palm Beach in March because no candidates came forward to challenge incumbents Fischer, Flagello and Elvadianne Culbertson.  “I’d like to think it reflects that residents think we’re doing a good job,” said Flagello of the absence of opponents. Ú


March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

News 13

Delray Beach

By Jane Smith Max Lohman continues to impress the Delray Beach city commissioners with his legal knowledge, leadership skills and willingness to answer their questions. At the Feb. 21 City Commission meeting, he gave the update he promised when he was hired on Nov. 1. He began by praising the support staff of Sue Kiminas and Cathy Lohman Inglese. They have been with the city more than 20 years each. “They are invaluable,” Lohman said. “They make the office work.” That comment went over well with Mayor Cary Glickstein. “I appreciate that you acknowledge the support staff,” he said. “You’re the quarterback that department needs.” Lohman also gave kudos to the assistant city attorneys who work for Delray Beach. He is revising the city’s purchasing policy so that it becomes a checklist that an assistant city

attorney can review. He’s streamlining other procedures to be able to hand them off to the assistant city attorneys. Then, Lohman told commissioners what they wanted to hear: His average cost per month was less than $25,000. In the first three months, through Jan. 31, he has billed the city for $74,445. January’s bill was higher than average with so many legal needs, Lohman said. He billed a total of $31,741, which included $2,950 for settlement negotiations in the Atlantic Crossing lawsuit. Vice Mayor Jordana Jarjura said, “You obviously have the technical knowledge and the personality to do the dual role” — acting as the city attorney and running that department. Shelly Petrolia thanked him for making her commissioner’s job easier to do. Commissioner Mitch Katz said: “A lot of times you tell me what I don’t want to hear. But you are willing to explain why.” Lohman replied, “It’s never wrong to ask a question.” Ú

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14 News

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Delray Beach

Additional parking will ease a space crunch. Rendering by Currie Sowards Aguila Architects

First Presbyterian Church renovations aim to serve growing congregation

By Jane Smith Presbyterian parishioners will soon have a more comfortable church-going experience on the barrier island. The First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach just received city approval for its $3.5 million renovation. Four outer, non-historic buildings on its property were demolished in early February. The bulk of the renovation will start in May, a few weeks after Easter, when the church goes on a summer schedule of holding only one service on Sundays, said Senior Pastor Doug Hood. “The church has grown so much in the past four years,” Hood said. Parking for services is at a premium, especially for religious holidays. In place of the demolished buildings, the church will add 34 parking spaces. “The city has a new code that dictates space between the cars and landscaping,” he said. That’s why the church was disappointed it could not add more parking, he said.

“We worked on quite a few renovations to make the parking work. Angle parking is a nightmare for churches with people coming and going for services,” architect Jess Sowards told the city’s Site Plan Review and Appearance Board in late January. “The 90-degree parking works better. It’s the most efficient for churchgoers.” During most of the year, the church rents the 135 parking spaces to the beachfront Caffe Luna Rosa for its valet parking operations. The church also owns a parking lot on the west side of Gleason Street that it rents to the city for about $1,720 a month. The lot has 39 spaces that are restricted to First Presbyterian parishioners on Sunday mornings and all day on five religious holidays, including Christmas and Easter. One space is reserved for the pastor. Most of the $3.5 million has been raised and Hood is confident the remaining $400,000 will be acquired. He told a story of how one elderly

couple willingly gave $50,000 when they heard the number of restroom stalls would increase from one to four for both men’s and women’s rooms, which are handicapped-accessible. The sanctuary will be enlarged and the porte-cochère entrance will be moved to the middle of the south side of the church with a circular driveway. Lowering that driveway will increase the clearance that rescue vehicles need, Sowards told the board. “We will be removing the ridge and lowering the entrance,” he said. To make that change, the church needed only permits from the South Florida Water Management District about the quantity of water runoff. The building addition and its new roof will match the existing structure of the historic sanctuary, Sowards said. The rear parking area will be level to the church entrance to allow parishioners to avoid using stairs to the sanctuary. Ú

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March 2017

Manalapan

Town plans to restart Hypoluxo water talks By Dan Moffett

Manalapan town commissioners will be watching election results in Hypoluxo on March 14 with unusual interest — and unusual impatience. The resolution of the Hypoluxo mayor’s race will enable the towns to resume talks over a new water contract. Manalapan is hoping to lock its neighbor into a renegotiated long-term deal for services that will solidify the future of the town’s utility system. Negotiations came to a standstill in November when long-term Hypoluxo Mayor Ken Schultz died. Manalapan commissioners hope to jumpstart talks with Schultz’s successor, either interim incumbent Mike Brown or challenger David Karpinia. Manalapan Vice Mayor Peter Isaac says the delays are costing Hypoluxo’s 550 customers. “I mean, it’s ridiculous that government stops when there’s an election,” Isaac said during the Feb. 28 town meeting. “They’re losing $1,000 a day.” A Manalapan consultant’s report estimated that a revised deal with lower rates on the table since last fall could save Hypoluxo residents roughly $30,000 a month. Manalapan Town Manager Linda Stumpf said as soon as the new mayor is seated, she will try to elicit a response to the proposal. In other business: • Commissioners unanimously approved a landscaping contract for $46,900 with Chris Wayne and Associates of Jupiter to finish the Audubon Causeway bridge project. Wayne was the only bidder, and commissioners are wondering why the town has had problems attracting bids. Stumpf said she invited 30 landscaping companies to submit bids, but only eight did. Outgoing Mayor David Cheifetz wondered if the applications are too complicated. Town Clerk Lisa Petersen said she would contact the seven companies that didn’t return applications and ask why. • Incoming Mayor Keith Waters said he would look into complaints about management of the La Coquille Club and its relationship with the Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa. Waters said he hoped to have a report ready by the March 28 town meeting. • Waters commended Cheifetz, who decided not to run for a third term, for his service, citing his success in guiding Manalapan through some contentious issues. “You were able to bring calm, elegance and a certain sense of order to this town,” he told Cheifetz.Ú

The COASTAL STAR

News 15

No election required, but much change in commission By Dan Moffett

There will be no March election in Manalapan because all Town Commission candidates went unopposed. But residents will see a sweeping overhaul of government leadership just the same. Three new Doyle commissioners, a new mayor and a new mayor pro tem are expected to be seated before the end of the month. Stepping down as mayor is David Cheifetz, who announced in Siemon December he wouldn’t be seeking a third term. Commissioner Keith Waters, who was appointed to the Seat 7 Manalapan point position in June, will replace Cheifetz after drawing Waters

no opposition in the March race. Mayor Pro Tem Chauncey Johnstone, holder of the Seat 3 ocean commission seat, and at-large Seat 5 Commissioner Basil Diamond also decided not to seek reelection. Johnstone will be replaced by Jack Doyle and Diamond by Hank Siemon. Both Doyle and Siemon are veterans of the town’s Architectural Commission. Doyle assumes Johnstone’s commission seat but not necessarily his mayor pro tem title, which commissioners are expected to fill through appointment during their March 28 meeting. Also at that meeting, the commission is expected to appoint someone to take over Seat 7, which Waters vacated when he resigned to run for mayor. Vice Mayor Peter Isaac also was unopposed and returns to his point seat for another term. Commissioners Clark Appleby, an at-large representative, and ocean seat holder Simone Bonutti aren’t up for reelection until next year. Waters, 57, and wife Valerie moved

to Manalapan in 2006. He served on the Architectural Commission from 2007-12, and on the town’s Zoning Commission from 2012-16. Waters is chairman and CEO of WPO Development, a national planning and campaign management company that works with nonprofit groups. Originally from Kentucky, he worked in broadcasting with CBS Sports before coming to Florida. Waters holds a communications degree from the University of Kentucky and earned a master’s degree from the University of Miami. Among the first orders of business for Waters will be helping to chart the future for the town’s water utility system. Manalapan wants to renegotiate a longterm contract to sell water services to Hypoluxo, and in recent months the new mayor has supported an aggressive approach for getting the deal done. Waters also has been a strong backer of efforts to bring a Publix supermarket to Plaza del Mar. Ú


16 News

Delray Beach By Jane Smith

March 2017

Election will reshape Delray Beach commission a lawyer, resigned his seat Nov. 8 after being elected as a state representative. On March 14, Delray Beach voters will select two, three-year commissioners from among candidates with a variety of backgrounds and financial support. The city does not hold a runoff election if a candidate fails to reach 50 percent plus one. The candidate with the most votes wins. Voting is citywide, even though the seats are for two districts. For Seat 2, Harvard-educated Jim Chard had both public and private sector working experience in the Northeast before he retired to Delray Beach. He has served on the Congress Avenue Task Force, the city’s Site Plan Review and Appearance Board and the city’s steering committee for its comprehensive plan rewrite. If

Delray Beach, which had three lawyers on its five-member City Commission, will lose that majority with the March 14 election. No lawyers are running for two open seats. Vice Mayor Jordana Jarjura, general counsel at Gulf Building in Fort Lauderdale, changed her mind about running for reelection. “As a newlywed, having married during my time in office and with starting my position as a general counsel, I need to balance my personal and professional lives with my service as a commissioner,” Jarjura wrote in a late January email to her supporters. She called the commission’s inability to appoint a fifth commissioner to replace Al Jacquet a low point. Jacquet, also

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he’s elected, Chard will have to step down from SPRAB and the comprehensive plan steering committee. He called himself the “intern emeritus” at a candidate forum, sponsored by the Beach Property Owners Association on Feb. 22. For the barrier island, he told the forum that the dunes on the east and crumbling seawalls on the west are its most pressing issues, along with cleanliness of the beach, lack of parking and proliferation of sober homes throughout the city. He raised $36,095 as of Feb. 10, the latest campaign contribution report available. That amount, which includes a $10,000 candidate loan, puts Chard at the top of the candidates for money raised. His contributors read like a who’s-who of Delray Beach: $1,000 from Scott Porten, $500 from Bob Victorin and $250 from Andy Katz, all three executives of the BPOA; $1,000 from Woo Creative, whose owner, Ryan Boylston, is chairman of the city’s Downtown Development Authority and an owner of the Delray Newspaper, which endorsed Chard; $500 from Jeff Perlman, a former Delray Beach mayor who is an owner of the Delray Newspaper and an employee of Carl DeSantis, who still has a stake in the Atlantic Crossing project; and $250 from Reginald Cox & Associates, the architectural firm owned by the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency chairman. His campaign treasurer, Jim Smith, donated $100. Chard’s closest financial competitor is Kelly Barrette, a relative newcomer to Delray Beach. She raised $15,995, including a $4,000 personal loan. She and her husband, Jack, moved to Delray Beach five years ago.

Barrette, who graduated from Tufts University, became immersed in Delray Beach and started a Facebook page called TakeBackDelrayBeach. She wants to stop the proliferation of unregulated sober homes and incompatible development in the city. She also told the candidate forum that parking is a big challenge during the season and flooding along the Intracoastal Waterway needs to be addressed. Her contributors include Anthony Petrolia, husband of current City Commissioner Shelly Petrolia, who donated $100, and Commissioner Mitch Katz, who gave $100; Kristine de Haseth, executive director of the Florida Coalition for Preservation, donated $100; Price Patton, a retired news editor and founding partner of The Coastal Star, gave $500; and Smith, Chard’s treasurer, donated $100. Two other candidates who were born in Haiti are the other challengers for Seat 2. Anneze Barthelemy holds a master’s degree in social work from Barry University and has worked with the state Department of Children & Families. She told the candidate forum that the city needs representation from the African- and Haitian-American communities. The biggest challenge she sees is the growth of the city. During the season, the city is overwhelmed with tourists, making it difficult for full-time residents to move around the city, she told the candidate forum. She also said Delray’s roads and alleys need to be safe and that the beach should be preserved. Her father, Otes, retired after 25 years from his job with the city’s Parks and Recreation Department. She has led several mission

trips to Haiti and is working on her dissertation in theology. Barthelemy has raised $2,480 for her campaign, including $1,050 in personal loans. The last competitor, Richard Alteus, has a public safety background, according to his campaign website. He said the city’s top issues are unregulated sober homes, emphasis on public safety, improving pedestrian safety and solving traffic problems from the overdevelopment of Delray. He raised $1,030 in contributions, as of Feb. 10. Alteus did not participate in the Beach Property Owners candidate forum. The race for Seat 4 pits Shirley Johnson against Josh Smith Jr. Johnson, a retired IBM administrator, has the support of the Northwest and Southwest neighborhoods. She has lived in the city for 38 years. Her financial backers include former City Commissioner Angie Gray, who donated $200; two current board members of the city’s CRA, lawyer Herman Stevens with a $100 contribution and architect Reginald Cox with a $500 contribution; $1,000 from Porten and $500 from Victorin, executives of the group that sponsored the forum; and $100 from retired educator Yvonne Odom, who also applied to fill Jacquet’s seat. Johnson was endorsed by the Delray Newspaper for Seat 4. She raised a total of $5,308, as of Feb. 10. The amount includes two self-donations of $1,250. Johnson’s platforms are sober homes regulation, sustainable growth and losing the politics and listening to the people. The last issue was raised when the City Commission was tied at 2-2 and could not pick a replacement for Jacquet. Her competitor for Seat 2, Smith, is a retired educator who has lived in the city for 51 years. Last fall, he was the choice of Commissioners Katz and Petrolia. Smith raised $6,595, including a $200 self-donation, as of Feb. 10. His notable contributors include Anthony Petrolia, who donated $500; frequent commission critic Ken MacNamee and his wife, who gave $1,000; Marine Way resident Nancy MacManus donated $150; and Seaside Builders contributed $500. The biggest issues that he sees facing Delray Beach are unregulated sober homes that are straining the budgets of the city police and fire rescue departments; improving public safety to allow residents to move around safely; and focusing on fixing the city’s seawalls, building sidewalks in neighborhoods near schools and paving alleys in some neighborhoods. He wants to unify the residents of Delray Beach after last fall’s divisive national election. Ú


March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

News 17

Delray Beach

Six candidates contend for two commission seats

The city of Delray Beach’s municipal election will take place March 14, as six candidates will compete for two seats on the City Commission. The winners will serve three-year terms. Despite many phone calls and emails, seat 2 candidate Richard Alteus did not respond to our requests for information.

Commission Seat 4

Commission Seat 2

Kelly Barrette Personal: 54; graduated from Tufts University with a degree in English; five-year resident of Delray Beach; married, no children. Professional: Owned an art gallery in Boston for 15 years then worked as an art consultant for another five years. Political experience: Never elected to public office, but volunteered on local political campaigns and with nonprofits such as the Delray Beach Historical Society, the Achievement Centers for Children and Families and the Sandoway Discovery Center, of which she is a board member. Has been outspoken proponent of sober home reform. Also worked with the Florida Coalition for Preservation and the Delray Beach Preservation Trust. Positions on issues: Regulation for sober homes; compatible development; quality of life; preserving and protecting neighborhoods; infrastructure.

Professional: President and CEO of Rapha Family Services from 2007-present. Founded Anneze Barthelemy Consulting, LLC in 2010, which serves as a consulting company for churches, leaders and individuals wanting a faith-based social services agency. Political experience: Served as an adviser to Sen. Daphne Campbell of the Florida Senate and assisted in her election. Positions on issues: Reducing the number of sober homes; affordable housing; responsible development of commercial property; economic development; job creation; transportation and safety.

Professional: Retired for the last five years. Over three decades of experience in management, finance, budgetary, economic development and community involvement in both the private and public sectors. Ran offices for three New York City mayors and ran that city’s largest agency, the Human Resources Administration; also headed several successful high tech startups, including a local one, JumpStart Wireless. Political experience: None, but has been involved in city matters for the last five years as a volunteer and serves on a City Commission advisory board. Positions on issues: Responsible administration of sober homes; the rise in drug addiction, homelessness and crime; addressing crumbling infrastructure; lopsided tax base; job opportunities for younger generation. Quote: “I’d like to get the sober home issue under control and under management. I’m not looking for any endorsements from any commissioners up on the dais who might tell me how to vote. I want to be known as someone who comes at each issue fresh, someone who does his own research and someone who makes his own decisions.”

Shirley Johnson Personal: 70; has a political science degree from Howard University; 38-year resident of Delray Beach; married, two children, three grandchildren. Professional: Retired. Worked in management and systems analysis at IBM for 26 years, from 1971-1997. Political experience: None, but helped start the Paradise Heights Homeowners Association and was its president from 1997-2000. Positions on issues: Safe neighborhoods; establishing sober home regulations; maintaining historic preservation; establishing sustainable growth. Quote: “I am going to be a commissioner who will be available to listen to all parties involved in my city. My slogan is ‘Lose the politics and listen to the people.’ ”

Candidate profiles compiled by Steven J. Smith

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administration and leadership from Florida Atlantic University; 51-year resident of Delray Beach; divorced; two children. Professional: Retired from job as administrator in the Palm Beach County School District, 1962-1994. Political experience: Ran for Delray Beach commission in 2015. Positions on issues: Sober home administration; safety; overdevelopment in some areas and a lack of development in others; infrastructure deterioration; traffic and parking problems. Quote: “Sober homes have wreaked havoc on our city and placed a strain on our police and fire departments, with drug overdoses and deaths at a big cost to taxpayers. My first priority is for the protection of our neighborhoods and the quality of life our residents want and richly deserve. There is nothing wrong with our city that cannot be corrected by what is right about our city — and the right makeup of our commission.”

Municipal elections will be held March 14. Polling places will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. For more information visit www.pbcelections.org

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Josh Smith Jr. Personal: 76; has a doctorate in educational

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Quote: “I believe that I possess the strengths that will be an asset to the city of Delray and the residents. As a social worker, my whole career has been about serving, advocating and defending those who are not able to defend themselves. I have the personality, commitment and leadership skills that will unite, encourage and empower the commission to work for the betterment of our city.”

Jim Chard Personal: 70; graduated from Pomona College with a degree in government and got master’s degrees in city planning and business administration from Harvard University; 15-year resident of Delray Beach; unmarried; two children, four grandchildren.

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Quote: “I want to do everything in my power to make Delray the most difficult place to open a sober home, instead of the easiest place, which it is. I hear the same refrain, which is that residents don’t feel they’re being listened to on development and our neighborhoods. My priority would be to listen to resident-driven agenda. I’m also endorsed by two sitting commissioners, Commissioner Shelly Petrolia and Deputy Vice Mayor Mitch Katz.”

Anneze Barthelemy Personal: 39; graduated with a bachelor’s degree in social work from Florida International University and a master’s in social work from Barry University, currently completing her doctorate in ministry at the University of Fort Lauderdale; 12-year resident of Delray Beach; unmarried.

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18 News

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Ocean Ridge

Three newcomers join field after vice mayor’s resignation

By Dan Moffett

Ocean Ridge voters will select two town commissioners from a field of four candidates running in the March 14 municipal election. All are familiar faces in the community. Incumbent Vice Mayor James Bonfiglio is seeking a second three-year term and faces challenges from Richard Bajakian, a Planning and Zoning Commission member, Don MaGruder, a frequent contributor to town meetings, and Nan Yablong, who played a leading role in the unsuccessful recall effort against former Commissioner Richard Lucibella. It was Lucibella’s resignation as vice mayor, stemming from an altercation with police at his home in October, that left the commission shorthanded with four members and helped draw the three political newcomers into the race. The top two vote-getters will fill the

Candidate forum

The office-seekers will take questions from the public at a candidates’ forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters, on March 9, beginning at 6 p.m. in the Town Hall. open seats. Bonfiglio, a foreclosure and real estate attorney, joined the commission in 2014 with Lucibella, and the two became political allies, supporting the ouster of then Police Chief Chris Yannuzzi and the appointment of current Chief Hal Hutchins. Bonfiglio opposed the 2015 recall campaign against Lucibella launched by Yablong and other Yannuzzi supporters who objected to his removal. Yablong helped gather hundreds of signatures calling for a recall election, but a Palm Beach County Circuit Court judge sided with Lucibella and killed

the movement, ruling the petitions legally insufficient. Yablong claimed that Lucibella was guilty of malfeasance in office and had caused embarrassment to the town. “I had lost confidence in a commissioner who would open our town to hundreds of thousands of dollars in liabilities,” Yablong testified during a court hearing. During the dispute, Bonfiglio said he “had a hard time finding anyone who would say good things about Yannuzzi,” and later credited Hutchins with “doing a great job of improving the morale in the department.” Bonfiglio served for a decade on the town’s Planning and Zoning Commission, leaving as its chair to run for commissioner. He was a leading opponent on the commission against the Sivitilli family’s continued commercial use of its building at 5011 N. Ocean Blvd. Bajakian, a radiologist, also has a

background in planning and zoning, joining the board as a regular member in 2012 after serving as an alternate since 2006. He has been an advocate of increasing the town’s floor area ratio, a measure of development density. Bajakian believes a higher FAR increases the town’s tax base and helps attract younger and larger families. MaGruder, a current member of the Ocean Ridge Board of Adjustment, is a frequent contributor to discussions during town meetings. He has been a supporter of license plate recognition cameras for police and tightening security measures throughout the town. MaGruder has criticized officials for not doing a better job of forcing contractors to fence their construction sites and clean up debris. In recent months, he has successfully lobbied commissioners to fix drainage and overgrowth problems at the Woolbright Road detention/retention pond. Ú

Four candidates contend for two commission seats

Ocean Ridge’s elections will fill the Town Commission seat held by James Bonfiglio and an open seat formerly held by Richard Lucibella, who resigned in December. The term length is three years. Richard Bajakian James Bonfiglio Don MaGruder Nan Yablong (incumbent) Personal: 59; Personal: 74; Personal: 65; master’s Personal: 63; graduated from MBA in business degree from Boston degrees in history Syracuse University administration from University in nursing; and political science with a B.S. in biology; the University of resident of Ocean from the University of graduated from the Miami; resident of Ridge for six years; Rochester; law degree University of Medicine Ocean Ridge for 31 married; two children. from Loyola University in New Orleans, years; married, two adult children. and Dentistry of New Jersey, where Professional: Served as RN CEO of he received his M.D.; 26-year resident 30-year resident of Ocean Ridge; divorced, no children. Professional: 34 years as director a health management company for of Ocean Ridge; engaged. of administration for five law firms five years. Professional: Practicing law in Florida around the state. Professional: Currently practices as Political experience: None. since 1979, specializing in mortgage a neuroradiologist, a subspecialty Political experience: Never elected foreclosure defense work for the last of radiology; worked at JFK Medical 30 years. Positions on issues: Sees a need for to political office, but is a current Center in Atlantis from 1991-2001; member of the Ocean Ridge Board of developing and organizing standards opened his own imaging center, MRI Specialists, in Boynton Beach in 2002. Political experience: Member of the of performance in job descriptions Adjustment. Ocean Ridge Town Commission since for all town employees; wants to Political experience: Has never been 2014; currently the town’s vice mayor. Positions on issues: Maintain maintain quality of life; secure a elected to public office, but served small-town ambiance; oversee the stable economic future. Positions on issues: Cleaning up for 10 years on the Ocean Ridge town’s drainage system to check Planning and Zoning Commission. Quote: “We need a mechanism to the Woolbright retention pond; the rising sea levels and ensure do performance evaluations for road paving; improving radio flood control; wants license tag Positions on issues: Strong local Ocean Ridge town employees that communications system for the police recognition cameras installed to police force; keeping taxes down; is accurate and can be used in hiring force; building reserves in the budget maintain security; need police ATV wants a small-town feeling to and termination practices. It’s also for unforeseen circumstances; hooking beach patrols for weekends and the community; wants to protect important to maintain the unique up south-end communities of town to holidays; concerned with potential property values; concerned with how a sewer system; attending to flooding overdevelopment in the south end of and beautiful seaside quality of our activities in other communities might issues in the north end of town. town. I want to represent everyone in town. infringe upon Ocean Ridge; wants our town. There have been times in Quote: “We have a pretty good town Quote: “I’ve attended almost every to maintain natural resources and the past when our Town Commission balance now. We have $156,000 meeting in Ocean Ridge over the respond to needs of the community. did not do that. I look forward to a currently in our contingency fund 31 years I’ve been here, so I’m in bright future for our town.” and we’ve allocated $180,000 in sync with what’s going on. I believe Quote: “My goal is to represent my capital projects for our road-paving it’s time for me to give back to my town’s interest as best as possible program. We have, I think, $2.5 million community. That’s why I’m running.” and look out for the interests of all in reserves, which is 50 percent of our the people in Ocean Ridge.” Candidate profiles compiled by operating budget. I’d like to get that Steven J. Smith up a little more, because that’s what we draw on for emergencies. I’m a lawyer and the Town Commission needs a lawyer to help it through these difficult times.”

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Continued from page 1 7 commission meeting. She said she paid $774 for the plastic-composite bench with a plaque. She also bought a silver buttonwood tree that would be planted near the bench. They were installed in 2009. The Finst family marker depicts palms and a surfer. “They provide an ambiance of the most fun small city,” she told commissioners. She chose the north end of the beach because that’s where she watched her boys surf. “I usually stood,” she later recalled, “on the bench to see them.” When she paid for the bench, Finst said, “I was told it would be a permanent location and the bench would not be removed.” Albert Richwagen, who

BEACH

Continued from page 1 year making the case for the project. Fischer has said that “false information and misunderstanding” have complicated the sales job. Condo boards have worried about giving away access to their land for 50 years, the term of the agreement. The most recent holdup has been a dispute over liability issues. At least a half-dozen condominium associations have expressed concerns over who would be responsible for possible accidents, injury or damage done by contractors. To allay those worries, county attorneys in February added a clause to the easement agreement that indemnifies

News 23

runs his family bicycle shop in the city, suggested recycling the plaques for use on the new benches. “When my father passed, I also bought a bench in the south end for people to use to take their shoes off before going down to the beach,” he told commissioners. While the Finst family bench is in good condition at the lesser-used north end, Richwagen’s bench sits at the more heavily used south end. The rusted L-shaped brackets connecting the base of his bench to the concrete slab are broken. Richwagen said he replaced the stainless-steel straps several times since he bought the bench a few years ago. Bob Victorin, president of the Beach Property Owners Association, which spearheaded

the beach plan, bought a bench with a plaque across from his Ocean Place condominium some two years ago. He paid $900 and the plaque reads: The Victorins since 1972. “It’s an emotional thing,” he said. “It serves no purpose for the city to disturb that. The old plaques can go on the new benches.” Both men admit they signed agreements allowing the city to move the benches at any time. “We will retrieve all the benches and hold them until we can notify the family,” Morgan said. “We will deliver the bench if the family wants it.” As to whether the new metal benches can have plaques, that’s a commission decision, he said. At the Feb. 7 meeting, Commissioner Mitch Katz said he liked the idea of putting the

old plaques on the new benches. But Mayor Cary Glickstein wants to see uniformity at the beach. “Some of (the markers) are on benches and some in the ground like headstones, but none are uniform,” Glickstein wrote in an email. “This is a public beach — not a cemetery — that we have gone to great lengths to improve.” He said millions have been spent to improve the beachside through renourishment programs and the dune management system that is widely regarded as one of the most successful in Florida. The last piece, Glickstein said, is the pedestrian promenade. MBR Construction of Fort Lauderdale was chosen in January with the low bid of

$2.3 million. The city also paid EDSA Inc. of Fort Lauderdale $425,000 to design and secure permits and oversee construction. A ground-breaking ceremony will be held in late March, Morgan said. In other barrier island news, work will start in April on the Gleason Street and Venetian Drive crosswalks on Atlantic Avenue. Because they travel across a state road, the crosswalks are controlled by the state Department of Transportation. The department does not allow pavers to be used in its roadways. Stamped concrete is preferred. The $366,000 cost will be paid by the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency. Ú

property owners from liability. If South Palm Beach can’t satisfy its requirements for the north end of the project, then Lantana’s municipal beach will suffer the consequences on the south end — though the town has already signed off on easements and has been supportive of the plan. Because the project is designed and permitted as a continuous stabilization strategy, without South Palm Beach’s involvement work couldn’t begin on Lantana’s beach groins because of engineering and administrative issues. “It’s engineered as a single project with the seven groins positioned to assist each other,” Vitas said. “Separating it just won’t work. If you tried, you’d

have to start over with a new design.” Starting from zero means potentially long delays, Vitas said, and Lantana Mayor Dave Stewart agrees. “If South Palm Beach doesn’t get on the train, I don’t know when we would start,” Stewart said. “You’d have to start from scratch with permitting. It could delay the project for a year or more.” The good news for Lantana is that the town doesn’t have any money at stake. Because its beach is public and the town is allowing particularly useful access for county contractors, Lantana doesn’t have to pay anything for the project. The stabilization, which will cost roughly $5 million to construct, has been in the works since shortly after

Hurricane Wilma tore up the beach in 2005. The project calls for constructing seven groins — concrete panels supported by concrete piles — buried in the sand, perpendicular to the shore, stretching some 75 feet into the water. The groins begin near the northern South Palm Beach boundary and go as far south as the end of Lantana’s Municipal Beach. Four of the groins would be squarely within South Palm Beach, one on the Lantana-South Palm Beach line, and two others on Lantana’s beach. The federal government will pay 50 percent of the construction costs, the county will pay 30 percent from its tourism bed tax, and South Palm Beach will have to cover

the remaining 20 percent, and also spend roughly $200,000 a year to bring in sand to keep the groins buried. If all property owners sign off on the easements, then county officials can move forward and issue work orders for contractors. Federal and state officials can then approve the final administrative details to set the project in motion. Fischer and Vitas are clinging to hope that work can begin in November and be done before turtle nesting season starts in March 2018. Vitas said some condo boards have signed the revised contract. Miranda has been studying the town’s beach since Wilma hit. She said access to the beach is essential to keeping the project alive. Ú

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24 News

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Lantana

Council rejects All Aboard Florida crossing agreement by 3-2 vote

By Mary Thurwachter Lantana said no to a crossing agreement with Florida East Coast Railway and All Aboard Florida. “This has to do with a second line for All Aboard Florida that they are going to be running through our town,” Mayor Dave Stewart explained during the Town Council’s Feb. 13 meeting, at which the council voted 3-2 against the agreement. Tequesta and Lantana are the only two municipalities involved in Palm Beach County that have not signed agreements. Municipalities that have signed are Boca Raton, Delray Beach, Boynton Beach, Lake Worth, West Palm Beach, Riviera Beach and Palm Beach Gardens. Neil Schiller, the attorney representing All Aboard Florida, said the town already has a crossing agreement with Florida East Coast Railway, which owns the property where the railroad crossings are (one at West Ocean Avenue and the other at Finlandia Boulevard and West Central Boulevard). “Because Mr. (Henry) Flagler was here so much earlier than all of us, he owns that property and, for cities to cross the property, they have these crossing agreements,” Schiller said. “There are a multitude of crossing agreements from the Keys all the way north to Jacksonville. Some are as old as 1896 and some are as recent as

didn’t ask for a 79-mile-perhour railroad to come through our town. …It’s not going to do anything for Lantana, and that just worries me.” Schiller said he appreciated Balfour’s comments, “but the project is occurring. We’re starting this summer. Some of the new trains have been delivered and we’re already testing them. “Not signing the agreement doesn’t mean the project is dead,” Schiller said. “Not signing this agreement means we are going to write you a bill for the improvements that were made for the crossings, and we have every right to do that.” Stewart showed a railroad plan from 2009 and said the railroad had “a dog and pony show” then and listed where all the railroad stations would be, including Lantana. “They were going to be bringing people, we were going to have businesses and there were people in town who owned properties they kept from improving because they thought there was going to be a new train station,” Stewart said. “What happened to 2009? This is what was sold to us.” Schiller said the 2009 plan, which he had not seen, wasn’t All Aboard Florida. Stewart, Balfour and Council member Philip Aridas voted no to the crossing agreement. Council members Tom Deringer and Lynn Moorhouse voted for it.

1958. But they are still in effect.” He said that All Aboard Florida, an express passenger rail service that will eventually connect Miami to Orlando, is a sister company to Florida East Coast Railway. “I have been hired to have all the municipalities that have crossing agreements with FEC to add All About Florida as a third-party beneficiary,” Schiller said. By adding a third-party beneficiary, he said, costs for initial improvements made on the crossings to accommodate the new train would be covered by All Aboard Florida. Each municipality would pick up costs after that. Without the third-party beneficiary contract, if something needs to be done on the tracks, All Aboard Florida would have to go through FECR, which would then call the town. “We want to be able to work directly with the town,” Schiller said. “FECR is very difficult sometimes, so we want to eliminate that step.” Schiller said All Aboard Florida is supporting efforts to create quiet zones in the construction phase of the project. Council member Malcolm Balfour said the proposed agreement wasn’t fair. “After the first 10 or 11 years, we’ll have to pick up the tab for the maintenance costs, and that seems unfair because we

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“I don’t have to like it to know it’s in the best interest of the town,” Moorhouse said. “This is kind of where we’re at from what the Flagler legacy is telling us,” Stewart said. “We either sign the agreement or you are going to bill us for the work you’ve already done for a rail line that we have no say in and that we will have no impact, no income from.” Schiller said the decision to bill the town would be up to his client. Over the years, Stewart said, the town had been paying for improvements and maintenance and the right to run water and sewer lines under the tracks. “I understand that,” he said. “But there have been a couple of things I asked for. How about the sidewalk and bicycle lane alongside U.S. 1 so that we can make U.S. 1 safer. Have there been any agreements on that?”

Although Schiller said he had been working toward agreements and to coordinate the best and most expedient way to make that happen, he didn’t have a definitive answer for the mayor. At the town’s Feb. 27 meeting, the council voted to invite representatives of All Aboard Florida to return to once again discuss the crossing agreement. This passed by a 3-1 vote with the mayor dissenting. Aridas thought the matter should be discussed more and was able to get Moorhouse and Balfour to agree. Deringer was absent. Bringing the attorney back may be pointless, though. “There’s not anything to come back for,’’ Town Attorney Max Lohman said. “They’re not going to make any concessions.”Ú

Briny Breezes

Mayor Hill stepping down By Dan Moffett

Briny Breezes Mayor Mike Hill says the Town Council doesn’t need him anymore and his grandchildren in the Midwest do. So it’s time to go. Hill announced his resignation Feb. 23, and with a wave and a smile, told council members he’d “had enough fun” working with them the last three years. Hill “I’m not moving, I’m staying where I am [in Briny Breezes],” Hill said. “But we’ve got some very wellqualified people on this panel now, and these are people who probably can devote more time to the issues that are facing the town than I can.” Council President Sue Thaler credited Hill, 69, with helping the town break in an inexperienced group of officials and staff after Roger Bennett left the mayor’s position in 2013. With a long career as a lawyer and service as an elected official in Highland Beach, Hill guided the council through some tough issues — such as switching to Boynton Beach from Ocean Ridge for police service, developing new golf cart operation rules and placing restrictions on truck traffic. “You stepped up to fill the role of mayor when Roger retired,” Thaler told Hill. “You did an outstanding job. Thank you for your service.” Hill said he wants to spend more time with his 11 grandchildren and family in Illinois. His wife, Shirley SmithHill, died unexpectedly at age 66 a year ago. “I want to thank my

colleagues and the people of the town of Briny Breezes for letting me serve as your mayor for the last few years,” Hill said. Thaler said the council hopes to appoint a replacement soon, perhaps as early as the March 23 meeting. The rest of the Town Council lineup remains unchanged, after no candidates filed to challenge incumbents Thaler and Jim McCormick, whose seats were up for contest in the March 14 election. “Not having an election saves us between $7,000 and $8,000,” Thaler said. In other business: • The town and corporation are planning to work together on an initiative to improve the safety of golf carts and ensure that those used in Briny are properly registered. An older model, gasoline-powered cart caught fire Feb. 14 on Cardinal Drive, damaging the street pavement and a couple of front yards. Alderman Bobby Jurovaty and Thaler say the town wants golf carts to be equipped with fire extinguishers and wants their owners to keep carts mechanically sound. Enforcing registration will help promote that, they say. “I’d like to see that as soon as possible,” Jurovaty said. • It’s been close to two years since the council started getting serious about putting a golf cart crossing at A1A and Cordova. Progress this year has been slow, but there has been some. Boynton Beach police have completed a survey of bicycle and pedestrian traffic on the sidewalk, and the council hopes to use it to convince the Florida Department of Transportation that a crossing won’t compromise safety. The project still has a chance to begin later this year.Ú


March 2017

Lantana

The COASTAL STAR

News 25

Four candidates contend for two commission seats

Lantana voters will choose from two candidates for each of two council seats. The town has no term limits. Term is three years.

Council Group 3 Tom Deringer (incumbent) Personal: 63; attended the University of Kentucky, but did not graduate; 36-year resident of Lantana; married; two children, seven grandchildren. Professional: Worked in sales for General Tire and in 1993 started Palm Beach Tire; still owns company. Political experience: Has served for 15 years on the Lantana Town Council. Positions on issues: Concerned with which businesses will go into the Water Tower Commons project; interested in preserving the condition of roads in the town; wants to keep taxes down.

Council Group 4 Edward Shropshire Personal: 64; attended several junior colleges, but did not graduate; 28-year resident of Lantana; married, one

child.

Professional: Works for Cemex, a building materials company; works part time as a defensive driving instructor and has served as a local union rep. Political experience: Alternate on the Planning Commission, but has held no political office. Positions on issues: Wants controlled development and to maintain Lantana’s small-town ambiance.

Quote: “I want to make sure that new development keeps coming in to give us more of a tax base to clean up the town and that our roads are in good shape. I like smart growth. We don’t need high-rises, like some of our neighboring communities. I’d like Lantana to stay a small town and I want to work toward that goal.”

Quote: “I want to upgrade Lantana’s town services such as the building department, code enforcement and Police Department. I want to maintain a quality standard of life.”

Philip Aridas (incumbent) Personal: 62; graduated from Lincoln Technical Institute in Union, N.J., with a diploma in air-conditioning, refrigeration and heating; 33-year resident of Lantana; divorced; no children. Professional: Currently a Palm Beach County park ranger since 2012. Political experience: Current member of the Lantana Town Council; sat on Ocean Reef Task Force; served as chairman of the Lantana Chamber of Commerce. Positions on issues: Wants the Water Tower Commons project completed responsibly with businesses and amenities that will benefit the town; relocating the Police Department to a larger facility; keeping parks, beaches and public areas and the nature center on Hypoluxo Island updated; street improvements; beach restroom upgrades; road striping.

child.

Suzanne Gordon Personal: 38; graduated from FAU with a degree in business (marketing); Lantana resident for 13 years; married; one

Professional: Worked for Regis, a Fortune 500 company, from 20102013 as its South Florida district manager; member of the National Association of Realtors from 2013-present; currently a stay-athome mother. Political experience: None. Positions on issues: Safety in the community; bringing in more local businesses; improving the local economy; maintaining local beaches, parks and preserves. Quote: “I would like to be a voice for our community and help preserve our town.”

Quote: “Lantana is one of the last true seaside communities and it’s my goal to make sure it stays that way.”

Candidate profiles compiled by Steven J. Smith

Incumbents face challenges Two Lantana Council members will face opposition from political newcomers in the March 14 election. Vice Mayor Philip Aridas, who has served on the council since 2011, is being challenged by Suzanne Gordon, 38. She is a stay-athome mom and Realtor. Aridas, 62, is a park ranger. Vice Mayor Pro Tem Tom Deringer, who has been on the council since 2002, is being opposed by Edward Shropshire, 64. He is a council watcher, works for a building materials company, is a defensive driving instructor and has worked as a local union representative. Deringer, 63, owns Palm Beach Tire, a company he founded in 1993. Two large projects Lantana’s Town Council will be keeping tabs on this year are construction of the mixed-use Water Tower Commons development, just east of I-95 on Lantana Road, and construction of Aura Seaside rental units and office space just north of Hypoluxo Road on the east side of Dixie Highway (the former home of the Cenacle retreat house). The council will also be coordinating sidewalk improvements on Broadway and north of Lantana Road along North Eighth Street, overseeing roadway

Meet the candidates

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The Lantana Chamber of Commerce will be hosting two pre-election events. A debate is set for 7 p.m. March 7 at the Lantana Recreation Center, 418 S. Dixie Highway. A Candidates Meet and Greet Luncheon will be from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 9 at the Old Key Lime House, 300 E. Ocean Ave., Lantana. Attendees will pay for their lunch. repaving and restriping and refurbishing the former Department of Juvenile Justice building on North 8th Street for future Police Department headquarters.

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26 Meet Your Neighbor

10 Questions

D

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR: Dorinda Burroughs

orinda Burroughs dedicated much of her career to improving children’s lives — working with students with learning, social, emotional and medical needs. Since retiring in 2015, she’s found a way to still make a difference, only now she’s doing it with a little help from a fourlegged friend. On Wednesday afternoons, the Ocean Ridge woman and her therapy dog, Ginny, head to Paul’s Place — the after-school program of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Delray Beach — where they spend an hour visiting with the children. At the beginning of the year, Burroughs contacted the church’s pastor and Kathy Fazio, the director of Paul’s Place, and asked if she and Ginny could volunteer. “When I approached them, they had never done anything like this before,” Burroughs said. “Some of the children were really frightened of dogs and had had bad experiences. So, I sit on the floor with them and we work through their fears or talk through the bad experiences, and usually by the end they’re petting Ginny and giving her hugs or brushing her.” Burroughs and Ginny, a 2-year-old golden retriever, usually see six to eight children per visit. Burroughs had the children read books about golden retrievers, and now she plans to have the children keep a journal about their experiences with Ginny. Paul’s Place, which was started in 2000, serves a Haitian-American population, with children ranging upward in age from 6 years old. All expenses are covered by fundraising, and volunteers keep expenses down. The children come Monday through Friday, 2:30 to 7 p.m. They have a snack, are tutored, and participate in activities such as music, art and sports. Before heading home, they have a hot dinner. On Wednesdays, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., they have fun with Burroughs and Ginny. “I think having them visit our children has taught them a whole new level of loving and caring for something,” said Fazio. “Ginny has become the mascot of this after-school program. We have a whole bulletin board now that’s dedicated to Ginny, with pictures from weekly visits, and research on golden retrievers.” Burroughs only recently started her therapy work with Ginny. But since April 2015, even before she had Ginny, it’s something Burroughs knew she wanted to do. Her granddaughter Reagan, who was 3½ at the time, was being treated in Washington, D.C., for a stage II cancerous tumor on her brain stem. One day, when Burroughs was at the hospital with Reagan

nearly $6 million to build the house debt-free. My husband did much of the legal work pro bono. I served on the Ronald McDonald House board for 16 years, the last two as board chair.

Q. What advice do you have for a young person selecting a career today? A. It is really important to learn what you don’t want to do, just as much as it is knowing what you will love to do. Try out all sorts of jobs while you are young and develop diverse skill sets. Q. How did you choose to make your home in Ocean Ridge? A. We found Ocean Ridge in 2002 and are here seasonally, as well as off and on throughout the year. We love the small village atmosphere and the geographic location in Palm Beach County, as well as the convenience to Palm Beach International Airport. People are friendly and welcoming.

Dorinda Burroughs and her therapy dog, Ginny, work with children in the after-school program at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Delray Beach. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star (who just turned 5 and is cancer free), it was “Doggie Day.” “I saw firsthand how the dogs just knew instinctively how to cheer and comfort the children,” said Burroughs, 64. “I saw the children really light up, and forget about their situation, and that they were in the hospital.” At the time, she had a very old golden retriever that wasn’t a candidate to be a therapy dog, and eventually had to be put to sleep. So, Burroughs and her husband, Benton, began their search for a new dog. They adopted Ginny, a well-bred but neglected rescue dog, in December 2015, just before her first birthday.  “She was just a really sweet, active and fun-loving girl, so we knew right away when we saw her that it was the right thing to do,” said Burroughs. About the same time, Burroughs retired and was able to pursue her goal of forming a therapy dog team. She and Ginny received their Canine Good Citizens training and therapy dog training early last year from Fur Life K9 Training Academy in Jupiter Farms. They continued training in northern Virginia — where Burroughs and her husband live part of the year — and received their therapy dog certification from PAL (People. Animals. Love.) in Washington, D.C., this past fall.  Besides visiting nursing homes, memory care centers, and the Armed Forces Retirement Home, they have worked with PAWS for Reading, the after-school and library program of PAL, where children, often ESL students,

can improve their reading skills by reading aloud to a nonjudgmental therapy dog. Burroughs also has taken and passed a pet handler’s course through Pet Partners, a nationwide group that certifies dogs for clinical settings. Her ultimate goal is to work with Ginny at Inova Children’s Hospital in Falls Church, Va. where her desire to work with a therapy dog originated. She expects to achieve that goal this summer or fall as Ginny gets more experienced and matures, and can take her exams for the Pet Partners certification. Helping children was always at the heart of Burroughs’ professional life. She worked for 15 years as a learning disabilities and behavior specialist with the Fairfax County public school system in northern Virginia. The last 20 years of her career, she worked as an educational psychologist and consultant at a large pediatric practice in the town of Fairfax, working with children who had medical needs, and with their families. Burroughs, who has four children and three grandchildren, looks forward to having her husband join her and Ginny in their volunteer work, once he retires. “There’s a great deal of science and research that shows that when sick children or adults can have positive interactions with dogs, they feel better,” said Burroughs. “It just gives them a lot of joy.”

— Marie Puleo

Q. Where did you grow up and go to school? How do you think that has influenced you? A. I grew up in a very small town in Mississippi after spending the first five years of my life in Michigan when my dad was in the Air Force. I attended Mississippi State University, and later the University of Virginia for graduate school. Growing up in a rural area, where everyone knew each other, with strong ties to church and community, certainly shaped me.  Q. What professions have you worked in? What professional accomplishments are you most proud of?  A. I was a learning disabilities and behavior specialist. I was a consultant at a large pediatric practice. I had many professional joys working with special-needs students and their families, including piloting immersion programs in the late ’80s and ’90s that helped integrate these students into the general education population.  At the pediatric practice, I evaluated students and wrote programs for them with a team of other specialists. I still communicate with many of my past students and their families. Knowing that I had an impact on their lives and seeing them succeed is truly a gift.  One of the proudest periods I have had was when my husband, Benton, and I chaired a capital campaign to raise funds (during the recession) for a new Ronald McDonald House in Washington, D.C. We raised

Q. What is your favorite part about living in Ocean Ridge? A. The people we have as friends and those friends who walk dogs on Old Ocean Boulevard.  Q. What music do you listen to when you need inspiration? When you want to relax?  A. Classical and instrumental jazz. Q. Do you have favorite quotes that inspire your decisions?  A. “What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make,” from Jane Goodall. Also “To serve is beautiful, but only if it is done with joy and whole heart and a free mind,” from Pearl S. Buck. Q. Have you had mentors in your life? A. My parents and grandmothers. They all instilled the importance of education, family, faith and service. Q. If your life story were made into a movie, whom would you want to play you? A. Annette Bening, for her grace and serenity. Q. Is there something about you that most people don’t know but may be interested to know? A. I love to try to imitate different accents. I have a very Southern accent and I once had a communications class whereby a professor made us take on different accents and personas. I also journal and write down funny things I hear when I’m out and about. I may compile it into a book. I also want to write a children’s book about Ginny and our therapy work. Ú


March 2017

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28 News

GUNS

Continued from page 1 Here’s the way the current law reads: “No state governmental agency or local government, special district, or other political subdivision or official … shall knowingly and willfully keep or cause to be kept any list, record, or registry of privately owned firearms or any list, record, or registry of the owners of those firearms.” To get an idea if there is a growing number of gun owners in Florida, and specifically in Palm Beach County, however, The Coastal Star looked at the number of concealed weapons permits issued to those with Palm Beach County addresses and those living in Florida. In addition, the newspaper looked at the number of background checks done by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement on those purchasing firearms in Florida. There are challenges to drawing a conclusion that there are more guns in the county or the state based on those statistics alone because there are many gun owners who do not have permits, nor do they need them. Florida does not require you to have a permit in order to legally have a gun in your home. You can also have a gun in your car without a permit as long as the firearm is safely secured and not readily available for immediate use. The data collected through public records, however, show a dramatic increase in the number of background checks done in Florida in the last 10 years as well as a significant increase in the number of concealed weapons permits being issued in Palm Beach County in the same time period. Everyone who purchases a new gun must submit to a background check, even people with concealed weapons permits. Those permit holders are each allowed to carry firearms in a concealed manner, either on them or in close proximity to them. In 2007 there were 32,446 concealed weapons permit holders in Palm Beach County, representing 2.5 percent of the county population. By 2016, according to statistics compiled by the Florida Department of Agriculture, which issues the permits, that number had nearly tripled to 97,215, representing about 7 percent of the population. The number of concealed weapons permits represents the total number of people who have licenses at a given point in a year. Statewide the number of permit holders increased from 472,936 in 2007 to more than 1.7 million in 2016. It is estimated that close to 8.5 percent of Florida residents now have concealed weapons permits. Also tripling during that

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Concealed weapons permits and firearm background checks growing steadily

Online background checks are required when handguns or long guns (rifles and shotguns) are purchased from federally licensed dealers, including retail stores, pawn shops and businesses that sell at gun shows. To purchase a handgun in Florida, a person must be at least 21 years old and a Florida resident. There is a three-day waiting period. There is no waiting period for rifles and shotguns, and the minimum age to purchase is 18. There is no limit to the number of guns per background check, but the background check process is repeated for any future purchases. In Florida, the Department of Law Enforcement conducts the federal background checks. SOURCES: Florida Department of Agriculture and FBI. Charts by Michelle Quigley

Vehicles are never a good place to store firearms

If you must store a firearm in your vehicle, here are safety tips from Ocean Ridge Police Chief Hal Hutchins: • Avoid leaving a weapon in your vehicle overnight or whenever the vehicle is unattended.  • Make sure your car is locked and your firearm is out of plain sight if you need to leave it in your vehicle. • If you must keep a weapon in the car, make sure it is secured in a gun safe that is mounted to the vehicle. • Avoid storing your weapon in a glove box. Even locked glove boxes are not truly secure. • If you must carry a firearm in a vehicle, always ensure that it is not accessible to children at any time. The best place to store a weapon in your home is in a locked gun storage area. same period was the number of Florida firearm background checks administered under the Florida Firearm Purchase Program and conducted by the FDLE. In 2007 there were 426,180 background checks conducted but by 2016, that number had ballooned to 1.4 million. Background checks are used to ensure that each customer purchasing a weapon does not have a criminal record, hasn’t been legally judged as mentally incompetent, hasn’t been dishonorably discharged from the military, or isn’t otherwise ineligible to make a purchase. Although these numbers cannot be construed as a definitive count, both the increasing number of concealed weapons permits issued and the growing number of background checks conducted appear to indicate two things: More Floridians are buying guns and more are carrying concealed weapons. Owners must take precautions Most people in law enforcement or who study the gun issue believe there are pros and cons to having an increasing percentage of the population with concealed weapons permits. “It’s a double-edged sword,” says Marc Woods, a former Delray Beach police officer with 30 years’ experience who now works for the city’s code enforcement division. “Having armed responsible citizens is not a bad thing.” Where problems arise, Woods believes, is when

gun owners do not follow precautions designed to keep themselves and others around them safe. “If you’re not a responsible gun owner, there could be problems,” he said. Hutchins agrees. “If you are carrying a firearm for lawful purposes, that’s not a bad thing,” he said. “If you want to be a firearms owner, however, you have to accept the responsibility that comes with it.” Thomas Gabor, a former professor of criminology at the University of Ottawa and author of a recently published book, Confronting Gun Violence in America, says recent national surveys show that people feel safer with more guns in their community. “If it makes them feel more safe, then I guess that’s an upside,” he said. One problem with having more guns in a community, however, is the increased possibility of those guns falling into the wrong hands. A study conducted by the University of Pittsburgh and released in late 2016 found that almost 80 percent of perpetrators of a crime were carrying a gun owned by someone else. The study also discovered that more than 30 percent of the guns recovered at crime scenes by police in Pittsburgh had been stolen and 4 in 10 of those guns weren’t reported stolen until after police contacted the owner. In other words, many owners weren’t initially reporting that the weapons

had been taken or were unaware that they were missing. It should be noted that unlike Florida, Pennsylvania does require a person to have a permit to carry a gun in a vehicle, which would make a person who had a gun stolen from a car but didn’t have a permit reluctant to report the theft. There are 10 states plus the District of Columbia that require gun owners to report when a weapon is lost or stolen but that is not the case in Florida or Pennsylvania. “If a gun is initially stolen, there’s a better than even chance it’s going to be used in a crime,“ says Gabor, who now makes his home in South Florida. “From the time of that theft, the gun is in the hands of someone who has already committed a crime.” Guns stolen from cars In Palm Beach County, where there have been several rashes of car burglaries affecting just about every community, law enforcement officials say leaving a firearm unsecured in your car could lead to the weapon’s being used for illegal purposes. “The chance it will be used in another crime is fairly high,” Hutchins says. Some of the weapons taken from cars, according to Lt. Scott Privitera of the Delray Beach Police Department’s investigative division, are kept by the thieves. Others end up being sold on the black market. “If they chose to sell them, they’re as good as cash,” he said, adding that prices can vary depending on how eager the seller is for money. Just last month, Delray Beach police discovered that 38 vehicles in an area from Federal Highway east to State Road A1A were broken into on the same night. In 2016, Delray Beach police reported 20 guns taken during auto burglaries, up from 15 the previous year. In all but four of those cases, the vehicles involved were unlocked. So far this year, Privitera said, the department has recorded five or six more

thefts of guns from unlocked vehicles — none of which occurred during the one-night crime spree in February. Those numbers could be even higher, Privitera says, since police know that crimes in general — including burglaries to vehicles — are often underreported. Larry Rosensweig, former president of the Seagate Neighborhood Association where some of the most recent car break-ins occurred, was surprised to hear that so many gun were left in unlocked cars. “That’s shocking,” he said. “It’s hard to believe that people are so careless that they leave a gun in a car that’s not locked or secured in a garage.” According to the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office, which polices the unincorporated portions of the county, there were 199 firearms reported stolen from vehicles in 2015. That number rose to 311 in 2016. In Boynton Beach, the number of guns reported stolen from vehicles dropped in 2016, with 35 reported last year and 39 reported in 2015. “If you want to own guns, you have to be responsible and not leave them unsecured in your car,” says Woods. Gabor, the criminologist, believes there is also a correlation between gun ownership and shootings by police and of police officers. With more weapons available — legally and illegally — there’s a greater likelihood that criminals will be armed. In some cases, he says, officers may be quicker to make a decision because they fear the person they’re dealing with could have a weapon. Hutchins says that because of national incidents where officers came under attack and because of a perceived increase in the number of weapons in the community, officers have to be more observant and guard against complacency when making traffic stops, investigating alarm calls or handling any other routine incidents they encounter on a daily basis. “We have to be hypervigilant,” he said. Ú


March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

News 29

Delray Beach

Tax-dollar incentives an issue in iPic discussions

By Jane Smith The iPic development team is asking Delray Beach’s Community Redevelopment Agency for more money, even though it has not closed on its contract to buy the 1.6 acres for $3.6 million from the agency. The seventh amended contract had a Jan. 31 deadline, but the agency’s attorney said the contract was still valid. The closing date will be 30 days after iPic secures all of its permits, according to the CRA attorney. For the proposed eightscreen, luxury movie theater at the corner of Atlantic Avenue and Federal Highway, iPic wants to charge the Delray Beach CRA for its share of operating and maintaining 90 public parking spaces in the project’s garage. That annual cost was not adjusted for inflation, which the iPic owners want. Then, the theater owners want to be repaid for providing 40 extra spaces, required by the city for a total of 90, with $400,000 in tax dollars spread over 10 years after the project is finished. The 90 public spaces could be sold to the CRA as space for condos, iPic’s attorney said. That price was not revealed at the Feb. 23 CRA meeting, nor was information provided on how that concept would work. The four board members agreed to let their staff and the iPic attorneys continue negotiating and bring it back at their March 9 meeting. The board members received only partial details at 2 p.m. on their meeting day. At the start of the Feb. 23 meeting, iPic’s attorney, Bonnie Miskel, said, “My client bid on a proposal that required 50 public parking spaces.” The iPic CEO also attended. “We were supposed to build 50 spaces, now we are building 40 extra parking spaces,” said Hamid Hashemi. The Delray Beach City Commission had to approve the project, which it did in March 2016. “Specifically, the developer, at the time of receiving approval, understood and agreed to construct an additional (40) spaces to correct what was, in my view, a flawed request for proposal in this regard,” Mayor Cary Glickstein wrote in an email on Feb. 24. He voted for the project. Commissioner Shelly Petrolia, who voted against the approval, attended the Feb. 23 CRA meeting. “I was shocked at what I witnessed at the CRA meeting,” she said. “I had no idea that additional incentives were in the mix when they got such a sweetheart deal on the property and the alleys for free.” CRA Chairman Reggie Cox said, “The extra spaces were

agreed to. … At this point in the project you want to recoup some of that cost, I understand that.” But that incentive of taxpayer dollars is not sitting well with some Delray Beach residents. “It is commonly accepted in Delray Beach that development east of Swinton Avenue does not need to be subsidized by taxpayers,” said real estate broker Chris Davey. “The CRA should take revenue from that area and use it in the northwest and southwest communities.” Davey voted against iPic in July 2015 when he was on the city’s Planning & Zoning Board. At that meeting, he said, “They are trying to put 10 pounds of something into a 5-pound bag.” With a projected completion date of 2020, the iPic complex will contain a 44,479-squarefoot movie theater, 43,880 square feet of Class A office

space, 7,487 square feet of retail and a multilevel parking garage with 326 spaces. The bottom two floors will have 90 public spaces that are metered. The city will collect that revenue. The CRA staff and iPic have been negotiating the parking cost sharing agreement since December. Initially, iPic had asked for $460,000 annually, which was reduced to $115,348 after taxes and debt service were eliminated. The CRA’s consultant, PMG Associates of Deerfield Beach, recommended paying $74,996 annually with just $50 set aside for reserves. The consultant based the amount on a new garage that Fort Lauderdale is building at its beach. It’s a municipal garage but with added touches, said Phil Gonot of PMG. Ú

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30 Obituaries/News

The COASTAL STAR

Obituaries

Gayl Laymon Brown

DELRAY BEACH — Gayl Laymon Brown passed away peacefully on Feb. 5. Gayl was a fixture in the Delray Beach community for over 60 years, having moved there with her family at the age of 12. She was born Jan. 21, 1937, in St. Joseph, Ill., to Dr. Gayle and Margaret Laymon, and spent her early childhood in Champaign, Ill.  After attending Seacrest High School, Stephens College and the University of Florida, Gayl met Air Force Lt. Harvey L. Brown on a blind date, and they were married six months later on June 11, 1955, at the First Presbyterian Church in Delray Beach. Harvey and Gayl made a life and raised their family in Delray Beach, where Gayl devoted her time and leadership to many organizations, including Unity Church of Delray Beach, The Delray Beach Historical Society, and as a

Hugh McCormick Jr.

sustaining member of the Junior League of Boca Raton. Gayl was an avid and talented bridge player, and cherished the many friendships she developed through her love of the game. She was predeceased by her loving husband and parents, her siblings Richard Laymon, Sally Hofling, Daniel Laymon and Linda Perkins, and her son-in-law Robert Long. Gayl is survived by her three children, Susan Long, Anne Pugliese (James) and Harvey Brown Jr. (Marilyn), and the true lights of her life, her grandchildren, Caroline, Catherine and Andrew Pugliese, and Robby and Isabel Long. She will also be greatly missed by her beloved dog, Luke. A celebration of Gayl’s life was held Feb. 12 at Unity Church of Delray Beach. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Unity Church of Delray Beach or the Delray Beach Historical Society. — Obituary submitted by the family

Krishna Gibson Espanet

COUNTY POCKET — Krishna Gibson Espanet, a shining light of a million stars, passed away on Feb. 23 after a short but intense battle with cancer. Krishna was born in Boynton Beach Nov. 25, 1971, to Wendy Baldridge Christie and the late Danny Gibson. Krishna’s radiant personality and infectious smile gained her a plethora of lifelong friends. She spent time growing up in Florida, Vermont, Maine and New Hampshire. In 2002, Krishna returned to Boynton Beach and shortly thereafter met her perfect match, Eric Espanet. In October 2007, they were married in a beautiful

March 2017

beachside ceremony and their little home nearby was always filled with love, friends and family — the very things that meant everything to her. To know her and be around her was an absolute privilege. She was selfless and cared for those she loved above all else. Krishna’s life was celebrated Feb. 26, with visitation at Scobee-Combs-Bowden Funeral Home in Boynton Beach. Krishna was vivacious; she filled her life with color and in keeping with her spirit, attendees were asked to put aside that black outfit and wear something bright and happy, something that would make her smile — as she did for us all of these years. — Obituary submitted by the family

By Ron Hayes OCEAN RIDGE — Some of us yearn for a little more spice in our lives. Hugh McCormick Jr. was born to a world filled with it, and spent his working days spreading the flavors and fragrances far and wide. In 1885, Mr. McCormick’s great-uncle, Willoughby McCormick, began selling flavoring extracts and fruit syrups door to door from a cellar in Baltimore. Seven years later, he added spices, and today McCormick & Co. is an international company with 8,000 employees. Hugh McCormick Jr., “The Spice Man” to family and friends, died peacefully on Valentine’s Day. He was 96 and had lived in Palm Beach County since retiring in 1983, first in Highland Beach and, since 2005, in Ocean Ridge. “He used to come home from work smelling like spices,” recalled his son, Hugh McCormick III. “They had a big concrete building on the inner harbor in Baltimore. Everyone called it ‘the plant,’ so as a kid I thought they actually grew all the spices down there from a plant.” Hugh Perry McCormick Jr. was born Aug. 5, 1920, in Baltimore. He graduated from City College High School as a center on the state champion

football team and captain of the swim team and then earned a degree in economics from Johns Hopkins University. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Mr. McCormick enlisted in the U.S. Navy, serving as second officer on the U.S. sub chaser SC-525 in the Mediterranean and a skipper of the SC-1369 in the Pacific. Following the war, he served another 20 years in the Naval Reserve, retiring in 1967 with the rank of commander. In 1938, Mr. McCormick met Alice Joy James, of Newton, Miss., at a Baptist summer camp in Ridgecrest, N.C. The couple began a seven-year courtship that ended in 1944, when they were wed while the groom was between Navy assignments. They were married for 60 years, until her death in 2004. “Now that Dad’s passed on, I’ve started going through their correspondence and found about 700 letters from their courting days,” his son said. “He’d saved them all.” Mr. McCormick began work at the family business as a salesman, driving 50 miles each day to sell spices and extracts out of his car. In time, he was promoted to tea taster. “He’d have a whole tray of samples and swish them around and spit it out like wine,” his son said. “His AOL address was ‘teabag.’” Mr. McCormick spent his middle career as credit manager for the company, then became head of the government supply

division, providing spices for U.S. military bases throughout the world. In that capacity, he traveled to Asia like a modern-day Marco Polo, buying spices and coordinating sales in Taiwan, Hong Kong and Japan. In Highland Beach, the McCormicks lived in an oceanfront home designed by his son, an architect. Mr. McCormick enjoyed golf and tennis and was a member of The Ocean Club of Florida, The Country Club of Florida, and the Manalapan Yacht Club. He attended the First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach. “He was a very loving father, and a modest and gracious man,” his son said. “He didn’t have a lot of bombast or any arrogance to him. He was charitable and unassuming, but he had a twinkle in his eye.” In addition to his son, Mr. McCormick is survived by two daughters, Mary Meyer and Alice Meiners, both of Ocean Ridge, seven grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. A celebration of his life will be held at 11 a.m. March 31 at University Baptist Church in Baltimore. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the ALS Clinic or Division of Endocrinology at Johns Hopkins Hospital; Building Families for Children of Columbia, Md.; or the Brother’s Brother Foundation of Pittsburgh. Lorne & Sons is in charge of arrangements.

Boynton Beach

City acts to limit its cemetery to residents By Jane Smith

Boynton Beach wants to stop out-of-towners from being buried at its city cemetery because it is running out of space. In early February, the City Commission approved new rules that would allow only fulltime residents, their immediate families and direct descendants to purchase grave sites at Boynton Beach Memorial Park. Former commissioners and mayors also were given burial-access rights, along with military veterans. In addition, exceptions were made for former residents who moved away after living in

Boynton Beach for at least 10 years. Vice Mayor Mack McCray brought up the issue in December when he heard about a nonresident using a Boynton Beach church address to be able to save money at a city cemetery. Previously, the city charged residents $525 and nonresidents $1,125 to be buried at Memorial Park. Following the February change, the city will collect only the resident fee. “Ours is more economical than Broward County and if we don’t do something they’ll be coming from Broward to be buried in our cemetery and we just can’t do it,” McCray said. The cemetery sits on 12.3

acres at the southwest corner of Seacrest Boulevard and Woolbright Road. The land remained in private hands until the 1950s, when the city acquired the cemetery from the developer of High Point. The cemetery first ran out of space in 2004, but it was replatted three times since then. More than a year ago, the City Commission directed staff to replat the cemetery by eliminating internal roads and buildings. That created 410 plots for a total of 820 gravesites. Other nearby cities, including Delray Beach and Boca Raton, restrict burial in their cemeteries to residents. Ú

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March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

31


32 News

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

A passive park has replaced the old dive shop at the Boynton Beach Marina. Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

Boynton Beach

Marina ribbon cutting set for March 31

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By Jane Smith The last piece of the Boynton Harbor Marina will soon be finished, and a ribbon cutting is set for March 31. The latest completed portion of the boardwalk project includes seat walls, Adirondack chairs, landscaping, roadway realignment and lighting. It is part of an overall $20 million marina redo by the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency. “We’re at the punch list stage now,” Michael Simon, interim executive director, told CRA board members. The project came in under budget at $892,357, Simon said at the Feb. 14 CRA meeting. The agency had set aside $820,612 plus a 15 percent contingency fee for a total of $943,704, he said. “Hats off for a job well done,” said CRA Vice Chairman Mack McCray. But the project did not finish on time because of unforeseen problems the contractor found and CRA staff-initiated changes during the construction,

according to Simon. Six signs, costing $358, were installed in late December to say: “Boynton Harbor Marina. Businesses open while improvements are being made.” The boardwalk sits next to deep-sea fishing and scuba diving charters, and personal watercraft and boat rentals. At the eastern end are two waterfront restaurants: Banana Boat and Two Georges. “I’m glad they are finished. It looks absolutely beautiful and is absolutely useless,” said Lynn Simmons, who rented space in the old dive shop that was demolished to make way for the walkway. She has since moved her scuba diving operation, Splashdown Divers, and opened a sandwich shop, Marina Bites, next to each other in Marina Village at the Boynton Harbor Marina. CRA board member Joe Casello voted against the walkway project last summer because he wanted to see the dive shop building reused. But in mid-February, he said, “It really came out nice.” Ú


March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

News 33

Boynton Beach

500 Ocean project given more time in exchange for better care of site By Jane Smith

The 500 Ocean apartment developers received a five-month extension to Dec. 31 to complete the luxury rental complex that sits at the Ocean Avenue and Federal Highway intersection in Boynton Beach. LeCesse Development Corp., one of the project’s partners, sought approval from the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency because the developers will receive taxpayer subsidies after the apartment complex is finished. The CRA will give the developers a total of $4.4 million spread over 10 years. In a Feb. 8 letter to the CRA, a LeCesse representative said the development team needed the extra time because of three problems: a shortage of skilled construction labor, unforeseen off-site underground conditions for utility placement, and complex coordination among the staff of the general contractor, architects and the city. 500 Ocean was supposed to be finished by now. The CRA is hoping the six-story building will jump-start the downtown. Earlier in the Feb. 14 meeting, resident Susan Oyer, whose family owns commercial buildings across Ocean Avenue from the apartment construction project, brought in some pieces of construction debris. She said she found them while cleaning the property two days before. The items she found were a 2-foot length of rebar and a 1-foot piece of wood, about

3 inches wide, with two nails sticking out from it. “The 500 Ocean doesn’t secure its site,” Oyer said. “You can go in there and take any kind of construction materials you want. Guards are nowhere to be found.” Oyer, a middle-school teacher, theorized that “someone was obviously looking to create mischief” with the wood and nails “because you don’t put that out there on the pavers without the intention of damaging someone’s tires.” Vice Mayor Mack McCray said he was in favor of giving the extension, “but I want something in return: Better care of the construction site.” John Flynn, acquisitions director for LeCesse, promised he would do better. “We do have a third-party general contractor,” he said. “As soon as I walk out of the building, I will be on the phone to him.” Mayor Steven Grant asked for a celebration when it’s complete. Flynn agreed. When finished, 500 Ocean will have 341 luxury rental apartments in one- to threebedroom units. It also will have 20,000 square feet of retail on the ground floor. It will offer tenant amenities that include a clubhouse, fitness center, theater room, bowling center, cyber café/game room, summer kitchen and a pool. A separate garage will have 664 parking spaces. None of the parking has been allocated for public use. Ú

Work continues on the site of the planned 500 Ocean complex, including the corner of Southeast Fourth Street and East Ocean Avenue. Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star


34 News

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Along the Coast

Summer program to let locals enjoy St. Andrews Club

By Brian Biggane

The combination of changing demographics and having a neighboring club going through extensive renovations has helped prompt St. Andrews Club of Delray Beach to launch a summer membership program for 2017. St. Andrews introduced a limited summer program last year highlighted by what General Manager Robert Grassi called an informal “Grillin’ and Chillin’” cookout every Wednesday night. It went over so well that Grassi and the board of directors have decided to keep the club open through the summer and offer memberships spanning May 1 to Oct. 31. “The membership said, ‘We really like this. Can you do more of this?’” board member Mark Mayer said. “And Robert’s thought was, well, we’ve got a beach, pool, a golf course we take care of, tennis courts, fitness center, croquet. We should stay open not only because we have more members here year-round, but there are just more people in the area in the summer than there used to be.” Further incentive was the fact the nearby Gulf Stream Bath & Tennis Club is undergoing extensive, multimillion-dollar renovations this summer and its yearround members have reciprocal

A light rain did not spoil a family event at the club. ABOVE: Holly Wamser and daughter Libby talk with Taylor Morris. LEFT: Gary Tapella and Robin Beamish share a laugh. Photos by Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

privileges at St. Andrews. A bad break with the weather resulted in what Mayer now considers only a

small setback for the plans. The club invited 15 families for an introductory looksee on Jan. 29, which turned

out to be a raw, rainy day on which temperatures never rose above the 50s. With the Super Bowl set for the following Sunday, there was no chance to reschedule. “So we went ahead and did it, and what we heard was, ‘We never knew this was here.’ So we at least got to show off the property,” Mayer said. Another family day, by invitation only, is set for March 5. Few other clubs in the area can even approach what St. Andrews has to offer. Located on both sides of A1A just north of The Little Club and adjacent to the county-owned Gulf Stream Park, St. Andrews has an 18-hole, par-54 Pete Dye golf course that has been recognized as a Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary, a world-class croquet court, a family-friendly beach area, state-of-the-art fitness center, guarded pool and several dining rooms. The Little Club, open yearround, has also extended an

Delray Beach

invitation to Bath & Tennis Club members to use its facilities this summer only. Long-standing member Donna Ayers, who owns one of the 136 apartments on the grounds of the St. Andrews Club, said she’s seen a remarkable transformation in membership from older adults to younger families in recent years. “It’s become much younger,” Ayers said. “It’s amazing what has happened to this club in the last five years.” Mayer said that, while the pool remains popular, families with children more and more head for the beach. “Every year they ask, ‘Can we get more lounge chairs?’” he said. Ayers credits head lifeguard Connie Case for much of the surge in younger families. Case plays guitar when the club stages bonfires on the beach and organizes events for the kids. “She’s amazing,” Ayers said. “She’s brought in activities. She’s got the kids playing tennis, golf, out on paddleboards, teaching them about turtles. It’s a great program.” The prominence of the croquet program was underscored when world champion Stephen Mulliner of England paid a recent visit. David Bent, who is onsite pro for both the tennis and croquet programs, is ranked nationally and internationally in croquet. As for the par-3 golf course, legendary course architect Dye, who redid the greens and tees two years ago, came by to play a round in early February. Both electric and pull carts are available. Tee times are not required. New club members must have one existing member sponsor.  Ú For more information about the summer membership program, contact GM Robert Grassi at 266-5714 or email robert@standrewsclub.org.

561-272-1400

Cramer

Breen

CGC1514778 brian@bcramer.com

561-541-9844

- BUILDING CORP. General Contractors Concrete • Additions • Remodeling

C

-B


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36 Business Spotlight

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Business Spotlight

Cleaned out by tornado, soap entrepreneur bubbles back

By Rich Pollack

Before she brought her burgeoning handcrafted soaps, bath bombs and scrubs business to South Florida, Tracy Gunn’s story had all the makings of an Emmy-winning, well, soap opera. Just seven years ago Gunn was a single mother on the verge of homelessness, unable to find work after losing a longtime job in a recession-driven layoff. Five years later, she was a successful soap-business owner whose entire supply of product was washed away in the rain when a tornado tore the roof off her building. Not long after that, she was sidelined by shingles. Through it all, Gunn dusted herself off and rebounded to the point where she now has a thriving business with projected annual sales of more than $12 million. It is tucked away in a small Delray Beach shop on North Federal Highway — The Naked Mermaid Soapery — that is easy to miss, even if you’ve been there a few times. “I never gave up,” Gunn says. “I wanted it to succeed so much and wanted it so badly that I refused to quit.” With sales growing at a rapid rate and her wholesale UR Bath and Body business churning out about 10,000 bars of soap, 10,000 scrubs and 8,000 bath bombs a month, Gunn is reconfiguring her

Tracy Gunn’s soap business in Delray Beach has projected annual sales of more than $12 million. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star 2,500-square-foot store as more of a production facility. The Naked Mermaid Soapery, however, will continue to exist as a small retail area out front. “The public can come in

and buy our handcrafted soaps and other products and see us actually making it,” Gunn said. Gunn’s soaps and bath bombs — which add natural oils and bubbles to bathwater —

come in a variety of scents and colors unique to her company. They are made with all-natural ingredients and are produced by a team of about six staff members and Gunn, who, when not making soap, is on the road or on the phone reaching out to boutiques and other potential customers. A Jacksonville native whose father was a horse trainer, Gunn ended up in Oklahoma as a single mom with two boys. She worked for nine years selling pharmaceuticals used to treat large animals such as horses and cows, mostly from a home office so she could be with her sons. Her sales were good enough to support the family — and then some — until the recession hit. In 2010 her company laid off 400 employees, including Gunn. “I kept saying, ‘I’ll find another job,’ but I was over 40 and no one was hiring,” she said. Two months behind in the rent, with only $100 in the bank, she spent $32 to buy soapmaking supplies and started the business. “I was so naïve and so unaware,” she said. “I had no idea what running a business entailed but I wanted to be with my children.” The work at first took over the house, with the kitchen becoming a soap factory and the living room becoming the shipping area. Gunn made soap during the day and spent her nights sending dozen of texts and other messages to boutiques around the country to offer her products. Eventually the business outgrew the house and Gunn was able to move it into an older

building in nearby Oklahoma City. Then in May 2015, a tornado struck the area. “I lost everything,” she said. The stress of having to refund money to customers and trying to rebuild got to her and she came down with shingles. After weeks of lying on her couch and watching “Blue Bloods” reruns, she decided to try to start the business again — this time in New York City. Although that didn’t work out, she connected with a homeless shelter for women in the Bronx. While she was there she heard one of the leaders constantly praising women, saying things such as “You are beautiful” and “You are brave.” That inspired the UR brand and led her to hire 17 women from the shelter for a short time to help her sell soaps at a holiday market in the city. It was her sons’ athletic abilities that led her to pick up and move to South Florida about a year ago. One son, Laken Hinton, 17, is an aspiring professional golfer whose coach is in Delray Beach. The other son, Logan Hinton, 19, is a hockey player who trains in Coral Springs. If there is a lesson in Tracy Gunn’s story, it is one of persistence. “I have failed over and over again,” she says. “You can’t imagine how many times I had run out of money.” Those days, it seems, have now been washed away thanks to sweet-scented soap. Ú Naked Mermaid Soapery, 271 NE Sixth Ave., Delray Beach; 4035950, www.urbathco.com. Hours: Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.


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38 Business Spotlight

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Business Spotlight

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Chambers present awards, install officers

he Greater Boynton Beach Chamber of Commerce hosted its Key to Success Business Awards Gala in January. The Business of the Year Award went to Senior Helpers, owned by Michael and Leann Mohl. The Nonprofit of the Year Award was given to the YMCA of South Palm Beach County. The Young Professional of Boynton Choice Award went to Elissa Erman, owner of Universal Coaching Services. The Health Care Initiative of the Year Award was given to Bethesda Health. The Women’s Business of the Year Award went to Debra Slobodow, owner of Primerica. The New Member of the Year Award was given to Rick Maharajh, owner of RM Logitech. The Harvey Oyer Jr. Community Service Award went to Robert Taylor Jr.

Karen Granger, president and CEO of the Greater Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce, welcomed 130 members and supporters to the chamber’s annual membership luncheon and installation of officers in January. Cathy Balestriere, general manager of Crane’s Beach House Boutique Hotel & Luxury Villas, was sworn in as the chamber’s chair of the board.

Others installed include Bill Branning of BSA Construction as advocacy vice-chair; Jesse Flowers of CenterState Bank as finance vice-chair; Kelli Freeman of Hamilton House Oceanfront Condos as government affairs vice-chair; Sarah Martin of Experience Epic, LLC as programming vice-chair, Christina Morrison of Carmel Real Estate & Management as economic development vice-chair, Noreen Payne of Northwestern Mutual/ The Ruhl Financial Group as membership vice-chair; Rob Posillico of The Scirocco Group as the 2018 chair elect; and Suzanne Spencer of The Crossroads Club as education vice-chair. The Delray Beach chamber’s 2017 board of directors are Mark Bryan of Delray Medical Center; Daniel Castrillon of The Scirocco Group; James Chard of Human Powered Delray; Lee Cohen of Carner, Newmark & Cohen, LLP; Sarah Crane of The HOW Foundation; Neal de Jesus, interim city manager of Delray Beach; Mark Denkler of Vince Canning Shoes; Evelyn Dobson of Delray Beach Community Land Trust; Sophia Eccleston of Florida Power & Light Co.; Charlene Farrington of Spady Cultural

Delray Beach author and developer Frank McKinney addresses an open-house crowd from atop his latest effort, a micromansion being offered at $3.95 million. The 4,042-squarefoot home is near the beach in Ocean Ridge and is being represented by Pascal Liguori of Premier Estate Properties. Jerry Lower/ The Coastal Star

Heritage Museum; Casey Flaherty of Delray Honda; Roger L. Kirk of Bethesda Hospital East; Connor Lynch of Plastridge Insurance Agency; Jeffrey Lynne of Beighley, Myrick & Udell, PA; Jeff Perlman of CDS International Holdings Inc.; Scott Porten of Porten Cos.; David Schmidt of Simon & Schmidt; Barbara Stark of The Milagro Center; and Rob Steele of Old School Square. Stephanie Immelman of the Delray Beach Marketing Cooperative was named exofficio board member. At the luncheon, Sarah Martin and Rob Posillico won Director of the Year Awards; Sally Areson was named Chamber Ambassador of the Year; and Simon & Schmidt received a special award as a 50year member. Year-end market statistics for Palm Beach County have been released from the Realtors Association of the Palm Beaches. For townhouses and condos, year over year, closed sales were 13,106, down 6 percent. Median sales were priced at $157,000, up 11.7 percent. The average sales price was $239,426, up 2.8 percent. Inventory was listed at 6,205, up 6.1 percent.

For single-family homes, closed sales were at 17,501, down 3.4 percent. Median sales were $306,953, up 7.7 percent. Average sales were at $471,710, up 6.1 percent, and inventory was listed at 7,127, up 6.6 percent. A new contemporary-style spec oceanfront home at 920 S. Ocean Blvd. in Manalapan sold

for $28 million, according to the deed recorded by the Palm Beach County Clerk’s office. The three-story, eight-bedroom house with 17,719 total square feet was sold by its developer, Farrell Building Co. The buyer listed on the deed, JSEJ LLC, is a limited liability company with an address in Philadelphia. Broker Christian Angle of Christian Angle Real


March 2017

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Business Spotlight 39

Graduate Business Programs (non-MBA) from U.S. News & World Report. Online programs at the university include master of accounting, executive master of taxation, and executive master’s in health administration.

ABOVE: A record sale in Gulf Stream of $18.5 million for an estate at 3333 N. Ocean Blvd. LEFT: Not a record by Manalapan standards, but the property at 920 S. Ocean Blvd. was just sold for $28 million. Photos provided

Estate handled both sides of the sale. A deed recorded Feb. 7 shows that Doris and Neil Gillman sold their 1.3-acre oceanfront four-bedroom estate at 3333 N. Ocean Blvd., Gulf Stream, for $18.5 million. A pocket listing, it was advertised at $19.95 million. The buyer is Sea Turtle Haven LLC, a Delaware company. It was listed and sold by Corcoran Group agents Nicholas Malinosky and Randy Ely, who say it’s a record breaker for Gulf Stream. Previously, 1511 N. Ocean Blvd. sold for $17,667,500 in March 2007. According to a deed recorded on Feb. 14, Doris Gillman bought a newly constructed home at 300 E. Key Palm Road in Boca Raton’s Royal Palm Yacht and Country Club for $12.42 million. The 1,774 totalsquare-foot, five-bedroom home was recently completed by SRD Building Corp. A residence at 1255 N. Ocean Blvd. in Gulf Stream, listed by Malinosky and Ely for $16.45 million, sold for $15 million on Feb. 7. It was built by Mouw Associates Inc., designed by Gary Eliopoulos and decorated by Phoebe Howard. The sellers bought the house in June 2008 for $5.5 million. Lang Realty hosts its sixth annual Open House Extravaganza from noon to 4 p.m. March 19. It offers an opportunity to tour a selection of single-family homes, condos and waterfront estates from Boca Raton to Port St. Lucie. Visit www.LangRealty.com for a list of participating properties. Lang Realty announced sales of more than $1 billion for 2016. Also, this year the company has launched a rebranding campaign. Lang Realty has more than 400 agents with offices in Boca Raton, Delray Beach, Boynton Beach, Manalapan, West Palm Beach, Palm Beach Gardens, Jupiter

and Port St. Lucie. Royal Palm Properties will host its “Showcase of Homes” on March 26. The open house will feature 25 homes in the Royal Palm Yacht and Country Club. Broker/owner David Roberts has been hosting this annual event for more than 30 years. In January, Equity One, a North Miami Beach and New York-based REIT, sold the 164,980-square-foot Lantana Village Square shopping center at 1201 and 1301 S. Dixie Highway and 457 Greynolds Circle to Lantana SDC LLC, an affiliate of Miami-based Saglo Development Corp., for $10.2 million. Casey Rosen of CBRE brokered the sale and debt was provided by BB&T. On Jan. 25, at a Delray Beach Site Plan Review and Appearance Board meeting, Kolter Group unveiled plans for a four-story, 150-room hotel

and 116-space parking garage to be located on a 1.169-acre parcel at 135, 145, 169, and 185 SE Sixth Ave., Delray Beach. The project has been underway since August 2016, as stated in the town’s video of the meeting. While compliant with the city’s code and design guidelines, the project is adjacent to the Marina Historic District, and neighbors complained that they had not been kept informed. They expressed concern about the impact of traffic as well as the building’s architecture. In light of this, the board postponed making a decision. Research faculty members at Florida Atlantic University rank 24th in the world for their intellectual contributions to the real estate industry through their publications in top peerreviewed journals, according to the Journal of Real Estate Literature. FAU ranked No. 32 in the latest ranking of Best Online

The Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs has awarded Palm Beach State College accreditation of its bachelor’s level supervision and management programs. Offered on the Lake Worth campus, as well as online, the programs include general management, entrepreneurship, health management and project management. Delray Beach resident Allison Turner, CEO and owner of BCoSF Inc., was appointed vice president of Network Professionals Inc.’s Palm Beach Gardens Get Connected Chapter. Network Professionals Inc. consists of business people, one in each professional category, who network through exchanging business referrals. Katz & Associates promoted Jon Cashion to senior director of leasing and investment sales, Paige Eber to vice president, and Donny Moskovic to director. The company’s Boca Raton office is at 2300 Glades Road. NAI/Merin Hunter Codman, Inc. named Lesley Sheinberg its 2016 Broker of the Year after she completed 250,000 square feet in commercial transactions for that year. Sheinberg specializes in office leasing and investment sales for institutional and private equity clients that include JP Morgan, Equus CapitalPartners and Lionstone Investments. NAI/Merin Hunter Codman’s Boca Raton office is at 951 Yamato Road.

Anne Lacombe, vice president of public relations for The Corcoran Group, has taken over Corcoran’s Delray Beach market public relations efforts. Steven G. Rappaport, Esq. was appointed to the board of directors of the Fair Housing/ Equal Employment Board of Palm Beach County, for the term from January 2017 through Sept. 30, 2019. Scott Field of Realty Associates was installed as president of The Realtors Commercial Alliance of the Palm Beaches and Treasure Coast. Other officers installed for one-year terms include: Ken Duke of Illustrated Properties Commercial as president-elect (for 2018), Robert Goldstein of Hospitality Consultants as secretary, Christina Morrison of Carmel Real Estate and Management as treasurer, and Douglas Rooks of Century 21 All Professional as Treasure Coast chairman. In addition, Arnold Broussard of Realty Group of the Palm Beaches, Michael Golieb of American Property Exchange, Erik Johnson of Genesis Commercial Group, Gretchen Krise and Blair Lee of Lighthouse Realty Services, and John Schmidt of Cornerstone Realty will serve as 2017 directors. Palm Beach Travel’s new service led by Kandace Philosophos, Palm Beach Art & Travel, will showcase post-war and contemporary artists in functions such as popup shops within galleries. Call 515-5411 or visit www. palmbeachtravelandart.com. Send business news to Christine Davis at cdavis9797@ gmail.com.


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The COASTAL STAR

March 2017


March 2017

Inside

Delray Beach Home Tour

Health & Harmony Family medical center endures. Page H6

Secret Gardens

Boynton Children’s Museum butterfly garden. Page H10

A nook in the upstairs guest suite at Steve and Lori Leveen’s house combines tongue-and-groove ceiling, open beams and a nautical feel to complement its Intracoastal location.

Built three years ago, Lori Peck’s home has a cottage feel, including cozy window bays. One of her two dogs, Rocco Taco, sits in the bay. Photos by Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

Seaside style

Paws Up for Pets

You may go hog wild over this pet. Page H14

Outdoors

Kids get a lesson in fishing, ecology. Page H20

Peek inside 10 of Delray Beach’s most beautiful coastal homes during the annual home tour.

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en gorgeous homes from the city’s northern beach area will be open for viewing during the 2017 Delray Beach Home Tour on March 9. Guests will have a rare glimpse into a variety of design and architectural styles, from old Florida cottages to stunning oceanfront estates. A luncheon on a tranquil waterfront property is part of the deal. The tour started 16 years ago when board members of the Delray Beach-based Achievement Centers for Children & Families needed an idea for fundraising. Since then, the tours have raised more than $1.1 million for the organization. “The home tour has not only become a signature Achievement Centers event but one the community looks forward to,” says event co-chairwoman Kari Shipley, a Claire Hansen’s brick home board member and longtime supporter of the centers. has a green-eyed grasshop— Mary Thurwachter per weather vane in the front See Pages H12-13 fenced-in courtyard.


H2 

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

PENDING

S T. A N D R E W S $2,650,000

ROBIN TURNER

561-267-5888

VILLAGE OF GOLF $990,000

MARY WINDLE

561-271-5900

HYP O LU XO I S L A N D ANA GUERRA

LAURA URNESS ROBYN LAWSON

ANN CORBIN

$729,000

LAURA URNESS ROBYN LAWSON

561-239-1911 561-866-1969

LA PENSEE 561-239-1911 561-866-1969

FLAGLER LANDING $424,900 JANINE TOMPKINS

561-543-5046

561-909-5139

$499,000

ROBYN LAWSON LAURA URNESS

561-866-1969 561-239-1911

$379,900 JANINE TOMPKINS

561-909-5139

MARINA VILLAGE

$279,000

$272,000

ALLISON MELVIN

561-441-1927

R O YA L S A X O N

$259,000

$239,500

561-239-1911

JACOBA BILL

561-271-5900

AT L A N T I S $595,000 ELYSE UNDERBERG

ALLISON MELVIN

VILLAGIO DELMAR

M O O R I N G S AT L A N TA N A LAURA URNESS

MARY WINDLE

$1,997,000

561-306-5521

$494,900

561-523-7500

561-441-1927

PA L M S E A JACOBA BILL

$375,000

$1,385,000 JOHN DUNNING

561-665-1028

$510,000 ELYSE UNDERBERG

561-523-7500

LAKESHORE DIANE DUFFY

$494,000

561-767-0860

MARINA VILLAGE 561-306-5521

LAKE WORTH $269,900 JANINE TOMPKINS

ESTUARY

3360 BUILDING

B AY W O O D AT B O C A W E S T

ACREAGE 561-512-6674

VILLAGE OF GOLF

3600 S OCEAN

LA PENSEE $499,000

$2,100,000

561-909-5139

T H E PA L M B E A C H E R $175,000 / $169,000 / $159,000 CHERYL BARNES 781-749-2992

ALLISON MELVIN

$330,000

561-441-1927

M O O R I N G S AT L A N TA N A HOLLY HICKMAN

$259,000

561-346-5594

COUNTRY MANORS ANA GUERRA

$140,000

561-543-5046


March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

H3

DELRAY BEACH

LUXURY PROPERTIES

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LAKE IDA WATERFRONT | $2,750,000

BEACH AREA | DELRAY BEACH $3,400,000

Brand new construction in desirable family neighborhood. Key West styled home offers 5,800 total sq ft with 5 BR & 5.1 BA. Large, treed lot with private dock/boat lift. Close to Atlantic Ave! Just completed!

Gorgeous newer home in prestigious beach area with 6 BR and 6.1 BA. Over 6,100 total sq. ft. Resort styled pool and large covered Loggia with Fireplace. Designed by noted architect Randall Stofft. Steps from the beach.

Julie Ann Giachetti

Julie Ann Giachetti

561-212-0022

561-212-0022

HYPOLUXO ISLAND | $2,100,000

THE BRIDGES | $1,250,000

Enjoy the best of both worlds with this private Intracoastal waterfront estate on prestigious and historic Hypoluxo Island. Large Intracoastal lot (105 x 255). 3 BR, 3 ½ BA, 3 CG.

Sebastian estate home located on a quiet cul-de-sec. Very private setting. Huge custom designed Chef’s kitchen featuring Viking and Sub Zero appliances. Oneof-a-kind RESORT STYLE pool and outdoor living space. 4 BR/ 4 ½ BA, 3 CG Robin Winistorfer 561-289-8805 www.8927SydneyHarborCircle.com

Ana Guerra

561-543-5046

MAJESTIC DEEPWATER ESTATE - BOCA RATON | $2,695,000

TROPIC ISLE | $3,395,000

Blue Inlet East exposure home, built in 2012. Shows like a model. 88’ of water frontage, 65’ dock. 5BR/5.1BA/3CG, office/library. Boating paradise. Walk to the beach.

Spectacular 3 level mansion, 6BR/ 6.2 BA/ 3CG. Elevator. Observation room and deck on 4th level. 20,000 lb boat lift. Marble floors, fireplace, media room, club room + office. Heated pool with spa & sun shelf.

Olive Belcher 561-271-6922

Jeanette Alexander

F

561-573-1454

R G LE IN L SE NC A IN

WALKERS ISLE - BOCA RATON | $2,750,000

BALLANTRAE CONDO | $2,150,000

Unique double waterfront estate home! Exclusive, gated enclave of 9 homes on a peninsula w/ private boat dockage on 185ft on deep water. 4BD+Loft, 4.5BA, (5,500 sf.) New roof. Seller financing. www.854LilacDrive.com Vini Antonacci 561-714-8464 Brian Pearl 561-245-1541

Oceanfront beauty boasting 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths. Highly sought after first floor eastern exposure. 3400+ sq. ft. under air. Stunning ocean views. www.BuyandSellGulfstream.com

Michael M. Mullin

561-441-0635

www.LangRealty.com Delray Beach Office 900 E. Atlantic Avenue, Suite 16B, Delray Beach, FL | 561.455.3300 Connect on Google Plus

facebook.com/langrealty

twitter.com/langrealty

blog.langrealty.com

youtube.com/langrealtytv


H4 Religion

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Finding Faith

Noted author to highlight Jewish Women’s Foundation Granting Wishes event

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he Jewish Women’s Foundation of South Palm Beach County will host its 2017 Granting Wishes award announcements and reception at 5:30 p.m. March 15, at Boca Rio Golf Club, 22041 Boca Rio Road in Boca Raton. The guest speaker is author Ellen Brazer, the recipient of Hadassah’s Myrtle Wreath Award, an honor also Brazer bestowed on the late Maya Angelou. Brazer’s new book, The Wondering Jew, My Journey into Judaism, tells the personal stories that helped Brazer understand her faith, its complicated, mysterious nature and its dichotomies — reward and punishment, good and evil, love and hate. Brazer’s first book, Hearts of Fire, released in 2000, is a saga set in Germany and Poland that follows two families, one Jewish and one Gentile, from prewar Paris to post-war Russia. Her 2009 book, Clouds Across the Sun, was named one of Amazon.com’s best Holocaustrelated novels. And So It Was Written, published in 2012, is praised as a well-researched foray into historical fiction set around 132 CE. In the past three years, Brazer has spoken to more than 6,000 people at venues across the country. She was recently invited to join the Jewish National Fund Speakers Bureau, and she especially enjoys speaking about angels and reincarnation. The JWF’s 2017 grants fund programs that create social change, especially initiatives that help women and children in the areas of education, health, abuse prevention and economic security. JWF trustees who contribute a minimum of $2,000 per year for five years determine the programs to fund. Over the last 13 years, the JWF has awarded more than $1.2 million to local organizations. Guests will also enjoy an array of hors d’oeuvres, desserts and wine. Tickets are $85. For information or tickets, visit jewishboca.org/grantingwishes, call 852-3188 or email lisbethc@ bocafed.org.

For your health

Trinity Lutheran Church & School is hosting a Community Health Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 11 at the school, 400 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach. The theme — “Just for The Health of It” — covers all aspects of healthy living. Exhibitors, live demonstrations in fitness, healthy eating, dancing and yoga, as well as children’s activities are planned. For more information or to

exhibit, call 276-8458.

Make a visual prayer

Unity Church of Delray hosts Treasure Mapping Day from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. March 11 in Mary Kupferle Fellowship Hall, 100 NW 22nd St., Delray Beach. Charlene Wilkinson will guide participants in making a treasure map — a collage of pictures and words — to help find their treasure. Sometimes called a vision board or a visual prayer, this collage is a powerful tool to help focus both your conscious and subconscious mind on a particular goal. Bring magazines, pictures and words that are meaningful to you and represent your primary goal for the coming year, and include a picture of yourself. Scissors, poster board and glue will be provided. A love offering will be taken. For more information, visit www.unityofdelraybeach.org/ events.php.

Pig roast fundraiser

Cason United Methodist Church will host its first Pig Roast from 1 to 8 p.m. March 12 at the church, 342 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach. The event is a fundraiser supporting Next Step’s upcoming mission trip to Sumpango, about an hour from Guatemala City, where volunteers are working with residents to expand a church building. They also serve at a local HIV orphanage and make home visits to pray and share their faith with Guatemalan families. The Pig Roast features pulled pork, cornbread, salad and dessert, plus vendors, games and music. Tickets are $15 for adults, $8 for children, or go all out with the $25 all-you-can-eat option. For more information, call 276-5302 or visit www. casonumc.org.

Join the discussion

Dr. Nasir Ahmad, the imam at the Masjid Al-Ansar in Miami, joins Canon Tom O’Brien, from the Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea, and Rabbi Howard Shapiro, rabbi emeritus of Temple Israel, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. March 14 for Interfaith Dialogues. This panel discussion brings these experts of different faiths together for a discussion of timely, important topics. This is Ahmad’s first year on the panel. He also serves as the assistant regional imam for the southeast United States. Hosted by the Palm Beach Fellowship of Christians and Jews, the topic this month is “The Meaning of Israel to Jews, Christians and Muslims.” The event takes place at Bethesdaby-the-Sea, 141 S. County Road, Palm Beach. Admission is free for fellowship members

and $10 for nonmembers. For information, call 833-6150 or visit www.palmbeachfellowship. net. A Joe-Paddy party The annual JoePaddy Festival celebrating the feasts of St. Joseph and St. Patrick will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. March 16, on the campus of St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary, 10701 S. Military Trail, Boynton Beach. Enjoy traditional Italian and Irish food and drink under the big-top tent with live entertainment by Echoes of Erin and Msgr. Stephen Bosso and St. Vincent’s seminarians. A silent auction and a separate live auction are planned. Tickets are $50 and are available online at www. svdp.edu/events. For more information, call 732-4424 or email smelancon@svdp.edu.

Ongoing

The Palm Beach Friends Meetinghouse, 823 North A St., Lake Worth, hosts “A Course in Miracles” study group each Wednesday at noon. The reading of a passage from the workbook opens a discussion. This free event is sponsored by Lisa Stewart and John Vincent Palozzi. For information, call 585-8060 or visit www.palmbeachquakers. org The Interfaith Cafe is a monthly gathering of people from diverse faiths to discuss topics of common interest. In February, Cantor Stephanie Shore led a discussion of how music moves our spirit and the importance of music in different forms of worship. The group meets from 7 to 9 p.m. the third Thursday of the month at the South County Civic Center, 16700 Jog Road, Delray Beach. Light refreshments are served. The meeting is free, but donations are appreciated. For information, email Jane@ Aurorasvoice.org.

Looking ahead

Mark your calendar for CROS Ministries’ Raise a Glass to End Hunger from 6 to 9 p.m. April 19, at Old School Square’s Fieldhouse, 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach. The evening will feature beer and wine tastings, food pairings, raffles and a live auction. Supporters include DaDa, Caffe Luna Rosa, Lemongrass, Scuola Vecchia Pizza, Route 128, Due-South Breweries. Info: crosministries.org. Janis Fontaine writes about people of faith, their congregations, causes and community events. Contact her at janisfontaine@ outlook.com.


March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Religion Calendar Note: Events are current as of 2/24. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 4

Saturday - 3/4 - Grief Share at St Vincent Rectory Conference Room, 840 George Bush Blvd, Delray Beach. Biblically-based grief support group. Every Sat through 4/15. 10 am-noon. Free. 921-5655; stvincentferrer.com

MARCH 5-11

Sunday - 3/5 - Bagels, Lox and Tefillin Club at Chabad of Delray Beach, 7495 W Atlantic Ave. Morning services including donning of tefillin, a torah thought from Rabbi Sholom Korf. Bagels/lox served. Chabad membership not required. 1st & 3rd Sun 9-9:30 am (follows 8 am service). Free. Reservations/donations appreciated: 496-6228; chabaddelray.com Monday - 3/6 - Networking Breakfast with Danny Ayalon at Chabad of East Boca, 120 NE 1st Ave. 8 am. $18. RSVP: 3949770; office@bocabeachchabad.com 3/6 - Monday Morning Women’s Bible Study at First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach, 33 Gleason St. Every M 1011:30 am. Free. 276-6338; firstdelray.com 3/6 - Women’s Bible Study at Seacrest Presbyterian Church, 2703 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Every M 10 am. Free. 2765633; seacrestchurch.com 3/6 - Rosary for Peace at St Vincent Ferrer Adoration Chapel, 840 George Bush Blvd, Delray Beach. Every M 7 pm. Free. 276-6892; stvincentferrer.com Tuesday - 3/7 - Lectio Divina (Divine Prayer) at St Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Traditional Benedictine practice of scriptural reading, meditation, prayer. Every T 9-10 am. Free. 276-4541; stpaulsdelray.org 3/7 - First United Methodist Church of Boca Raton Pub Theology at Biergarten, Royal Palm Place, 309 Via de Palmas #90. Conversation, fellowship, open discussion. 1st T 7 pm. 395-1244; fumcbocaraton.org 3/7 - Rector’s Bible Study at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Every T 10:30 am; Th 7-8:30 pm. Free. 276-4541; stpaulsdelray.org 3/7 - St Mark Bible Study at St Mark Catholic Church, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Every T 7-8 pm. Nominal fee/free will offering for study guide. Register: 7349330; stmarkboynton.com Wednesday - 3/8 - St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Bible Study at Panera, 1701 S Federal Hwy, Delray Beach. Read, discuss upcoming lesson & gospel readings. Every W 8-9 am. Free. 276-4541; stpaulsdelray. org 3/8 - Legion of Mary at St Mark Catholic Church, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Follows 8 am Mass every W. Free. 73493300; stmarkboynton.com 3/8 - Bible Study at First United Methodist Church, 101 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Every W 11 am. Free. 7323435; fumcbb.com 3/8 - Wonderful Wednesdays at First Presbyterian Church, 33 Gleason St, Delray Beach. All ages. Every W 5:45 pm dinner; 6:30 pm program. $7/adult; $5/child; $20/ max per family. Reservations: 276-6338; firstdelray.com 3/8 - Rector’s Bible Study at St Gregory’s Episcopal Church, 100 NE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. Every W 6 pm supper (soup & salad, donation requested); 7 pm Bible study (free). 395-8285; stgregorysepiscopal.org 3/8 - Women’s Evening of Enrichment at St Vincent Ferrer Catholic Church, 840 George Bush Blvd, Delray Beach. Praise, worship, prayer. Light refreshments. 6-9

pm. Free. RSVP: 665-8566; stvincentferrer. com 3/8 - Simple Truths: The Beauty of the Struggle at Chabad of East Boca Raton, 120 NE 1st Ave. Monthly course for women from the Rosh Chodesh Society. 7:30 pm. $15/class. 394-9770; bocabeachchabad. org/rcs Thursday - 3/9 - Prayer Circle at Trinity Lutheran Church Courtyard, 400 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Every Th 8:05 am. 2781737; trinitydelray.org 3/9 - Men’s Fellowship at First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach, 33 Gleason St. Every Th 8:30 am. Free. 2766338; firstdelray.com Friday - 3/10 - Women’s Bible Study Group at St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church, 266 NE 2nd St, Boca Raton. Every F 9:15 am. Free. 395-8285; stgregorysepiscopal.org 3/10 - Couples’ Bible Study Group at First United Methodist Church Boca Raton, 625 NE Mizner Blvd. Childcare available on request. Every F 7-9 pm. Free. 395-1244; fumcbocaraton.org Saturday - 3/11 - St Mark Council of Catholic Women at St Mark Catholic Church, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. 2nd Sat 10 am. Free. 734-9330; stmarkboynton. com

MARCH 12-18

Monday - 3/12 - Purim in Israel at The Pavilion, 201 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Food, entertainment, bounce house, crafts. Come in costume as an ancient Israelite (prizes for best costume). 5 pm. $25/adult; $15/ child under 12. RSVP: 394-9770; office@ bocabeachchabad.org Friday - 3/17 - Parents of St. Gregory’s at St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church, 100 NE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. Potluck dinner, topic discussion (targeted to young parents w/children age 2-13), childcare available. 3rd F 6-8 pm. Free. 395-8285; stgregorysepiscopal.org Saturday - 3/18 - Catholic Men for Jesus Rally at St Luke, 2892 S Congress Ave Palm Springs. Talks, music, prayer, personal testimony, afternoon Mass w/ Bishop Gerald M. Barbarito. 8 am-2 pm. $20/person includes breakfast & lunch. 772-321-3886; catholicmenforjesusflorida. com

MARCH 26-APRIL 1

Monday - 3/27 - Catholic Grandparents Meeting at Emmanuel Church, 15700 S Military Tr, Delray Beach. All welcome. 4th M 9 am. Free. 496-2480; diocesepb.org 3/27 - Dying to Live: Theological Perspectives on Migrants & Refugees at Lynn University DeHoernle Lecture Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Guest speaker Rev. Daniel G Groody, CSC. Part of Hesburgh Lecture Series. 5 pm Mass followed by dinner;7 pm lecture. $9/dinner; free/lecture. 237-7132; lynn.edu Tuesday - 3/28 - The Secret of Chabad: Inside the World’s Most Successful Jewish Movement with Rabbi David Eliezrie at Levis Jewish Community Center Sandler Center, Beifield Auditorium, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $15. 5582520 levisjcc.org Wednesday - 3/29 - Simple Truths: Overcoming Limitation at Chabad of East Boca Raton, 120 NE 1st Ave. A new monthly course for women from the Rosh Chodesh Society. 7:30 pm. $15/class. 3949770; bocabeachchabad.org/rcs Saturday - 4/1 – Catholic Grandparents Meeting at Ascension Church, 7250 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. All welcome. 1st Sat 10-11:30 am. Free. 289-2640; diocesepb.org

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Health Religion & Harmony Calendar H5


H6 Health & Harmony

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Health & Harmony

Generations in, family medical practice endures

F

rom an early age, Dervi Ganesh could hardly miss the positive effect her father’s medical practice had on his patients’ lives. “People tell me, ‘I knew your parents before you were born,’” she recalled. “He was in the Atlanta airport once and somebody rushed up to him and brought out pictures of a baby he had delivered.” In due time, Dervi Ganesh, now 32, went to medical school at the University of Miami and now practices in Boynton Beach with Selva Ganesh, her father, and Jan Ganesh, her mother, a psychologist. The couple lives in Gulf Stream. Their waiting room is filled with pregnant women, and the walls of the small office are covered with photos of newborns, some of whom are the fourth generation Selva Ganesh has delivered over his more than 40 years as an OB/ GYN. Now Dervi Ganesh-Baluyot, who lives in Lake Worth, is married and expecting her first child. She joined the Ganesh practice earlier this year. Her younger brother, Devin, is an orthopedic surgeon married to an emergency room doctor. “It’s a happy profession, both for me and my brother,” Dervi Ganesh-Baluyot said. “I don’t think of it as a job or a duty. It’s a privilege.” The daughter has also joined her father in teaching and mentoring students from the University of Miami medical school, who regularly visit the Ganesh offices to see patients. Jan Ganesh has a general practice, seeing patients of all ages and both genders for couples counseling, addiction and other issues. But she takes a particular interest in postpartum depression. “We screen [patients] throughout

Dervi Ganesh-Baluyot and her father, Selva Ganesh, are surrounded by snapshots of newborns he has delivered in his decades as an OB/GYN physician. The family’s practice is in Boynton Beach. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star the pregnancy as well as postpartum,” she said. The medical staff is alert for signs of depression, which can appear as early as the first trimester of pregnancy. Then there may be a need for a family conference with counselor and gynecologist. “We might bring in the mother and the grandmother and an aunt, to form a support system,” she said. Kathleen Weigel has been a patient of Selva Ganesh for about 20 years. Then she met Dervi and Devin Ganesh when they were students in the international baccalaureate program at Atlantic Community High School, where Weigel was

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principal. Weigel is now dean of education at Lynn University. “I made a lap quilt for Jan because she’s always cold in the office,” Weigel said. “Now I’m making a baby quilt for Dervi.” Selva and Jan Ganesh make a strong team. “They are both very observant and they collaborate on how to help the patient holistically,” Weigel said. “I have referred a number of people to them and they touch people’s lives.” Selva and Jan Ganesh met 41 years ago when both were starting their careers, working at a women’s center. While Jan Ganesh was working on her Ph.D., Selva Ganesh worked with Planned

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Parenthood and started a rape crisis clinic. He also did rape exams for the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office at JFK and Bethesda hospitals and testified at trials. They opened their practice in Boynton Beach in 1975 and, though they’ve moved a couple of times, have stayed within a mile of their original office. During the last 42 years, Selva Ganesh was the doctor for Katie Barber’s mother and grandmother, delivered Katie Barber, and is scheduled to deliver her child this year. “He’s known my entire family,” said Barber, a lawyer. “He delivered my nieces and my cousins. They all say, ‘Tell Dr. Ganesh we said hi.’” The Ganesh offices are in downtown Boynton Beach, a short drive to Bethesda Medical Center, which Selva Ganesh praises for its ability to handle high-risk pregnancies. The UM students have been able to observe a variety of conditions they might never see during their education, including postpartum cardiomyopathy, a rare form of heart failure that can prove fatal to new mothers.

‘Love for the field’

At 70, Selva Ganesh says, “I need to work for my head, for

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my health. I see patients all day and I go home happy.” He had been up all night with a delivery and was back at work the next morning after a four-hour nap. “He has such a love for the field,” said Dr. Gauri Agarwal, UM regional dean. “The pace is fast, and it can get wearing. But he has passion and excitement, a sense of humor, he’s very kind and knowledgeable and downto-earth.” With Selva Ganesh already on her teaching faculty, Agarwal was quick to urge Dervi Ganesh-Baluyot to join after she completed her studies. “Dervi was a student of mine from her first year,” Agarwal said. “She’s a tough teacher, with high standards. But she’s one of the students’ favorite teachers because she is so clear about expectations and so engaging. When she came back to practice with her dad, I said, you have to join the faculty. The students love both of them.” Lona O’Connor has a lifelong interest in health and healthy living. Send column ideas to Lona13@ bellsouth.net.

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March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Health Notes H7

Health Notes

Home caregivers now must carry licenses

Effective March 1, in-home caregivers must have licenses in their possession while working. For each violation, they will be subject to fines and/or imprisonment. It’s the latest part of the Palm Beach County Home Caregiver Ordinance to be enacted. The ordinance requires that applicants for a home caregiver license submit fingerprints and undergo a national fingerprintbased criminal-history records check. A home caregiver license can be obtained only from the county’s Consumer Affairs Division. The license ensures people that their home caregiver has undergone a national fingerprint check, and has not been disqualified from working as a home caregiver in Palm Beach County because of certain criminal findings.

Delray Medical Center received the 2017 Distinguished Hospital Award for Clinical Excellence from Healthgrades. This distinction places Delray Medical Center in the top 5 percent for clinical excellence among more than 4,500 hospitals nationwide. Delray Medical Center is one of four hospitals to have earned this designation for 15 straight years. To improve patient outcomes and quality of life, Delray Medical Center performs neuroscience, cardiovascular, trauma, physical therapy and nursing clinical trials. The studies evaluate therapies, drugs, diagnostic tools and practices to enhance patient care. Neuroscience and stroke trials are overseen by Dr. Nils Mueller-Kronast, regional medical director of neurosciences for Tenet Florida. One of his major goals is to assess the outcomes associated with the use of devices and medications intended to restore blood flow in patients experiencing acute ischemic strokes. Dr. Lloyd Zucker, chief of neurosurgery at Delray Medical Center, leads the neurooncology research trials, which include the use of fluorescenceguided surgery for brain tumors. The cardiovascular trials at Delray Medical Center are led by Dr. Brijeshwar Maini, medical director of

transcatheter therapies for Tenet Florida, and Dr. Brian Bethea, regional medical director of cardiovascular surgery for Tenet Florida. To learn more about the clinical research trials at Delray Medical Center, visit www. delraymedicalctr.com/about-us/ research-clinical-trials.

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U.S. News & World Report ranked the Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing at Florida Atlantic University No. 43 nationally and No. 1 in Florida for the “Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs.” For the “Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs for Veterans,” the college ranked No. 17 nationally and No. 1 in Florida. Shawn Franklin was named executive director of Bethesda Health’s Integrated Networks, a new organization that partners community physicians Franklin with Bethesda Health to ensure high quality health care and the more efficient use of resources.

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Dr. Cristina Mata was appointed vice president and chief medical officer of Boca Raton Regional Hospital. An endocrinologist who practiced clinically for 15 years, she most recently was chief medical officer, medical director of informatics Mata and interim medical director of graduate medical education at Palmetto General Hospital. To celebrate their 30-year anniversary, Hospice of Palm Beach County Foundation and Hospice by the Sea Foundation Resale Shops will host quarterly customer appreciation days with complimentary bites and beverages, discounts and prizes at all three of their locations. In Boca Raton, the address is 141 NW 20th St. For information, visit www.hpbcf.org/resale or call 494-6814. Send health news to Christine Davis at cdavis9797@gmail.com. As seen in The Scout Guide – Palm Beach.

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H8 Health & Harmony Calendar

The COASTAL STAR

Health & Harmony Calendar Note: Events are current as of 2/24. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 4

Saturday - 3/4 - Saturdays @ Sanborn: Yoga Class at Sanborn Square, 72 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. 8:45 am registration; 9 am class. Free. 393-7703; downtownboca. org 3/4 - Kemetic Yoga at Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NE 5th Ave, Delray Beach. Calming, therapeutic yoga using ancient Kemetic postures/teachings. Bring yoga mat, water; wear comfortable clothing. Every Sat 9-10:30 am. $10/person. 279-8883; spadymuseum.com 3/4 - Qi Gong at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Ancient Chinese system of exercise, meditation. Improve flexibility, balance, muscle tone, energy, mental well-being. Adults. Every Sat 9 am. Free introductory class. $40/month. Reservations: 419-5403; facebook.com/WestBocaTaiChi 3/4 - Yoga Class at Train Depot, 747 S Dixie Hwy, Boca Raton. T 6:30-8 pm; T/Th/Sat 9:30-11 am. 5 classes $75/resident, $94/ non-resident; 10 classes $130/resident, $162.50/non-resident; 20 classes $240/ resident, $300/non-resident. 477-8727; myboca.us 3/4 - Yoga Class at South Palm Beach Town Hall Chambers, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Every Sat 9:30 am. $5/class. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com

3/4 - Tai Chi/Chi Kung/Meditation Class at Delray Beach Community Center, 50 NW 1st Ave. Every Sat. Intermediate 9:30-10:30 am; beginner 10:45-11:45 am. Per class $15/resident; $17/non-resident. 243-7250; mydelraybeach.com 3/4 - Judo Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Warm-up exercises, instruction, practice, tournament training. W 6:30-8 pm mixed ages & ranks, 8-9 pm advanced; Sat 10 am-noon all groups. Per month $21.50/resident; $27/ non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/4 - Yoga at the Beach at Red Reef Park West (Intracoastal side), 1400 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Register/get parking pass at Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Classes held on grass overlooking the Intracoastal. No cash accepted on-site. 1st & 3rd Sat 10-11 am. $10/class; 60-day membership (unlimited classes) $65/resident, $81.25/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/4 - Capoeira Fitness at Sanborn Square, 72 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. Age 12 & up. Every Sat 10:30 am. Free. 393-7703; downtownboca.org 3/4 - Zumba Class at South Beach Park Pavilion, 400 N State Rd A1A, Boca Raton. Every Sat 10:30 am. Free. 393-7703; downtownboca.org 3/4 - Chair Yoga at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every Sat 1 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach. org

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3/4 - Safe Baby: Prepare, Prevent & Respond Class at Bethesda Heart Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. CPR for infants from birth to one year old, how you can assist in an emergency. 2-3:30 pm. $20/couple. Payment due before class date. 369-2229; publicrelations@bhinc.org 3/4 - CA (Cocaine Anonymous) at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every Sat 6 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org

MARCH 5-11

Sunday - 3/5 - Childbirth Express: A Day Full of Fun & Learning at Bethesda Memorial Hospital Parent Education Resource Center, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 10 am-4 pm. $50/couple. Payment due before class date. 369-2229; publicrelations@BHInc.org 3/5 - Yoga at the Beach at Red Reef Park East, 1400 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Register/get parking pass at Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. No cash accepted on-site. Through 3/12: 4:30 pm; after 3/12: W/Sun 6:30 pm. $10/class; 60-day membership (unlimited classes) $65/resident, $81.25/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/5 - CODA (Codependents Anonymous) at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every Sun 6 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org Monday - 3/6 - Fitness on the Beach at Delray Beach at Lifeguard stand North I across from the Marriott at 10 N Ocean Blvd. Bring a towel, plenty of water, a cando attitude. Age 18+. M/W/F 7:30-8:30 am.

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$10/class. 502-523-0284; mydelraybeach. com 3/6 - SoulCore at St. Vincent Ferrer Kelleghan Hall, 840 George Bush Blvd, Delray Beach. Contemporary 1-hour core workout paired w/prayers of the rosary. Every M/W through school year 7:50 am. Free. 6658566; stvincentferrer.com 3/6 - Circuit Training: Workout for Mom at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Circuit-based workout targets multiple muscle groups to build lean muscles. Modifications accommodate pregnant moms/beginner to advanced fitness levels. M/T/Th 8:30-9:20 am. 4 classes $40-$50; 8 classes $70-$88; 12 classes $100-$125, 15 classes $125-$156. 306-6985; fitmomboca@aol.com 3/6 - Adult Jazzercise Lo at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Workout targets 3 major muscle groups: upper body, abs, legs. M/T/F 9-10 am. 12 months $39/month; 6 months $49/month; $25 membership fee. 400-1268; lisajar@ comcast.net 3/6 - Flow Yoga Class at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. Slow intuitive vinyasa flow class. M/F 9-10:30 am. $15/ class; $60/5 classes. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/6 - Chi Kung & Meditation at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. All ages. Every M 9-10 am. Per class: $15/resident; $16/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/6 - Yoga Class at First United Methodist Church Boca Raton, 625 NE Mizner Blvd.

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www.bit.ly/4parkplace

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Every M 9:30 am. Free. 395-1244; fumcbocaraton.org 3/6 - Get Fit Mom’s Boot Camp at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Circuit-based workout incorporates cardio exercises, strength training, running drills, body weight resistance training, agility drills and core strengthening. M/T/Th 9:30-10:20 am. 4 classes $40-$50; 8 classes $70-$88; 12 classes $100-$125, 15 classes $125-$156. 306-6985; fitmomboca@aol.com 3/6 - Yoga Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. M/W/F 9:30-11 am. 5 classes $75/resident, $94/nonresident; 10 classes $130/resident, $162.50/ non-resident; 20 classes $240/resident, $300/non-resident. 477-8727; myboca.us 3/6 - Chair Massage at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Every M 10 am-noon. $10/10-minute session. Appointments recommended: 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/6 - Tai Chi for Beginners at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Every M 10-11 am. Per class: $15/resident; $20/nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/6 - Stretch at Delray Beach Tennis Center, 201 W Atlantic Ave. Every M/W 10-11 am. $5/member; $10/non-member. Sign up in advance: 243-7360; delraytennis.co 3/6 - Parkinson’s Exercise Class at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Improve balance, flexibility, muscle strength. Every M 11:30 am-12:30 pm; W 2-3 pm. 1st class free. 8 classes $32/ resident, $40/non-resident; 16 classes $60/ resident, $75/non-resident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/6 - Basic Exercise for Parkinson’s Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Every M/W through 3/29. M noon-1 pm; W 11:30am12:30pm. $6/class. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/6 - The Happiness Club of Palm Beach at BICE Restaurant, 313 Peruvian Ave, Palm Beach. 1st M 5-6 pm. $20. Happinessclubpalmbeach.com 3/6 - Exercise Class at First United Methodist Church Boca Raton, 625 NE Mizner Blvd. Every M 5:30 pm. Free. 395-1244; fumcbocaraton.org 3/6 - Meditation Mondays at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Meditate to enhance overall health, well-being. Every M 5:30-6:15 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/6 - Get Fit Smart at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Specific, measurable goals attainable in a timely manner. Customized 6-week program. Ages 18+. Every M through 4/10 6-7 pm. $75/resident; $90/non-resident. 742-6640; boynton-beach.org 3/6 - Men’s Issues Support Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every M 6:30-8 pm. $5/ session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 3/6 - Boca Raton Multiple Myeloma Support Group at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Meet, interact with fellow myeloma patients, their family members, friends. Learn new aspects of treatment/management of myeloma. 1st M 6:30-8 pm. Free. 901-5938; 637-4682; myeloma.org Tuesday - 3/7 - Women’s Issues Support Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every T 10-11:30 am. $5/session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 3/7 - Silver Sneakers Cardio Strength Sr. Gold Class at Personal Physician Care Community Center, 4800 Linton Blvd #F111, Delray Beach. Every T/Th 10-11 am. $5/ class; free for members w/participating health plans. 808-7743; ppcare.net 3/7 - Yoga at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Bring a yoga mat. Every T/ Th 10:15 am. $10/session. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/7 - Big & Loud: Parkinson’s Disease Exercise Program at Bethesda Heart Hospital 3rd Floor Conference Room, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 10:30-11:30 am. Held again 3/21. Free. 292-4950; RLatino@BHInc.org 3/7 – Breastfeeding Support Group at Boca Raton Regional Hospital Dawson Theater, 800 Meadows Rd. Every T noon1:30 pm. Free. 955-5415; brrh.com 3/7 - Modern Line Dance Class at Vet-


March 2017 erans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Enhance quality of life through modern music, dance. Age 50 & up. Every T 1:302:30 pm. Per class: $5/resident; $6/nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/7 - Senior Challenges: Coping with Emotions in Later Life Support Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every T 2-3:30 pm. $5/ session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 3/7 - Neighbor2Neighbor hosted by MorseLife at Temple Sinai, 2475 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Resources to help seniors live with better health, safety, independence. 2nd & 4th T 3-4 pm. Free. 5319844; morselife.org/neighbor2neighbor 3/7 - Yoga with Cara at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. Slow, intuitive vinyasa flow class. Th 9-10:15 am; Every T 3:30-4:45 pm. $15/class; $60/5 classes. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/7 - Community Consciousness with Marisol Yoga at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. T/Th 5:15-6:15 pm. $5/resident; $6/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/7 - Tai Chi: Introductory Demonstration at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Held again 12/13 (3-4 pm). 6-7 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/7 – Tai Chi Class at Christine E. Lynn Women’s Health & Wellness Institute, 690 Meadows Rd. Every T/Th 6-7:15 pm. $20/ session. 955-7227; WIProgram@brrh.com 3/7 - Al-Anon 12-Step Study at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every T 7 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 3/7 - Food Addicts Anonymous at Unity of Delray Beach Prayer Room, 101 NW 22nd St, Delray Beach. Every T 7 pm. Free. 7422121; foodaddictsanonymou.org Wednesday - 3/8 - CPR Class (American Heart Association Heartsaver/ AED) at Ocean Rescue Headquarters, 340 S Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach. Open to all Delray Beach residents, taught by AHA CPR-certified Ocean Rescue. Topics include activating the emergency response system; adult, child, infant CPR; choking; defibrillation. CPR masks available for $5 (recommended). Ages 12 & up. 1st W 9 am-12:30 pm. Free. 243-7425; mydelraybeach.com 3/8 - Yoga at Veterans Park, 802 NE First St, Delray Beach. Age 18 & up. Every W 9-10:30 am. Per class $10/resident; $15/ nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach. com 3/8 - Tai Chi Class at South Palm Beach Town Hall Chambers, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Every W 9-10 am. $5/class. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/8 - Shared Care at Temple Beth El, 333 SW 4th Ave, Boca Raton. Interfaith respite program supported by Temple Beth El, St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church, and Grace Community Church. Every W 9:30 am-2:30 pm Sep-May. $25/year. 391-8900; tbeboca. org 3/8 - Exercise: Activity with Wonderful Side Effects! presented by Mike Cortese, MS, PT, OCS, ATC, at Mandel Jewish Community Center of the Palm Beaches, 8500 Jog Rd, Boynton Beach. 10 am. Free. 2593016; publicrelations@bhinc.org 3/8 – Yoga Class at Christine E. Lynn Women’s Health & Wellness Institute, 690 Meadows Rd. W/F 10-11 am. $10/class; $50/6 classes. Registration: 955-7227; WIProgram@brrh.com 3/8 - Al Anon Discussion Group at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Every W 10:30-11:30 am. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/8 - Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network’s New Discoveries Research Luncheon & Lecture at The Beach Club, 755 North County Road, Palm Beach. Listen to guest speakers Dr. David McConkey, director of The Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Institute, and Fay Vincent, former Major League Baseball commissioner and bladder-cancer survivor. 11 am. $200. 301215-9099, Ext. 202 or bcan.org. 3/8 - Coloring Club for Adults at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Carefree fun of childhood, de-stress with art therapy. Easy activity for those with memory problems. Use our coloring sheets or bring your own. Every W 1-4 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us

The COASTAL STAR 3/8 - Moving Forward for Widows & Widowers: Support and Discussion Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every W 1-2:30 pm. $5/session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 3/8 - Family Caregiver Support Group at St Mark Catholic Church St Anthony Room, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Every W 2:30-3:30 pm. Free. Register: 7353530; stmarkboynton.com 3/8 - Cryoablation for the Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation by Luis Mora, M.D., Cardiac Electrophysiologist, at Bethesda Hospital East, Clayton Conference Center, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 4:305:30 pm. Free. 731-2273; publicrelations@ bhinc.org 3/8 - AA Big Book Study at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every W 5:30 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 3/8 - Family and Friends at Boca Raton Regional Hospital Education Center Classroom B, 800 Meadows Rd. Basics of infant, child and adult CPR, relief of choking, child and infant one-person CPR. Held again 3/15, 25 (9-11 am) & 4/5. 6-8 pm. $25. Registration: 955-4468; brrh.com 3/8 - Divorced and Separated Support Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every W 6-7:30 pm. $5/session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 3/8 - T’ai Chi at First United Methodist Church, 101 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Every W 6 pm. Free. 732-3435; fumcbb.com 3/8 - Tai Chi Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Moving meditation for focus, concentration, release of stress, attention skills. Every W 6:10-7:10 pm beginners; 7:10-8:10 pm intermediate. 8 classes $48/resident, $60/non-resident; 12 classes $66/resident, $82/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/8 - Soulcore at St Mark Catholic Church St Clare Room, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Bring floor mat/optional hand weights. Every W 6:30-7:30 pm & Thu 8:30-9:30 am. Free/donations accepted. 734-9330; stmarkboynton.com 3/8 - Food Addicts Anonymous at The Crossroads Club Room E, 1700 Lake Ida Rd, Delray Beach. Every W 7 pm. Free. 6800724; foodaddictsanonymou.org Thursday - 3/9 - Senior Health Fair at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Free blood work, vision and cholesterol screenings, door prizes, entertainment, healthy appetizers. 9 am-noon. Free. 742-6570; boynton-beach.org 3/9 - Wellness Program at South Palm Beach Town Hall Chambers, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Talks by local physicians; no physical exercise. Every other Th through Mar 10 am-noon. Free. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/9 - Yoga at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Every Th 10:15-11:15 am. $10/ session. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/9 - Grief Support Group at St Mark Catholic Church St Anthony Room, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Every W 2:30-3:30 pm. Free. Register: 735-3530; stmarkboynton.com 3/9 - Living Longer and Healthier: Lifestyle and Pharmacologic Tips with Dr. Charles Hennekens at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/ at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau. edu/lls 3/9 - Yoga Class at First United Methodist Church Boca Raton, 625 NE Mizner Blvd. Every Th 6:30 pm. Free. 395-1244; fumcbocaraton.org 3/9-10 - Zumba Gold at Veterans Park, 802 NE First St, Delray Beach. Age 18 & up. Th/F 9:30-10:30 am. Per class $5/resident; $6/nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach. com Friday - 3/10 – Breastfeeding Support Group at Boca Raton Regional Hospital Dawson Theater, 800 Meadows Rd. Every F 1-3:30 pm. Free. 955-5415; brrh.com 3/10 - Open AA Meeting at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every F 7 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdel-

raybeach.org Saturday - 3/11 - International Essential Tremor Foundation Education Forum at Boca Raton Marriott, 5150 Town Center Rd. Presentations, exhibits. 8 am check-in; 9 am-noon program. Free. 888387-3667; essentialtremor.org/seminars 3/11 - Community Health Fair at Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 400 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Exhibitors/live demonstrations in healthy eating, fitness, dancing, yoga, more; kids activities. Family fare. 10 am-3 pm. Free. 276-8458; trinitydelray. org 3/11 - Family Yoga at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Breathing exercises, relaxation techniques, yoga, poses for concentration, balance, flexibility, meditation, lessons in self-acceptance, positive thinking. Open to extended family and caregivers. Every Sat through 4/1 11:15 am-12:15 pm. $60/resident; $75/nonresident. 393-7807; myboca.us

MARCH 12-18

Tuesday – 3/14 - Breastfeeding Class at Bethesda Heart Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Certified lactation consultant teach expectant parents about the benefits of breastfeeding. 6-8:30 pm. $15/couple. Payment due before class date. Registration: 369-2229; publicrelations@ bhinc.org 3/14 – Making the Mind-Body Connection featuring Judy Weaver at Christine E. Lynn Women’s Health & Wellness Institute, 690 Meadows Rd. Part of Peaceful Mind Peaceful Life Series. 6 pm. $15. 9557227; WIProgram@brrh.com Wednesday - 3/15 - Basics of Baby Care at Boca Raton Regional Hospital Education Center, 800 Meadows Rd. Basics of baby

Health & Harmony Calendar H9 caring for your newborn, taught by a registered nurse. Held again 10 am-noon 3/25. 7:30-9:30 pm. $40/couple. Registration: 955-4468; brrh.com Saturday - 3/18 - One Day Childbirth Preparation Class at Boca Raton Regional Hospital Education Center Classroom B, 800 Meadows Rd. One-day program prepares couples for the birth of their first child by discussing birthing options, practicing birthing skills. 9 am-4 pm. $125/couple. Registration: 955-4468; brrh.com 3/18 - 3rd Annual Health and Wellness Experience at Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Presented by WPEC, hosted by City of Boca Raton. Healthy cooking demonstrations, free health screenings, fitness demonstrations, activities for all ages. Free parking at City Hall and Downtown Library w/complimentary trolley service to Mizner Park. 10 am-4 pm. Free. 881-0702; thewellnessexperience.org

MARCH 19-25

Monday - 3/20 - Zumba Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd, Boca Raton. Every M through 5/8 7:30-8:30 pm. $40/8-weeks. 393-7807; myboca.us Wednesday - 3/22 - Vascular Disease in Seniors by Reagan Ross, M.D., General/ Vascular Surgeon, at Bethesda Hospital East, Clayton Conference Center, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. 731-2273; publicrelations@bhinc. org Friday – 3/24 - Managing Chronic Pain, Anxiety, and Depression Through Cognitive Restructuring: A Practical Approach at Mental Health Association of Palm Beach County, 909 Fern St, West Palm Beach. Lunch included. Noon-2 pm. $25/

member; $30/non-member. RSVP: 8323755; mhapbc.org Saturday - 3/25 - Geri-Fit Senior Fitness Instructor Certification Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd, Boca Raton. 9:30 am-4:30 pm. $315/includes all study materials. 3937807; myboca.us

MARCH 26-APRIL 1

Wednesday - 3/29 - Focal Treatment for Cancer of the Kidney and Prostate by Raymond Leveillee, M.D., Urologic Surgery, at Bethesda Hospital East, Clayton Conference Center, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. 7312273; publicrelations@bhinc.org 3/29 - Mindfulness Matters: Habits for Cultivating Strengths, Courage and Resilience with John Davis, LHMC at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Community Institute. Every W through 4/19 6 pm. $50/4 sessions. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org Saturday – 4/1 - Boot Camp for New Dads at Bethesda Memorial Hospital, 2815 S. Seacrest Blvd., Boynton Beach. Join veteran dads (with their babies), who tell how they made it through the first months of parenthood and resurfaced as confident, on-the-job fathers. 9 am-noon. $20/at the door includes class, refreshments, book. 369-2229; bootcampfornewdads.org 4/1 - Safe Baby: Prepare, Prevent & Respond Prenatal Class at Bethesda Memorial Hospital Parent Education Resource Center, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Increase awareness of safe practices and what to do in the event of an emergency. 2-3:30 pm. $20/couple. Payment due before class date. 369-2229; publicrelations@BHInc.org


H10 Secret Gardens

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Secret Gardens

T

Small space is big on butterflies

he next time you are near the Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center in Boynton Beach, take a few minutes to explore its butterfly garden. Set on a pie-shaped piece of land at the southeast corner of the building, this garden is filled not only with color and fragrance, but also butterflies. Lots of butterflies. “When we took out pencil and paper to design this garden, we knew we wanted it to be both pretty and functional,” says Christine Johnson, a member of the Boynton Beach Garden Club who helped create the museum’s garden. Today she is working with five other club members to ready the garden for an art festival that should draw a good number of people to the area. “We want our butterfly garden to look its best,” she says. It was the city that got the garden club involved. When Johnson first came to the site in 2013, there were only a few round paving stones, an irrigation system and five small trees. “Otherwise it was just dirt,” she says. Today the garden is a perfect example of what you can grow and achieve in a small space. And like any well-designed butterfly garden, this plot includes the specific plant species necessary to support each variety of butterfly throughout its life cycle. These include plants that the butterflies need to lay their eggs as well as leaves for their caterpillars to eat. And then, after those caterpillars form pupae (chrysalises) and turn into graceful butterflies, the garden provides the appropriate nectar plants to nourish them. Today you can walk through the museum garden

An adult Atala is about the size of your fingertip.

Gardening Tip

If you want to attract Atala butterflies to your garden, plant native coontie, which is the host plant for their colorful caterpillars. But not just one coontie; you have to plant a bunch of them. That’s because the Atala won’t lay eggs if there’s not enough coontie around to feed their caterpillars as they develop into butterflies. — Christine Johnson

Christine Johnson (left) shows a visiting family the Children’s Museum butterfly garden, including a 2-foot-wide kinetic sculpture metal butterfly. Photos by Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

If You Go The Butterfly Garden is at the Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E. Ocean Ave., Boynton Beach; 742-6780; www.schoolhousemuseum.org The garden, brought to you by the Boynton Beach Garden Club, is on the southeast corner of the museum building to the right of the front stairs. For more information about the Boynton Beach Garden Club, call Second Vice President for Membership Christine Johnson at 736-2909. The club meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Boynton Beach Women’s Club, 1010 S. Federal Highway. The public is welcome. on a paver path past the sweet almond tree. Its fragrant white blooms attract dozens of Atala butterflies to sip their nectar. These black insects with metallic blue polka dots and a splash of orange on their wings

are considered rare. But here you’ll find plenty of them. Nearby the milkweed plants silently signal to the orange and black monarch butterflies that they will find sustenance here. And a fennel plant sends up its feathery fronds in the hopes of attracting black swallowtail butterflies. The club members plan to plant parsley that, like fennel, will attract these black

butterflies with blue, orange and yellow markings on their wings. “Isn’t nature marvelous?” asks Johnson. There’s plenty here for butterflies to snack on, including the yellow flowers that look like pats of butter on the popcorn cassia. Ask how this plant got its name and Johnson will tell you to rub your hands along its leaves. Take a whiff and you’ll smell the toasted aroma of, yes, popcorn. There’s always something new being planted. In fact, today Johnson was on her way to the garden when she found 10 red and pink pentas that a neighbor had set at the curb as refuse. She gathered them up, brought them along and the club members have planted them bordering the wellmulched path.

Garden Calendar Note: Events are current as of 2/24. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 5-11

Tuesday - 3/7 - The Boca Raton Garden Club Treasures at BRGC Clubhouse, 4281 NW 3rd Ave, Boca Raton. Gloria Blake: Floral Home & Show Designs. 1st T 1 pm. Free. 395-9376; bocaratongardenclub.org Wednesday - 3/8 - Delray Beach Orchid Society at Veterans Park Recreation Center, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. 2nd W 7 pm. Free. 573-2422; delraybeachorchidsociety.com Friday - 3/10-11 - Boynton Beach Garden Club 2nd Annual Art in Bloom at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum, 129 E Ocean Ave. 10 am-5 pm. Free w/admission. 496-0629; schoolhousemuseum.og

MARCH 12-18

Tuesday - 3/14-15 - Environmental Studies School Series X Course III: Air & Related Issues at Pine Jog Environmental

Education Center, 6300 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Presented by National Garden Clubs; sponsored by The Oleander Garden Club of the Palm Beaches. Reading prerequisite. Credit/exam optional. $65/course; $7/exam. 702-0550; gardenclub.org Saturday - 3/18 - Art In The Garden: Vessels for Ikebana at Armory Art Center, 1700 Parker Ave, West Palm Beach. In collaboration w/Mounts Botanical Garden. 9 am. $115/member; $125/non-member; $10/materials fee. Registration: 832-1776 x33; mounts.org 3/18-19 - Art In The Garden: Mosaics in the Garden at Mounts Botanical Garden Auditorium, 531 N Military Tr, West Palm Beach. In collaboration w/Armory Art Center. 10 am-4:30 pm. $265/member; $275/ non-member; $15/materials fee. Registration: 832-1776 x33; mounts.org

MARCH 19-25

Tuesday - 3/21 - Ocean Ridge Garden Club 50th Anniversary Lecture Series:

“We don’t have a big budget for our garden, so this was a wonderful find,” says Johnson, who also regularly checks the nursery sale racks at big box stores. Other plants are donated by club members who raise them from seeds. The women enjoy working together to make this garden welcoming to children and nature. “When visitors come by, they often compliment us on the garden, and that makes the work so much more pleasurable,” says Johnson. Master Gardener Deborah S. Hartz-Seeley can be reached at debhartz@ att.net

Patricia Crawford, Landscape Architect at Ocean Ridge Town Hall, 6450 N Ocean Blvd. Lecture, discussion, vendors. 2-5 pm. Free. facebook.com/Ocean-RidgeGaden-Club 3/21 -Florida Native Plant Society Chapter Meeting at Mounts Botanical Garden, 531 N Military Tr, West Palm Beach. Laura Olson: Florida native medicinal plants. 3rd T 7 pm. Free. palmbeach. fnpschapters.org Wednesday - 3/22 - Ocean Ridge Garden Club 50th Anniversary Lecture Series: John Lopez, former president of Tropical Orchid Society at Ocean Ridge Town Hall, 6450 N Ocean Blvd. Lecture, discussion, orchid sale, vendors. 2-5 pm. Free. facebook.com/Ocean-RidgeGaden-Club

MARCH 26-APRIL 1

Friday - 3/31-4/1 - The Boca Raton Garden Club Treasures & Plant Sale at BRGC Clubhouse, 4281 NW 3rd Ave, Boca Raton. 9 am-2 pm. Free. 395-9376; bocaratongardenclub.org


March 2017H11 The COASTAL STAR


H12 Home Tour

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Delray Beach Home Tour

An open kitchen with stainless steel appliances and vent hood is a focal point of Karen Williams’ remodeled cottage. Photos by Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

Seaside style

The 2017 Delray Beach Home Tour

Ten homeowners will open their doors, giving a rare glimpse into a variety of design and architectural styles. Event includes a luncheon on a waterfront property and a raffle with chances to win spa services, dining certificates and décor items, as well as a silent auction for Caribbean vacations, artwork and luxury home goods. When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 9 Where: The northern beach area of Delray Beach Tickets: $100 per person. Includes a tour through distinctive residences, complimentary parking and trolley service between homes. For tickets, visit www.DelrayHomeTour.com or call Elena Trowell, 266-0003, ext. 14. Benefit: Proceeds go to Achievement Centers for Children & Families, a community-based organization dedicated to serving low-income children and families. www.AchievementCentersFL.org. Sponsors: Page H14.

A combination of palm trees, gumbo limbo, bromeliads and grasses makes Marc Schiller’s pool garden a cool oasis.

Tom and Lori Cunnington’s house on N went significant interior remodeling in


March 2017

North Ocean Boulevard, which boasts this soaring living room, undern the past few years.

The COASTAL STAR

Home Tour H13

Artist models perched on a tree trunk and glass table greet visitors at the home of Josh and Kate Littlefield.

A whimsical metal chair for two sits in a side courtyard at the home of Delray Beach Mayor Cary Glickstein.

The staircase at Renie and Bruce Shandler’s house has vintage fixtures.

Symmetrical decorating and ceiling beams highlight Gerard and Laura Mastroianni’s master bedroom, which has a view of the pool.


H14 Pets

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Paws Up for Pets

Potbellied pigs are smart and clean, but need space

T

he majority of the pet columns I’ve penned for The Coastal Star have gone to the dogs and cats. But not this one. Brace yourself. We are about to go hog wild about what it is really like to pick a potbellied pig as your pet. In Palm Beach County, pigs as pets created quite a stir with the County Commission four years ago. The elected officials agreed to conduct a threeyear trial to weigh the pros/ cons of pigs as pets in urban and suburban neighborhoods. Because there were no major protests or pig problems, the commissioners voted in late 2015 by a 6-1 vote to OK these sweet swines as pets. If you do explore adopting a pig, you’ll want to know, how healthy are they? For answers, we turned to Dr. Kristy Lund, a veterinarian who treats all animals, including exotic pets, at her practice, Lund Animal Hospital in Boca Raton. Lund, who has been caring for potbellied pigs since 1991, says, “Pigs are extremely intelligent. They are hypoallergenic and do not get fleas, so they do make good pets for certain households. But they do require regular teeth trimming and hoof trimming.” She adds that they love to learn tricks and can live up

to 25 years. She recommends seeking out a veterinarian trained to care for exotic pets and consider ones who do house calls, because these big-and-wide pets can be challenging to inspect in an exam room. “We encourage the owner to work with their pigs when they are little to allow them to accept being handled and to train them to wear a harness,” Lund adds. And what exactly is life like with a pet pig? For insights, we chatted with a pair of Loxahatchee residents, Alissa Gilman and JoJo Milano. Gilman, her husband, Chris, and their 4-year-old daughter, Luciana, happily cuddle up in the living room each night with a pair of pigs named Sonny and Ruby, who collectively weigh about 150 pounds … and counting. Milano’s menagerie at her Goodness Gracious Acres home includes a pair of pet pigs named Ignatius C. Potbelly and Sweet Pea, as well as some goats. Gilman’s pig pair definitely are homebodies. Sonny, 5, and Ruby, 3, spend their days in and out of the open-styled house and particularly love diving their snouts into the yard to root out bugs, which they like

Luciana Gilman, of Loxahatchee, finds Ruby, left, and Sonny good company. Together, the pigs weigh 150 pounds. A potbellied pig can reach 200 pounds. Photo by Ximena Olds to eat. But Ruby also enjoys participating in mock “tea times” with Luciana and hanging out with the cats, named Nemo and Jack, plus the assortment of chickens clucking out in the backyard. Both pigs perform tricks, including sit and spin. The pair apparently can tell time (especially for 5 p.m. dinners) and love belly rubs and behind-the-ear scratches. And, yes, they are house trained: They go to the door and oink when it is time for a potty break. “There is a notion that

potbellied pigs are smelly and dirty — and they are not,” says Gilman, who works in airport services at Palm Beach International Airport. “Once in a while if our pigs roll in the mud, they will go into the shower with us. “Sonny and Ruby are very sweet, very loving and they make us laugh. At night, we all hang out on the couch or in the living room. At bedtime, Ruby follows us like a dog into our bedroom to sleep on her bed and Sonny heads to his bed in the living room.” At Milano’s 2-acre home, Ignatius and Sweet Pea revel in spending time outdoors, but display different personalities. “Iggy acts like a grumpy old man and Sweet Pea loves, loves, loves to meet people,” says Milano, who operates a homebased design and advertising company as well as Delilah’s Dairy, which features goat milk and handmade soaps. “She squeals with delight when saying hello to new customers.” Parting advice? Prep your home before adopting a pig and make sure to go with tile flooring, not carpeting. And be aware that tiny potbellied

piglets grow big and wide. They can reach up to 200 pounds. “Potbellied pigs do not stay small at all,” says Gilman, whose pigs eat commercial pig chow plus fruits and vegetables. “They are bulky and need wide spaces in the house to maneuver. And they are super smart. They quickly learned if they squealed, I’d feed them. But don’t overfeed them or they will get overweight quickly.” Before you rush out to adopt a potbellied pig, call your local municipality — and your homeowners association. Permission for having pigs as pets can vary by municipality. Arden Moore, founder of www.FourLeggedLife.com, is an animal behavior consultant, editor, author, professional speaker and master certified pet first aid instructor. Each week, she hosts the popular Oh Behave! show on www. PetLifeRadio. com. Learn more by visiting www. fourleggedlife. com.

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March 2017H15 The COASTAL STAR


H16 Tots & Teens

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Tots & Teens

7th-grader gets St. Andrew’s students involved in fight against hunger By Janis Fontaine

Marissa Govic’s goal is to feed hungry children. She’s using all her talents — and they’re considerable — to achieve her goal. Between academics (she’s in the seventh grade at St. Andrew’s School in Boca Raton) and family responsibilities, Marissa raised the funds for and organized a Hunger Project for the Sanford-based charity Feeding Children Marissa Everywhere. On Feb. 3, Marissa, 12, rounded up more than 160 seventh- and eighth-grade volunteers to pack singleserving meals for hungry and malnourished families. The meals were distributed by FCE, the nonprofit founded by Don and Kristen Campbell in 2010. FCE has distributed more than 64 million meals, 75 percent of them to people in the United States, and all the meals packed by St. Andrew’s will be distributed locally through Feeding South Florida. Ann Haynes, division head of the middle school, worked with Marissa to organize and oversee the event. “We provided the place, the setup, the organizational structure and the labor. FCE came in with food and supplies.

More than 160 St. Andrew’s School students worked to package single-serving meals. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star They broke the kids up into 12 groups and each group had a station. First, they got a lesson on being hygienic. They all had to wear hairnets or hats. They learned about quality control and its importance, and about teamwork and that they all had to be engaged in the process to succeed,” Haynes said. “There was catchy music that got the kids excited and there was lots of noise. We had just finished a special project week, and this was our culminating activity on a Friday afternoon. So there was lots of enthusiasm.”

her school’s backpack program, which sends kids home with food for the weekend on Friday afternoons. She found out about Feeding Children Everywhere as a volunteer at a Palm Beach event. Haynes had become interested in food-packing events for charity after she attended a conference with Round Square, a network of schools that share a holistic approach to learning. “I was at a conference in California and heard about it,” Haynes said. “But there’s a hefty price

The volunteers formed an assembly line, and each group had a purpose. They took dry ingredients (lentils, rice, dried vegetables, herbs and spices, and sea salt), combined them in the correct proportions in biodegradable plastic bags and sealed them. The meals are high in protein, with no artificial flavorings. FCE had challenged the teams to pack 20,000 meals in two hours. It took the students only 90 minutes. Marissa has been active in school food drives and with

involved in hosting a Hunger Project.” To raise money for the Hunger Project, Marissa entered and won the preliminary round of the Miss Planetary Teen pageant. It recruits teens who are interested in promoting their philanthropic causes and in doing community service. Marissa is representing her father’s home country of Croatia. Her father, Mario, is a wealth manager in Palm Beach. Her mother, Ann Marie, also of Croatian heritage, is a Realtor. Marissa raised the money through donations and the sale of merchandise on the Miss Planetary pageant website. She met her goal and held her event, but she’s continuing to raise money for charities that feed hungry children. In June, she’ll be competing in the Miss Planetary International teen pageant in Las Vegas. Marissa is also promoting her new EP pop album, Trending Now, released on iTunes on Feb. 1. The music video for the first single, the title cut, was published on YouTube Feb. 9. “I want to be a pop star,” she says. She sings, dances, acts, and plays piano and violin. She plays tennis, swims, rollerblades and plays table tennis. She can do a passable British accent, and has had experience on stage, television, in the recording studio, and has done live-on-the-red-carpet TV interviews for the Teen Choice Awards. Learn more about Marissa at www.marissagovic.com.

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March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Tots & Teens Calendar Note: Events are current as of 2/24. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 4

Saturday - 3/4 - Lil Sluggers Baseball at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Specially designed to introduce children to baseball. Every Sat through 4/22. Age 3 9-9:45 am; age 2 10-10:45 am; age 4-5 11-11:45 am. Special time for only 4/22 classes: Age 3 11:30am-12:15 pm; age 2 12:30-1 pm; ages 4 & 5 1:30-2:15 pm. $126/resident; $157.50/nonresident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/4 - Tiny Toes Ballet/Tap Class at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Ages 3-7. Every Sat 9:30-10 am. $10. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com 3/4 - Little Wonders at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Hike, crafts, stories. Ages 3-4. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Held again 4/1. 10-11 am. $5/member; $8/non-member. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org 3/4 - Drop-In Story Time at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Music, stories, finger plays, action songs. Children all ages accompanied by an adult. Every Sat 10-10:30 am. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/4 - Kidz On Stage Class: The Minions at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Children audition, act, sing, dance, perform. Age 3-7. Performance date 5/20. Every Sat through 5/20 10-11 am. $300. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com 3/4 - Sibling Class at Bethesda Heart Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Learn about their new role, the new baby joining their family. Decorate a onesie, celebrate with a birthday cupcake. Age 2-6; must be accompanied by parent. 10-11:30 am. $20/parent & child; additional sibling $10/each. Payment due before class date. 369-2229; publicrelations@ bhinc.org 3/4 - Archaeofest at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Uncover the past, see Florida’s history through the eyes of archaeologists. Hands-on science demos, interactive presentations, immersive planetarium shows, fossil digs. All ages. 10 am-3 pm. $16.95/adult; $14.95/ senior; $12.95/child (3-12); free/child under 3. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org 3/4 - We Care Kids Fair at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Features entertainment, vendors, lots of fun. 10 am-4 pm. Free w/regular admission. 533-0887; palmbeachzoo.org 3/4 - Family Studio: Abastraction in Action at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Children w/adult partner tour the current special exhibition, then create their own artwork. Age 5-12 w/parents. Every Sat through 3/18 10:30 am-12:30 pm. Free. 8325196 x1196; norton.org 3/4 - Drop-in Craft at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Ages 3 & up. Every Sat 10:3011:30 am. Free w/paid admission. Registration: 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/4 - Acro Class at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Ages 3-7. Every Sat 11-11:30 am. $10. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com 3/4 - Story Time at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Stories, songs, fingerplays parents and children enjoy together. All ages. W 11 am; Th 10:30 am & 4:30 pm; Sat/T/F 11 am & 4:30 pm. Free w/paid admission. 3686875; cmboca.org 3/4 - Group Swim Lessons at The Swim Center, 21618 St. Andrews Blvd, Boca Raton. Level 1, 2, 3 & 4 classes. Every Sat through 4/22 11 am, noon & 1 pm. Per session $60/resident; $75/non-residents. 544-8540; ci.boca-raton. fl.us/rec/pools 3/4 - Mother Daughter Tea at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Traditional tea service, receive a copy of the book The Little Princess at time of enrollment. Book discussion, fun activities. Girls age 9-17, 11:30 am-1:30 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary.org 3/4 - Nature Detectives at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. New mystery each month. Ages 5-7 w/an adult. 1st Sat 11:30 am-12:30 pm. $5/member; $8/ non-member. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org 3/4 - All Art Class at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Ages 2-9. Th 3 pm, Sat 11:30 am & 3 pm. $5/member; $8/nonmember. 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/4 - Science Stories at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hear favorite science inspired stories. Age 5 & up. Every Sat 11:30 am. Free. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 3/4 - Glamour Spa Party for Girls at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca

Raton. Age 4-12. 1:30-3 pm. $55/resident; $65/ non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/4 - Busy Babies (Mommy & Me) at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Ages 1-2. W 10 am, Sat 3:30 pm. Per session: $12/member; $15/non-member. 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/4 - Mulan at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. Every Sat through 4/8 4 pm. $14.50/adult; $10.50/ child under 12. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com 3/4 - Art-E-Ology: Sal Meo: Sculpture Using Found Objects at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Learn about a master artist on exhibit, create a masterpiece in the style of the selected artist. Grades 3-5. 1-2:30 pm. $5/child. Reservations: 392-2500 x106; bocamuseum.org 3/4-5 - Family Fun: Hina Matsuri: Japanese Doll Festival Craft at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Features fun craft activity. 10 am-5 pm daily. Free w/paid admission. 4950233 x237; morikami.org

MARCH 5-11

Sunday - 3/5 - Science Make & Take at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. 1st Sun 11:30 am. $5/project. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 3/5 - 11th Annual Children & Parents Day Celebrates Blueberry Fruit & National Nutrition Month at Boynton Woman’s Club, 1010 S Federal Hwy. Hosted by The Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History. Cooking class, buffet, farm to table nutrition & activities, entertainment, more. Noon-4 pm. $20/advance; $25/at the door; free/age 2 & under. 638-8277; mlfhmuseum.org 3/5 - Audition: Paris Ballet Conservatory Intensive at Kravis Center 701 Okeechobee Blvd. Auditions for 7/3-8; students train in the pure tradition of l’Ecole Francaise. 4th & 5th grade 1-2 pm; 6th & 7th grade 2-3:30 pm. 8th12th grades 3:30-5 pm. $600/intensive. 6514350; hawkins@kravis.org 3/5 - Musical Collages at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Part of ARTful Adventure Sunday series. Interactive opportunity to learn, create, enjoy the arts. Family fare. 2-3 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum. org 3/5 - Jr. Shark Biologist at Sandoway Discovery Center, 142 S Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach. Age 5-12. Every W & Sun 3:15 pm. Free w/$5 admission. 274-7263; sandowayhouse.org Monday - 3/6 - The Berenstain Bears Live! Family Matters, the Musical at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 11:30 am. $5. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/6 - Kids Music Circle at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12 Ave, Boynton Beach. Participatory musical sing-along, dance-along, shake-along class. Ages 3-4. Every M through 4/24 noon-1 pm. $48/resident, $60/non-resident. 742-6650; boynton-beach.org 3/6 - Once Upon A Story: A Workshop for Homeschoolers at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Get ideas, create characters, find new stories to tell. Ages 10-13. 1-2:30 pm. $27/resident; $33.75/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/6 - Children’s Fitness Classes/Gymnastics at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Build confidence and coordination. Every M through 4/17. Age 3-4 Three 40-minute classes 1:15, 2 & 2:45 pm; age 5-6 Two 55-minute classes 3:45 pm & 4:45 pm; age 7 & up Two 55-minute classes 3:45 pm & 4:45 pm. 40-minute classes $54/resident, $67.50/ non-resident; 55-minute classes $78/resident, $97.50/non-resident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark. org 3/6 - Rhythmic Gymnastics: Beginner 2 at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 5-6. Every M through 4/24 3-4 pm. $140/resident; $175/non-resident. 3473950; sugarsandpark.org 3/6 - Creative Fairy Tales at Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. Ages 4-6. Every M through 5/22 3:30-4:30 pm. $216 + one time $50 registration fee. 447-8829; solchildren.org 3/6 - Tennis Whiz Kids at Tennis Center, 3111 S Congress Ave, Boynton Beach. Key elements (space, object, people, brain, body, movement) combined in every on-court session. Age 3-5 (age 5 w/no experience). Every M through 3/27 (no class 3/20) 4-4:30 pm. $30/resident; $38/ non-resident. 742-6575; boynton-beach.org 3/6 - Tennis Fundamentals at Tennis Center, 3111 S Congress Ave, Boynton Beach. Based on USTA Florida Youth Tennis Pathway. Smaller courts, shorter racquets, slower-moving and lower-bouncing balls. Every M through 3/27 Age 5-8 4:30-5:15 pm $36-$45; age 9-12 5:306:15 pm $45-$54. 742-6575; boynton-beach.org 3/6 - Kids Activity Lab at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Board/video

Tots Tots&&Teens TeensCalendar Calendar H17

LAPS

Saint Joseph’s Episcopal School, Boynton Beach – Jan. 27

Students participated in an annual event in which all grade levels run, walk and navigate an obstacle course to raise awareness of the importance of fitness and funds for the school’s new playground. An informative lecture from parent Lew Gallego about the benefits of living a healthy lifestyle also took place. ABOVE: (l-r) Gallego and eighth-graders Jenna DeFrances, 13, Gianna Smith, 13, and Dhir Patel, 12. Photo provided games using Wii, Wii U, PS3 or Xbox 360, or make wearable art w/Rainbow Looms. Grades K-5. Every M through 3/27 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. 742-6393; boyntonlibrary.org 3/6 - No Filter Teen Group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Keep it real with Mr. Irijah; talk about issues that matter to you and your friends. Topics/activities change each week; snacks served. Grades 8-12. Held again 3/13 & 27. 6-7 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/6 - Happy Sunshine Yoga: Kids & Teens at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Focus on building self-confidence, physical strength, concentration. Every M through 4/10. Age 7-14 4:45-6:15 pm; age 13-18, 6:30-8 pm. $15-$18.75/per class; $65-$81.25/full session. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/6 - Circuit Drawing at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Children attend independently. Age 12-17. 6-7 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/6 - Delray Divas Step Teams at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Organized, structured step team performs at local events and statewide competitions. Program reinforces role of youth as positive members of the community. Grades K-12. M/W 6-8:30 pm. Yearly $30/resident; $40/non-resident. 2437356; mydelraybeach.com 3/6 - Rise and Grind Sports Class at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Part of Youth Empowerment Center, keeping teens active, competitive. Flag football, kickball, dodgeball, basketball. All skill levels welcome. Age 13-18. Every M through 5/1 6-8 pm. Free. 742-6641; boynton-beach.org 3/6 - Fencing/Epee Class at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Learn fencing skills, forge new friendships, have a blast. Beginners M/F 7-8:15 pm $90-$112.50/ month; intermediate/advanced M/W/F 7-10 pm $135-$168.75/month. 954- 854-7843; sugarsandpark.org Tuesday - 3/7 - Music & Movement at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Presented by the YMCA. Parents w/kids ages 2-4. Every T 10 am. Per session $12/member +1 child, $6/sibling; $15/non-member +1 child, $7.50/sibling. Registration: 368-6875; cmboca. org 3/7 - Baby Storytime at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Stories, rhymes, sing songs promote learning/development; meet other babies & parents. Age birth-2 years. Held again 3/14 & 28. 10:30-11 am. Free. 7426380; boyntonlibrary.org 3/7 - Mother Nature & Me: Super Snakes at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Stories, puppets, games, role play, nature walks, crafts. Age 2-5 (w/ guardian). 10:30 am. $4/child. RSVP: 629-8760; pbcgov.com/parks/nature 3/7 - Inspired Art at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Ages 2-11. T/W/Th 11:30 am-noon. $5/member; $8/non-member. 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/7 - Imagination Playground Open Play Session at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Ages 2-11. Every T noon-2:30 pm. $5/member; $8/non-member. 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/7 - It’s Great to Create at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Ages 2-11. Every T 3-3:30 pm. $5/member; $8/nonmember. 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/7 - Group Swim Lessons at The Swim Center, 21618 St. Andrews Blvd., Boca Raton. Level 1 & 2. Every T through 3/30 4-4:45 pm. Per session $60/resident; $75/non-resident. 5448540; ci.boca-raton.fl.us/rec/pools

3/7 - Mini Masterpieces at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Grades 2-7. 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. 742-6380; boyntonlibrary. org 3/7 - USCA Super Stars Cheer Level II at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 6-8. Every T through 3/28 5:30-6:30 pm. $40/resident; $50/non-residents 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/7 - Adobe Photoshop Basics 1 at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Ages 8+. Every T 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary. org 3/7-8 - Sensational Story ‘n More at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Children’s books come to life through interactive performance, singing, movement, props. Ages 2-5. Every T 10:30 & W 2 pm. Free w/paid museum admission. 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/7-8 - Explorium Science Squad: Robot Evolution at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Kids explore, experiment, trying something new every month. Tue Ages 5-6 (w/parent); W Ages 7-9. Both days 4-5 pm. $10/resident; $12.50/non-resident. 3473912; scienceexplorium.org Wednesday - 3/8 - Family Matters at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Not all families are the same. Explore the different ways that animals live and play. Age 2. One adult required to attend with children. 10-11 am. $20/session. Registration: 533-0887 x 229; palmbeachzoo.org 3/8 - Art Studio at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Age 3-5. Every W 10:30 am. $3/ museum member; $4/non-member + admission. Registration: 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/8 - Lil’ Explorers: Super Sensory Messy Play at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Explore, develop important readiness skills. Ages 18 mos-5 yrs. Every W 3-3:45 pm. Per class $3/member; $4/non-member + admission. 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/8 - Rhythmic Gymnastics at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Every W through 4/26. Beginner 1 age 4-5, 4-5pm, $140-$175; Beginner 2 age 5-6, 3-4 pm, $140-$175; Intermediate age 7-12, 3:45-5:15pm, $180-$225. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/8 - Singing Starz Group Voice Class at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Ages 4-7. Every W 4-4:45 pm. $15. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com 3/8 - Yoga Kids Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Multi-sensory learning combines yoga positions with music, storytelling, art; conveys lessons in positive thinking, self confidence, environment awareness. Wear comfortable clothing, bring a yoga mat. Every W through 4 /5. Ages 5-7 4-4:45 pm; Ages 8-12 5-6 pm. $48/resident; $60/nonresident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/8 - Fun with Makey Makey at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 12-17. 6-7 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/8 - Healthy Chefs Class at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Part of Youth Empowerment Center. Learn to select, prepare, cook, store healthy foods. Help reduce preventable diseases through behavior/lifestyle modifications, minimize exposure to toxic chemicals. Age 13-18. Every W through 4/12 6-8 pm. Free. 742-6641; boynton-beach.org 3/8 - Tween Explorers: Creative Writing Class and Activities at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 9-12. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org

Thursday - 3/9 - Drop-In Story Time at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Music, stories, fingerplays, action songs. Children of all ages; 8 & younger must be accompanied by an adult. Every Th 10-10:30 am. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/9 - Little Artists at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Explore creativity, showcase your artistic side. Age 2-5. 10-11 am. Free. 742-6380; boyntonlibrary.org 3/9 - Full S.T.E.A.M. Ahead: Fairytales and Fables at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Kindergarten readiness class. Ages 3-5. Every Th through 4/13 10:30-11:30 am. $40/ member; $52/non-member. 742-6782; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/9 - Y-Kids Yoga at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Presented by the YMCA. Parents w/kids ages 3-5. Every Th 11 am. Per session $12/member +1 child, $6/sibling; $15/non-member +1 child, $7.50/sibling. Registration: 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/9 - Brought to You by the Letter at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Kindergarten readiness class. Ages 3-5. Every Th through 4/13 3 pm. $40/member; $52/nonmember. 742-6782; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/9 - Knitting Club at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Ages 7 to adult. Every Th 3:30-4:30 pm. Free w/museum admission. 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/9 - Storytime Yoga at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Ages 4-8. Every Th 3:30 pm. Free. 266-0798; delraylibrary.org 3/9 - Lego Club at Boynton Beach City Library, 508 S Seacrest Blvd. Monthly build challenge or free build. Grades K-6. 4-5 pm. Free. 742-6380; boyntonlibrary.org 3/9 - Yu-Gi-Oh Tournament at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Grades 6-12. 6-7:45 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/9 - Adobe Photoshop Basics 2 at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Ages 8+. Held again 3/16. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/9 - 4 Knowledge is Power Class at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Part of Youth Empowerment Center. Supports healthy development, academic achievement, leadership, growth, success. Build values, raise self-esteem/confidence, instill values of social responsibility/integrity. Age 13-18. Every Th through 4/20 6-8 pm. Free. 742-6641; boyntonbeach.org 3/9 - Drone Program for Teens at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 13-17. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/9 - Space Case by Stuart Gibbs part of Tween Book Jam at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 9-12. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/9-10 - Karate/Martial Arts Classes at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Karate and blend of other combat martial arts. Age 9 to adult. Every Th/F 6-7:30 pm. Per month $10/ resident; $12/non-resident; + $25/one-time uniform fee. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com Friday - 3/10 - Stories in the Garden: Counting in the Garden at Mounts Botanical Garden Pavilion, 531 N Military Tr, West Palm Beach. Librarian leads stories, songs. Age 2-6. 10-11:30 am. Free. 233-1751; mounts.org 3/10 - Tot Time at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Crafts, snacks, indoor play stations. Drop in anytime during the program. Ages 2-5. 10 am-noon. $5/child. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/10 - Sensory Art for Tots at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Ages 1-4 w/parent or caregiver. Every F 11:30 am & 3 pm. Per session $3/member; $5/non-member. 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/10 - Rhythmic Gymnastics at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Every F through 4/28. Mini Stars age 3-4, 2:15-3 pm, $130-$162.50; Beginner 2 age 5-6, $140$175; Intermediate age 7-12, 3:45-5:15, $180$225. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/10 - All About the Nails Class at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Part of Youth Empowerment Center. Cosmetology: manicuring, pedicuring, nail art, acrylics as done by the professionals. Age 13-18. Every F through 4/14 4-6 pm. Free. 742-6641; boyntonbeach.org 3/10 - Unity Dance Team at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Enhances balance, provides exercise, teaches how to gracefully dance, execute interpretive movement. Age 7-15. Every F 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com 3/10 - Eyes to the Skies with professionalgrade 16-inch Meade LX Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Informal event held in the parking lot (weather permitting). Telescope is out for at least one hour after scheduled start time; stars must be visible for telescope to align. Ages 8+ (under 18 must be accompanied by an adult). 8 pm. Free. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org


H18 Tots & Teens Calendar Saturday – 3/11 - Audition: Broadway Artists Intensive at Kravis Center 701 Okeechobee Blvd. Auditions for 7/10-29; taught by all-Broadway faculty. Video audition optional. Age 12-20. 9:30 am. $1,650/intensive (housing & meal plan additional). 651-4376; ehm@kravis.org 3/11 - Mad Hatter Tea Party at Flagler Museum, One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Create festive bonnets and top hats, enjoy a story from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, learn proper table manners from the Mad Hatter, enjoy Gilded Age Style Tea. 10 am. $30/member; $45/ non-member; includes museum admission, tea, tax, gratuity. Advance purchase required: 6552833; flaglermuseum.us 3/11 - Family Saturdays at the Cultural Council at Cultural Council of Palm Beach County Main Gallery, 601 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. 10-11:30 am. $5/family. 471-2901; palmbeachculture.com 3/11 - Family Matters at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Not all families are the same. Explore different ways animals live and play! Ages 3-4. One adult required to attend with children. 10-11:30 am. $20/session. Registration: 533-0887 x 229; palmbeachzoo.org 3/11 - Group Swim Lessons at John Denson Pool, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Children must be potty trained. Levels 1-3. Ages 3 & older. Every Sat through 4/1 10:30 & 11:15 am. $40/resident; $50/non-resident. 742-6645; boynton-beach.org 3/11 - Tail Waggin Tutor with Dolce at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Elementary school children read to certified therapy dog. Grades K-5. 1:30-3 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/11 - Rhythmic Gymnastics: Intermediate at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 7-12. Every Sat through 4/29 2-3:30 pm. $180/resident; $225/nonresident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/11 - USA Netball Association at Pompey Park Recreation Center, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Fast, skillful team game based on running, jumping, throwing, catching. Females age 6 & up. 2nd & 4th Sat 6-8 pm. Free. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com

MARCH 12-18

Monday - 3/13 - Dance Trends Youth Dance Program at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128

The COASTAL STAR E Ocean Ave. Learn discipline and art of dance. T/W/Th/Sat through 6/3. Class times/prices vary by age/style. 542-0215; dancetrendsboynton.com 3/13 - Baby Bookworm at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Storytime for infants accompanied by an adult. Age 3 months to walking. Every M through 4/24. 11-11:30 am. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/13 - Early Afternoon Explorers: Design, Devise and Discover at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 6-9 1-2 pm; ages 10-12 2-3 pm. $10/resident; $12.50/non-resident. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 3/13 - Acting 101 at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Age-appropriate character work. Ages 5-10. Every M through 4/17 3-5 pm. $200/resident; $250/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/13 - Adventures in Reading at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Ages 4-6. Every M through 4/24 3:30-4 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.or 3/13 - Youth Knitting Club (Intermediate) at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Children attend independently. Age 9-12. Every M through 4/24 6-7 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org Tuesday - 3/14 - Toddler Tales at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Stories, songs, puppets teach the love of books. Age up to 3 years; children must be accompanied by an adult. Every T through 4/25. 10-10:30 am. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/14 - Daggerwing Visits the Library: Frogs and Toads at West Boca Branch Library, 18685 N State Rd 7, Boca Raton. Special program features live animal ambassadors. Age 5+. 3:30 pm. Free. RSVP: 470-1600; pbcgov.com/parks/ nature 3/14 - Teen Team Up! at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Team builder games & ice breakers. Grades 6-12. 6-7 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/14 - Feed by M.T. Anderson part of Teen Book Club at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 13-17. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. 3937852; bocalibrary.org Wednesday - 3/15 - Family Storytime at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Age infant to 5 yrs. Held again 3/22 & 29. 10-11 am. Free. 742-6380; boyntonlibrary.org 3/15 - Music and Movement for 2’s & 3’s

at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Evey W through 4/26 10-10:30 or 11-11:30 am. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/15 - Booktastic Book Club for 7s & 8s: The Name Jar by Yangsook Choi at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Free copy of book upon registration. Child attends independently. Registration: 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/15 - Community Coloring at Boynton Beach City Library, 508 S Seacrest Blvd. All ages. 4-6 pm. Free. 742-6380; boyntonlibrary.org 3/15 - Teen Gaming at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Video games use Wii, PS3, Xbox 360. Grades 6-12. Held again 3/29. 5:30-7 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/15 - Introduction to Tinkercad at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 8+. Held again 3/22. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org Thursday - 3/16 - Drawing & Painting for Kids at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Experiment with different art materials to create animal projects. Ages 6-13. 3-5 pm. $28/resident; $35/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/16 - St. Patrick’s Day Craft at Boynton Beach City Library, 508 S Seacrest Blvd. Grades K-5. 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. 742-6380; boyntonlibrary.org 3/16 - DIY Art Projects: The Language of Mark Tobey at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Families participate in self-guided gallery activity, then visit the Atrium for related DIY art project. All ages. 6-8 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton.org 3/16-19 - Honk Jr. at Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. Th-Sat 7 pm; Sat/ Sun 2 pm. $15. 447-8829; solchildren.org Friday - 3/17 - Little Picassos and Caregivers at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 4-6. 10 am-noon. $28/resident; $35/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark. org 3/17 - Archery 101 at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. USA Archery certified instructor. Learn basics of archery, develop a fun new skill. 2-hour program. Equipment provided, wear closed-toe shoes, bring sunscreen. Age 8+. 10 am. $10/person per session. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcparks.com/nature 3/17 - Fabulous Fun Fridays! at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E

March 2017 Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Age 2-7. 1st & 3rd F 10:30-11:15 am. $3/member; $4/non-member + admission. Registration: 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 3/17 - Read with FAU Basketball Players at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Grades K-5. 3-3:30 pm. Free. Registration: 3937852; bocalibrary.org 3/17 - Friday Night at the Museum at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. A night out without your parents! Wear comfy clothes, hang out in the Explorium after hours, watch a movie, do a fun experiment. Ages 7-12. 6-9:30 pm. $20/resident; $25/nonresident. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org Saturday - 3/18 - 3D Printing & Design 101 at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Ages 10-14, 9:30-11:30 am; ages 15+, 1-3 pm. $50. 8321988; sfsciencecenter.org 3/18 - Air Waves Kite Flying at Oceanfront Park, 6415 N Ocean Blvd, Boynton Beach. Enjoy kite flying, games and activities on the sand. 10 am-1 pm. Free. 742-6640; boynton-beach.org 3/18 - Pajama Jams Story Time with Miss Mij at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Stories, fingerplays, poems, songs, props, puppets. Ages 18 mo-2 yrs 10-10:45 am; 3-4 yrs 11 am-noon. $5/drop in (includes one carousel token/paid child). 347-3900; SugarSandPark.org 3/18 - Adobe Photoshop Studio at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 8+. 1:30-3:30 pm. Free. 393-7906; bocalibrary.org 3/18 - Realistic Drawing/Painting Instruction Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Learn basic techniques essential to quality, realistic paintings. Every Sat through 4/8. Adult class 12:30-2:30 pm $65/resident; $81/non-resident; Children class (ages 7-12) 2:30-4:30 pm $40/resident; $50/non-resident; + additional materials to be purchased by parents after first class. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/18-19 - Science Demonstrations at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hear favorite science-inspired stories. Ages 5 & up. 3:30 pm. Free. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 3/18-19 - Zoo Clues Family Overnight at the Zoo at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Ages 6 & up; minimum 1 adult/family required. 6:30 pm-8 am. $40/ member; $50/non-member. Registration:

533-0887 x 229; palmbeachzoo.org/familyovernights

MARCH 19-25

Monday - 3/20 - Kangaroo Kids Programs at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Educational development class. Every M through 4/10. Age 15 mos-2 years 9-9:30 am; age 2-3 years 10-10:45 am; age 3-5 years 11-11:45 am. $60/resident; $75/nonresident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/20 - Uno Tournament at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Grades 4-12. 2:30-4 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/20-21 - Bright & Smart 3D Printing at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Age 7-14. 8:30 am-3 pm. $70/resident; $82/ non-resident. 347-3900; sugarSandPark.org 3/20-21 - Fun & Fitness Activities Program at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 7-14. 8:30 am-5:30 pm. $65/resident; $81.25/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark. org 3/20-22 - Curtain’s Up Drama Workshop at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 6-15. 8:30 am-3 pm. $175/resident; $218.75/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/20-24 - Spring Break Camp at Art Center, 125 SE 2nd Ave, Boynton Beach. Arts & crafts, special guests, daily field trips. Ages 5-12. 7:30 am-5:30 pm. $130/resident; $163/non-resident. 742-6221; boynton-beach.org 3/20-24 - Spring Break Camp at Carolyn Sims Center, 224 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Arts & crafts, movies, field trips. Ages 5-12. 7:30 am-5:30 pm. $130/resident; $163/non-resident. 742-6221; boynton-beach.org 3/20-24 - Spring Break Basketball Camp at Ezell Hester Jr. Center, 1901 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Learn basketball fundamentals, participate in drills and organized game play. Ages 6-15. 9 am-3 pm; 7:30-9 am & 3-5:30 pm add $25. $90/resident; $113/non-resident. 7426640; boynton-beach.org 3/20-24 - Spring Break Cheer Camp at Carolyn Sims Center, 224 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Learn basic cheers, chants, jumps and the concept of team cheerleading. Ages 6-12. 7:30 am-5:30 pm. $130/resident; $163/nonresident. 742-6221; boynton-beach.org 3/20-24 - Sea Turtle Camp at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Close encounters with resident sea turtles, visit a local nesting beach. New theme each day. Bring a healthy snack, beverage; camp shirt required (additional shirts may be purchased). Grades 1-3. 8:30 am-noon. $155/member; $205/non-member (includes 1 year Family membership). Prepayment required: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org 3/20-24 - Ocean Adventure Sea Program at Red Reef Park (M/T/W/F), 1400 N.State Road A1A, & Silver Palm Park (Th), 600 E Palmetto Park Rd, Boca Raton. Beach days M/T/W/F at Red Reef Park, sail/snorkel day Th at Silver Palm Park. Ages 5-15. 9 am-3 pm. $325/resident; $406/non-resident; after care (3-5 pm) $20/ day. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/20-24 - Sports Camp Powered by YES at Levis Jewish Community Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Age PreK-4th grade. 9 am-4 pm $275/week, $60/day; pre-care $6/day; post care $8/day; pre & post care $12/day. 852-3117; nancyc@levisjcc.org 3/20-24 - Travel Day Camp at Levis Jewish Community Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Grades 3-8 9 am-4 pm. $275/week; $60/ day; pre-care $6/day; post care $8/day; pre & ost care $12/day. 852-3117; nancyc@levisjcc.org 3/20-24 - School of Rock and Other Rock Musicals at Center Stage Performing Arts, 7200 W Camino Real #330, Boca Raton. 9 am-4 pm. $275/week + $30 one time enrollment fee. $50 downpayment required to reserve spot. Before care begins 8 am $10. 558-4148; centerstageboca.com 3/20-24 - Spring Break Blast Camp at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Exploration, experiments, games, more. Grades 1-5. M-F 9 am-1 pm. Full week $107/ resident, $134/non-resident; daily $25/resident, $31.25/non-resident. Advance purchase required: 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 3/20-24 - One Week Wonder Spring Break Camp at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. Kids work together to produce And Then There Was One. M-F. 9 am-3 pm. Performance 11 am 3/25. Ages 8+. $200/child. 584-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/20-24 - Spring Break Art-Sea Camp at 112 S Federal Highway #7, Boynton Beach. 2-3 projects a day. Pottery painting, decoupage, canvas painting, watercolor, jewelry making, mosaic, more. 10:30 am-2:30 pm. Held again 3/27-31, 4/3-7 & 4/10-14. $353/week camp; $65/one-day camp. Reservations: 737-2600; art-sealiving.com Tuesday - 3/21 - Mother Nature & Me: Cats in Hats at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Stories, puppets, games, role play, nature walks, crafts. Age 2-5 (w/guardian). 10:30 am. $4/child. RSVP: 629-


March 2017 8760; pbcgov.com/parks/nature 3/21 - Heads Up! at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Play Charades app game. Grades 6-12. 4-5:30 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/21-24 - Junior Lifeguard Aquatic Camp at John Denson Pool, 225 NW 12 Ave, Boynton Beach. Lifeguard training, water safety skills, open swim. Ages 10-14. 9:30 am-3:30 pm. $50/resident; $62/non-resident. 742-6645; boynton-beach.org 3/21-22 - Group Swim Lessons at John Denson Pool, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Young children must be potty trained. Ages 3 & older; Level 1. T/Th through 4/13 or W/F through 4/14 4, 4:30 & 5 pm. $40/resident; $50/ non-resident. 742-6645; boynton-beach.org Wednesday - 3/22 - Jr. Herpetologist Class at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Junior Naturalist Series designed for youth interested in nature and outdoor activities. Age 9-14. 8:30-11:30 am. $10/session; $50/6 sessions. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcgov.com/parks 3/22 - Playdate at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Get info about upcoming programs, free kid’s activities. 11 am-12:30 pm. Free. 347-3900; SugarSandPark.org 3/22 - Jr. Survivalist Class at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Junior Naturalist Series designed for youth interested in nature & outdoor activities. Age 9-14. Noon-3 pm. $10/session; $50/6 sessions. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcgov.com/parks 3/22 - Movie: Muppets From Space at Sugar Sand Park Community Center, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. 1 pm. $1 admission includes popcorn/beverage. 347-3948; sugarsandpark. org 3/22 - Sand Art Bottles at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Create layered sand art in bottles. Grades K-5. 3-4 pm. Free. 742-6393; boyntonlibrary.org 3/22 - Teen Gaming Tournament: NBA2K17 at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Grades 6-12. 4-6 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/22 - Tween Explorers: Make a Stop Animation Movie with an iPad at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 9-12. 6:307:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org Thursday - 3/23 - Jr. Wetland Ecologist Class at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Junior Naturalist Series designed for youth interested in nature and outdoor activities. Age 9-14. 8:30-11:30 am. $10/session; $50/6 sessions. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcgov.com/parks 3/23 - Curtain’s Up Theatre Make Up at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 6-15. 8:30 am-3 pm. $65/resident; $81.25/ non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/23 - Intro to Archery at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. USA Archery and N.F.A.A. certified instructor. Bow and arrow safety, how to properly use equipment, practice on the range. Ages 8+. 10 am. $10. Reservations: 629-8760; pbcgov.com/ parks/nature 3/23 - Juggling Workshop at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 5 & up. 11:30 am. $10/resident; $12.50/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/23 - Jr. Ornithologist Class at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Junior Naturalist Series designed for youth interested in nature and outdoor activities. Age 9-14. Noon-3 pm. $10/session; $50/6 sessions. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcgov.com/parks 3/23 - Drawing & Painting Art Class at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 6-13. 2-4 pm. $28/resident; $35/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/23 - DIY Art Projects: Strike a Pose with Diana and Actaeon! at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Families participate in self-guided gallery activity, then visit the Atrium for related DIY art project. All ages. 6-8 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton.org 3/23 - Create it @ Your Library: Creative Writing & Activities at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Grades 6-12. 6:307:30 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org Friday - 3/24 - Jr. Lepidopterist Class at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Junior Naturalist Series designed for youth interested in nature and outdoor activities. Age 9-14. 8:30-11:30 am. $10/session; $50/6 sessions. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcgov.com/parks 3/24 - Fun Chefs at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 5-12. 8:30 am-1 pm. $65/resident; $81.25/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/24 - Jr. Botanist Class at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Junior Naturalist Series designed for youth interested in nature and outdoor activities. Age 9-14. Noon-3 pm. $10/session; $50/6 sessions. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcgov.com/parks 3/24 - Starlab Adventure at Children’s Sci-

The COASTAL STAR ence Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Enter inflatable Starlab to explore what lies within our galaxy. Age 6-12. 2-3 pm. $10/ resident; $12.50/non-resident. Registration: 347-3900; scienceexplorium.org 3/24 - Movie Break: The Secret Life of Pets at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. All ages. 3:30-5 pm. Free. 742-6380; boyntonlibrary.org 3/24 & 26 - Auditions for Once on This Island at Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. Sat 7-9 pm; Mon 6-8 pm. By appointment only: 447-8829; solchildren.org Saturday - 3/25 - Soccer Shots at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Every Sat through 5/20. Age 2-3 9:30-10 am; age 4-5 10-10:45 am. $120/resident; $150/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/25 - Story & Craft Time at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Discover nature through crafts, stories about animals, other nature-related themes. Age 4-10. 10 am. $2. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcgov.com/ parks 3/25 - Mountainfilm on Tour at Kravis Center Persson Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Family fare. 10 am. $5. 832-7469; kravis. org 3/25 - Meet the Orchestra: The Symphonia at Saint Andrew’s School Roberts Theater, 3900 Jog Rd, Boca Raton. Interact with The Symphonia’s conductor and musicians at live dress rehearsals, discover how classical music inspires creativity. 10:30 am-noon. $5/adult; free/child. Reservations: 866-687-3848; thesymphonia. org 3/25 - It’s Circus…It’s Science (G) at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. 11 am & 2 pm. $8/adult; $6/child 12 & under. 347-3948; willowtheatre.org

MARCH 26-APRIL 1

Sunday - 3/26 - COBRA Minis Basketball at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 3-5. Every Sun through 5/7 10-10:45 am. $80/resident: $100/non-resident. 347-3916; sugarsandpark.org 3/26 - COBRA Minis Soccer at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 3-5. Every Sun through 5/7 11-11:45 am. $80/resident; $100/non-resident. 347-3916; sugarsandpark.org Monday - 3/27 - Acrobatics Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Basic skills on mats: stretches, bridges, rolls, cartwheels, handstands, balances. Musical warm-ups, prop routines included. Age 5-9. Every M through 5/22 5-5:45 pm. $126/resident; $158/non-resident. 954-971-9917; myboca.us 3/27 - Jazz & Hip Hop Dance Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Learn choreographed warm-ups, dances to favorite songs. Age 5-9. Every M through 5/22 4:15-5 pm $126/resident; $158/ non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us Tuesday - 3/28 - Kangaroo Kids Programs at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Educational development class. Every T through 4/18. Age 2-3 years 10-10:45 am; age 3-5 years 11-11:45 am. $60/resident; $75/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/28 - COBRA Minis Basketball at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 3-5. Every Th through 5/9 3:30-4:15 pm. $80/resident; $100/non-resident. 347-3916; sugarsandpark.org 3/28 - GEMS Club: Sports Science at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Empower young girls to explore STEM fields. Girls grades 3-8.

Tots & Teens Calendar H19 High school girls can volunteer to be mentors. 5-7 pm. $7/child. Registration: 370-7710; sfsciencecenter.org/gems Thursday - 3/30 - COBRA Minis Soccer at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 3-5. Th through 5/11. 3:304:15 pm. $80/resident; $100/non-resident. 347-3916; sugarsandpark.org 3/30 - Project Fashion Design & Sewing Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Students sketch 2-3 pieces to be made during class. Learn fundamentals of sewing, choosing fabric, decorating with fabric paint, ribbons and trim. Each session concludes with a fashion show for friends and family. Ages 8 & up. Every Th through 5/18 5-6:30 pm. $180/resident; $225/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/30 - Mad Hatter Tea Party at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. All ages. 6-7 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/30 - Mean Girls (PG-13) part of Teen Movie Night at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Ages 13-17. 6-8:15 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org Friday - 3/31 - Sports Science Night At The Museum at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Science crafts, activities, entertainment, exhibits, planetarium shows, a chance to view the night sky. Family fare. 6-9 pm. $13.95/adult; $11.95/senior; $9.95/child (3-12), $6/adult member; free/child member & kids under 3. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org Saturday - 4/1 - Soccer Shots at Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Age-specific curriculum; equipment provided. Every Sat through 5/20. Ages 2-3 9:30-10 am; ages 4-6, 10-10:45 am. $92/resident; $115 nonresident. 742-6240; boynton-beach.or

4/1 - Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Tails at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Do you sleep at night like a parrot or during the day like an owl? Meet friends who like breakfast for dinner. Ages 3-4. One adult required to attend with children. 10-11:30 am. $20/session. Registration: 533-0887 x229; palmbeachzoo.org 4/1 - Shape, Rattle, and Roll at the Zoo at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Age-specific crafts, activities, up-close animal encounters, stories, more. Ages 3-4 10-11:30 am; age 2 10-11 am 4 /5; minimum 1 adult/family required. $20/member; $40/nonmember. Registration required: 533-0887 x 229; palmbeachzoo.org/childrens-workshops 4/1 - Art Goes Green: Paper Mache at the Intracoastal Park Clubhouse, 2240 N Federal Hwy, Boynton Beach. Students’ imaginations are stretched as they create artwork from recycled materials. Ages 8-14. Every Sat through 5/20 12:15-1:45 pm. $63/resident; $79/ non-resident. Registration required: 742-6221; boynton-beach.org 4/1 - Art-E-Ology: Louise Nevelson: Wood Is Beautiful at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Learn about a master artist on exhibit, create a masterpiece in the style of the selected artist. Grades 3-5. 1-2:30 pm. $5/child; free/member. Reservations: 392-2500 x106; bocamuseum.org 4/1-2 - Auditions for Madagascar: A Musical Adventure Jr. at The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St. Production dates 6/27-7/14. Bring sheet music; no CDs allowed. Cast requires elementary, middle and especially high school students. Ages 6-18. Sat 11 am-1:30 pm; Call Backs Sun 4:30-6:30 pm. $750/student (10% sibling discount). By appointment only: 272-1281 x4; delraybeachplayhouse.com


H20 Outdoors

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

On the Water

B

Nonprofit teaches kids fishing, ecology and generosity

rothers Lucas and Nick Metropulos love fishing and diving and sharing their passion for the ocean and marine conservation with children. When Lucas was attending St. Andrew’s School in Boca Raton in 2007, he started the nonprofit Fishing for Families in Need to provide fishing and ocean education to children and to offer fresh fish to soup kitchens. Lucas wanted children to develop an appreciation for fish, coral reefs and other aspects of the ocean. His father, a Greek Orthodox minister, trained him to provide service to others. “We don’t just teach the kids to go out and catch whatever they can,” Lucas Metropulos said. “At the end of the day, they learn that we need to protect what’s out there.” Fishing for Families in Need — www.F4FN.com — held its first student-run classes for youths in 2008. Nine years later, the organization is still teaching children about fishing and the ocean, taking them on fishing trips and providing fresh fish to soup kitchens. Nick Metropulos, a senior at St. Andrew’s School, is overseeing the nonprofit organization, which uses about 30 student volunteers from high schools in Boca Raton to provide its services. The organization’s core program teaches fishing skills with a dose of environmental education to children 8-12 at the Florence Fuller Child Development Centers in Boca Raton. During the first day of the spring 2017 class, held Feb. 1 at the Florence Fuller centers, children raised their hands eagerly to answer questions about ocean pollution, overfishing and what constitutes a keystone species. Together, with a little help,

to attend college in the fall, but he said Fishing for Families in Need will continue to operate with another student serving as chief executive officer. He said he plans to continue offering fishing and ocean education to children near the college he attends.

Non-motorized boat registration

Isaiah LaFaille listens for sounds inside a conch shell held by instructor Jason Fox of the St. Andrew’s School in Boca Raton. The student-run nonprofit Fishing For Families in Need conducts afterschool fishing and ocean education programs weekly at the Florence Fuller Child Development Centers in Boca Raton. Willie Howard/ The Coastal Star they named the five oceans along with the largest ocean (Pacific), the second largest (Atlantic) and the smallest (Arctic). The fishing lessons are hands-on as well as conceptual. Volunteers show the kids how to rig rods, tie fishing knots, throw cast nets and clean fish. They practice casting on the basketball court. After the training is complete, the kids take a graduation fishing trip — usually to Anglins pier in Lauderdale-by-the-Sea or aboard the Lady K drift boat based in Lantana. Youths who complete the fishing education program each receive a rod and reel and tackle

The Metropulos brothers — Nick, left, and Lucas — have operated the nonprofit fishing and environmental education organization Fishing for Families in Need based at St. Andrew’s School in Boca Raton since 2007. This photo was taken in January, when the brothers traveled to Nassau, Bahamas, to help with Hurricane Matthew relief efforts through Lend a Hand Bahamas. Photo provided box donated by Fish Florida, a nonprofit organization that raises money through the sale of sailfish license tags (www. fishfloridatag.org). Students working with Fishing for Families in Need also host a summer spearfishing tournament after which they clean and bag fish for donation to soup kitchens. Student volunteers collect and clean fresh fish from anglers throughout the year — often fish brought to the scales during tournaments — to make

A C P Home Interiors

fresh fish available to soup kitchens. Fish donated by the students is welcomed at the Boca Helping Hands Food Center, which serves lunch six days a week, Executive Director James Gavrilos said. “When Fishing for Families in Need makes a donation, we know that lunch the next day will be a healthy, heart-friendly meal that is often beyond the financial reach of our clients,” Gavrilos said. Nick Metropulos, 18, plans

Let us help you make your house, your home!

A non-motorized boat working group, created in 2015 to make recommendations to the state’s Boating Advisory Council, considered — but did not recommend — expanding vessel registration to nonmotorized boats in Florida during its February meeting in Orlando. The group has not recommended registration for canoes, kayaks, sailboats and other types of non-motorized boats, said Rob Klepper, a spokesman for the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission. K lepper said the working group discusses many topics related to non-motorized boats, including access to the water, education and safety. The possibility of charging annual fees to register nonmotorized boats has been part of the discussion, but there is no recommendation to require registration at this time, Klepper said. On Feb. 1, FWC Executive Director Nick Wiley issued a statement opposing registration and fees for non-motorized boats. “The FWC appreciates the work of this advisory group, but we are not supportive of increasing fees on Floridians or visitors who participate in nonmotorized boating,” Wiley said.

Palm Beach boat show

This year’s Palm Beach International Boat Show in downtown West Palm Beach will feature more than $1.2 billion in boats, electronics, accessories and clothing along with fishing and diving gear. Educational events include fishing seminars for adults provided by the IGFA School of Sportfishing and children’s fishing clinics provided by Hook the Future. Show attendees also will be able to sign up for classes in boat handling and docking. The boat show opens at noon March 23. Regular hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., except on March 26, when the show ends at 6 p.m. Admission: $22 for adults; $12 for ages 6-15; free for children younger than 6. Call 954-764-7642 or go to www. showmanagement.com.

Coming events

visit us online at

www.ACPHomeInteriors.com

March 4: Basic boating safety class offered by Coast Guard Auxiliary, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the headquarters building at Spanish River Park, 3939 N. Ocean Blvd., Boca Raton. Fee: $35 for adults, $20


March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Outdoors H21

www.excentricities.com

Tom Perry of Ocean Ridge holds the 14.5-pound kingfish he caught Feb. 3 while fishing aboard the Living on Island Time drift boat. His kingfish hit a dead sardine north of the Lake Worth pier and was the largest fish caught during an outing for members of the West Palm Beach Fishing Club. The drift boat is based at the Palm Beach Yacht Center in Hypoluxo. Willie Howard/The Coastal Star ages 12-19. Register at the door. Bring lunch. Call 391-3600 or email fso-pe@cgauxboca.org. March 7: Fishing author Manny Luftglass discusses saltwater fishing in Florida, 2 p.m. at Palm Beach County’s Lantana branch library, 4020 Lantana Road. Free. Call 3044500. March 22: Capt. Scott Fawcett offers tips for catching yellowfin tuna at the West Palm Beach Fishing Club’s meeting, 7 p.m., 201 Fifth St., West Palm Beach. Free. Call 832-6780 or www. westpalmbeachfishingclub.org. March 25: Boating safety class offered by Coast Guard Auxiliary, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the classroom building next to the boat ramps, Harvey E. Oyer Jr. Park, 2010 N. Federal Highway, Boynton Beach. Fee: $20 adults, $10 ages 14-18, free for 13 and younger; $50 family rate for three or more people. Register at the door. Call 7047440. March 31: Kickoff party for the Lantana Fishing Derby, 5:30 p.m. at The Hive

Bar & Grill, 618 W. Lantana Road. Call 585-8664 or www. Lantanafishingderby.com.

Tip of the month

Boaters who want up-todate information on navigation hazards, military exercises on the water and other advisories for South Florida waters can check the Coast Guard’s Local Notices to Mariners at www. navcen.uscg.gov. Select District 7, which includes Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and Puerto Rico. The Coast Guard also encourages mariners who notice hazards or discrepancies with published information, such as bridge clearances, to report them to the Miami office by calling (305) 535-4472. Willie Howard is a freelance writer and licensed boat captain. Reach him at tiowillie@ bellsouth.net.

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1810 S. Dixie Highway 561-249-6000

North Palm Beach

1400 Old Dixie Highway 561-845-3250

Jupiter

225 E Indiantown Road 561-748-5440 Open Sunday 11:00am-4:00pm

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Grand & Private executive retreat on premier .37 acre lot. As you drive into the gated motor court

you will immediately be impressed at the detailed precast stone columns and embellishments, soffit corbels and magnificent designed elevation. Proceed through the arched wood mahogany entry doors to be equally pleased at the incredible interior finishes and amenities that await you. This home, designed by original owner, includes a resort-styled pool that will take your breath away! With six bedrooms, one currently used as an office, and several living areas & patio areas, you will have ample place to entertain guests. Lush landscaping affords plenty of privacy. And at a moments notice grab a towel and stroll to the deeded beach included with this opulent residence. This home is a must see for the buyers wanting it all. Offered at $3,495,000.

V. Anthony Loffredo Broker/Owner/Realtor® 561-445-6555 • AVR.Loffredo@gmail.com


H22 Outdoors Calendar

The COASTAL STAR

Outdoors Calendar Note: Events are current as of 2/24. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 4

Saturday - 3/4 - Sand Sifters Beach Clean Up at Oceanfront Park, 6415 N Ocean Blvd, Ocean Ridge. Meet at pavilion in lower parking lot. 1st Sat 8-10:15 am. Free. jefflev02@gmail.com 3/4 - Outdoor Adventure Day at John Prince Park Smythe Pavilion, 4759 S Congress Ave, Lake Worth. Presented by Palm Beach County Parks & Recreation Department in partnership with Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation. Canoeing, fishing, archery, rock climbing, more. Family fare. 10 am-3 pm. Free. 963-6749; pbcparks.com 3/4 - Tram Tours of the Marsh at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, 10216 Lee Rd, Boynton Beach. M/W/Th 1-2:30 pm; M/W/Th/Sat 10-11:30 am. $5/automobile; $1/pedestrian. Reservations: 733-0192; loxahatcheefriends. com/events/events.shtml 3/4 - Outdoor Marine Aquarium Feedings at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. All ages; children must be accompanied by an adult. Mangrove & nearshore reef aquariums daily M-Sat 10:30 am; tropical coral reef & shipwreck aquariums 12:30 pm. Free. 5448605; gumbolimbo.org 3/4 - Boardwalk Tours at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boyn-

March 2017

Loop for Literacy

ton Beach. Docent-guided tour of wetlands. All ages. Times vary, call for details. Free. 966-7000; pbcgov.com/parks/nature

John Prince Park, Lake Worth – Feb. 4

MARCH 5-11

Monday - 3/6 - Beginner Bird Walk at Wakodahatchee Wetlands, 13206 Jog Rd, Delray Beach. Meet at top of boardwalk. 7:30-9:30 am. Free. auduboneverglades. org Tuesday - 3/7-8 - A Walk On The Ashley Trail at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Guided walk along 1/4-mile natural trail winds through the butterfly garden, coastal hammock, mangroves to a sandy beach by the Intracoastal. All ages; children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Every T/W 11 am12:30 am. Free. 544-8605; gumbolimbo.org Wednesday - 3/8 - Beach Treasures at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Learn about seashells, the animals that make them. Caravan to Red Reef Park, 1400 N State Rd A1A, to search for ocean treasures. All ages; children must be accompanied by an adult. Held again 3/22. 3:30-5 pm. $5/member; $8/non-member. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org 3/8 - Eco-Watch: Endemic Wild Flowers of Florida presented by Roger Hammer, part of Lecture Series at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Opportunity to talk with the speaker; light

Boca Raton. Explore grasses and flats of the Intracoastal Waterway behind Gumbo Limbo. Hand-held dip nets and large seine nets allow participants to catch and release a variety of fish, shrimp, crabs and marine life. Wear clothes that can get wet. No flip-flops or sandals. Old Sneakers or water shoes only. Ages 10 to adult; children must be accompanied by an adult. Held again 3/25. 3-4:30 pm. $7/member; $10/ non-member. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org

MARCH 12-18

More than 350 cyclists, runners and walkers turned out for the annual fundraiser that had cyclists pedaling 40 miles and runners and walkers doing 3.1 miles. There also was a 1-mile Family Fun Walk & Ride. The event benefited the Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County, whose mission is to ensure every child and adult in the area can read. ABOVE: (l-r) Kendall Apte, Susan Tusting and Margaret Blume. Photo provided refreshments follow. Ages 14 & up; children under age 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 7-8:30 pm. $5/suggested donation. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org Thursday - 3/9 - Bass Fishing Workshop at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Introduction to fishing for largemouth bass in local Florida waters and throughout the nation. Instructor Ron Gallo. Ages 13 & up. 6-9 pm.

Held again 3/30. $35/resident; $44/nonresident. 367-7035; myboca.us Saturday – 3/11 - Birds & Breakfast at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Coffee, refreshments, 1-hour walking tour w/a naturalist. Ages 9+. 9 am. $3. Reservations: 966-7000; pbcparks.com 3/11 - Seining the Lagoon at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd,

Friday - 3/17 - Wetlands & Wildlife at Wakodahatchee Wetlands, 13026 Jog Rd, Delray Beach. 3/4 mile guided boardwalk tour. Bring camera, binoculars. Ages 7 to adult; children must be accompanied by an adult. 3-5 pm. Free. Reservations: 5448615; gumbolimbo.org Saturday - 3/18 - Beginner Bird Walk at Wakodahatchee Wetlands, 13206 Jog Rd, Delray Beach. Meet at top of boardwalk. 5-7 pm. Free. auduboneverglades.org

MARCH 19-25

Tuesday - 3/21 - Archaeology Day: Archaeology of Tree Islands, The Loxahatchee and CRM at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Learn about local history of South Florida and Cultural Resource Management; presentation by Rodrigo Cardenas, Palm Beach County Archaeological Society. Ages 8+ (w/guardian). 1:30 pm. Free. 629-8760; pbcgov.com/parks/nature Wednesday - 3/22 - Geocaching By Bike at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11200 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Bring your own bike, participate in the worldwide scavenger hunt. Learn how to use a GPS handheld unit or bring your own smartphone w/ free Geocaching Intro app installed. Ages 8+. 10 am. $5. Reservations: 629-8760; pbcgov.com/parks/nature 3/22 - Eco-Watch: Gumbo Limbo’s First People presented by Arlene Fradkin, PhD, part of Lecture Series at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Opportunity to talk with the speaker; light refreshments follow. Ages 14 & up; children under age 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 7-8:30 pm. $5/suggested donation. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org Friday - 3/24 - Fishing Fun at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Bring sunscreen, water bottle, closed-toed shoes that can get wet/muddy. Age 8+. 10 am. $10/includes fishing supplies. RSVP: 629-8760; pbcgov.com/parks/ nature Saturday - 3/25 - Sea Angels Beach Cleanup at Ocean Inlet Park, 6990 N Ocean Blvd, Ocean Ridge. Last Sat 8-10:30 am. 369-5501; seaangels.org

MARCH 26-APRIL 1

Monday - 3/27 - Conservation Stewardship Training Course at various locations. 7-week course presented by Audubon Society of the Everglades in partnership with IFAS/UF Extension of PBC. Classroom & fieldwork; catered lunch. Every M through 5/8. 9 am-1 pm. $75/ASE member; $90/non-member. Registration: 876-8815; auduboneverglades.org Tuesday - 3/28 - Boynton Beach Fishing Club at Harvey E. Oyer, Jr. Park, 2010 N Federal Hwy. Join other fishermen to discuss hot topics, learn new tricks of the trade. 4th T 7-9 pm. Free. 703-5638; boynton-beach.org Thursday – 3/30 - The Night Stalkers at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Join a Naturalist on a boardwalk tour looking at nature from the point of view of its nocturnal residents. Age 9+. 7 pm. $5/person. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcgov.com/parks Friday - 3/31 - The 23nd Annual Lantana Fishing Derby Kick Off Party at The Hive Bar & Grill, 618 W Lantana Rd, Lantana. 5:30-7 pm. Derby scheduled 4/2930. 585-8664; lantanafishingderby.com 3/31 - Night Hike at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Walk through the wetlands, call for owls, shine for gators! Bring bug spray, flashlight. Ages 5+. 7 pm. $5. Reservations: 629-8760; pbcgov.com/parks/nature


March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

House of the Month H23

House of the Month

Each month, The Coastal Star features a house for sale in our community. The House of the Month is presented as a service to our advertisers and provides readers with a peek inside one of our houses.

Wide Intracoastal vistas are available from nearly every room of this house on a double point lot with 295 feet of water frontage.

This two-story living room is brightened by three sets of French doors opening to the waterfront patio.

Elegance with a view in Delray Located on Brooks Lane, a quiet cul-de-sac off A1A, this European-inspired estate is entered via a gated motor court leading to the formal entry and three-bay garage. With 12,520 square feet under air, this two-story residence has five bedrooms and 6½ baths. Capturing waterfront views from nearly every room, all windows and exterior doors are fitted with impact-rated glass. The open-concept kitchen has custom cabinetry, quartz countertops and top-of-the-line chef’s appliances. The dining room, living room, library, media room and master suite are the outstanding features on this level. A sculptural staircase leads to the second-floor balcony, which overlooks the stately living room below and adjoins an office with built-ins. Three more en suite bedrooms, two with waterfront balconies, complete this floor’s impressive renovation. Offered at $7,950,000. Call Pascal Liguori, 561-278-0100. Premier Estate Properties, 900 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach. pascal@premierestateproperties.com

The loggia was designed for maximum outdoor entertainment appeal — near the summer kitchen, lounge and free-form pool.


H24 

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017


INSIDE:

The reports of bookstores’ death have been greatly exaggerated ... Page AT13 Pay it Forward - Page AT2 Celebrations - Page AT5 Thom Smith - Page AT10 Calendar - Page AT22

March 2017

Along the Coast

A tradition of talent Marie Soltis at the Briny Art League studio with her painting of a blue heron at Wakodahatchee Wetlands. Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

Briny art show marks 65th anniversary By Ron Hayes

Quiet, please. Artists at work. The men and women in Pat Columbus’ mixedmedia class at the Briny Breezes Art League are bent over desks, gently working their canvases, so Marie Soltis speaks softly. “When I first saw everything that went on,” she recalls, “it was like an art colony to me. Most everybody here is highly motivated. They don’t want to just sit around.” Soltis is a former art director at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y., who taught watercolor painting here for seven years, until failing vision forced her to stop. She is 82 now. When the Briny Breezes Art League was born, she was 15. That was 1950, when this tiny town of mobile homes was still a seasonal campground. Roland Stebbins, the retired head of the University of Wisconsin’s art department, started teaching about 20 aspiring amateurs in a storage building where the local beauty parlor stands today.

Two years later, the group held its first art show, a casual celebration of its efforts. A year later, the classes moved to an old cottage, which served until 1967, when the current swimming pool was installed. For the past 40 years, the league has met in a Quonset hut behind the beauty parlor. The studios have come and gone, the students and teachers have come and gone, but the art shows endure. On March 18-19, the 65th annual Briny Breezes Art League Show will display the members’ work in the town’s community center and art studio. Some paintings will touch you with their sincerity; some will dazzle you with their mastery. Marion Roddin joined the league in 1990, enrolling in a watercolor class to fulfill a childhood dream. Twenty-seven years later, she’s still painting. “I don’t want to brag,” says Roddin, 79, who summers on Long Island, “but I charge a lot, $50 to $200. And in New York I get more. I sold in East Hampton this year. I have doctors.” See BRINY on page AT12

Artist Louise O’Brian holds one of her paintings outside her Briny Breezes mobile home in the 1940s. Photo provided


AT2 Pay it Forward/Calendar

Pay it Forward

Pay it Forward

Events are current as of 2/26. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH

Saturday - 3/4 - Bascom Palmer Eye Institute’s Evening of Vision Gala at The Mar-a-Lago Club, 1100 S. Ocean Blvd., Palm Beach, 5:30-11:30 pm. $600. 305-326-6190 or bascompalmer.org. 3/4 - Palm Beach Day Academy’s The Great Gatsby Feather Ball at 241 Seaview Ave. Be transported back to the 1920s, when the school got its start as Florida’s first independent one, and enjoy a roarin’ good time. 6 pm. $195. 655-1188, Ext. 125 or pbday.org. 3/4 - 211 Palm Beach / Treasure Coast’s Under the Sea Spring Gala at The Colony, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Join event Chairmen Richard Gaff, Ozzie Medeiros and Edward Schmidt for an evening complete with cocktails, dinner, dancing, live performances and sensory entertainment all in support of a valuable resource. 6-11 pm. $350. 383-1128 or 211palmbeach.org/ spring-gala. 3/4 - Bethesda Ball “Bethesda Has Heart” at The Breakers, One South County Road, Palm Beach. Benefits the Structural Heart Program. 6:30 pm cocktails, 7:30 pm dinner and dancing.  $375. 737-7733, Ext. 84445 or bethesdahospitalfoundation.org. Sunday - 3/5 - Zonta Club of Greater Deerfield Beach’s Cabaret Brunch at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Drive, Boca Raton. See who wins the “Heart, Soul & Service Award” while savoring food, bidding in a silent auction, taking a chance in the raffle and listening to live entertainment. 11 am-2 pm. $80. 715-0416 or facebook.

com/zontaclubofgreaterdeerfieldbeach. Wednesday - 3/8 - Hanley Center Foundation’s Palm Beach Dinner at The Beach Club, 755 N. County Road, Palm Beach. Enjoy an evening under the stars with an elegant reception, live music and a silent auction to raise funds for the foundation’s life-enhancing work. 6:30 pm. $350-$500. 841-1212 or hanleycenterfoundation.org. 3/8 - Naoma Donnelley Haggin Boys & Girls Club of Delray Beach’s Be Great Celebration Dinner at The Seagate Country Club, 3600 Hamlet Drive, Delray Beach. Honor Youth of the Year nominee Karah Pierre and Community Philanthropist Muriel Losee-Pratt while raising money to support programming for more than 300 children. 6:30 pm cocktail reception, 7:30 pm dinner. $200. 683-3287 or bgcpbc.org. Thursday - 3/9 - Achievement Centers for Children & Families’ Home Tour in coastal Delray Beach from Atlantic Avenue to George Bush Boulevard. Explore inviting residences, enjoy a catered luncheon and take advantage of trolley service along the route. 10 am-4 pm. $100. 266-0003, Ext. 16 or delrayhometour.com. 3/9 - Center for Family Services of Palm Beach County’s Dinner Dance at Club Colette, 215 Peruvian Ave., Palm Beach. Enjoy “An Enchanted Evening” and celebrate the agency’s accomplishments during the past year while taking in a performance by John Lloyd Young, of the Broadway show Jersey Boys. 7 pm. $500. 616-1258 or ctrfam. org/dinner-dance. Friday - 3/10 - Promise Garden Luncheon & Spring Fashion Show at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Drive. Benefits Alzheimer’s Association’s Southeast

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Circle of Hope Gala

Westchester Country Club, Boynton Beach

March 30: Artist DUAIV will create a one-of-a-kind painting to be auctioned during Women’s Circle’s 13th-annual fundraising gala. Enjoy dinner, live music, silent auction, raffle and dancing. Proceeds from the event support programs to improve career prospects of culturally diverse, underserved women in Palm Beach County. Time is 6 p.m. Cost is $150. Call 244-7627, Ext. 106 or visit womenscircle.org/gala. ABOVE: (l-r) Shelley Eichner, Sister Lorraine Ryan, Linda Chapley, Sister Joan Carusillo, Marge Blanz, Dee Price, Jo-Ann DiLorenzo and Nelly Mejia. Photo provided Florida chapter. 11 am-1:30 pm. $100. 800272-3900 or alzheimersluncheon.eventbrite. com. 3/10 - Alzheimer’s Association’s Rita Hayworth Luncheon at The Colony, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Party with Princess Yasmin Aga Khan, daughter of the legendary movie star and event namesake who died from Alzheimer’s disease. 11:30 am. $300-$500. 312-604-1680 or alz.org. 3/10 - KidSafe Foundation’s “Shine the Light” Gala at Woodfield Country Club, 3650 Club Place, Boca Raton. Hear from guest speaker and Palm Beach County State Attorney Dave Aronberg and participate in a live auction to raise funds for the prevention of bullying and child abuse. 7-11 pm. $175. 855-844-7233 or kidsafefoundation.org. Saturday - 3/11 - The Unicorn Ball featuring artist Michael Israel at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Drive. 6 pm. $300. 620-9377, Ext. 302 or unicornchildrensfoundation.org. 3/11 - Palm Beach Dramaworks’ Black & White Ball at Kravis Center, 701

Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. 6:30 pm cocktails. 7:30 pm, dinner and dancing. $600. 514-4042, Ext. 106 or palmbeachdramaworks.org. Monday - 3/13 - Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America’s Book of Hope Luncheon at Boca Raton Resort & Club, 501 E. Camino Real. 10:30 am. $150. 218-2929 or bookofhopeluncheon.weebly.com. Tuesday - 3/14 - Musical Series Luncheon at The Beach Club, 755 N. County Road, Palm Beach. Benefits School of the Arts Foundation and includes performances and raffles. 11:30 am. $125-$150. 805-6298 or soafi.org. 3/14 - Art of Phoenix Luncheon “Hope & Healing Through Art” at Club Colette, 215 Peruvian Ave., Palm Beach. Produced by Armory Art Center in partnership with Human Trafficking Coalition of Palm Beach County. Noon. $350. 832-1776 or armoryart.org. Thursday - 3/16 - Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County’s Love of Literacy Luncheon at Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Enjoy featured speaker Diane Ackerman, an award-winning poet, author and naturalist. 11:30 am. $150. 279-9103 or literacypbc.org. Sunday - 3/26 - Il Circolo’s Viaggio Italia: The 41st Anniversary Gala at The Breakers, One South County Road, Palm Beach. 6 pm. $350. 371-4517 or ilcircoloflorida.com. Thursday - 3/30 - Family Promise Luau at The Beach Club, 755 North County Road, Palm Beach. 6-9 pm. $200. 318-8864 or familypromisencpbc.org. 3/30 - 2017 Circle of Hope Gala at Westchester Country Club, 12250 Westchester Club Dr., Boynton Beach. Benefits The Women’s Circle and includes dinner, music, silent and live auctions and a special program. 7-10 pm. $150. 244-7627 or womenscircle.org. 3/30 - 2017 South Florida Science Center and Aquarium Annual Benefit at The

Breakers, One South County Road, Palm Beach. Guest speaker Michio Kaku. 7 pm. $500. 370-7738 or sfsciencecenter.org. Friday - 3/31 - 2017 Youth of the Year Dinner at Eau Palm Beach, 100 S. Ocean Blvd., Manalapan. Benefits Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County. 6-9 pm. $150. 6833287 or bgcpbc.org.

Publisher Jerry Lower publisher@thecoastalstar.com

Advertising Executives Mike Mastropietro Jay Nuszer

Executive Editor Mary Kate Leming editor@thecoastalstar.com

News Operations Tracy Allerton Chad Armstrong Brad Betker Chris Felker Steve Plunkett Victoria Preuss Michelle Quigley Clare Shore Scott Simmons Michele Smith Margot Street Tom Warnke Amy Woods

Advertising Manager Chris Bellard sales@thecoastalstar.com Managing Editors Henry Fitzgerald henry@thecoastalstar.com Mary Thurwachter maryt@thecoastalstar.com Founding Partners Carolyn & Price Patton

APRIL

Saturday - 4/1 - President’s Gala 2017 at Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton. Benefits scholarships and support for FAU students. Gourmet dinner, open bar, live entertainment and an auction. 6:30 pm. $250. 297-6144 or faugala.info. Sunday - 4/2 - Mounts Botanical Garden of Palm Beach County’s Spring Benefit at a private garden in Palm Beach. Join the organization’s Friends group for a fundraising event that will include cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and a live auction of rare plants. 5:30 pm. $175. 233-1757 or mounts. org/eventscalendar. Monday - 4/3 - Navy SEAL Foundation’s Palm Beach Evening of Tribute at The Mar-a-Lago Club, 1100 S. Ocean Blvd., Palm Beach. Get patriotic while raising money for the Navy SEAL Museum. 5:45 pm Navy SEAL demonstrations, 7-10 pm dinner. $750. 2810481 or navysealfoundation.org. Tuesday - 4/4 - Boca West Foundation’s “Concert for the Children” at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Drive, Boca Raton. Raise funds for at-risk children and their families in South County by attending an event headlined by famed rhythm-andblues artist Ellis Hall and Academy Awardwinning actress Jennifer Hudson. 6 pm doors open, 8 pm concert. $200. 488-6980 or bocawestfoundation.org.

ArtsPaper editor Greg Stepanich gstepanich@pbartspaper.com www.thecoastalstar.com

The Coastal Star is a monthly newspaper with two editions serving Hypoluxo Island, South Palm Beach, Manalapan, Ocean Ridge, Briny Breezes, Gulf Stream and coastal Delray Beach; Highland Beach and coastal Boca Raton. ©2008-2017

Send letters, opinions and news tips to news@thecoastalstar.com The Coastal Star 5114 N Ocean Blvd. Ocean Ridge, FL 33435 561-337-1553

313 N. Railroad Avenue Boynton Beach, FL


The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Pay it Forward AT3

Pay it Forward

Poet, naturalist to speak at Literacy Coalition fundraiser

By Amy Woods The Love of Literacy Luncheon has brought authors to the podium with householdname status. Henry Winkler. Pat Conroy. David Baldacci. This year’s keynote speaker is different. Although she has written two best sellers, was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize and has published more than two dozen literary works, she remains a little off the radar. “Kristin and I both had to Google her,” luncheon Chairwoman Bettina Young said, referring to the Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County’s chief executive officer, Kristin Calder. “We learned that she is profound, both talented and multifaceted and who writes in a way that is so detailed.” Diane Ackerman, of A Natural History of the Senses and The Zookeeper’s Wife fame, will headline the annual fundraiser March 16. “The cool thing about her is she’s an award-winning poet and naturalist,” Young said. “Poet and naturalist had an edge to it. It was something completely out of the box.” The Zookeeper’s Wife, based on Ackerman’s 2008 book about the Warsaw Zoo in Poland during World War

Love of Literacy Luncheon committee members (l-r, in front) Patricia Knobel, Stephanie Kahlert, Deborah Ghostine, Lisa Fullmer, Nicole Pasquale, Laura Silver, (in back) Ken Spillias, Jorgette Smith, Lynn Kalber, Carol Rose, Susan Rabinowitz, Jennifer Cacioppo, Regine Bataille, CEO Kristin Calder and Bettina Young. Photo provided

If You Go What: Love of Literacy Luncheon When: 11:30 a.m. March 16 Where: Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach Cost: $150 Information: Call 279-9103 or visit literacypbc.org II, will be released in theaters later this month. It stars Jessica Chastain as lead character Antonina Zabinski. Zabinski, along with her husband, Jan Zabinski, saved hundreds of Jews from the Holocaust by

sheltering them in zoo cages. “It’s not only a read that you want to know what’s going on, but it is so interesting,” Young said. Up to 700 guests are expected at the event that last year generated $200,000 for literacy programs in the area, among them ReaderCorps. ReaderCorps is a new youth initiative that awards prizes and recognition to children who organize book drives, participate in read-a-thons and read to younger children or elderly people. “Reading is fundamental, and it’s fun,” said Young, who has chaired the luncheon for

three consecutive years. “It’s something that really touches me in a personal way.” A startling statistic: One in seven adults in the county functions at the lowest level of literacy.

“It’s not a frou-frou luncheon,” Young said. “It’s a luncheon that gives back. It’s a luncheon where you learn about what’s going on in our community.” Ú “Let the planner take care of the party while I take care of you.”

Daryl Hall 561-706-3401 darylbridalvalet@gmail.com www.atyourservicebridalvalet.com

I do day-of concierge for bar and bat mitzvah host families too.


AT4 Philanthropy Notes

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Philanthropy Notes

S

Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties welcomes 3

usan Brockway, Dennis Hudson and Jane Mitchell have joined the board of an organization Brockway that manages a $154 million endowment and has been serving the region for more than four decades. Brockway is a CPA who worked at a national accounting firm and later as the financial controller for a real-estate developer. Hudson has headed Seacoast Bank since 1998 and serves on the board of the Florida Public Utilities Co. Mitchell built a startup business with her family and invented the first surgical bone drill; she also chaired the board of the Kravis Center for three years. “We are extremely pleased to welcome these three

Hudson

Mitchell

outstanding business leaders to our board,” said Bradley Hurlburt, president and CEO of the Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties. “They represent the growing diversity of the Palm Beach and Martin county area and will help to guide and ensure the continued strength and growth of our vibrant community through philanthropy.” The Community Foundation has also announced it will invest $450,000 into nonprofit endowments this fiscal year. Of that amount, 16 winners

of the Forever Nonprofit Endowment Challenge will each receive $25,000 in matching funds to establish a permanent endowment with the Community Foundation. The winners include: Armory Art Center, Boca Raton Museum of Art, CROS Ministries, Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, Delray Beach Public Library and the Historical Society of Palm Beach County. The funds for this initiative come from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fund and the Marie Graber Martens Fund.

Boca Helping Hands debuts job-training center For nearly two decades, Boca Helping Hands has been known as a soup kitchen and pantry program. Last month, the nonprofit began a new chapter as a job-training

center. A ribbon-cutting ceremony officially dedicated the Justin D. Webb Training Center at the Boca Raton facility, building a bridge to help clients cross from basic human needs to self-sufficiency. The center is named in the memory of Justin Daniel Webb from Boca Raton, who spent his 38 years encouraging those around him to reach higher. The Webb family played a part in launching this center filled with opportunities for the community and the ability to carry on Justin Webb’s sense of optimism and resilience. The center is the result of a gift from the Ruth and Hal Launders Charitable Trust, Harry and Marcia Hochman and the Goody Two Shoes Foundation. The training center will

offer classes in computer use, life skills and literacy, as well as health and wellness.

Grant will aid needy kids in Palm Beach County

Place of Hope has received $5,000 from the Margaret & R. Parks Williams Charitable Foundation, a grant that will be used to support the nonprofit foster-care agency’s child-welfare programs for abandoned, abused and neglected youths on both the Leighan and David Rinker Campus in Boca Raton and the Paxson Campus in Palm Beach Gardens. Programs include Homes of Hope, a traditional fostercare program; Genesis and Seven Stars cottages, a pair of emergency-placement and assessment centers; and Joann’s Cottage, a maternity sanctuary for pregnant women and new mothers. “We strive to meet the needs of each child who comes into our care by uniquely serving them based on their individual gifts, abilities and experiences,” said Charles Bender, Place of Hope’s executive director. “Place of Hope is extremely grateful for the support we receive from local foundations, such as the Margaret & R. Parks Williams Charitable Foundation, which enable us to provide the kind of nurturing environment children need to succeed and thrive.”

George Snow fund gets $200,000 from Quantum

The Quantum Foundation has made a $200,000 grant to the George Snow Scholarship Fund to support higher education and scholar services to Palm Beach County high school seniors who are part of their schools’ medical programs and plan to attend college locally. The Health Professions Scholarship Initiative was launched in 2015 to help students from low-income families who are committed to careers in health care. “It is our goal that through this initiative, we will be able to improve and increase the number of qualified health care providers in the county, while at the same time providing a pathway out of poverty for many students,” said Tim Snow, the fund’s president. “This initiative has the potential to have a significant impact on everyone in Palm Beach County.” Submit your event or listing to Amy Woods at flamywoods@ bellsouth.net


The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Celebrations AT5

Boca Raton

Boca Bacchanal events support Historical Society

In its 15th year, the Boca Raton Historical Society & Museum’s main fundraising event, the annual Boca Bacchanal Wine & Food Festival, will be March 24-25. The celebration begins with the exclusive vintner dinners on March 24, and a spirits dinner followed by Bacchanalia on March 25.

The vintner dinners

These dinners are at grand estates and unique historical sites in Boca Raton. The dining experiences each feature a vintner and chef pairing their wine and cuisine to create a five-course meal. Guests attending the vintner dinners can meet their chef and vintner. Tickets are $325.

The community’s party

Bacchanalia combines food from more than 30 local restaurants with vintners showcasing their wineries’ best — all for attendees to sample. DJ and electric violinist Timothee Lovelock will entertain until 11 p.m. Auction is included. Tickets to Bacchanalia are $125.

Our Seafood Menu Is Off The Hook. Discover Delray’s premier seafood restaurant, where bold flavors and fresh ingredients are only part of the lure. Our live entertainment and colossal aquariums will delight your senses, and our ocean-themed cocktails and newly expanded seafood menu will catch you by surprise!

Attending vintners and chefs

Vintners • Chris Silva: St. Francis Winery, Sonoma, Calif. • Miles MacDonnell: Round Pond Estate Winery, Napa, Calif. • Claudio Andreani: Ambrogio e Giovanni Folonari, Italy • Luciano Castiello: Banfi Vintners, Glen Head, N.Y. • Cuvaison & Brandlin, Napa, Calif. • David Ortiz, mixologist Chefs • Brian and Shanna O’Hea: The Kennebunk Inn, Kennebunk, Maine • Jacob Cureton, Annunciation, and Ryan Haigler, Grand Isle, New Orleans • Philippe Reynaud: Ocean Reef Club, Key Largo • Patrick Duffy: The Addison, Boca Raton • Regina Charboneau: Twin Oaks, Natchez, Miss. • Annemarie Stenfors: Alma Nove, Hingham, Mass. Times and tickets Vintner dinners: 7 p.m. Bacchanalia: 7-11 p.m. Tickets: Vintner dinners:  $325; Bacchanalia:  $125 Info or to buy tickets: www.bocabacchanal.com

Chefs share spinach recipes Popeye loved it, but many picky eaters shy away from spinach. If you want to be “strong to the finish” like Olive Oyl’s main squeeze, some of the chefs participating in this year’s Boca Bacchanal Wine & Food Festival offer assistance in the form of recipes just in time for National Spinach Day on March 26. Here is one of them:

Chilled spinach and mint soup

Shared by Brian and Shanna O’Hea of The Kennebunk Inn and Academe Brasserie, Kennebunk, Maine. Serves 12 4 cups spinach, cleaned and trimmed 1 bunch watercress, stems removed 3 cucumbers, skin off, seeded and rough chopped 1 onion, small dice 3 cups chicken stock or vegetable stock 2 tablespoons mint, chopped 1 cup yogurt, plain Greek 1 lemon, zested and juiced Season salt and black pepper

Salad 4 ounces micro-greens

Method for soup: Sweat onions in olive oil until translucent, reserve. Blanch watercress and spinach in boiling water for one minute and shock in ice water to retain bright green color and squeeze dry. In blender puree smooth half of the watercress, spinach, onions, mint, cucumbers and 1½ cups of chicken stock until smooth. Strain through small chinacap Continue to blend the other half of ingredients and combine together Whisk in yogurt, lemon juice and seasoning. Chill for at least two hours before serving.

Method for vanilla oil: Place vanilla bean and oil in saucepan over medium heat, bring to boil, turn off and let steep for up to 24 hours. Reserve.

Method for plating: Pour soup in reserved chilled bowl, garnish with tablespoon size of microgreens and drizzle with vanilla oil

Vanilla oil 1 cup grapeseed oil 1 vanilla bean

OPEN FOR DINNER DAILY | HAPPY HOUR 4:00 – 7:00 P.M. LIVE ENTERTAINMENT TUESDAY – SUNDAY

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AT6 

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017


March 2017AT7 The COASTAL STAR


AT8 Celebrations

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Celebrations Laugh with the Library

Pool Party

Turtle Beach, Ocean Ridge – Feb. 12

Delray Beach Marriott – Feb. 3

Residents and friends enjoyed a beautiful afternoon at the condo’s annual gathering. ABOVE: (l-r) Peter McMullin, Joe and Eveline Kochling and Terrell Cheney. LEFT: Susan Hurlburt and Josee Laperriere. Photos provided by Paul Zaza

ABOVE: Nancy and Caron Dockerty were co-chairwomen of the 11th-annual Laugh with the Library comedy event to benefit the Delray Beach Public Library. Organizers raised more than $85,000 for children’s-outreach programs at the library. LEFT: Comedian Kevin Flynn was the headliner. Photos by Jerry Lower/ The Coastal Star

OPAL Awards

Boca West Country Club, Boca Raton – Jan. 14

Annual Luncheon

Indian Creek Country Club, Miami Beach – Feb. 4

Peter and Carmel Baronoff were honored at the 19th annual Rotary Club of Boca Raton’s Outstanding People And Leaders gala that recognizes local residents who have demonstrated a commitment to serve their neighbors and the city through philanthropic deeds. The Baronoffs were recognized for their passion for health and wellness. Other honorees included Arthur Adler, Yvonne Boice and Jordan Zimmerman. Proceeds from the event will benefit the club’s scholarship programs. Photo provided

Unicorn Children’s Foundation’s second such event – this year, it had a Mad Hatters theme – was a success. Longtime benefactor Madeline Hillsberg was honored, and in all organizers collected more than $75,000 to help youths with special needs. ABOVE: (l-r) foundation President Gregory Fried, Nicole Shelley, Jeannette Stark, Connie Danluck, Carol Adams, Claudia Baz, Pat Berkule, Jane Cundy, Gwen Taylor, Juliette Ezagui and Sharon Alexander. Photo provided by Mitchell Zachs

Boca Raton Regional Hospital Ball Boca Raton Resort & Club – Jan. 21

Boca Raton Regional Hospital celebrated its 50th birthday — July 17 — early at its yearly affair. Recognized for excellence as a top-ranked regional hospital, the facility has transformed from its founding into an institutional vanguard of medicine. ‘The hospital and its subsequent growth were made

possible through the largesse of our generous donors,’ says Mark Larkin, president of the hospital’s foundation. Photos (l-r): Terry and Jerry Fedele, Jo Ann and Philip Procacci, Richard and Barbara Schmidt, and Debbie Lindstrom and Bob Sheetz. Photos provided by Downtown Photo

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March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Celebrations

Valentine’s Day luncheon

The Ocean Club, Ocean Ridge – Feb. 14

Celebrations AT9

Opening night

Kravis Center, West Palm Beach – Jan. 27 Palm Beach Opera’s board of directors, board of governors and friends and supporters gathered for the debut performance of Giacomo Puccini’s ‘Madama Butterfly.’ Nearly 130 attended Jan. 27 and enjoyed dinner, the show and an afterparty with a dessert buffet. The opera also celebrated its annual gala Feb. 2 at the Flagler Museum on Palm Beach, featuring superstar tenor Michael Fabiano. The concert was followed by dinner for more than 200 guests. ABOVE: ‘Madama Butterfly’ underwriters Henry and Marsha Laufer. Photo provided

Les Girls of Palm Beach, a group of international, foreign-born women, celebrated Valentine’s Day with a luncheon. The group was founded in 1972 and meets regularly to foster friendship and exchange ideas and understanding between cultures. There are 54 members representing 37 countries. ABOVE: (l-r) Maureen Hamilton (South Africa), Andree Downling (Lebanon), Carlene Kolbe (USA-Poland), Henya Betras (Poland) , Kathryn Diamond (Greece), Sophia Isaac (England) and Despina Constas (Canada). Photo provided

Flavors

The Addison, Boca Raton – Feb. 2

Annual tea

Four Seasons, Palm Beach – Jan. 24 Sacred Heart School started the new year with flair, fun and function. More than 100 guests were invited to wear hats, whether silly or sophisticated, for the fundraiser. Principal Candace Tamposi welcomed attendees and thanked them for their support of the school’s scholarship fund. RIGHT: (l-r) Joe Silk, Gary and Frankie Stevens and Bruce Allen. Photo provided

The Junior League of Boca Raton’s annual culinary event raised $29,600 to benefit volunteer programs that help improve the South Florida community. The evening included an array of wines, spirits and savory samplings from local restaurants, enjoyed by a crowd of 600. Photo: Chef Patrick Duffy, with Co-Chairwomen Emily Ghijselinck (left) and Meg Fielder. Photo provided


AT10 Around Town

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Around Town

A

Kravis’ silver anniversary a glittery, star-studded event

crouching lion, a modern day Acropolis. The rounded lobby and copper-domed roof even suggest a streamlined steam locomotive roaring along the Coastal Ridge, the highest point in West Palm Beach. Regardless of its appearance, for a quarter century the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts has been a beacon not only for culture and the performing arts, but for the area’s residents, workers and visitors. On Feb. 11, the miracle on the ridge celebrated its silver anniversary with a gala performance. Michael Feinstein, who has performed at the Kravis every one of those 25 years, hosted and joined Alan Cumming, Denyce Graves, Storm Large, Darren Criss and Neil Sedaka to provide the vocals. Lil Buck and Jon Boogz added elastomeric dance moves, Cameron Carpenter the organ theatrics, all backed up by Karma Kamp singers and dancers and the Kravis Pops Orchestra. The first gala — Nov. 28, 1992 — featured sopranos Leontyne Price and Roberta Peters, violinist Isaac Stern, jazz legend Ella Fitzgerald, actresses Lily Tomlin and Faith Prince, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre and the Florida Philharmonic Orchestra. “Is this a miracle or what?” host Burt Reynolds asked as the curtain rose. To many, he wasn’t kidding. So much had happened since Jan. 13, 1989, when bigwigs in hard hats jammed shovels into sandy soil some eight miles south on the shore of Lake Osborne. “There is no way this project can fail,” Palm Beach Community College President and eternal optimist Ed Eissey proclaimed, even though the project’s price tag had already doubled to $62 million. Three weeks later, college trustees began to balk — too many questions, not enough answers. A month later the construction company threatened to pull out. Undaunted, the primal force behind the center, WPEC-TV owner Alex Dreyfoos, quietly and industriously pressed on. Downtown West Palm Beach was in the midst of revitalization. Land had been cleared along Okeechobee Boulevard, and West Palm Beach officials suggested an alternative to the lake. Five months after that ill-fated groundbreaking, the deal was sealed to put the Kravis atop the ridge overlooking the derelict Connie Mack Baseball Stadium. A dejected Eissey was promised use of the Kravis Center for college programs plus downtown classrooms at the soon-to-be-renovated

TOP: Michael Feinstein has performed each of the 25 years that the Kravis has been open. ABOVE: Jeff and Aggie Stoops attended the Kravis Center’s 25th anniversary gala performance on Feb. 11. Photos provided by Capehart Twin Lakes High School next door. But the waters remained choppy as Burt Reynolds offered Eissey his Jupiter theater as a teaching facility. One condition: Renovations would come from $10 million the Florida Legislature had earmarked for the Kravis Center at PBCC. Reynolds’ offer fell through in August; the downtown deal for PBCC disappeared in October. (Twin Lakes was transformed into the showcase Dreyfoos School for the Performing Arts.) In the end, it all worked out. The MacArthur Foundation gave Eissey 5.4 acres to build an auditorium-theater complex at PBCC’s (now Palm Beach State College’s) north campus. It opened in 1994 as the Eissey Campus Theatre. Reynolds sold his theater and it served two more companies and a church before becoming the Maltz Jupiter Theatre in 2004. It remains a thriving tribute to community involvement.

As is the Kravis, for the 8 million who have bought tickets to shows and more than 2 million students who have participated in its arts education programs, for the arts and business communities and for residents of Palm Beach County and beyond. “Beyond expectations,” exclaimed Kravis CEO Judy Mitchell at the gala, as she soaked up the scene and made sure the event ran according to plan. Mitchell started as development director in 1989, overseeing fundraising. Three years later, she became the boss — overseeing 200 fulland part-time employees, 700 volunteers and a $24 million budget. With the title of “founding board chairman,” Dreyfoos, who turns 85 on March 22, is technically semi-retired, but he still makes his presence known. A true renaissance man — his father was an inventor and photographer, his mother a cellist — Dreyfoos combined both to claim 10

patents plus a love of the arts. He was convinced that hightech research facilities would be attracted to Palm Beach County by thriving arts and cultural programs. That initial $30 million construction price tag that rose to $62 million eventually peaked at $100 million. But only $18 million was government money; $82 million came from private sources, corporations and individuals. The Helen K. Persson Society, a permanent endowment program named for one of the Kravis’ most devoted patrons, now boasts 139 members and has more than $19 million in hand. Among performing arts centers, Kravis’ attendance recently ranked No. 2 in the state behind only the Broward Center for the Performing Arts, No. 15 in the nation and 20th worldwide according to Pollstar, a trade publication for the concert tour industry. “Just over a quartercentury ago, building a major performing arts center in Palm Beach County seemed an uphill challenge,” Mitchell said. “Today, a thriving cultural complex, which serves as a gateway to downtown West Palm Beach, not only serves the community but also is gaining a worldwide reputation as a premier entertainment venue and arts education facility.” Though the baseball stadium long ago gave way to the Kravis parking garage, the adage from the movie Field of Dreams still holds true: If you build it, they will come.     The 11th annual Concours d’Elegance rolled into the Boca Raton Resort & Club Feb. 1012. Comedian Jeff Foxworthy provided the entertainment at the Gala Dinner and show, which benefits the Boys & Girls Clubs of Broward County, but the real stars at this party are automobiles — some on display, some up for auction, some old, some new, some costly and some downright outrageous. Ferraris, Lamborghinis, Bentleys, Corvettes, Porsches. More than half of the cars on the block sold, including four that went to online bidders. Among the 71 cars up for bid, more than half sold for a total of $2.5 million, including a 1966 Citroen 2CV (a la Inspector Clouseau) at a bargain $9,900 and a ’59 Nash Metropolitan at $11,000. Other notables: a ’48 Chevy Woodie, $55,000; a ’49 Fiat Topolino, $38,500; and a ’66 Corvette Stingray, $93,500. Top bids went to a 2011 Porsche 911 Speedster, $246,750;  ’97 Lamborghini Diablo VT Roadster, $189,000; and a ’96 Porsche 993 Turbo, $187,000. Several, however, didn’t make minimum bid, including a 1965 Lancia Flaminia valued between

$325,000 and $425,000, and a ’94 Ferrari Berlinetta ($300,000-$325,000). A ’63 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud convertible also fell short. No one was willing to bid $550,000.     The restaurant scene in Lantana doesn’t generate the buzz of, say, Atlantic Avenue in Delray Beach or Clematis Street in West Palm Beach, but the clientele is loyal. When a change occurs, those customers buzz. Such is the case with one of the best and one of the smallest eateries in the county. In 2009, Dak Kerprich, a veteran of the high octane restaurant wars, turned a 1950s house on Ocean Avenue just east of Kerprich Walgreens into Pizzeria Oceano: five stools at the inside counter, six snug tables on the outside deck under umbrellas. So close to the street that passing cars provided a pleasant breeze. Using only local food sources and a custom-built wood-burning oven, Kerprich fashioned some of the tastiest and most unusual pizzas anywhere. Octopus, even, on a menu that changed every day. When the food ran out, he closed. Regulars knew to arrive early. A couple of years ago, however, Kerprich altered course, serving up Jerk Oceano, or Jerk O for short. The pizzas remained but he served up more seafood, albeit a bit more Caribbean in style. He also took a short-lived stab at a takeout only with Swell Pizza in Delray’s Pineapple Grove, but even a couple of years before that, Kerprich was searching, hoping to find a spot with a little more space, a kitchen slightly larger than 15 feet square. That all changed a couple of months ago when Jeremy and Cindy Bearman, peripatetic New Yorkers, made an offer Kerprich couldn’t refuse. Word is that J. Bearman he’s enjoying the break but looking toward possibilities in West Palm Beach. While Kerprich is gone, the name remains, in part, as Oceano Kitchen, still cash only, still with local suppliers, daily menu changes — and pizza. The Bearmans met in a New York kitchen. Each claims solid credentials with stints in New York, San Francisco and Las Vegas, including Michelinstarred Rouge Tomate for Jeremy and ABC Kitchen for Cindy. The domed, woodburning pizza oven remains,


The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

and Jeremy brought along his prized giant smoker from his most recent gig at One Door East in Fort Lauderdale. Recent menu offerings included an entree of pulled pork sandwich with ginger sauce, beet greens and an avocado corn salad and for dessert, lady finger banana bread with chocolate ganache, toasted graham crumbs and coffee anglaise.     Down in Boca Raton, the Mizner look is giving way to 1940s Rome at Louie Bossi’s Ristorante, which is set to open in late March in the new Hyatt Place Hotel at the corner of Palmetto Park Road and Federal Highway. The restaurant, affiliated with Big Time Restaurant Group (Rocco’s Tacos, City Oyster), is the second for Bossi, who opened his first in Fort Lauderdale two years ago and plans a third in Delray Beach next year. Just about everything is made in house — from pasta, to pizza dough to gelato, even the pancetta — and guests can choose from 300 seats in the 8,000-square-foot dining room or the 2,000-square-foot patio, decorated with a fireplace, an active bocce court and a 70-year-old Vespa, claimed to be the only one in the world with two side cars. (Not used for delivery!) Bossi will waste no time becoming involved in the community. In his ninth year of recovery from drug and alcohol addiction, he’s spearheading “A Taste of Recovery” June 3 at Old School Square in Delray Beach. It’s a benefit for the Crossroads Club in Delray Beach, which helped Bossi. Tickets are $40 and will offer bites and desserts from Rocco’s Tacos and City Oyster in Delray Beach, Mario’s Ocean Ave in Lantana, The Grille on Congress in Boca Raton and others.      Food for thought. Marilynn

Wick is expanding the restaurant service at The Wick Theatre to attract diners, even when the curtain is closed. Lunch and dinner will be served Wednesday through Sunday, the kitchen under the direction of chef Marc Cela, who for 25 years topped the bill at L’Anjou in Lake Worth. “The restaurant has been a very popular spot for pretheater dining,” Wick said, “but now with Chef Cela’s stellar reputation, our goal is to establish Tavern at the Wick as one of the best restaurants in the area.”    

Alpert

Alexander

Two performers from the 2016 Festival of the Arts Boca were up for Grammy awards Feb. 12. No hardware for either Herb Alpert, who turns 82 March 31, or Joey Alexander, who’ll be 14 in June, but the latter returns to Mizner Park Amphitheater March 5, this time with another youngster. Mexican pianist Daniela Liebman turns 15 in June, but their performance will be anything but a kiddie show. The program includes classical works by Johann Strauss and Felix Mendelssohn and some jazz from conductor Constantine Kitsopoulos. Alpert and his wife, Lani Hall, blew away the Boca Festival crowd last year. She was originally a singer with Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66. This year on March 12 Mendes closes the festival, although the group has changed — ’66 is now 2017. Elsewhere in the festival lineup, Grammy-winning sax man Branford Marsalis (March 3); New Yorker cartoon

editor Bob Mankoff: “I Only Read It for the Cartoons: An Insider’s History of The New Yorker” (March 4); presidential historian and Time magazine editor Jon Meacham discussing “The Art of Leadership — Lessons from the American Presidency” (March 6); physicist Brian Greene: “Beyond Einstein: Space, Time and Reality” (March 7); violinist Sarah Chang and pianist Daniel Hsu with The Symphonia (March 10); and the world premiere of the original Pink Panther with live orchestra. (www. festivaloftheartsboca.org)      A few hundred feet to the south, Mizner Park Cultural Center has come alive. Golda’s Balcony, the longest-running, one-woman show in Broadway history, plays March 17-19. DaVinci & Michelangelo: The Titans Experience, a multimedia tour de force, plays March 27-29. Broadway/ Hollywood legend Renee Taylor examines My Life on a Diet (March 31 and April 1) and a day later Forbidden Broadway serves up two shows, followed by Robert Dubac’s The Book of Moron, April 6-9. (miznerparkculturalcenter. com)      Delray remains busy with nine shows set for Old School Square this month, including Lorna Luft, March 13 and 14, The Klezmatics, March 16, and Linda Lavin’s My First Farewell Concert, March 27 and 28. The month opens March 3 with Rhythmic Circus: Feet Don’t Fail Me Now! and New York City-Country band Shotgun Wedding, March 5. Classical crossover ensemble O Sole Trio goes “From Pavarotti to Pop,” March 9, and Angela LaGreca and Dick Capri offer “Catch a Rising Star Comedy,” March 10, while Shades of Bublé presents a three-man tribute to Michael Bublé, March 17-19. A well-traveled production

Around Town /Dining AT11

of Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park closes out the month March 24-26. Well-traveled in the truest sense, the Montana Repertory Theatre affiliated with the University of Montana in Missoula is hitting the road for its 50th season. The 44-performance tour opened at home Jan. 20, bounced around Montana for two weeks, and the Midwest for a month. Now in the Deep South for another month, including stops in Fort Lauderdale, Belle Glade and three Century Villages, it will wrap April 2 in Sandusky, Ohio. And you thought only the buffalo roamed in Montana.     For the ninth year, Savor the Avenue returns to Delray Beach on March 27. Only a few spaces remain for “Florida’s longest dining table,” which stretches 1,300 feet on Atlantic Avenue between Fifth Avenue (U.S. 1) and Swinton. Four-course meals with libations will be served by 16 of the city’s top restaurants, including such veterans as 32 East and 50 Ocean and newcomers ROK:BRGR and Che!!! Menus and contact information are posted at www. downtowndelraybeach.com/ SavortheAvenue; reservations must be made directly with the participating restaurants no later than March 24. Tickets range from $90-$150 depending on the restaurant. Three dollars from each meal ticket will go to the Delray Beach Public Library.      Brace yourself! The Boca West Foundation has found its “dream girl.” Headlining the foundation’s annual Concert for Children, April 4, at the Boca West Amphitheater will be Oscar and Grammy winner Hudson Jennifer

Hudson. Money raised from the concert and the $200,000 Charity Golf Challenge the day before plus 45,000 hours donated every year by Boca West residents provide assistance to more than 5,000 children and 24 area charities. Hudson follows such superstars as Patti LaBelle, Jay Leno and Diana Ross. For information and tickets, $200 for the concert, with seats assigned by lottery, $600 to play golf and/or $150 for the awards presentation and cocktail party, call 488-6980 or email foundation@bocawestcc.org.     “I did it, but he made me do it.” That was the defense used by Delray Beach developer Anthony Pugliese in his suit against the late Subway founder Fred DeLuca. The six-member jury, however, Pugliese concluded that Pugliese had ripped off DeLuca with phony invoices and owed DeLuca’s estate $2.9 million for a botched effort to build Destiny, a “green” city near Yeehaw Junction. The jury rejected Pugliese’s argument that he had faked expenses because DeLuca wasn’t paying his fair share, upward of $20 billion. The damages against Pugliese could be tripled or even quadrupled for breach of contract and other misdeeds. With his lawyers vowing to appeal, Pugliese remained pugilistic: “I’m ready for the next fight.” Thom Smith is a freelance writer who can be reached at thomsmith@ ymail.com.

Dining

Granger’s cup of conch chowder a meal The Plate: Bahamian Conch Chowder The Place: Granger’s Grille, 802 SE Fifth Ave., Delray Beach; 276-7881​or www.grangersgrille. com. The Price: $5 The skinny: This month’s Plate actually is a bowl. Well, it’s a cup, if you’re going to get technical. But this cup of conch chowder was substantial enough to stand on its own as a meal. The hearty tomato-based broth was packed with tender bits of ground conch, potato and other goodies. It was not overloaded with sherry the way some chowders can be. Also tasty: The lunch portion of fried shrimp, with a half-dozen lightly breaded large shrimp

served up with a zesty cocktail sauce. The shrimp were perfectly cooked until tender and the crinkle-cut fries were hot and crispy. Service was friendly and efficient. It was an excellent first visit to Granger’s new space south of downtown. I can’t wait to return. — Scott Simmons

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AT12 Art

People gather for the Briny Breezes Art League’s Beaux Arts event, ‘Vin et Fromage,’ in 1987. Photo provided “I’m not good enough.” She’s laboring over a mixedContinued from page 1 media work, a Halloween cat mask taped to a canvas and Which may sound a bit like covered in papier-maché for bragging, until she leads you painting. along the wall to Five Parrots, a “I joined to meet new people. lusciously bright portrait of five I just wanted to try it,” she orange birds posed against a explains, “and what I’ve learned gloriously green background. is how hard it is. I force myself “I matted and framed it to look at details more now. myself, too,” Roddin adds, and When you look at a flower, you yes, you think, those parrots don’t notice all of it.” could indeed sell for $200. Students arrive for their first If they do, it might not be the class expecting to learn how to first time. paint. Pat Columbus teaches Along with 65 annual art them how to see. shows, the league has also “If you want to do a cloud,” acquired a legend. says Columbus, 66, a graduate Back in those early days, the of the Ontario College of Art story goes, one lady’s loving who has taught acrylics and husband secretly bought her mixed media since 2013, “look painting for $20, added a zero, at a cloud.” returned it to the exhibit — and Here’s a silver teapot on a red the painting immediately sold tablecloth, she tells them. What for $200. color is the teapot? Black, white No one alive today can prove and gray, the students decide. this did not happen. And so the “But they don’t notice the story goes. And goes. red cloth reflecting in the silver Over the years, the league’s teapot,” Columbus says. “Most ambition expanded. From people can paint. It’s teaching January to March, classes are them how to look at light and now offered in mixed media, dark and the contrasts and acrylics, pastels, collage and oils. combinations of colors.” When Mildred Miller, a As Columbus’ students retired fashion designer and huddle at their desks, a lone illustrator, began teaching oil painter stands at an easel in the and acrylic painting in the mid- back of the room, dabbing at a 1950s, her lessons were free. small, 8-by-10 canvas. Today, students pay $50 for four “I’m a dabbler,” says Michael weekly classes of about two Coppola, 56, who sells real hours each. estate up in Portsmouth, N.H., One artist whose work you and dabbles when visiting his won’t see at any price is Sandy parents down here. Dietzel, 69, who signed up in Today the dabbler is dabbling 2013. at a swirl of whites and blues “Nope,” she says, adamantly. with a touch of green and red

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

BRINY

Pat Columbus teaches Andy Neureuther during a class at the Briny Breezes Art League. Photos by Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

If You Go

What: 65th Annual Briny Breezes Art League Show When: March 18-19 Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Where: 5000 N. Ocean Blvd., on A1A just south of Woolbright Road Admission: Free Info: Call Michael Coppola at 603-365-6040.

Janice Vizino holds a painting by her mother, Mildred Miller, who taught 60 years ago. that might be a sky. “It’s probably going to be a landscape,” he says. “I do two or three at a time because the oils take so long to dry.” Sometimes he gives his work away, sometimes he sells. “I paint for the fun of it,” he says. “What I’ve learned is that when you think you’re done, you were usually done 10 minutes ago.” Beginners, intermediates and

advanced, for 67 years residents of the campground that became a mobile home park and then a town have joined the art league to learn the art of painting. Along the way, they’ve learned the art of friendship, too. Mildred Miller taught oil and acrylics from the 1950s until her death in 1997. Now her daughter, Janice Vizino, teaches watercolors. “You wouldn’t believe the

friendships,” says Vizino, 86. “People become very close. I had a heart attack Thanksgiving week and people were here every day, bringing me hot meals. The club means as much to me for the friendship as the artwork.” Vizino’s home is adorned with her work, new and old. Dolphins leaping, an array of endangered species, tigers, turtles and birds. A vase. Her mother taught 60 years ago, and now she teaches. “Painting is very restful to me,” she says. “I put on some nice quiet music and I paint for hours. I’ll work from about 10 a.m. until lunch, and then I’ll paint some more.” And what, you ask, have all those years of painting, all those classes, all those canvases taught her? She doesn’t hesitate for a second. “Patience.” Ú

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March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

ArtsPaper AT13

Must See

www.palmbeachartspaper.com

Art Theater

Director Jeffrey Moss tackles Guys and Dolls for the Wick Theatre. Page AT15

Film

Israeli documentary by Dani Menkin recalls astounding '77 basketball win. Page AT16 Javier Pérez’s Carroña forms an unsettling scene amid the glassworks on display at the Boca Museum of Art. Photo provided

‘Glasstress’ reveals brilliant medium in sharp detail By Gretel Sarmiento ArtsPaper Art Writer

Reviews

Jordan Peele’s new film Get Out offers clever riff on classic horror tropes. Page AT18

Sorry, ashtray-looking accents, candleholders and paperweights. Glass is done with being polite. It has traded its smooth curves and comfort zone for thorns, a strong pulse and a lot of nerve. The underestimated medium long thought of as merely decorative is now demanding acknowledgment through daring shapes, provocative themes and stunning colors. Glasstress, a new show featuring 46

glass pieces by 33 artists from around the world, makes that point crystal clear. On view at the Boca Raton Museum of Art through July 2, the pieces are graphic and defiant. Joana Vasconcelos’ bright Blue Velvet chandelier is the first to pierce our eyes. Small LED lights illuminate the blue Murano glass dressed up in polyester. Golden sequins add a shimmering effect to the handmade golden woolen crochet crowning the narrow blue vessels. The pairing of textures and hues has a dramatic effect.

Nearby, we find a more somber installation by Hans Op de Beeck: The Frozen Vanitas. Inspired by Dutch memento mori still-lifes from the 17th century — known to feature skulls, rotten fruit and extinguished candles — Op de Beeck sets his table with a skull, grapes and candles. The modern twist consists of a disposable cup with straw, a lighter, high-heels and a cellphone. The use of opaque glass is a fitting choice that lends the scene a ghostly

Books

See GLASS on Page 14

A promising new chapter for independent bookstores

By Christina Wood ArtsPaper Books Writer

Calendar

Violinist Nicola Benedetti plays with the Royal Scottish Orchestra at the Kravis Center March 14-15. Page AT19

When Joanne Sinchuk opened Murder on the Beach in Sunny Isles, it was one of 60 mystery bookstores across the country. Twenty years later, there are fewer than half that number. Between the store’s opening and its 20th anniversary celebration earlier this year, independent bookstores such as Murder on the Beach were rocked by

a one-two punch. According to the National Bureau of Economic Research, the Great Recession began in 2007 — the same year that Amazon introduced the Kindle e-reader. “It was kind of a double whammy,” Sinchuk recalls. “People asked me if e-books were affecting me and I said, ‘Yeah, but I don’t know how much because of the recession.’” It wasn’t just specialty stores

like Sinchuk’s reeling from the blow; independent bookstores across the board and across the nation were feeling the pain. Many predicted the end of the neighborhood bookstore was in sight. But a funny thing happened. The more people talked about the death of independent bookstores, the more people realized they wanted them to live. See BOOKS on Page 14


AT14 ArtsPaper/Art

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

GLASS

Continued from page 13 quality. Vanitas, after all, is meant to remind us of mortality and advise us against indulgence and vanity. Given that the artists who created the works at the Berengo Studio in Murano, Italy, don’t usually work with glass, one would expect to find frigid objects evoking as much emotion as a freezer. Not here. When not blowing us away with color and fluid motions, as Marta Klonowska’s The Fish, the works impose inconvenient realities, as Erdag Aksel’s Crescent Disabled does through glass crutches engraved with grenades. Clear police batons hold their heart-shaped formation against the wall in Kendell Geers’ Cardiac Arrest VIII. In the middle, the pairs form crosses. The glass batons will remain intact, Geers suggests, so long as people conform. They are the weapons awaiting those who demand social reforms. From a distance, Song Dong’s Glass Big Brother looks like a gothic take on the classical Venetian chandelier. Give it time. The Orwellianinspired piece slowly unveils the troubling details shaping its stark black glass body, which hangs from the ceiling. The five-tiered creature is

If You Go

Glasstress is on display at the Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real, Mizner Park, through July 2. Admission: $12. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. T, Th, F; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. first W; noon-5 p.m. Sat and Sun. Info: 392-2500 or www. bocamuseum.org

from extinction. According to the Association of American Publishers, sales of e-books declined nearly 25 percent from January 2015 to January 2016, the last year for which figures are available. The fact that the economy picked up didn’t hurt, either. But all of that might not have mattered, if neighborhood stores hadn’t adapted to the new realities of retail life in the 21st century. These days, as Kravetz says, “You can’t depend on just the walk-ins.” Murder on the Beach, which moved to Delray Beach in 2002, frequently hosts author signings and ships signed books to customers as far away as Australia. During the summer months, the store offers a series of workshops for writers. Groups can book a literary lunch through the store and then look forward to a visit with an author, a copy of the author’s book and lunch at the popular tapas restaurant a few doors away. The mystery bookstore also handles book sales for outside events, such as Sleuthfest, an annual conference sponsored by the Florida Chapter of the Mystery Writers of America, and the regional Romance Writers Conference. Classic Bookshop offers the same service for events at the Society of the Four Arts in Palm Beach. “We never pass up an opportunity to sell books — whether it’s the library or a conference,” Sinchuk says. “Actually, our biggest customer right now is the Palm Beach Poetry Festival.” While all independent

bookstores are subject to the same market conditions, each neighborhood haunt has its own distinct personality. Palm Beach, with three locally owned shops, has a veritable wealth of independents. In addition to the selection of popular fiction, biography, Florida history, cookbooks and other general interest material at Classic Bookshop, book lovers can shop for architecture, interior design, fashion, jewelry and other categories of coffee table books at the Palm Beach Book Store on Royal Poinciana Way. Late last year, a third store joined them when Raptis Rare Books opened on Worth Avenue to offer first editions, signed and inscribed books. Like other indies that survived the lean years, Books & Books took the lemons handed them by the economy and the internet and made lemonade. The Coral Gables location provides books and programming for public and private schools, for synagogues and for churches. The store has hosted book fairs and serves as a place for community groups to meet.  “We now Kaplan live-stream a great majority of our 400 author events per year,” Kaplan adds. “We provide our customers with a distinct experience that can’t be found in the chains or online; our partnerships in the community run deep and wide.”

The Fish, by Marta Klonowska; Glass Big Brother, by Song Dong. Photos provided clearly set on documenting everything. Its vertebraelooking arms hold LED-lit surveillance cameras that cover every angle of the room. Nothing escapes it. While being watched is often presented as a necessary evil, the overabundance of cameras here presents it as an excessive measure with a high price. Its chandelier facade distracts us from the sinister mission, and that bares the question: if

given a sparkling justification, would we happily and willingly give up our rights? The gallery rooms in Glasstress are cleverly balanced in intensity and color. The most breathtaking works are spaced out and paired with tamer ones as to allow visitors sufficient time to have an emotional reaction at a time, not simultaneous strokes. That’s a good thing, because it takes a long time to recover

BOOKS

Continued from page 13 “There is an awareness of independent bookstores now. There wasn’t just five years ago,” Sinchuk says. Five years ago, the “shop local” movement was in its infancy. Small Business Saturday, which was launched in 2010 by American Express, originally offered cardholders incentives for shopping small. At the time, most shoppers were still recovering from the financial crisis. As the economy improved, however, the shop-local movement gained traction. Congress now designates the Saturday after Thanksgiving as National Small Business Saturday. A handful of “holidays” related specifically to bookstores have even emerged. Take Your Child to a Bookstore Day falls a week after Small Business Saturday. Nothing says you have to take the kids to an independent bookstore to mark the day; but if you read between the lines — and when you’re talking to an audience of readers, that’s not a problem — you’ll know just where to go to find a celebration. Just to make things clear, Independent Bookstore Day went national in 2015. These initiatives drive business to Murder on the Beach and other independent bookstores in South Florida — from Books & Books in Coral Gables to Classic Bookshop in Palm Beach. And each is evidence that, even in the face of online pricing, we have come to realize the value of our

from the epic battle taking place in Javier Pérez’s Carroña (Carrion). Stuffed crows take turns picking at the red flesh of a defeated animal bleeding to death on the floor. The glass bloodstain pattern are fragments of a Rezzonico-style chandelier featuring floral motifs that the artist purposely dropped on the floor and smashed to pieces. The crows’ black eyes focus on the feast. Their sharp beaks

tear the raw translucent meat. It is a glorious moment for the birds, which stand victorious as if they had played a significant role in bringing the beast down. This vivid picture of life and death has transformative powers. It is the sort of finding that forever alters the senses and inevitably blurs whatever follows it. Glasstress is the latest in a series of exhibits that wish to push the notions about craft and elevate it. It is nothing like the contemporary studio glass exhibit the Boca Museum presented five years ago. To admire these pieces for their arresting color and form instead of the social, political and environmental message they carry, feels slightly wrong. Glass wants to be loved for its smarts, not its looks alone. It should have figured that out before.

Books & Books in Coral Gables has been an indie bookstore standout since it opened 35 years ago. Photo provided neighborhood bookstores. “You pay a little extra to shop here because you pay for our knowledge of the book business and of your likes and dislikes,” Sinchuk says. As she’s talking, a Sinchuk customer walks through the door and, as if to prove her point, tells the bookseller at the register, “That book you recommended last time was fabulous. Give me another one!” “Selection, service and ambiance,” says Mitchell Kaplan, who opened Books & Books in Coral Gables in 1982. “This is the mantra of independent booksellers, and that’s what we’ve all been focusing on as we’ve met increased competition all these years. We continually have to demonstrate our value to our customers and make our stores the most inviting they can be, our staff and store policies as

customer-friendly as possible, and provide an offering of books and related items that is interesting and different enough to help drive business past much larger competitors.” Need a good book to keep you company on a long flight? The folks at your locally owned bookstore will help you find a compelling read that’s right up your alley. Looking for a gift for someone who loves Agatha Christie mysteries, Vietnamese cooking or model trains? They’ll know just the thing — because they read. A lot. “We might ask you what did you read last that you liked. You tell us and we go from there,” says Cheryl Kravetz, who works as a bookseller at both Murder on the Beach and Classic Bookshop. The vast card catalog in her head allows her to make solid recommendations. And those recommendations keep customers coming back. The introduction of Independent Bookstore Day did not, of course, single-handedly save neighborhood stores


March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

ArtsPaper/Theater AT15

Wayne LeGette makes his debut as Nathan with this production; Aaron Bower plays prim do-gooder Sarah. Photos provided

Theater

Wick brings to life classic tale of love between Guys & Dolls By Hap Erstein ArtsPaper Theater Writer Composer-lyricist Frank Loesser has written more artistic shows (The Most Happy Fella) and more commercially successful shows (How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying), but his 1950 adaptation of Damon Runyon’s tales of the denizens of Times Square, Guys and Dolls, is widely considered to be a perfect musical. “It is the perfect example of a book and a score that go together so beautifully, so perfectly. I don’t know that there are others that do it any better,” says Jeffrey Moss, who will be directing the show at Boca Raton’s Moss Wick Theatre, beginning March 9. “It’s got lovable characters, memorable songs, great jokes. Every time an audience comes in, they fall in love with it all over again.” Speaking of love, the show features two couples who are — or soon fall — madly in love. Compulsive gambler Nathan Detroit (Wayne LeGette) has been engaged for 14 years to sniffles-prone nightclub singer Adelaide (Lauren Weinberg). And high-roller Sky Masterson (Timothy John Smith) becomes hopelessly smitten with uptight Salvation Army sergeant Sarah Brown (Aaron Bower). “I’m coming in as a ῾Guys and Dolls’ newbie,” notes LeGette. “I’ve never done the show before. I’ve never seen the show.” Speaking prior to the start of rehearsals, the actor suspected he knew how director Moss would approach the material. “Knowing the way Jeff likes to work, he probably doesn’t see it as this big, splashy musical. Jeff wants to approach this like a play, as if we were doing Shakespeare or anything with a strong story.” If LeGette is new to the show, Moss is an old hand at it, having helmed a national tour four years ago and directed several productions before that.

If You Go

Guys and Dolls plays at the Wick Theatre, 7901 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton, from March 9 to April 9. $75-$80. 995-2333. “It’s a show I know and like. I think it’s in the league of ῾My Fair Lady’ and Rodgers and Hammerstein,” he says. “It’s about love. Everybody in this show wants to be a winner — either in a crap game or in love. If you don’t think that Mr. Loesser isn’t the ultimate romantic, just close your eyes and listen to the tunes and then listen to the words.” Bower, who also has never performed in Guys and Dolls, was torn between auditioning for Sarah and Adelaide. “I think I’m a combination of the two of them, which is kind of funny,” she says. “I think if Adelaide and Sarah had a baby, it would be me. “I’m not a super-religious person, but I think I can relate to (Sarah’s)  frustration of trying to reach these sinners and not being able to. And I think she’s frustrated in love and Sky comes and sweeps her off her feet,” says Bower. “She resists it a little bit and then she gives in. I love that about her.” As LeGette sees his character, “He’s got this girl that he’s absolutely crazy about and just can’t commit to. I’m going to try to approach it from a realistic standpoint — it’s a love story and it’s a guy who’s willing to do anything for his girl. Except marry her.” The script by Abe Burrows and Jo Swerling is full of humor, without sacrificing on the romance. And the score by Loesser is chock full of hit songs like “If I Were a Bell,” “Luck Be a Lady,” “A Bushel and a Peck” and “Sit Down, You’re Rocking the Boat.” No wonder the show has become a classic. “It’s such a lot of fun. It speaks to audiences in special and mysterious ways, just like Lady Luck,” enthuses Moss. “There’s something compelling about this show. You can just sit down and have a really good time. Boy, do we need that now.”

“PRESENTS”

THE NERD A Comedy by

Larry Shue March 31, April 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 14 & 15 Friday & Saturday performances at 8:00pm Sunday Matinees at 2:00pm $ 20.00 per performance

Follow us on 145 SE 2nd Ave, Boynton Beach, FL 33435 Facebook

www.BoyntonBeachPlayhouse.com ~ Follow us on Facebook

For tickets call: 561-301-5404

All shows subject to change based on availability. No exchanges or refunds.


AT16 ArtsPaper/Film

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Film

῾On the Map’ chronicles Cinderella story of underdog Israeli hoops team By Hap Erstein ArtsPaper Film Writer

Israeli filmmaker Dani Menkin was 7 when his country’s miracle Maccabi Tel Aviv team overcame its underdog status to win the European Cup basketball championship. But like that team, and much of the nation, he remembers it like it was yesterday. “I was a small kid when it happened, but nobody who was there could forget that day. It was one moment that changed so much in our history,” says Menkin. “I was old enough to remember the excitement, not only throughout the game, but throughout the entire team.” He has paid tribute to that milestone in Israel’s development with his new documentary, On the Map, opening this weekend at

If You Go On the Map is playing at Movies of Delray, Movies of Lake Worth and other area theaters. theaters in South Florida. “I love basketball, but one of my challenges was to make it appeal to everyone, not just sports fans,” he says. He recalls watching the game at home, on a small black-andwhite television. “We wanted our team to win, not only because we were cheering for our club, but also there was a feeling that this was something much bigger than basketball,” Menkin says. “They represented our country.” The year was 1977, soon after the Yom Kippur War, when, as Menkin puts it, “Israel was staggering for its existence.”

Tal Brody of Maccabi Tel Aviv is hoisted on a teammate's shoulders after the team’s upset of the USSR squad on the way to the European Cup championship in 1977. Shmuel Rahmani The victory over an Italian team was a source of great national pride for Israel. But it was the semifinal game against CSKA Moscow — the powerhouse Red Army team — that truly lifted the country’s spirits. “First and foremost, it was the first time that Israel had beaten Russia. Secondly, the Russians didn’t even want to play the Maccabi team,” Menkin notes. “So beating them made it even more sweet.” Menkin, known for such award-winning films as 39 Pounds of Love and Dolphin Boy, began work on On the Map three years ago when Israeli TV approached him about the project. “I just found so much unbelievable material that had never been seen, and then we found so many stories that have never been told,” he recalls. Following the film’s success

in Israel, Menkin recut it for a wider audience. “I joined forces with Nancy Spielberg (Steven Spielberg’s sister) to make a new version of ῾On the Map,’” he says. “We did it for the American audience, because we realized that in the United States people don’t know of this iconic story.” Menkin senses that he could have a commercial hit on his hands. “I think so, yes. It’s very uplifting. Like The L.A. Weekly said, ‘It’s a classic Cinderella story.’ It’s like a Hollywood drama. Yeah, I’m really excited, and the fact that it comes now to Florida makes it amazing.” Menkin downplays the difficulty of tracking down the players from that ’77 team. “It wasn’t that hard, I have to say, because they are in touch with each other. Once I had Tal Brody — the captain of the team — the others all came in.”

Brody was the 12th pick in the National Basketball Association draft in 1965, but chose to pass up a far more lucrative NBA career to play basketball in Israel. His quote in a 1977 television interview, after the victory over the Soviets — “We are on the map! And we are staying on the map — not only in sports, but in everything” — gives the film its title. Today, Brody concedes that he came up with the line on the spur of the moment. “It just came out of me at the time, my heartfelt expression of the importance of the win,” he says. “Then, it caught on as a description of how we all felt, how the country felt. But I had no idea when I said it that it would be repeated, over and over, let alone remembered 40 years later.” So when the idea of the documentary came up, Brody did not hesitate to get involved. “I, like the rest of my teammates, jumped at the chance to have a record of those dramatic events, which felt like yesterday to us.” Those who see On the Map are “going to see a story that is much larger than basketball. They will see something that will move them, will make them laugh, maybe shed a tear,” offers Menkin. “It will make them remember how things used to be 40 years ago, and they will simply enjoy this wonderful Cinderella story.”


March 2017

Film

The COASTAL STAR

ArtsPaper/Film AT17

Inaugural Boca Raton Jewish Film Festival debuts this month

By Palm Beach ArtsPaper Staff Making its inaugural debut into an increasingly competitive arena of film festivals comes the Boca Raton Jewish Film Festival, planned for March 1926 at the Cinemark Palace 20 in Boca Raton. Driven by members at the Adolph and Rose Levis JCC’s Phyllis and Harvey Sandler Center and community demand, the grassroots movement was looking for a Jewish-themed film festival in its own backyard. “This project is a labor of love for the many people involved in it,” says Wendy Honig, the artistic director of the festival. “Our community came together and said, ‘this is something we want in Boca, in our theaters, we will support this … we can grow it.’” The festival features an eclectic collection of 27 feature films, documentaries and short films from the United States, Israel, Japan, Germany, the Netherlands and Canada, including one U.S. premiere, one Southeast U.S. premiere, 10 Florida and Palm Beach County premieres, and one Boca Raton premiere. The films explore the Jewish experience, culture, history, identity and topics relevant to Jewish life. Highlights include Rani Sa’ar’s opening night docudrama, Sabena Hijacking: My Version, which uses previously undiscovered audio recordings and archive material to retell the story of Sabena Flight 571 from Brussels to Tel Aviv in 1972, which was hijacked by four members of the Black September wing of the PLO. The film includes candid interviews with Prime Ministers Shimon Peres,

If You Go

Leititia Loreni and George Iskandar in the docudrama Sabena Hijacking: My Version, which opens the new Boca Raton Jewish Film Festival on March 19. Photo provided Benjamin Netanyahu and Ehud Barak, who were personally involved in the situation, as well as with the only surviving hijacker, who was released from prison after serving 13 years of a 220-year prison sentence. Nati Dinnar, creator and producer of the film, will fly in from Israel for the red-carpet gala kickoff of the festival, which will be held at the Wick Theatre on Monday, March 13. Director Cellin Gluck’s Persona Non Grata: The Chiune Sugihara Story, recounts another lost-to-history episode during World War II. Sugihara, Japan’s consul in Lithuania, was declared persona non grata by the USSR as a result of not following his superiors’ orders while posted to Manchuria. Sugihara put his family and career at great risk by issuing more than 2,000 transit visas to thousands of Jews who escaped to Japanese territory, resulting in saving the lives of 6,000 Jewish refugees.

THE HEART OF DELRAY

GALLERY

GRAND OPENING Friday, March 3 • 6:30pm-’til ?? Music ~ Food ~ Wine ~ And Art!

Host your event at The Heart of Delray Gallery, call 561-707-0360

Gluck, the son of a JapaneseAmerican mother and a JewishAmerican father, will be in attendance on opening night March 19. On a lighter note are French director Philippe de Chauveron’s Serial (Bad) Weddings, and Basil Khalil’s comedy short Ave Maria, which pairs a family of West Bank Israeli settlers with the Sisters of Mercy after they crash their car into the convent on the brink of Shabbat. Because of the Sabbath laws,

the Israelis can’t operate a phone to call for assistance, and the nuns have taken a vow of silence. In Serial (Bad) Weddings, a Catholic French couple has their life turned upside down when their four daughters marry men of different religions and origins. “The festival’s mission is to provide the newest, most stimulating and thoughtprovoking films,” said Ellen Safran, the festival’s director. “We hope to encourage

The inaugural Boca Raton Jewish Film Festival takes place March 19-26 at the Cinemark Palace 20, 3200 Airport Road, Boca Raton. Individual tickets: $10; VIP tickets: Film Buff ($136), one pass to all screenings (25 films); Film Circle ($365), one pass to all screenings, assigned seats, Hospitality Suite; Supporting Cast ($600), one pass to all screenings, assigned seats, Hospitality Suite, the April 2 Patron Appreciation Event (with U.S. premiere of Sylvia: Tracing Blood, the story of Mossad agent Sylvia Rafael), select Levis JCC film programs and special film events through November. Tickets available online at levisjcc.org or at the Sandler Center. Info: 558-2520, bocajff.org audiences to expand their awareness and understanding of the Jewish world and engage in dialogue to explore the many diverse perspectives portrayed by the films. “We are thrilled to be the hub of Jewish film for one very special week in March,” she said.


AT18 ArtsPaper/Reviews

The COASTAL STAR

Flagler Museum Programs

March 2017

Reviews

Tharp show is full but thin; ῾Get Out’ brilliant, provocative

Here are excerpts of reviews for current and recent shows. For full reviews, see palmbeachartspaper.com.

“An absolute must-see” — National Geographic Traveler

For More Information or to Purchase Tickets Call (561) 655-2833 or visit www.FlaglerMuseum.us Mad Hatter’s Tea Party 10:00 a.m., Saturday, March 11

Families are invited to come dressed for Tea! Parents and children will create festive hats and crafts and hear a story from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, learn the art of table etiquette with the Mad Hatter, and enjoy Gilded Age-style Tea in the Café des Beaux-Arts.

Winter Exhibition Harem: Unveiling the Mystery of Orientalist Art On view through April 16

Flagler Museum Music Series The finest chamber music setting in South Florida Last concert of the Series: St. Petersburg Piano Quartet - March 7 h e n r y

m o r r i s o n

FLAGLER MUSEUM palm beach, florida

A National Historic Landmark One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach, FL 33480

Twyla Tharp (Feb. 17, Kravis Center) Twyla Tharp’s 50th Anniversary Tour, which came to West Palm Beach on Feb. 17, featured two works: Preludes and Fugues (created especially for the tour) and Nine Sinatra Songs (1982), a staple in the repertories of many ballet companies worldwide. Both works were ebulliently danced by the 12 dancers who formed the present touring company. The 43-minute Preludes and Fugues seemed to contain just about every move and mood audiences have come to know from Tharp’s choreography. The new creation (which might actually be considered a type of re-creation) is a substantial work that more than highlights that the 75-year-old Tharp is still a master in her craft of putting steps together. In the easy, breezy Nine Sinatra Songs, there is no denying that part of the great appeal of this elegantly entertaining work is its wonderful music. Frank Sinatra’s smooth songs resonate in every romantic’s heart. In the series of seven duets, couples danced under the spinning mirror ball of a dance hall giving us hints of the waltz, the tango and the quickstep as well as hints of the dynamics in their relationship. Looking back at Tharp’s body of work — which includes 129 dances, 12 television specials, six Hollywood movies, four full-length ballets, four Broadway shows and two figure skating routines — one has to admire her artistic grit. She has also written four books, received one Tony Award, two Emmy Awards and 19 honorary doctorates. Not bad for someone who said that she started choreographing over 50 years ago just to “have a good time.” — Tara Mitton Catao Get Out (opened Feb. 24) It’s been about 20 years since Wes Craven’s Scream franchise foregrounded what we all subconsciously knew: that African-Americans in horror movies are the most expendable of specimens, so detached from the white gaze that, by the time they’re dispatched as guinea pigs to the ominous cabin or menacing basement or mosseaten manse, their chances of survival are less than nil. Since the 1970s, the ubiquitous horror-film Black Friend has done his due diligence on the front lines, inevitably paving the way for the lily-white survivor girl’s grand exit.

One of the brilliant things about Jordan Peele’s ingenious horror comedy Get Out is how it upends, satirizes and updates this flippantly racist cinematic tradition for 21st century anxieties. To do so, Peele’s debut as writer-director largely draws not from slasher history but from the wincing sanctimony of Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? (Not coincidentally, Peele and his television partner Michael Key have already riffed on Stanley Kramer’s 1967 feature in a classic Key & Peele sketch.) College students Rose Armitage and Chris Washington (Allison Williams and Daniel Kaluuya) are a picture-perfect biracial couple. So much so that, five months into the relationship, Rose’s parents don’t know that their daughter will be bringing her first African-American boyfriend for a weekend visit to their isolated country estate. The elder Armitages, it turns out, are a strange pair. Bradley Whitford’s Dean, a retired neurosurgeon, goes out of his way to project tolerance and political correctness. Catherine Keener’s Missy is a practicing hypnotherapist who seems all too eager to regress her potential son-in-law and break his nasty nicotine addiction — and force him to explore a traumatic event from his past in the process. Weirdest of all are the Armitages’ other houseguests: Georgina (Betty Gabriel), a black housemaid, and Walter (Marcus Henderson), a black groundskeeper. Dean is aware of the plantation optics, but the help don’t seem to possess any self-awareness. The oddness accelerates as, apparently unbeknownst to Rose, Caucasian family after Caucasian family descends on the chateau Armitage for an annual gathering, and these ancient, leathery, Botoxed 1 percenters stroke Chris’s musculature, pry about his athletic ability, and complement the golf swing of Tiger Woods. Get Out dances remarkably on the borderline between abject terror and uproarious comedy. This deft balance belies Peele’s inexperience behind the camera. He has cited the influence of The Stepford Wives as a classic example of the proto-horror satire, and it’s an apt comparison. But even as Get Out spirals into darker and more absurd places, it never loses its central purpose — as a potent expose of racial tension, exploitation and legally sanctioned abuse in a nation where black-and-white division is stoked daily, and where the meaning of “political correctness” is a double-edged sword with an unforgiving blade. — ArtsPaper staff


March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

ArtsPaper Calendar (Note: Events are listed through March 31 and were current as of Feb. 22. Please check with the presenting agency for any changes. Ticket prices are single sales. Most of the presenting organizations offer subscription plans.)

ART EXHIBITS

Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens: Through June 28: The Lost Bird Project, Todd McGrain’s tribute to extinct birds, including sculptures on the lawn; Rising: The Mystical World of Sophie Ryder, works by the British artist. Main gardens open 10 am-4 pm. W-Sun. $10, $8 students. 832-5328 or www.ansg.orgg. Armory Art Center: Through March 10: Artists in Residence Exhibition, works by Jenny Day, Spence Townsend, Alicia Boswell, Chad Steve and Andy Denton. Through March 26: NAWAFL: Down the Rabbit Hole, works by Florida members of the National Association of Women Artists. 9 am-4 pm M-F, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat. Free admission. 832-1776 or www.armoryart.org. Boca Raton Museum of Art: Through July 2: Glasstress, 25 to 30 glass installations by global artists; Mediterranea: American Art from the Graham D. Williford Collection, works by American artists visiting the Mediterranean region in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; Salvatore Meo and the Politics of Assemblage: mixed-media works by the mid-century American artist. $12. 10 am-5 pm T/Th/F; 10 am-8 pm first W; noon-5 pm Sat & Sun. 3922500, or www.bocamuseum.org. Cornell Museum of Art and American Culture: Through April 23: Fabricated, an exhibition of fiber art, from large-scale to tiny works, by 15 different artists. 10 am-4:30 pm T-Sat; 1-4:30 pm Sun. Suggested donation $5. 243-7922 or www.oldschoolsquare.org. Cultural Council of Palm Beach County: Through March 18: 10x10, works for 10-by-10 surfaces by Palm Beach County artists. In the main gallery. Through March 25, exhibits by Pat Levey and Kris Davis. 10 am-5 pm T-Sat; free admission. 471-2901 or palmbeachculture.com. Flagler Museum: Through April 16: Harem: Unveiling the Mystery of Orientalist Art, paintings, drawings and other artworks exploring the Gilded Age’s fascination with the seraglio. 18 adults; $10 ages 13-17; $3 ages 6-12; under 6 admitted free. 10 am-5 pm. T- Sat, noon-5 pm. Sun. 655-2833 or www. flaglermuseum.us. Lighthouse ArtCenter. March 8-12: Plein Air Festival, 41 area artists head out in the field for four days, then come back for judging, with $10,000 in prizes at stake. 10 am-4 pm M-F, 10 am-2 pm Sat & Sun. 746-3101 or www. lighthousearts.org. Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens: Through May 21: Deco Japan: Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945, an exhibit of more than 200 works from this little-known but highly creative period of Japanese art. $15, $13 seniors, $9 children and college students. 10 am-5 pm. T-Sun. 495-0233 or www.morikami.org. Norton Museum of Art: Through April 16: Svenja Deininger: Second Chances, First Impressions, works by the contemporary Austrian abstract painter. Opens March 9: Spencer Finch: Back to Kansas, the American artist’s color-blocks response to repeated viewings of The Wizard of Oz. Free admission through 2018. 832-5196 or www.norton.org. Society of the Four Arts: Through March 26: A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America, 60 works by some of the most admired folk artists working in the South between 1800 and 1920. Through July: Illustrating Words, poems by Robert Forbes illustrated by Ronald Searle. $5. 10 am-5 pm M-Sat; 1-5 pm Sun. 655-7226 or www.fourarts. org.

BOOKS

Wednesday, March 8 Women’s National Book Association: Al Hallonquist, a former Florida state investigator and police detective, talks about safety in an active shooter situations. 6:30 pm, Murder on the Beach. Nonmbers: $10. Email Michelle @ wnbasofla@gmail.com. Wednesday, March 29 Randy Wayne White speaks and signs his latest Doc Ford novel, Mangrove Lightning. 7 p.m. Murder on the Beach, Delray Beach. 279-7790 or www.murderonthebeach.com.

CABARET

Through Saturday, March 4 Christine Andreas: The Broadway veteran, TV actress and cabaret favorite makes another visit. 8:30 pm: $90 weekdays, $100 weekends. Royal Room Cabaret, Colony Hotel, Palm Beach. 6598100 or www.theroyalroom.com. Tuesday, March 7-Saturday, March 11 Tuesday, March 14-Saturday, March 18 Steve Tyrell: The Grammy winner and movie actor (Father of the Bride) is celebrated for his fresh way with the Great American Songbook. 8:30 pm: $110 weekdays, $125 weekends. Royal

Room Cabaret, Colony Hotel, Palm Beach. 6598100 or www.theroyalroom.com. Tuesday, March 21-Saturday, March 25 Marilyn Maye: The veteran singer appeared on Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show more than 75 times. 8:30 pm: $90 weekdays, $110 weekends. Royal Room Cabaret, Colony Hotel, Palm Beach. 659-8100 or www.theroyalroom.com.

CLASSICAL MUSIC

Tuesday, March 7 St. Petersburg Piano Quartet: The Florida ensemble wraps the Flagler Museum music series with the Mozart Piano Quartet No. 2 and the ever-popular Brahms Quartet No. 1. 7:30 pm, Flagler Museum, Palm Beach. Tickets: $70 (includes champagne reception); 655-2833 or flaglermuseum.us. Symphony of the Americas: The piano duo of Sergio and Barbara Salani are joined by X Factor singer Lillie McCloud for an evening called “Classical Soul.” 7:45 pm, Broward Center for the Performing Arts, Fort Lauderdale. Tickets $20$60. 954-462-0222 or www.browardcenter.org. Wednesday, March 8 Atlantic Classical Orchestra: The wunderkind pianist and composer Conrad Tao gives the world premiere of his new piano concerto, while conductor David Amado leads the orchestra in the Dvořák Ninth Symphony and the Fair Melusina Overture of Felix Mendelssohn. 7:30 pm, Eissey Campus Theatre, Palm Beach State College, Palm Beach Gardens. $50-$60. 772-4600850 or atlanticclassicalorchestra.com Friday, March 10 Sarah Chang: The eminent violinist joins the Symphonia Boca Raton for the Bruch Violin Concerto, while pianist Daniel Hsu is on hand for the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1 in a concert for the Festival of the Arts Boca. 7:30 pm, Mizner Park Amphitheater.$9.99 and up. 866-571-2787 or www.festivaloftheartsboca.org. Saturday, March 11 Seraphic Fire: Russian-American conductor Elena Sharkova guests with the Miami concert choir in works by Rachmaninov and Tchaikovsky. All Saints Episcopal in Fort Lauderdale, 7:30 pm. 305-285-9060 or www.seraphicfire.org. Sunday, March 12 Doric String Quartet: The British foursome performs music by Beethoven (Op. 59, No. 2), Mendelssohn (Op. 12) and Berg (Lyric Suite). 3 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $20. 655-7226 or www.fourarts.org. Tuesday, March 14-Wednesday, March 15 Royal Scottish National Orchestra: The young Scottish violinist Nicola Benedetti solos with the RSNO and Peter Oundjian in the Brahms Violin Concerto on Tuesday night and the Bruch First Concerto on Wednesday afternoon. Tchaikovsky’s Fourth is the big orchestral work Tuesday; Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony is Wednesday. 8 pm Tuesday, 2 pm Wednesday, Kravis Center. $39 and up. 832-7469 or www.kravis.org. Wednesday, March 15 James Galway: The Belfast-born flutist gives a recital with his wife, Jeanne, that includes numerous showpieces as well as a sonata by Philippe Gaubert and the lovely Concertino of Cecile Chaminade. 8 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. $40-45. 655-7226 or www. fourarts.org. Sunday, March 19 Jerusalem Quartet: The Israeli musicians have scheduled Haydn’s Lark Quartet, the first Rasumovsky Quartet (Op. 59, No. 1) of Beethoven, and the first of Prokofiev’s two quartets. 3 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. $20. 655-7226 or www.fourarts.org. Academy of St. Martin in the Fields: Pianist and conductor Inon Barnatan solos in the Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9 (in E-flat, K. 271, Jenamy) as well as the composer’s Symphony No. 29 (in A, K. 201). Also on the program is Aaron Copland’s tone poem Quiet City. 8 pm, Kravis Center. $35 and up. 832-7469 or www.kravis.org. Sunday, March 19; Tuesday, March 21 South Florida Symphony: Joined by several vocal soloists, Sebrina Maria Alfonso and the orchestra pay tribute to musicals of the Great White Way that have won Tony Awards. 5 pm March 19, Kaye Auditorium, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; 7:30 pm March 21, Broward Center, Fort Lauderdale. 954-522-8445 or southfloridasymphony.org. Monday, March 20 Bach in the Subway: In honor of J.S. Bach’s 332nd birthday on March 21, Lynn Unversity’s Roberta Rust offers her second annual program of free music by Bach as played by a host of students from her studio. 7:30 pm, AmarnickGoldstein Concert Hall, Lynn University, Boca Raton. Sunday, March 26 Symphonia Boca Raton: Gerard Schwarz returns to lead the orchestra in music by Copland (Appalachian Spring) and David Diamond (Concerto for Small Orchestra), while hornist Gregory Miller is soloist in the Third Horn Concerto of Mozart. 3 pm, Roberts Theater, St.

Andrew’s School, Boca Raton. $50-$84. 3763848 or thesymphonia.org. Tuesday, March 28 Palm Beach Symphony: Ramón Tebar leads his band in a Florida premiere, Can Spring Be Far Behind?, by Andre Previn, along with Gershwin’s An American in Paris and the Shostakovich Tenth Symphony. 7:30 pm, Bailey Hall at Broward College, Davie. 954-201-6884 or palmbeachsymphony.org. Wednesday, March 29 Jacob Shaw: The young British cellist and founder of “radical classical” concerts, on his U.S. tour, stops off in the Classical Café concerts at the Duncan Theatre’s Stage West. 2 pm, Palm Beach State College, Lake Worth. $35. 868-3309 or www.palmbeachstate.edu.

DANCE

Friday, March 17-Sunday, March 19 Miami City Ballet: The company’s Program IV features Divertimento No. 15 (Balanchine/ Mozart), Arden Court (Taylor/Boyce) and Who Cares? (Balanchine/Gershwin). 8 pm Friday, 2 pm and 8 pm Saturday, 1 pm Sunday. Tickets start at $20. 832-7469 (Kravis), 305-929-7010 (MCB) or www.kravis.org or www.miamicityballet.org. Friday, March 24-Saturday, March 25 Momix: Moses Pendelton’s sensational bodyshaping dance troupe. Both performances at 8 pm, Palm Beach State College, Lake Worth. $39. 868-3309 or www.palmbeachstate.edu.

FILM

Thursday, March 9 Revolution: New Art for a New World: A documentary about the artists of the Russian avant garde in the early 20th century, whose work flourished before being shut down by Stalin. At Living Room Theaters, Boca Raton. 549-2600 or fau.livingroomtheaters.com. Friday, March 24 Personal Shopper: A young woman who works as a personal shopper for a celebrity in Paris is obsessed with the death of her twin brother a few months before. With Kristen Stewart. At Living Room Theaters, Boca Raton. 549-2600 or fau.livingroomtheaters.com.

JAZZ

Wednesday, March 8 Karrin Allyson: The noted jazz singer presents a program of songs by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. 7:45 pm, Broward Center for the Performing Arts, Fort Lauderdale. 954-462-0222 or browardcenter.org. Saturday, March 11 Catherine Russell: The Grammy-winning jazz and blues singer has worked with David Bowie, Cyndi Lauper and others. 8 pm. $30 and up. Arts Garage, Delray Beach. 450-6357 or www. artsgarage.org Sunday, March 19 Bill Mays: The pianist presents a history of the jazz piano in a special program. 8 pm. $30 and up. Arts Garage, Delray Beach.450-6357 or www. artsgarage.org

OPERA

Saturday, March 4 La Bohème: Giacomo Puccini’s 1896 mega-hit is seen in a semi-staged performance a the Festival of the Arts Boca. With Jennifer Goode Cooper, John Kaneklides and Melissa Dyer. With the Symphonia Boca Raton under Constantine Kitsopoulos. 7:30 pm, Mizner Park Amphitheater. $9.99 and up. 866-571-2787 or www. festivaloftheartsboca.org. Friday, March 10-Sunday, March 12 Rigoletto: Renowned baritone Michael Chioldi stars as the bitter jester in this presentation of Giuseppe Verdi’s 1851 opera about possessive love and a curse. With Andrea Carroll as Gilda and Alexey Tarantsev as the Duke of Mantua, all on Friday and Sunday; on Saturday, Alexander Krasnov is Rigoletto, with Deanna Breiwick as Gilda and Alok Kumar as the duke. 7:30 pm Friday and Saturday, 2 pm Sunday, Kravis Center,

ArtsPaper/Calendar AT19 West Palm Beach. 833-7888 or pbopera.org. Saturday, March 18-Saturday, March 25 Before Night Falls: Cuban-American composer Jorge Martín’s 2010 opera based on the memoirs of the Cuban poet Reinaldo Arenas, who ran afoul of the Castro regime as a dissident and homosexual. With Elliot Madore, Dinyar Vania and Calvin Griffin. Five performances at the Ziff Ballet Opera House, Miami. 800-741-1010.

POPULAR MUSIC

Saturday, March 4 WIRK Rib Roundup: The country radio station presents an all-day lineup including Randy Houser, Chris Janson, Jon Pardi, LoCash and Craig Campbell. Doors open at noon. www.livenation. com for tickets. Through Sunday, March 5 Okeechobee Music and Arts Festival: The altmusic fest returns for its second year at Sunshine Grove in Okeechobee with a four-day bash that includes hundreds of bands including Kings of Leon, Usher and The Roots, The Lumineers and Wiz Khalifa.$249-$269. okeechobeefest.com Wednesday, March 8 John Sebastian: The songwriter who first made his mark with The Lovin’ Spoonful gives a solo concert of his best-known songs. 8 pm, Crest Theatre, Delray Beach. $57-$77. 243-7922 or oldschoolsquare.org. Thursday, March 9 The English Beat: Dave Wakeling’s ska-pop band has been popular since the 1980s (Save It for Later, Mirror in the Bathroom). With the Skatalites. 8 pm, Culture Room, Fort Lauderdale. www.cultureroom.net for tickets. Monday, March 13 Michael Feinstein: The singer and pianist performs songs by three celebrated crooners: Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby and Sammy Davis Jr., with the Kravis Center Pops Orchestra conducted by Larry Blank. 8 pm, Kravis Center. 832-7469 or www.kravis.org. Wednesday, March 15 Karla Bonoff: The pianist and singer-songwriter (Home, Tell Me Why) whose songs have been hits for artists including Bonnie Raitt and Wynonna Judd. 8 pm, Crest Theatre, Delray Beach. Tickets:

$57-$77. 243-7922 or oldschoolsquare.org Wednesday, March 22 The Pretenders: Chrissie Hynde returns to the road after the release of Alone, the first Pretenders album in eight years. $50-$70. 8 pm, The Fillmore Miami Beach. livenation.com. Wednesday, March 29 Dinosaur Jr.: The alt-rock trio from Massachusetts. 8 pm, Culture Room, Fort Lauderdale. www.cultureroom.net for tickets.

THEATER

Opens Thursday, March 9 Guys and Dolls: Frank Loesser’s classic 1950 musical based on stories of grafters and toughs by Damon Runyon. Through April 9. Wick Theatre, Boca Raton. $75-$80. 995-2333 or thewick.org. Trough Sunday, March 19 The Sugar Bean Sisters: Nathan Sanders’s 2006 Southern Gothic comedy about two sisters who are trying to avoid becoming spinsters.$23 and up. 586-6410 or lakeworthplayhouse.org. Opens Tuesday, March 21 Gypsy: Jule Styne’s classic 1959 musical about the stripper Gypsy Rose Lee. Through April 9 at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. 575-2223 or www. jupitertheatre.org. Opens Thursday, March 23 Phantom of the Opera: Andrew Lloyd Webber’s operatic musical about the deformed composer and his lady love. Through April 1. $31 and up. Kravis Center; 832-7469 or www.kravis.org. Opens Saturday, March 25 I Do! I Do!: Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones’ classic 1966 musical about married life. Through April 9 at the Delray Beach Playhouse. $30. 2721281, ext. 4, or delraybeachplayhouse.com. Opens Friday, March 31 Arcadia: Tom Stoppard's 1993 play about science and the need for human connection. Through April 30. At Palm Beach Dramaworks, West Palm Beach. Tickets: $46-$66. Call 514-4042, ext.2, or visit www.palmbeachdramaworks.org. The Nerd: Larry Shue's 1981 comedy about an architect and an annoying houseguest. At Boynton Beach Playhouse through April 15. $20. Call 301-5404; boyntonbeachplayhouse.com.


AT20 Books

The COASTAL STAR

March 2017

Books

Ocean Ridge author’s latest novel in Africa series the best of the four

The Last Rhino, by James Gardner; Pennington Publishers, 274 pp, $14.95 By Steve Pike James Gardner has been to Africa 27 times since 1968. The trophies mounted on the wall and the cases of African masks and artifacts in the den of his Ocean Ridge home reflect those treks to the Dark Continent. Gardner’s voice — deep and rustic — reflects his respect for Africa, its people, animals and diverse cultures. “We’ve been so embroiled in the Middle East, we’ve kind of left Africa to itself,’’ Gardner said. That means mass murders, animal extinctions, civil wars and unabashed government corruption that have been around since the European explorers in the 19th century. It’s the background in which we hear Gardner’s literary voice — bold and unflinching — in his latest novel, The Last Rhino, the fourth in his Dark Continent Chronicles. “What I try to do with all my books, I take the problems of Africa and weave them into a thriller,” Gardner said. In The Last Rhino we find hero Rigby Croxford searching for the killer of his wife, Helen, and his plans to avenge her death. Along the way, Croxford encounters ruthless poachers, a barbaric despot, Bushmen and an ex-lover who seeks his help (with a twist) in finding her daughter, who disappeared in Africa. It’s a terrific tale — fastpaced and surprising — that further enhances Croxford as a great literary character and Gardner as a great adventure author in the mold of his friend, West Palm Beach resident and mega-selling author James Patterson. Gardner’s prose in The Last Rhino captures the African landscape with the same detail as that of a National Geographic photographer. It’s clear that Gardner, an accomplished outdoorsman and wildlife conservationist, knows the African landscape and is as comfortable in

Croxford’s fictional skin as his own. It should be noted that while Croxford is a fictional character, he isn’t pure fiction. Gardner admits Croxford is a compilation of characters he’s met in nearly 50 years of African adventures. “He’s the kind of guy you’d want to be in a foxhole with,” said Gardner, 73. “The Last Rhino is kind of a metaphor for him.” To read The Last Rhino (available at Amazon.com) is to read more than just a great adventure story. The Last Rhino, perhaps even better than Gardner’s previous books in the series — The Lion Killer, The Zambezi Vendetta and The Honeyguide — reveals his love and compassion for a continent and its inhabitants (human and animal) that the Western world largely has exploited and tossed aside. Only the Chinese — much to Gardner’s chagrin, if not downright anger — seem interested in Africa these days, and not for healthy reasons. “There are a million Chinese living in Africa now,” Gardner said. “I think China has aspirations to annex Africa. They need the natural resources. Africa has all the minerals — gold, diamonds, coal.” Gardner spent this past September in Africa. “To me it’s like the last inland frontier,’’ Gardner said. “There are so many things that I love about it.’’ And Gardner’s readers will surely love The Last Rhino.

Click…Kill

the new sci-fi thriller by James Patterson Master Class Graduate

s. snyder-carroll “fast-paced” claims kirkus review available now on amazon.com


March 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Shopping AT 21

Shopping

F ISH I NG , FO OD, FA SH ION 5 not-to-miss spots on East Ocean Avenue in Lantana Story by Mary Thurwachter Photos by Ruth Cincotta

Some say Lantana is a quaint drinking village with a fishing problem. You can get a feel for both west of the bridge on East Ocean Avenue, the town’s Old Florida-style downtown with restaurants, shops, Bicentennial and Sportsman’s parks, a fishing pier and a marina. What can you do there? Here are five suggestions:

Start the day with a latte and a freshly baked almond croissant. Jouko Vaskivuo’s Palm Beach Bakery and Cafe (206 E. Ocean Ave. — right around the corner from the Hoochi Coochi Wax Studio) remains a favorite for local Finns who gather around tables outside. Vaskivuo is known for his European sourdough breads, pastries, cakes and pies. We found the friendly Inger Kolehmainen (above) behind the counter.

Buy a colorful T-shirt or koozie. The gift shop at the Old Key Lime House (300 E. Ocean Ave., www.oldkeylimehouse. com) is full of fun souvenirs and beach gear. Shop while you wait to eat lunch or dinner in the restaurant in back, which has a chickee-hut roof built by Seminole Indians and tiki bar. The waterside view can’t be beat. Built in 1889 by pioneering Lantana family the Lymans, the house, painted Key lime green, has become one of the most popular island-style eateries around. Be sure to have a slice of the restaurant’s namesake Key lime pie. And say hello to the trio of giant lobsters gliding around in a fish tank in the lobby. This is the second of three shopping areas The Coastal Star will check out this year. Next month, we’ll visit Pineapple Grove in Delray Beach.

Protect your eyes with fashionable shades. In the Sunshine State, sunglasses are a must. See Alan Ross at Shades of Time (214 E. Ocean Ave., www.shadesoftimeonline. com) to be fitted with some high-quality, high-functioning and cool-looking sunglasses from top manufacturers. Ross loves his Costa del Mars. “My prices are the best in the area and I won’t let anyone go out of here looking like a doofus,” he says.

Find out what’s biting and stock up on bait. Going fishing? See Marc Lee at Bar Jack Fish Tales (314 E. Ocean Ave., www. barjackfishing.com). Find everything from ice and snacks to high-end trolling bait. You can also reserve a spot on the Lady K drift boat (the boat goes out at 8 a.m., 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.). Lee’s family has owned the marina for several decades.

Catch breakfast or lunch at Kona Bay Café (310 E. Ocean Ave., www.konabaycafe, next to Bar Jack’s). Start with a giant mimosa. And, if you’ve been fishing, the chef may cook your catch. Not looking for seafood? Try the Coconut Macadamia Nut French Toast. Scrumptious! Other good places to eat on the avenue include Mario’s Ocean Ave (225 E. Ocean Ave.), and Oceano Kitchen (201 E. Ocean Ave.).

Discover over 40 truly spectacular antique and specialty shops, art galleries and restaurants, all on one street.

South Dixie Highway between Southern and Belvedere w w w.WestPalmBeachAntiques.com


AT22 Community Calendar

The COASTAL STAR

Community Calendar Note: Events are current as of 2/24. Please check with organizers for any changes.

MARCH 4

Saturday - 3/4 - 2017 Hunger Walk/5K Charity Run/Kids Fun Run begins on Federal Highway at NE 4th Street, Boynton Beach. Benefits Community Caring Center. 5K/ Kids Fun 6:30 am registration, 7:30 am start; Walk 7:30 am registration, 8 am start.  $15$35 + non-perishable food donation. 3748536; cccgbb.org 3/4 - Neighborhood Rummage Sale at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. $20/vendor spot; free/admission. 8 am-1 pm. 742-6243; boynton-beach.org 3/4 - Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation One Walk 2017 for a World Without Type 1 Diabetes at Meyer Amphitheatre, 105 Evernia St, West Palm Beach. 5K walk, complimentary refreshments for walkers. 9 am registration; 10 am walk. Register to raise funds. 801-7270; jdrf.org/ events 3/4 - Statewide Youth Activism Summit Against Domestic & Dating Violence at Boynton Beach Community High School, 4975 Park Ridge Blvd. Hosted by AVDA (Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse) and Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Workshops, performances, lunch. All ages. 9 am-4:30 pm. Free. Register: 850-425-2749; fcadv.org 3/4 - Generations: A Grandparents Guide to Today’s Parenting at Bethesda Memorial Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 10-11:30 am. Held again 4/1. $20/couple. Registration: 369-2229; publicrelations@BHInc. org 3/4 - Exhibition: Opposites: The Paintings of Anita Lovitt and James Rabidoux at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Runs through 4/28. Library hours. Free. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/4 - Coral Reef Shark, Alligator & Stingray Feedings at Sandoway House Nature Center, 142 S Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach. Shark T-Sat 10:30 am, Sun 1:30 pm; Alligator W/Sat 1 pm; Stingray T-Sun 2:45 pm. Free w/$5 admission. 274-7263; sandowayhouse. org 3/4 - A Gilded Age Style Lunch in Café des Beaux-Arts at Flagler Museum Kenan Pavilion, One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Delicacies, refreshments reminiscent of the elegance of entertaining during the Gilded Age. Runs through 4/16. T-Sat 11:30 am-2:30 pm; Sun noon-3 pm. $22/museum member (includes tax/gratuity); $40/non-member (includes museum admission, tax/gratuity). Registration: 655-2833; flaglermuseum.us 3/4 - Pickleball at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Adult. M-F 8:30-11:30 am, F 6-8:30 pm, Sat 1-4 pm. Monthly pass $15/resident; $25/non-resident; $2/day. 2437356; mydelraybeach.com

CHEF SHOWCASE

3/4 - Tea Ceremony Workshop at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens Seishin-an Teahouse, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Learn the basics of sado Tea Ceremony necessary to know to learn more about the aesthetics of sado. Workshop is a prerequisite to study sado at Morikami. 1-3 pm. $40. Registration: 495-0233 x237; morikami.org 3/4 - Better than the Beatles: Featuring the Liverpool Legends at Kings Point Theatre, 7000 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. 2 pm. $54. 800-716-6975; spanishriverconcerts. com 3/4 - Celtic Woman 2017 Tour at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 3 & 8 pm. Tickets start at $29. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/4 - Alligator, Snake & Owl Feedings at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Alligator W/Sat 3:15 pm; Snake Th 3:15 pm; Owl F 3:15 pm. Free. 6298760; pbcgov.com/parks/nature 3/4 - Korepanove Plays Liszt at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N Federal Hwy #100, Boca Raton.4 pm. $25/advance; 430/at the door. 573-0644; pianolovers.org 3/4 - The Doo-Wop Kids at Ellie's 50's Diner, 2410 N Federal Hwy, Delray Beach. Show, buffet dinner, cash bar. 6 pm. $38. Reservations required: 276-1570; elliescatering.com 3/4 - Evening on Antique Row, 33003900 Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. Benefits Historical Society of Palm Beach County. Food trucks, musicians, entertainment, antique shop showcases. 6-9 pm. Advance $40-$100; at the door $65-$125. 832-4164; hspbc.org 3/4 - Shakespeare in the Garden at Swinton Community Garden, 28 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Child care available. Adults 7 pm. $75. 877-407-1122; findspaceofmind. com 3/4 - Valerie Tyson: Aretha & Gladys at The Wick Theatre and Costume Museum, 7901 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. 8 pm. $75-$85; optional themed dinner for additional $48. 995-2333; thewick.org 3/4 - First Nighters at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hobnob with the performers and have your photo taken with the stars. Follows performance by Capitol Steps. 9 pm. $20. 237-7750; lynn.edu 3/4 - Shallow Howl The Improvised Musical by Sick Puppies Comedy at Center Stage Performing Arts, 7200 W Camino Real #330, Boca Raton. Held again 4/1. 9-10:30 pm. $15/online; $20/at the door. 954-667-7735; sickpuppiescomedy.com 3 /4-5 - Yart Sale at Cultural Plaza, 414 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Presented by Lake Worth Art League. 9 am-4:30 pm. Free. 586-8666; lwartleague.org 3/4-5 - Artists in the Park presented by Delray Beach Art League at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St. Fine art exhibition and sales. Every

February 2017

Municipal Meetings 3/6 - Ocean Ridge - First Monday at Ocean Ridge Town Hall, 6450 N Ocean Blvd. 6 p.m. Agenda: oceanridgeflorida.com 3/7 - Boynton Beach - First and third Tuesday at Boynton Beach City Hall, 100 E Boynton Beach Blvd. 6:30 p.m. Agenda: boynton-beach.org 3/7 - Highland Beach - First Tuesday at Highland Beach Town Hall, 3614 S Ocean Blvd. 1:30 p.m. Agenda: ci.highland-beach.fl.us 3/7 & 21 - Delray Beach - First & third Tuesdays at Delray Beach City Hall, 100 NW 1st Ave. 6 p.m. Agenda: mydelraybeach.com 3/10 - Gulf Stream - Second Friday at Gulf Stream Town Hall, 100 Sea Rd. 9 a.m. Agenda: gulf-stream.org 3/13 & 27 - Lantana - Second & fourth Mondays at Lantana Town Hall, 500 Greynolds Cir. 7 p.m. Agenda: lantana.org 3/14 & 28 - Boca Raton - Second & fourth Tuesday at Boca Raton City Hall, 201 W Palmetto Park Rd. 6 p.m. Agenda: myboca.us 3/23 - Briny Breezes - Fourth Thursday at Briny Breezes Town Hall, 4802 N Ocean Blvd. 4 p.m. Agenda: townofbrinybreezes-fl.com 3/28 - Manalapan - Fourth Tuesday at Manalapan Town Hall, 600 S Ocean Blvd. 9:30 a.m. Agenda: manalapan.org 3/28 - South Palm Beach - Fourth Tuesday at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7 p.m. Agenda: southpalmbeach.com Sat/Sun except 3/18-19 10 am-4:30 pm. Free. 843-2311; delrayartleague.com 3/4-5 - Bijoux! A Contemporary Art Jewelry Sale at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Annual exhibition & sale of contemporary art jewelry by international artists. Sat/Sun noon-5 pm. Free. 832-5196 x1212; norton.org 3/4-5 - Midnight Sun Festival 2017 at Bryant Park, 6 S Golfview Rd, Lake Worth. Celebrate the rich Finnish heritage of Lake Worth. Sat 10 am-6 pm; Sun 10 am-5 pm. $5/ person; free/kids under 4 ft tall. 629-3194; midnightsunfest.org 3/4-5 - Jewtopia presented by Chicken Coop Theatre at Levis Jewish Community Center Sandler Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 2 pm. $23-$36. 852-3200; levisjcc.org 3/4-5 - Collected Stories by Donald Margulies at Palm Beach Dramaworks, 201 Clematis St, West Palm Beach. Sat/ Sun 2 pm; Sun 7 pm; Sat 8 pm (check website for specific days). $66. 514-4042 x2; palmbeachdramaworks.org 3/4-5 - Capitol Steps at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Runs through 3/19. T-Sat 7:30 pm, W/Sat/Sun 1:30 pm. Tickets $40. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/4-5 - Good Mourning (PG 13) at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Sat 8 pm, Sun 2 pm. $25. 3473948; willowtheatre.org 3/4-5 - Live at Lynn Series: Lucie Arnaz starring in Latin Roots at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 4 pm. $50$70. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets 3/4-12 - 11th Annual Festival of the Arts BOCA at Mizner Park Amphitheatre, 590 Plaza Real & Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real. Check website for schedule and times/tickets. 368-8445 festivaloftheartsboca.org

MARCH 5-11

Sunday - 3/5 - Autism Speaks Walk at Meyer Amphitheatre, 105 Evernia St, West Palm Beach. 9 am registration; 10:30 am walk starts. Free/raise funds. 465-0054; autismspeaks.org 3/5 - House and Garden Day at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 9:30 am boutique opens; 11 am-4 pm tours. $150. 837-6635; fourarts.org 3/5 - The Playwright’s Forum Master Class: An Afternoon with Israel Horovitz at Florida Atlantic University Theatre Lab at Parliament Hall, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 11 am. $30. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 3/5 - Sado Tea Ceremony Class at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens Seishin-an Teahouse, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Study the traditional art of Sado, The Way of Tea. Attending a Tea Ceremony Workshop is required for those who have never taken a Tea Ceremony Class but wish to start studying Sado. Two lessons/month (3/5 & 19). Individual appointments begin at 10:15 am. $50/member; $55/non-member. Registration: 495-0233 x210; morikami.org 3/5 - Woodcrafters Show & Sale at 5000 N. Ocean Blvd., Briny Breezes. Raffle, silent auction and Octoberfest-style lunch. 11 am-1 pm. Free attendance. 276-7405. 3/5 - Free Museum Admission at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 1st Sun noon-5 pm. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/5 - Mystery and History Panel at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. Nancy J. Cohen speaks and signs Facials Can Be Fatal, Alyssa Maxwell speaks and signs A Pinch of Poison, and V.S. Alexander speaks and signs The Magdalen Girls. 1 pm. Free. 279-7790; murderonthebeach.com 3/5 -South Florida Symphony plays for the Young and Young at the Young at Heart - Congregation B'nai Israel,

SATURDAY, MARCH 4 • 10 - 11AM – FEATURING 50 OCEAN CHEF JOE BONAVITA SATURDAY, MARCH 18 • 10 - 11AM – TBA

2200 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Pre-concert music led by flutist Donna Wissinger at 1 pm. Performance of "Peter and the Wolf" conducted by Maestra Sebrina Maria Alfonso at 2 pm. Ice cream social and meet and great with musicians follows. $18 for singles $36 for family of 4; non-members: $50 for family of 4 and $25 for individual tickets. 241-8118; cbiboca.org 3/5 - Fiddler On The Roof: In Concert at Florida Atlantic University Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Music director & conductor Aaron Kula. 2 pm. $25-$55. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3 /5 - American Association of Caregiving Youth 1st Annual Bowling Competition at Strikes @ Boca, 21046 Commercial Trail. Food, beverage, shoe rental, 2 hours of bowling. 2:30-5:30 pm. $200/lane for up to 6 children; $150/team of 5 bowlers; $40/person. 3917401; aacy.org 3/5 - Concert: Barry Porter as Elvis at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Part of Friends Music Series. Adults. 3-4 pm. Free. Reservations required: 393-7852; bocalibrary. org 3/5 - The Mystical Brain: The Emergence of 20th Century Spirituality by John Madden at Flagler Museum, One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Part of Whitehall Lecture Series. 3 pm. $10/Individual, Family, Life Member; $28/non-member. 655-2833; flaglermuseum.us 3/5 - The Florida Singing Sons & The Girl Choir of South Florida at St Gregory’s Episcopal Church, 100 NE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. 4 pm. $30-$99. 395-8285; stgregorysepiscopal.org 3/5 - Radioactive Band at The Pavilion Grille, 301 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 6 pm dinner; 7:30 pm music. $10/includes first house drink. 912-0000; paviliongrille.com 3/5 - Shotgun Wedding: A NY City-County Band at Old School Square Pavilion, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 7 pm. $30/general admission. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/5 - Smokey Robinson at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 8 pm. Tickets start at $30. 8327469; kravis.org Monday - 3/6 - Pickleball at Ezell Hester, Jr. Community Center, 1901 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Combines badminton and tennis. Adults. No play 3/20-24. M/W/F 9 am-1 pm. $5/person; annual pass: $130/resident, $165/non-resident. 742-6550; boynton-beach. org 3/6 - Socrates Cafe at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. M 10-11:30 am. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/6 - Adult Watercolor Painting Workshop at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Instructor provides class lesson and lecture, emphasis on composition and drawing, then a painting demo. Remainder of class time is one-on-one instruction, finishing with class critique. Age 18 & up. Every M or W 10 am-1 pm. Monthly $35/resident; $40/nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com


The COASTAL STAR

February 2017 3/6 - Friends of the Museum Auxiliary General Meeting at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 590 Plaza Real. Membership meeting. Learn about upcoming events. Meeting, coffee, pastries, film and/or speaker. 10:30 am-1 pm. Free. RSVP: 392-2500 x208; bocamuseum.org 3/6 - Senior Bingo at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Adults age 50 & up. M/W 10:30 am-noon. Free. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com 3/6 - Doug Brueggemann: Preparing Your House for Sale presented by Friends of the Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of Brown Bag Series. Noon-1 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/6 - Duplicate Bridge Games at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. M/W/F noon-3 pm. $3/person. 7426640; boynton-beach.org 3/6 - Art Talks: The Magic Moment: The Miracle of Photography with Fred Rosenberg at Levis Jewish Community Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 2 pm. $12-$60. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 3/6 - 100 Years of Comedy: Lenny Dave at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of the Lifelong Learning Community Institute. Every M through 3/20 2 pm. $45/3 sessions. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/6 - Mayor’s Town Hall Meeting at Boynton Beach City Hall, 100 E Boynton Beach Blvd. 4 pm. Free. 742-6010; boynton-beach. org 3/6 - Culture & Cocktails: Sparkle & Shine: A Conversation with Coomi at The Colony Palm Beach, 155 Hammon Ave. Presented by the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. 5-7 pm. $65/advance; $75/at the door. 472-3330; palmbeachculture.com 3/6 - Due North: A Delicious Wine journey through Oregon, Washington and New York at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Part of Wine & Spirits Appreciation class with Athena Yannitsas. 5:30-7 pm. $45/ class. 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/6 - Estate & Tax Planning with Your Art Collection with Jennifer McCall at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 6-7 pm. $25. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/6 - Happy Squares Dance Club at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. All skill levels welcome. Age 18 & up. Every M 6:45-9:15 pm. $6/person. 865-2611; boyntonbeach.org 3/6 - Bike Nite at Tilted Kilt Pub & Brewery, 3320 Airport Rd #1, Boca Raton. Held by Fury Road Riders, benefits Natural High, a national 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to inspire youth to discover their natural high so they have a reason to say no to drugs and alcohol. Tilted Kilt donates 10% of food bill to Natural High. Every M 7 pm. 504-3310; furyroadrc.com 3/6 - Dog Obedience Intermediate/Games Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Every M through 4/10. 7-8 pm. $95/resident; $119/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/6 - New Play Reading: The Camp by Michael McKeever at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $10. 237-9000; lynn. edu/events 3/6 - Adult Beginner Dance: Tango at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Essentially walking with a partner and the music. Every M 7:50-10:50 pm. Per class $9/resident; $10/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/6-7 - Better than the Beatles: Featuring the Liverpool Legends at Spanish River Church, 2400 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 8 pm. $54. 800-716-6975; spanishriverconcerts.com Tuesday - 3/7 - The Federation of Boca Raton Homeowner Associations at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford blvd. Honorable Susan Bucher, Palm Beach County Supervisor of Elections discusses making our municipal elections more efficient/effective. Attorney Arthur Koski discusses proposed purchase of Ocean Breeze Golf Course by Greater Boca Raton Beach & Parks District. 8:30 am. Free. 998-7798; federationofbocahoa.com 3/7 – Pickleball: Advanced Play at Delray Beach Community Center, 50 NW 1st Ave. Adults. T/Th/F 9 am-1 pm. Monthly pass $15/ resident, $20/non-resident; 3-month pass $40/resident, $50/non-resident; 6-month pass $60/resident, $70/non-resident. 2437250; mydelraybeach.com 3/7 - Computer Basics for Older Adults at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. In partnership with Urban League, Comcast, and Older Adults Technology Services. Introduction to Internet and Email. Every T/W through 5/10 10:30 am-noon. Free. Pre-registration & valid Delray Beach Library card required: 266-0196; delraylibrary.org

3/7 - Greeting Card Craft at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Held again 3/28. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 7426390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/7 - Chess Club at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Knowledge of the game necessary. Age 18 & up. T/F Noon-4 pm. Annual fee $20/resident; $30/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/7 - Boca Raton Noon Toastmasters at Train Depot, 747 S Dixie Hwy. Improve public speaking, leadership abilities. Every T 12:151:15 pm. Free. 251-4164; toastmastersclub.org 3/7 - The New Anti-Semitism: Where the New Left, Old Right, and Islamic Brotherhood, Iran and Hezbollah Meet with Dr. Samuel Edelman at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter OneTime Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 12:30-2 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/7 - Couples Round Dance at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Learn figures/routines to waltz, swing, foxtrot. Age 18 & up. Every T 1-3 pm (high intermediate level), 3-4:30 pm (beginner level). $12/couple. 352-455-5759; boynton-beach.org 3/7 - Chess Club at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Knowledge of the game necessary. Age 18 & up. Every T/F 1-4 pm. Annual fee $20/resident; $30/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/7 - Ikebana Flower Arrangement: Ikenobo School at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Traditional flower arranging using fresh flowers. Every T through 3/28. 1-3 pm. $60/member; $70/non-member + $80 flower fee. Registration: 495-0233; morikami. org 3/7 - A Salute To Great Women Vocalists and Their Performances at Kravis Center Cohen Pavilion, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 1:30 pm. $25. 832-7469; kravis. org 3/7 - Lecture: A Salute to Great Women Vocalists and Their Performances by Dr. Roni Stein-Loreti at Kravis Center Cohen Pavilion, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Part of Kravis Film & Literary Club. 1:30 pm. $25. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/7 – Socrates Café at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Philosophical discussions. Every T 1:30-3 pm. Free. 3937852; bocalibrary.org 3/7 - Modern Line Dance Class at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Enhance quality of life through modern music/dance. Age 50 & up. Every T 1:30-2:30 pm. Per class: $5/resident; $6/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/7 - Author Manny Luftglass at Lantana Road Branch Library, 4020 Lantana Rd, Lake Worth. Fishing author discusses saltwater fishing in Florida. 2 pm. Free. 304-4500; pbclibrary.org 3/7 - Live Interview of Lyricist Sheldon Harnick hosted by Sheryl Flatow part of Dramalogue Talking Theatre series at Palm Beach Dramaworks, 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Series explores theatre in conversations with and about the artists who create the magic. 2 & 7 pm. $25/individual ticket. 514-4042; palmbeachdramaworks.org 3/7 - Eleanor Reissa: Hip, Hot, and Heymish at Florida Atlantic University Wimberly Library, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 2 pm. $20. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/7 - Literary Afternoon: Eileen Pollack, A Perfect Life at Levis Jewish Community Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 2:30 pm. $20-$25. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 3/7 - Gallery Talk: Permanent Collection at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Held again 3/28. 3 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/7 - In Defense of Criticism with A.O. Scott part of O’Keeffe Lecture Series at Society of the Four Arts Gubelmann Auditorium, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 3-4 pm. $35/non-member; free/member. 655-7227; fourarts.org 3/7 - Fiorella La Guardia with Ronelle Delmont at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/7 - Music & Interactive Art at Veterans Park Recreation Center, 50 NW 1st Ave, Delray Beach. Bring an instrument, join the open jam session style music. Easels & art supplies set up for anyone wanting to explore their inner creativity in a non-instructional environment. Join in or sit and listen! All ages. 2nd T 6-9 pm. Free. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/7 - Lantana Candidates Debate at Lantana Recreation Center, 418 S Dixie Hwy. 7 pm. Free. 585-8664; lantanachamber.com

3/7 - Soul Line Dancing at Ezell Hester, Jr. Community Center, 1901 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Age 18+. Every T 7-8:30 pm. $6/person. 742-6550; Boynton-beach.org Wednesday - 3/8 - Lawn Bowling at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Age 18 & up. Every W/F 9 am-noon. Annual fee: $40/resident; $45/non-resident. 2437350; mydelraybeach.com 3/8 - Latin America’s Political Pendulum part of Great Decisions group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 10 amnoon. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/8 - Modern Biology: When Paleo Goes Digital with Christine Zamenick at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/8 - Latin America’s Political Pendulum part of Great Decisions group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 10 amnoon. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/8 - Gold Coast Tiger Bay Club at City Fish Market, 7940 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Speaker: Ron Klein. 11:30 am-1:30 pm. $45/member or first-time guest; $50/non-member. 852-0000; goldcoasttigerbayclub.com 3/8 - Michelangelo and the Secrets of the Sistine Chapel with Dr. Terryl Lawrence at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 12:30-2 pm. $60/ annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/8 - Getting to Know Your New iPad at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1-2:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/8 - Scrabble at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. W 1-4 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/8 - Wine Appreciation Course: Learn How to be a Wine Expert with James Gabler at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of What’s on Wednesdays series. 1:30-2:30 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/8 - Peter Sokolow: The REAL History of American Klezmer at Florida Atlantic University Wimberly Library, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 2 pm. $20. 297-6124; fauevents. com 3/8 - Silver Science Days at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Special afternoon for adults and retirees. Ages 62 & up. 2nd W 2-5 pm. $10. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org 3/8 - Making Marriage Work with Dr. Bert Diament at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/8 - Zonta Club of Boca Raton at Pavilion Grille, 301 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 2nd W 5:30 pm. $30. 482-1013; zontabocaraton.org 3/8 - Non-Partisan Candidates Forum for Boynton City Commission District II at Boynton Beach Library, 208 Seacrest Blvd. Hosted by Boynton Beach Chamber of Commerce. 6:30-8 pm. 732-9501; boyntonbeach.org 3/8 - Writers’ Corner at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Manuscript critiquing by published authors. 6:30-8 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/8 - Women’s National Book Association (WNBA) Meeting at Murder on the Beach Mystery Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. Speaker Al Hallonquist, former police detective and Florida State investigator. 6:30 pm. $10/non-member. wnbasofla@gmail.com 3/8 - Art Deco Second Wednesdays: Camaguey Cuba Deco! at Armory Art Center Library, 811 Park Place, West Palm Beach. 7 pm. Free. 832-1776; armoryart.org 3/8 - Music Americana: The Songs of Elvis Presley with Rod MacDonald at Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 7-9 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/8 - It Was a Very Good Year, A Multimedia Tribute to Frank Sinatra presented by Tony Sands Productions at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. 7:30-9:30 pm. $25. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/8 - Concert: Russian Seasons Dance Company: Celebration of World Dance at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 8 pm. $40-$45. 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/8-9 - A Life in Diplomatic Service: From Tokyo to Moscow to the European Union presented by Ms. Beryl Blecher at South Palm

Community Calendar AT23 Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7:30 pm. $25. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com Thursday - 3/9 - Rippers Knitting Club at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. All skill levels. Every Th 9 am-noon. $10/per season. 742-6240; boynton-beach.org 3/9 - Quilters meet at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest. Share quilting information, perpetuate quilting as a cultural and artistic form. Sale of quilted items supports the Library. Every Th 9-11:30 am. Free. 742-6886; boyntonlibrary.org 3/9 - 16th Annual Delray Beach Home Tour from Atlantic Avenue to George Bush Boulevard between the Intracoastal & A1A. Benefits Achievement Centers for Children & Families. Tour, parking, trolley, catered luncheon. 10 am-4 pm. $100. 266-0003; delrayhometour.org 3/9 - Lantana Candidates Meet & Greet at Old Key Lime House, 300 E Ocean Ave. 11:30 am-1 pm. Attendees pay for their own lunch. 585-8664; lantanachamber.com 3/9 - Adult Acrylics Art Class at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Local instructor teaches basic acrylic painting techniques to beginners; also available for instruction to advanced painters. Call for list of supplies needed. Age 18 & up. Every Th noon-3 pm. Per class $10/resident; $12/nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/9 - Resume Coaching Services at Delray Beach Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Help with resume; advice to improve employment opportunities. Every Th through 3/23 1-4 pm. Free. Appointments required: 266-0196; delraylibrary.org 3/9 - Adults Tech Help Lab at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Every Th 1:303:30 pm. Free. 393-7906; bocalibrary.org

3/9 - The Philosophy of Food: A Vegan Perspective with Philip Nicozisis at 1330 Lands End Rd, Manalapan. Part of J. Turner Moore Library Lecture Series 2017. Refreshments follow. 1:30 pm. Free. 588-7577; manalapan.org 3/9 - Movies on Thursdays: B. Wilder comedy (NR 1959) at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 2 pm. Free. 7426390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/9 - Senior Bridge at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Experienced players welcome. Partners not needed. Every Th 2:304 pm. Annual fee: $15/resident + $1/game; $25/non-resident + $2/game. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/9 - Gallery Talk: Sculpture Garden at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Held again 3/16 & 23. 3 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/9 - Concert: Remedy Jazz Quartet at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. 5:30 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/9 - Ocean Ridge Candidate Forum at Ocean Ridge Town Hall, 650 N Ocean Blvd. 6 pm. Free. 732-2635 3/9 - Night Line Dance at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Th through 4/27. Beginner 6-7 pm; Beginner & High Beginner 6-8 pm; High Beginner 7-8 pm; Intermediate 8-9 pm; High Beginner & Intermediate 7-9 pm. $50/resident; $63/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/9 - Art Talk with Amy Gross at Cornell Art Museum at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Wine, light bites. 5:30 pm doors open; 6-8 pm talk. $15/admission. 2437922; oldschoolsquare.org 3/9 - The Next Generation Road Rascals Car Show at Lake Worth Casino Building &

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AT24 Community Calendar Beach Complex, 10 S Ocean Blvd. 2nd Th 6-9 pm. rstarr2010@gmail.com 3/9 - Palm Beach Watercolor Society Meeting at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. 2nd Th 6:30 pm Oct-May. Palmbeachwatercolorsociety.org 3/9 - Open Reading Night at School of Creative Arts/Crest Studios at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Listen or sign up to read from an original work (published or unpublished). All levels welcome. Read for 10-15 minutes then open discussion (not critique). 2nd Th 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. 212-677-4278; oldschoolsquare.org 3/9 - Exhibition Lecture: Conversation with Spencer Finch at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. 6:30 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton.org 3/9 - Inside a Jazz Ensemble: The Jose Scott Jazz Trio at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 7-9 pm. $60/ annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/9 - Jazz in the Gallery at Boca Raton Museum of Art Outdoor Sculpture Garden, 501 Plaza Real, Mizner Park. The Marshall Turkin Classic Jazz Ensemble. 7-8:30 pm. Free w/ museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum. org 3/9 - O Sole Trio: From Pavarotti to Pop at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $35-$45. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org Friday - 3/10 - 22nd Annual Student Showcase of Films at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Presented by Palm Beach County Film and Television Commission. 9:30 amnoon. Free. 237-7000; lynn.edu 3/10 - Sounds Like a Winner: What Birdsong, the Human Voice and Politics Teach Us About Vocal Communication Systems with Dr. Rindy Anderson and Dr. Casey Klofstad at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/10 - Supervised Bridge Play at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. John Black: 2 hours supervised Bridge play. Partners not needed. Adults. Every F 10 amnoon. $10/person. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/10 - Current Events Discussion Group at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. F 10:30 am-noon. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/10 - Balkan by the Beach: International Folk Dance at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Benefit of exercise, pleasure of dancing to beautiful music. No experience or partner needed. Age 50 & up. Every F 10:45 am-1:15 pm. $5/resident; $6/non resident per class. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/10 - Bill Gove Golden Gavel Toastmasters Club at Duffy’s Sports Grill, 4746 N Congress Ave, Boynton Beach. Every F noon-1 pm. $12/lunch or $5/soft drink; cash only. 742-2121; billgovetoastmastersclub.com 3/10 - Zap! Electricity in Your Home and Body with Dr. Stephen Kowel at Florida

The COASTAL STAR Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter OneTime Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 12:30-2 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/10 - iPad 2: Using Apps at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1-2:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/10 - Bob Roberts Society Orchestra at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Full 16-piece big band; variety of tunes for lovers of music and dance. Every F 1:30-3:30 pm. $4. 742-6240; boynton-beach.org 3/10 - New Yorker Magazine: A Story and a Poem with Judith Klau at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Community Institute. Every F through 3/31 2 pm. $50/4 sessions. 2669490; delraylibrary.org 3/10 - Grace of Monaco (2014 NR) part of the Friday Films Series at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30, 5:15 & 8 pm. $5/adult. 655-7227; fourarts.org 3/10 - Beverly Sills Ten Years After: Made in America with Giuseppe Albanese at Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/10 - Opening Night Dinner: Rigoletto The Power of a Curse presented by Palm Beach Opera at Kravis Center Cohen Pavilion, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 5:30 pm. $135 (does not include opera performance ticket). 833-7888; pbopera.org 3/10 - Neil Zirconia, The #1 Neil Diamond Tribute Show at Ellie's 50's Diner, 2410 N Federal Hwy, Delray Beach. Show, buffet dinner, cash bar. 6 pm. $42. Reservations: 276-1570; elliescatering.com 3/10 - Evening on the Avenue at Cultural Plaza, 414 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Live music, food vendors, crafts, artists selling their artwork. Every F 6-10 pm. Free. 588-8344; lakeworth.org 3/10 - Friday Oldies Night with Joey Dale at The Pavilion Grille, 301 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Every F 6 pm dinner; 8 pm showtime/ dancing. $10/includes house drink. 912-0000; paviliongrille.com 3/10 - Boca Raton Mayors Forum at Wayne Barton Study Center, 269 NW 14th St. Hosted by Boca Raton Tribune. 6:30-8 pm. Free. 826-7945 3/10 - Opening Reception: Haitian Heritage Exhibit at The Blueprint Gallery at Milagro Center, 695 Auburn Ave, Delray Beach. Runs through 5/5 M-F 10 am-5 pm. 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. RSVP: 279-2970; milagrocenter.org 3/10 - Speaker Series: The Golden Age of Sumo: Behind the Curtain with Lynn Matsuoka at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens Theater, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. 7 pm. $7/member; $10/ non-member. 495-0233 x237; morikami.org 3/10 - Castoffs Square Dance Club at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Basic modern western square dancing. Every F 7-7:45 pm dance & rounds; 7:45-9:30 pm dance club. $12/couple at the door. 731-3119; boynton-beach.org 3/10 - Catch A Rising Star Comedy Club: Angela Lagreca & Dick Capri at Crest

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Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $47-$67. 243-7922 x1; delraycenterforthearts.org 3/10 - Improv Comedy Show: Daddy’s Little Nest Egg at Center Stage Performing Arts, 7200 W Camino Real #330, Boca Raton. Held again 4/14. 9:30-11 pm. $15/ online; $20/at the door. 954-667-7735; sickpuppiescomedy.com 3/10-11 - Steve Ross In To Wit: Funny Songs Throughout The Ages at Kravis Center Persson Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 7:30 pm. Tickets $39. 8327469; kravis.org 3/10-11 - St. Patrick’s Day Festival & Parade on Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach. Check website for events, parking, more. Festival F 5-10 pm & Sat 11 am-7 pm; parade Sat noon. Free. stpatrickparade.com 3/10-12 - 1st Annual Palm Beach Contemporary: The Art, Design & Fashion Event of the Year! At South Florida Fairgrounds Expo Center, 9067 Southern Blvd, West Palm Beach. One-of-a-kind or limited edition glass, ceramics, jewelry, wearable art, more. F/Sat 10 am-6 pm; Sun 10 am-5 pm. $15/adult; 412/senior (65+); $7/student; free/ under 14. 635-2037; pbartshow.com 3/10-12 - Legendary Ladies of Song: Side by Side at Lake Worth Playhouse Stonzek Theatre, 713 Lake Ave. F/Sat 8 pm, Sun 2 pm. $25. 296-9382; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/10-17 - 2017 Delray Beach Senior Games at multiple locations. Competition, fun, fitness. Age 50 & older. Check website for times, locations, events. Spectators/ participants welcome. Free. 243-7277; mydelraybeach.com Saturday - 3/11 - Art Al Fresco at Lake Worth Beach, 10 S Ocean Blvd. Presented by Lake Worth Art League. Held again 3/25. 9 am-5 pm. 586-8666; lwartleague.org 3/11 - La Petits Collecteurs of South Florida Dollhouse Miniatures Show & Sale at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 NW Crawford Blvd. Exhibit, demos, raffles, lunch facilities, silent auction. 9 am-3:30 pm. $/adult; $2/under 12. 954-725-1270 3/11 - Family Golf Day 2017 at Osprey Point Golf Course, 12551 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Skills challenge, activities for the whole family. Benefits Families First Golf Foundation. 10 am-2 pm. 265-4392; familiesfirstgolffoundation.com 3/11 - Exhibition: Edel Rodriguez at Cultural Council Sanders Foundation Artist Resource Center, 601 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Runs through 4/15 T-Sat 10 am-5 pm. Free. 471-2901; palmbeachculture.com 3/11 - Ride & Remember Trolley Tour departs from Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NW 5th Ave, Delray Beach. 2-hour tour focuses on 5 historic districts. 2nd Sat 10 am-noon. $25. Reservations: 279-8883; spadymuseum.com 3/11 - Community Cookout presented by The Boca Chamber at YMCA of South Palm Beach County, 6631 Palmetto Circle S, Boca Raton. Food/games, bounce house, slides, DJ, more. 11 am-3 pm. Free/admission; $5/meal ticket. Registration: 395-4433; bocaratonchamber.com 3/11 - Taste History Culinary Tours of Historic Lake Worth and Lantana conducted by Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History departs at 11 am from Macy’s (outside East Entrance) Boynton Beach Mall, 801 N Congress Ave. 4-hour tour includes bus/walking tour, food sampling, visits to historical/cultural sites. 2nd Sat yearround, rain or shine. Reservations required: check website for available dates. $50-$60/ adult & senior citizen; free/child under 18 (max 5 children per family.) 243-2662; tastehistoryculinarytours.org 3/11 - Genealogical Society of Palm Beach County: Is There a Patriot in My Tree? at Palm Beach County Library Main Meeting Room, 3650 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Speaker Debbie Duay PhD. 1:30-4 pm. Free. 616-3455; gensocofpbc.org 3/11 - Linkedin at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1:30-3 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/11 - Florida East Coast Chapter En Pointe: Classical Ballet Competition at Harid Conservatory, 2285 Potomac Rd, Boca Raton. 2 pm. Free. 391-6380; nsalfloridaeast. org 3/11 - Live! At the Norton: Seraph Brass at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. 2 pm doors open; 3 pm show. $3/ member; $8/non-member. 832-5196; norton. org 3/11 - Artist at Work Series: Carin Wagner Oil Painting at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Demonstration, discussion with the artist, materials, concepts of creating art. 3-4 pm. Free w/museum admission. 3922500; bocamuseum.org 3/11 - Joseph Sobol: In the Deep Heart’s Core: A Celebration of William Butler Yeats at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW

February 2017 2nd Ave. Part of Story Central: One World, Many Cultures series. Adults. 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/11 - The Cameo Chamber Players at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N Federal Hwy #100, Boca Raton. 4 pm. $20/at the door cash only. 982-8887; steinwaybocaraton.com 3/11 - Fab 4 Artist Happening at 3500 NW Boca Raton Blvd #702, Boca Raton. Celebrate the works of Anne Carter, Denise Goldstein, Michelle Marra, Denise McNellis. 5:30-8:30 pm. Free. 860-690-6966; michellemarr@ comcast.net 3/11 - Ronnie Spector: Pop, Rock & Doo Wopp Live! at Florida Atlantic University Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. The Ronettes, The Legendary Teenagers, Jimmy Beaumont & The Skyliners, Joey Dee & The Starliters. 8 pm. $39-$72. 2976124; fauevents.com 3/11 - Sick Puppies Comedy Show at Center Stage Performing Arts, 7200 W Camino Real #330, Boca Raton. Every Sat 9:30-11 pm. $15/online; $20/at the door. 954-667-7735; sickpuppiescomedy.com 3/11-12 - 110th Hillsboro Lighthouse Birthday Tour meets at Sands Harbor Resort and Marina, north side, 125 N Riverside Dr, Pompano Beach. Visitors park in Pompano Beach City Parking (fee required) across from Sands Harbor. Look for HLPS Lighthouse tour table beginning at 8:30 am. Transportation to and from lighthouse is only by tour boat provided by South Florida Diving Headquarters. First boat departs 9 am. Last boat returns 4 pm. USCG regulations require closed-toe flat shoes with rubber soles to climb lighthouse. Children must be accompanied by an adult and a minimum of 48” tall to climb the tower. No pets allowed. Sat 8:30 am-4 pm; Sun 8:30-11:30am. $25 transportation fee. 954-942-2102; hillsborolighthouse.org/tours 3/11-12 - The Lion in Winter by James Goldman at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, 22094 Lyons Rd, Boca Raton. Sat 8 pm, Sun 2 pm. 954-784-0768; curtaincallplayhouse.com

MARCH 12-18

Sunday - 3/12 - Daylight Savings Time Begins 3/12 - Israeli Film Series: Peter the Third at Levis Jewish Community Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 9:30 am. $6-$16. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 3/12 - Nihongo: Japanese Language Levels I-IV at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. 8-week course covers effective conversational Japanese plus reading and writing skills. Every Sun through 5/14. Level I class 10:15-11:15 am; Level II class 1:20 am-12:20 pm; Level III class 12:20-1:20 pm; Level IV class 1:20-2:20 pm. Registration: $90/member; $100/non-member. 495-0233; morikami.org 3/12 - The Way of Taiko: The Heartbeat of Japan at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens Theater, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Introduction to the history of taiko; understand sounds/ movements, how to connect nature, the meaning of body movement; learn how to drum. Wear comfortable clothes, shoes; jewelry not recommended. Every T 11 am-1 pm or 2-4 pm. $50. Registration: 495-0233; morikami.org 3/12 - Writing from Life: A Close Look at the Work of Jack Gilbert: A Workshop with Visiting Poet Kevin Goodan at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 1 pm. $10/person. 868-2063; palmbeachpoetryfestival.org 3/12 - Deby Eisenberg speaks and signs her book Protecting Paige at Temple Sinai, 2475 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. 1-2 pm. Free. 2766161; templesinaipbc.org 3/12 - St. Patty's Day Celebration at Bog Apple Shopping Bazaar & Flea Market, 5283 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Bingo, Prizes1-3 pm. Free. thebigappleshopping bazaar.com; 499-9935 3/12 - Art Show at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 2-4 pm. Free. 5888889; southpalmbeach.com 3/12 - The Robert Sharon Chorale Benefit Concert at Palm Beach Atlantic University DeSantis Family Chapel, 300 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Benefits The Lord’s Place. 3 pm. $20/adult; $10/child under 12. 687-4245; therobertsharonchorale.com 3/12 - Musical Fireworks from Paris: Piano Works by Chopin, Saint-Saens and Others with Sofiya Uryvayeva at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter OneTime Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/12 - Brandeis National Committee presents Jure Rozman, Pianist at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N Federal Hwy #100, Boca

Raton. 4 pm. $20/member advance; $25/at the door. 998-7784; steinwaybocaraton.com Monday - 3/13 - On the Cannibals part of Great Books group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 9:30-11 am. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/13 - Zionism and Jewish Identity with Dr. Samuel Edelman at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every M through 4/3 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/13 - Imaginations, Innovations, and Inventions: Leah Polin at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Community Institute. Every M through 3/27. 10:30 am. $45/3 sessions. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/13 - Monday Morning Muffins & Mysteries: Summertime, All the Cats are Bored by Phillipe Georget at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:3011:30 am. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/13 - Tennessee Williams: Timeless Art from a Tortured Soul at Kravis Center Persson Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 11 am. Tickets $49. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/13 - Steven Grant: A Trip to Taiwan presented by Friends of the Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of Brown Bag Series. Noon-1 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/13 - The Poetry of Protest: Race, Gender, Public Policy and War with Dr. Jeff Morgan at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every M through 4/3 12:30-2 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/13 - Pianist Mini-recital and Master Class with Michael Lewin at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 2 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets 3/13 - The New Normal: Emerging Sexual and Gender Identities with Dr. Fred Fejes at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every M through 4/3 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/13 - Old School Square Master Plan Public Input Meeting #2 at Old School Square Field House, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 6 pm. Free. 276-8640; shutt@ mydelraybeach.com 3/13-14 - An Evening with Lorna Luft at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $57-$72. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/13-14 - Synco Romantico at Spanish River Church, 2400 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Held again 3/20-21, 3/27-28. 8 pm. $54. 800-7166975; spanishriverconcerts.com Tuesday - 3/14 - Municipal Election Day: Polls open 7 am-7 pm. 3/14 - The New Administration and American Power with Dr. Robert Rabil at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every T through 4/4 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/14 - Bingo at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Adults. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/14 - Introduction to Mah Jongg at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Required 2016 National Mah Jongg League playing card needed for class. Every T through 5/9 10:30 am-12:30 pm. $80/resident; $100/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/14 - The Jive Aces at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 11 am & 2 pm. $29. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/14 - In the Good Old Summertime: Memories of the Catskills with Ronelle Delmont at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every T through 4/4 12:30-2 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/ advance member; $65/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/14 - Gallery Talk: Modern and Contemporary Collection at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Held again 3/21. 3 pm. Free w/museum admission. 3922500; bocamuseum.org 3/14 - The American Unwinding and the New Administration with George Packer part of O’Keeffe Lecture Series at Society of


The COASTAL STAR

February 2017 the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 3-4 pm. $35/non-member; free/member. 655-7227; fourarts.org 3/14 - Introduction to Philosophy with Dr. Simon Glynn at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every T through 4/4 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/14 - Facebook: Getting Started at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/14 - The Henry Morrison Flagler Chapter National Society Daughters of the American Revolution March Dinner at Chesterfield Hotel, 363 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach. 6 pm. RSVP: 324-2937 3/14 - The Life and Music of the Beatles with Dr. Herbert Keyser at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 7-9 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/14 - Shed Sessions at The Spady: Spady House Band at The Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NW 5th Ave, Delray Beach. 8-11 pm. $10/at the door; free/musicians. 2788883; spadymuseum.com Wednesday - 3/15 - Hollywood’s Visions of War with Dr. Burt Atkins at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every W through 4/5 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/15 - Prospects for Afghanistan & Pakistan part of Great Decisions group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 10 am-noon. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/15 - Yoga and Mindfulness: Practice, Science and Research with Sat Bir Sangh Khalsa at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Noon. Free. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets 3/15 - Baby Boomers, American Character, and Film with Dr. Susan Love Brown at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every W through 4/5 12:30-2 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/15 - Bards of a Feather Round Robin Poetry Reading at Green Cay Nature Preserve, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. 12:30 pm. Free. 868-2063; palmbeachpoetryfestival.org 3/15 - Matinee Movies with Myrna Loman at Levis Jewish Community Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 1st & 3rd W through May 1 pm. $8-$10. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 3/15 - One Woman, Four Decades, Eight Wishes with Marilyn Willison at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of What’s on Wednesdays series. 1:30-2:30 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/15 - The Time to Buy: Collecting Early American Antiques with Brock Jobe at Society of The Four Arts King Library, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30 pm. $10/person. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/15 - Gallery Talk: Pre-Columbian Collection at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 3 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/15 - Where Does Bioethics Fit Into Our Everyday Lives? with Carol Pollard at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/ annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/15 - Highland Beach Coastal Democratic Club at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. 3rd W 5 pm. Free. 2726280 3/15 - Always Delray Community Workshop: Live at Old School Square Fieldhouse, 51 N Swinton Ave. Community workshop on creation of the City’s new Comprehensive Plan. 5:45-9 pm. Free. 2437040; alwaysdelray.com 3/15 - Art Boca Raton Vernissage Preview Party at International Pavilion of the Palm Beaches at Research Park at Florida Atlantic University, 3450 NW 8th Ave, Boca Raton. Benefits Boca Raton Museum of Art School. Cocktails, dinner-by-the-bite. 6-10 pm. $150. RSVP by 3/8: 392-2500 x213; bocamuseum.org 3/15 - From The Met To Broadway part of Cy Schonberg Concert Series at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7 pm doors open; 7:30 pm performance. $25/singleevent ticket. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com

3/15-18 - Kol Esperanza with Lev Voce at Florida Atlantic University Auditorium, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton. Presented by Spanish River Concerts. W-Sat 8 pm; Sat 2 pm. $40-$65. 800-716-6975; spanishriverconcerts. com Thursday - 3/16 - News of the Week with Frank Cerabino at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every Th through 4/6 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/16 - 2017 Love of Literacy Luncheon at Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd. Benefits Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County. Guest speaker Diane Ackerman. 11:30 am. $150. 279-9103; literacypbc.org 3/16 - National League of American Pen Women Scholarship Luncheon at Delray Beach Golf Club, 2200 Highland Ave. Author/ humorist Lea Hope Becker. 11:30 am. $27-$30/ member; $32-$35/guest. Bocapenwomen.org 3/16 - The Healing Power of Laughter: A Happier, Healthier Life with Dr. Shellie Fraddin at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every Th through 4/6 12:30-2 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/16 - Love Loss & What I Wore presented by Chicken Coop Theatre at Levis Jewish Community Center Sandler Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Held again 3/18-19. Th/Sat 7:30 pm; Th/Sun 2 pm. $23-$36. 852-3200; levisjcc.org 3/16 - Movies on Thursdays: T. Hanks (PG-13/2016) at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 2 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/16 - Edwina von Gal: Turning PRFCT: The Evolution and Adventures at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30 pm. $25/non-member. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/16 - Third Thursdays @ 3 presents Joshua Liller at Palm Beach County History Museum, 300 N Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. 3 pm. $10/non-member. Reservations: 8324164, x101; historicalsocietypbc.org 3/16 - Was Elvis Jewish? with Paulette Cooper Noble at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/16 - What Modernism Means: Visual Arts in the Early 20th Century at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 4 pm. $25. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 3/16 - Creative Art for Adults at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Ages 18+. 5-7 pm. $28/resident; $35/non-resident. 3473900; sugarsandpark.org 3/16 - Music in the Museum: Bob Hanni Jazz Ensemble at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Limited seating. 6-7 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/16 - Distilled: A Conversation with Charles Bronfman at Society of the Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Book signing follows. 6 pm. Free. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts. org 3/16 - Joe-Paddy Festival at St Vincent DePaul Regional Seminary, 10701 S Military Tr, Boynton Beach. Celebrating the Feasts of St Joseph & St Patrick. Italian & Irish food/beverage, silent/live auctions, live entertainment, raffle, more. 6-9 pm. $50. 732-4424; svdp.edu 3/16 - The Sons of Sam Spade: Four Detective Films From Around the Globe with Dr. Kurt F. Stone at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every Th through 4/6 7-9 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/16 - Holly Brown speaks and signs her book This Is Not Over at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 7 pm. Free. 279-7790; murderonthebeach.com 3/16 - A Court of Thrones and Roses by Sarah J. Maas part of (Not Too) Young Adult Book Club at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 7-8 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/16 - Sheng-Yuan Kuan Piano Recital at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $20. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets 3/16 - The Klezmatics at Old School Square Pavilion, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach.

7:30 pm. $25/general admission. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/16 - William Close/Earth Harp at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 8 pm. $35. 8683309; duncantheatre.org 3/16-18 - Visiting Artist: Rob Stern at Benzaiten Center for Creative Arts, 1105 2nd Ave S, Lake Worth. 3/16 6-9 pm private dinner, $100; 3/17 6-8 pm gallery opening $10; 3/18 2-5 pm public demo free. 508-7315; benzaitencenter.org 3/16-18 - Art Boca Raton Art After Dark at International Pavilion of the Palm Beaches at Research Park at Florida Atlantic University, 3450 NW 8th Ave, Boca Raton. 60-65 dealers showcase contemporary, modern and emerging art, sculpture, photography, works on paper, installations. 6-8 pm. $10/pass holders, $12/general admission. 305-4904584; artbocaraton.com 3/16-19 - Ringing True (PG-13) at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Th/F/Sat 8 pm; Sat/Sun 2 pm. $25. 347-3948; willowtheatre.org Friday - 3/17 - St. Patrick’s Day 3/17 - Space Planning 101 with Kevin Byrne at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Every F through 3/31 9:30 am-12:30 pm. $275. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts. org 3/17 - Objection! Current, Contentious and Confusing Legal Battles with Irving Labovitz, J.D. at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every F through 4/7 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $50/ advance member; $65/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/17 - The Real Story Behind the Financial Crisis of 2007-2008 with John Eberhardt at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every F through 4/7 12:30-2 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/ advance member; $65/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/17 - St. Patrick’s Day Party at Boynton Beach Senior Center, 1021 S. Federal Hwy. 1-3 pm. $3/advance; $5/at the door. 742-6570; boynton-beach.org 3/17 - Female Agents (2008 NR) part of Friday Films Series at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30, 5:15 & 8 pm. $5/adults. 655-7227; fourarts.org

Community Calendar AT25 3/17 - The Magic That was Pavarotti with Giuseppe Albanese at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every F through 4/7 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/17 - Evenings at the Council at Cultural Council of Palm Beach County Main Gallery, 601 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. 6-8:30 pm. Free. 471-2901; palmbeachculture.com 3/17 - Boynton Beach Blarney Bash at 129 E Ocean Ave. 6-10 pm. Free. catchboynton.com 3/17 - Nova Singers: Jubilate Deo at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church, 370 SW 3rd St, Boca Raton. 8-10 pm. $15/advance; $20/at the door; $5/students. 954-683-8866; nova.edu/ novasingers/ 3/17 - Mix Tape Music Series: Disco Inferno A 70’s Celebration at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 8 pm. $35. 868-3309; duncantheatre.org 3/17-19 - Golda’s Balcony at Mizner Park Cultural Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. F/ Sat 7 pm; Sun 2 pm. $34-$45. 844-672-2849; miznerparkculturalcenter.com 3/17-19 - Shades of Buble at Old School Square Crest Theatre, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. F/Sat 8 pm; Sat/Sun 2 pm. $43$53. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org Saturday - 3/18 - Air Waves Kite Flying at Oceanfront Park, 6415 N Ocean Blvd, Boynton Beach. Kite flying, games, activities on the sand. 10 am-1 pm. Free. 742-6640; boyntonbeach.org 3/18 - 9th Annual Boating & Beach Bash for People with Disabilities at Spanish River Park, 3001 N State Rd A1A, Boca Raton. Largest free fun-day event in America for children and adults with special needs. More than 2 dozen health-related exhibitors, boat rides on the Intracoastal Waterway, music, BBQ lunch, games, more. 10 am-3 pm. Free. 715-2622; boatingbeachbash.com 3/18 - Women Today Luncheon at Lynn University DeHoernle International Center Henke Wing, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 11 am. $20/person; $10/students & faculty w/ ID. Advance registration required. 237-9000; lynn.tix.com 3/18 - Taste History Culinary Tours of Historic Delray Beach & Boynton Beach conducted by Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History departs at 11 am from Macy’s (outside East Entrance) Boynton Beach Mall, 801 N Congress Ave. 4-hour tour includes

bus/walking tour, food sampling, visits to historical/cultural sites. Held again 3/25. Yearround, rain or shine. Reservations required: $50-$60/adult & senior citizen; free/child under 18 (max 5 children per family.) 2432662; tastehistoryculinarytours.org 3/18 - The Way of Tea: Sado Demonstration at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens Seishin-an Teahouse, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Observe Japanese sado by the Omote Senke tea group, an ever-changing tea ceremony demonstration rich in sensational subtleties. Noon, 1 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm. $5 w/paid museum admission. 495-0233 x210; morikami.org 3/18 - Book+Art Discussion: Waiting for Snow in Havana: Confessions of a Cuban Boy + Si Se Pudiera at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. 2 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton.org 3/18 - Rick Allen: Drums for Peace Exhibition at Wentworth Gallery, Town Center, 6000 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Proceeds from art sales benefit Project Resiliency’s Warrior Resiliency Program. 6-9 pm. Free. RSVP: 338-0804; wentworth-art.com 3/18 - Paul Levine speaks and signs his book Bum Luck at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 7 pm. Free. 279-7790; murderonthebeach.com 3/18 - Live Jazz Jam Session & Showcase at Flamingo Clay Glass Metal Stone Studio & Gallery, 15 S J St, Lake Worth. 3rd Sat 7-10 pm. $5/cover. 588-8344; flamingoclaystudio.org 3/18-19 - 12th Annual Detail Fest & Car Show at Palm Beach County Convention Center, 650 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Product demonstrations, mini detailing classes, live entertainment, industry insiders, celebrities, food vendors, more. Sat 9 am-4 pm; Sun 10 am-4 pm. $10/1 day; $15/2 days. 800-869-3011; autogeek.net 3/18-19 - Art on the Square at Old School Square Cornell Art Museum, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Original works by 100 fine art/ fine craft artists from around the country. 10 am-5 pm. Free. 243-7922; oldschoolsquare.org 3/18-19 - Lerner and Loewe’s Brigadoon at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Sat 2 & 7:30 pm, Sun 4 pm. $50-$70. 237-9000; lynn.edu/ tickets

MARCH 19-25

Sunday - 3/19 - 5th Annual 50 Mile Granfondo Garneau Florida Ride & Gambler Ride presented by Delray Beach Twilight Festival at Veterans Park, 802 NE


AT26 Community Calendar  1st St, Delray Beach. 7:30 am ride begins. $150/A+ Experienced and All Category Rider; $100/Gambler Ride Entry. 289-9052; delraygranfondo.com 3/19 - Brotherhood Breakfast & Bingo at Temple Sinai, 2475 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Bagels, lox, salads, eggs, $1,000 prize money, more. 9:30 am. $18. 276-6161; templesinaipbc.org 3/19 - Ice Cream Social at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 2-4 pm. Free. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/19 - Women in Today’s Art World at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. 2-4 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton. org 3/19 - Boca Talk: Petah Coyne The Art of Materials at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 3-4 pm. $5/museum member; $10/ non-member. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/19 - Concert: Camerata del Re: Not outside the Bachs part of Music at St. Paul’s series at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 3 pm. $20/ preferred seating; $15/regular seating; $5/ student. 276-4541; music.stpaulsdelray.org 3/19 - Musical Fireworks from Paris: Piano Concert with Dr. Sofiya Martin at Unity of Delray Beach, 101 NW 22nd St, Delray Beach. 5 pm. Free/love offering. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 3/20 - Winston Churchill: American Hero with Richard D’elia and Lee Pollock at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 6 pm. $10/person. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/19 - I’m A W-O-M-A-N! The Music and Unbelievable Life of Miss Peggy Lee at Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 7:30 pm. Tickets $35. 832-7469; kravis.org Monday - 3/20- Sacred Heart School’s Heroes Pro-Am Golf Tournament at Breakers West, 937 Dickens Place, West Palm Beach. Swing for scholarships at the eighthannual event that helps prepare students for the challenges of the 21st century. 7 a.m. $250. 379-4593 or sacredheartschoollakeworth. com. 3/20 - Luncheon with Gil Walsh and Steven Stolman at Cultural Council of Palm Beach County Main Gallery, 601 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Benefits programs for and about artists in Palm Beach County. Valet parking available. 11:30 am-2 pm. $125. RSVP: 4723342; palmbeachculture.com 3/20 - Colin Gross: Boynton’s Town Square Project presented by Friends of the Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of Brown Bag Series. Noon-1 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/20 - Music Americana: The Music of Cape Breton with Rod MacDonald at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 7-9 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/20 - Piano Lovers Presents Ziata Chochieva, Pianist at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N Federal Hwy #100, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $25/advance; $30/day of. 573-0644; pianolovers.org 3/20 - Manual Cinema ADA/AVA at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 8 pm. $27. 8683309; duncantheatre.org Tuesday - 3/21 - Coloring for Adults at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Special coloring pages, colored

The COASTAL STAR pencils, gels, markers provided or bring your own. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/21 - PULSE Luncheon: An Epidemic in Our Own Backyard: South Florida’s Heroin Addiction at Boca Country Club, 17751 Boca Club Blvd. Presented by PULSE, Boca Chamber’s Business Professionals under 40 United for Leadership, Service and Empowerment. Moderator Lawrence Mower. 11:45 am-1:15 pm. $35/member; $50/nonmember. 395-4433; bocaratonchamber.com 3/21 - Is Asia Lost to China? With Mary Kissel part of O’Keeffe Lecture Series at Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 3-4 pm. $35/non-member. 6557227; fourarts.org 3/21 - U.S. Foreign Policy by Dr. Jeffrey S. Morton at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Every T through 5/9 4-5:30 pm. $68/6-week series; $25/single lecture. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 3/21 - Music for the Mind: The Best of David Krohan at Harriet Himmel Theater at CityPlace, 700 S Rosemary Ave, West Palm beach. Benefits Lighthouse for the Blind of the Palm Beaches. VIP cocktail reception includes meet David Krohan, wine, light hors d’oeuvres, premier seating. 6 pm VIP cocktail reception $50; 7-9 pm show $10 adult; $5/student w/ID. 586-5600 x3248; lighthousepalmbeaches.org 3/21 - Ukulele Music Interactive at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. All ages. 1st & 3rd T 6-9 pm. Free. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 3/21 - The Tuesday Murder Club Book Group at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 6:30 pm. Free. 279-7790; murderonthebeach.com 3/21 - FAU Astronomical Observatory public viewing day at Florida Atlantic University Science & Engineering Building 4th floor, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 1st F & 3rd T 7 pm. Free. 297-STAR; physics.fau.edu/ observatory 3/21 - Remembering Woodstock: Songs from a Seminal Event in An Upstate New York Pasture with Joan Friedenberg & Bill Bowen at Florida Atlantic University Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 7-9 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/21 - Ed Lin speaks and signs his book Incensed at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. Free. 279-7790; murderonthebeach.com Wednesday - 3/22 - Nuclear Security part of Great Decisions group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 10 am-noon. Free. 742-6390; 3/22 - Saving Space on Your Apple Device at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1-1:30 pm. Free. 393-7902; bocalibrary. org 3/22 - The Republic of Florida: The American Invasion and the Seminole Wars with George Greider at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of What’s on Wednesdays series. 1:30-2:30 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/22 - Mango by Jen Karetnick at Society of the Four Arts King Library, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 1:30 pm. Free. 655-2766; fourarts.org 3/22 - Trials and Tribulations: Stephen Singer, Esq. at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of the Lifelong Learning Community Institute. Every W through 4/12. 2 pm. $50/4 sessions. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org

3/22 - The Confusing Map of the Middle East: Blame the Mess on the British, the French and the US Congress with Dr. Samuel Edelman at Florida Atlantic University Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/22 - Community Cabaret at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Calling all singers, dancers, musicians, stand-up comedians; performers must register in advance. 7:30 pm. $5. 3473900; willowtheatre.org 3/22 - Chubby Checker at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 8-9:45 pm. $37. 868-3309; duncantheatre.org 3/22-23 - The Nazi Titanic…The Final Days of WWII presented by Dr. Robert Watson at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7:30 pm. $25. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/22-23 - Synco Romantico at Kings Point Theatre, 7000 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Held again 2 pm 3/25. 8 pm. $54. 800-7166975; spanishriverconcerts.com 3/22-24 - Postcards from Paradise by David Fleisher at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. W/Th/F 7:30 pm, W 12:30 pm. $10/person. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets Thursday - 3/23 - Movies on Thursdays: Marx Brothers comedy (NR 1932) at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 2 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/23 - Irrepressible: The Jazz-Age Life of Henrietta Bingham with Emily Bingham at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30 pm. $10, free/members. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.or 3/23 - Concert: Lyric String Orchestra at Highland Beach Library Community Room, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. 5:30 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/23 - Opening Reception at Artists’ Guild Gallery, 512 E Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Wine and dessert. 6-8 pm. Free. 278-7877; bocaguild.com 3/23 - Curator’s Conversations: Paul Manship’s Diana and Actaeon at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Curators lead insightful discussions about special exhibitions, installations, and the Museum Collection. All ages. 6:30 pm. Free. 832-5196: norton.org 3/23 - I Am Woman Hear Me Roar: A History of Women’s Activism in the US at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 7-8 pm. Free. Reservations: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/23 - Dean’s Showcase No. 3 at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $10. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets 3/23 - Jim Caruso’s Cast Party at The Fieldhouse at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Cool cabaret night out enlivened by a hilariously improptu variety show. Participants sign in with their sheet music and wait to be called up on stage. 9 pm. $50. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/23-26 - 32nd Annual Palm Beach International Boat Show at West Palm Beach waterfront on Flagler Drive at Evernia & Clematis Streets. Th noon-7 pm; F/Sat 10 am-7 pm; Sun 10 am-6 pm. $22/adult; $15/ child age 6-15; free/under age 6. 355-1081; visitwpb.com

February 2017

Green Markets Artisan Market, every Sunday and Wednesday, Plaza del Mar, 230 S. Ocean Blvd, Manalapan. Unique food finds, local artists, handicraft vendors. 10 am-3 pm. Free. 762-5340; plazadelmarshopping.com Boca Raton GreenMarket, every Saturday, Royal Palm Place Southwest Parking Lot, intersection of S Federal Highway and SE Mizner Blvd. 8 am-1 pm. Free. 368-6875; myboca.us Boynton Beach Mall Green Market, every Sunday at 801 N. Congress Ave, between Cinemark 14 Theater and TooJay’s. Every Sun noon-5 pm. Free. 736-7900; boyntonbeachmall.com Delray Beach GreenMarket, every Saturday, Old School Square Park, 50 NE 2nd Ave, one block north of Atlantic Ave. Fresh local produce, baked goods, gourmet food items, plants, live music, children’s activities. 9am-2pm. 276-7511; delraycra.org Lake Worth Farmer’s Market, every Saturday, Old Bridge Park, 10 S Ocean Blvd, Lake Worth. 9 am-1 pm. Free. 547-3100; lakeworthfarmersmarket.com Lake Worth Night Market Waterside, every 1st Wednesday, Old Bridge Park, 10 S Ocean Blvd, Lake Worth. 6-9 pm. Free. 533-7395; lakeworth.org Friday - 3/24 - Box Lunch It with The Symphonia: Up Close & Personal at Unitarian Church, 2601 St. Andrews Blvd, Boca Raton. Sit in on part of a rehearsal; share a box lunch with conductor, soloists, musicians. Adults. 11:30 am. $35. Reservations: 866-6874201; thesymphonia.org 3/24 - Tracks (2013 PG-13) part of Friday Films Series at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30, 5:15 & 8 pm. $5/ adult. 655-7227; fourarts.or 3/24 - Adult Student Exhibition Reception: Jewelry, Paintings, and Photographs at Boca Raton Museum of Art School, 801 W Palmetto Park Rd. Exhibit runs through 4/15 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/24 - Adult Ballroom Dance Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Instructor: Lee Fox. Singles and couples welcome. Every F through 4/21. Beginner (Swing) 6:30-7:30 pm; Intermediate (Two-Step) 7:45-8:45 pm. $60/resident; $75/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/24 - Concert in the Park at Bicentennial Park, 312 E Ocean Ave, Lantana. 7-9:30 pm. Free, 540-5000; lantana.org 3/24 - God Save the Queen: Queen Tribute Sensation at Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 7 pm doors open; 8 pm concert. $45-$120. flavorus.com/queenbocaf 3/24 - Jimmy Mazz: America Thru Song at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. 7:309:30 pm. $25. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse. org 3/24 - Sick Puppies Comedy Stand Up Night at Center Stage Performing Arts, 7200 W Camino Real #330, Boca Raton. 9-10:30 pm. $15/online; $20/at the door. 954-667-7735; sickpuppiescomedy.com 3/24-25 - Collectible Treasures Sale & First Dibs at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Preview F 6-8 pm $10/ person (RSVP by 3/17); sale Sat 10 am-3 pm free w/museum admission. 392-2500 x213; bocamuseum.org 3/24-25 - Boca Bacchanal at various unique Boca Raton locations. Benefits Boca Raton Historical Society. Wine & food, hi-tech auctions, meet chefs/vintners. Vintner dinners F 7 pm at private residences $325; Bacchanalia Sat 7-11 pm at Mizner Park Amphitheater $125. bocabacchanal.com 3/24-26 - Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. F/Sat 8 pm; Sat/Sun 2 pm. $47-$57. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org Saturday - 3/25 - Spring Break Kickoff Concert at Lake Worth Beach, 10 S Olive Blvd. Live music all day. 586-1600; lakeworth.org

3/25 - Jewelry! Art Clay Silver Pendants at Mounts Botanical Garden Pavilion, 531 N Military Tr, West Palm Beach. In collaboration w/Armory Art Center. Instructor Nzingah Oniwosan. 9 am-noon. $115/member; $125/ non-member; $35/materials fee. Registration: 832-1776 x33; mounts.org 3/25 - Digital Design & Photoshop Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Introduction and basic steps to editing digital images using Adobe Photoshop. Intended for beginners, basic computer skills required. Students encouraged to bring a laptop. Every Sat through 4/15 10-11:30 am. $79/resident; $99/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/25 - Mountainfilm on Tour at Kravis Center Persson Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Family Fare. $5/10 am show; $20/7:30 pm show. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/25 - Paper Shredding Fundraiser at Cason United Methodist Church, 342, N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. No plastic please. 10 am-1 pm. $5/box. 706-9618; casonumc.org 3/25 - Highland Beach Spring Fling at Town Hall, 3614 S Ocean Blvd. Shred documents, register pets. 20 vendors. Music performance at 12:30 pm. 11 am-3 pm. Free. 278-4548. 3/25 - Tools & Tips for Meatless Monday Meals at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1:30-3 pm. Free. 393-7906; bocalibrary.org 3/25 - 2017 South Florida Police K9 Competition hosted by Boynton Beach Police Department at Boynton Beach High School, 4975 Park Ridge Blvd. Food vendors, rock climbing wall, prizes, more. No pets allowed. 2-8 pm. Free. 742-6191; sflpolicek9competition.com 3/25 - Irena Kofman and Friends at Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Meet faculty with guest artists in a chamber setting of classical and romantic repertoire. 7 pm. $20. 297-6124; fauevents.com 3/25 - Elmar Oliveira and Friends at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $20. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets 3/25 - First Nighters at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hobnob with the performers and have your photo taken with the stars. Follows performance by Tenors UnLimited: The Rat Pack of Opera. 9 pm. $20. 237-7750; lynn.edu/tickets 3/25-26 - PrideFest 2017 at Bryant Park, 30 S Golfview Rd, Lake Worth. Parade, live entertainment, vendors, food. Sat/Sun noon-6 pm. Parade Sun 11:30 am. Per day $8/advance; $10/at the gate. 533-9699; compassglcc.com


The COASTAL STAR

February 2017 3/25-26 - Tenors UnLimited: The Rat Pack of Opera at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 4 pm. $50-$70. 237-9000; lynn. edu/tickets

MARCH 26-APRIL 1

Sunday - 3/26 - Basics of Sushi Workshop at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens Oki Education Studio, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach.Learn basics of sushi making, cultural information about sushi. Participants must bring sharp 7-8 inch knife, cutting board (approximately 10”x15”), apron, dishtowel. 10 am-noon. $70. Registration: 495-0233 ext. 237; morikami.org 3/26 – Sunday Musical Matinee Series: Duo Paloma at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. 2 pm. $20/show. 2669490; delraylibrary.org 3/26 - Out of the Trunk: Irving Berlin with Sandy Livingston at Florida Atlantic University Wimberly Library, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 3 pm. $20-$30. 297-2891; fauf. fau.edu/17JCSCalendar 3/26 - Keyboard Conversations with Jeffrey Siegel: Virtuoso Variations at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 3 pm. $20. Reservations: 8058562; fourarts.org 3/26 - Giorgio Mirto, Classical Guitarist and Composer at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 3 pm. $20. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 3/26 - The Symphonia Connoisseur Concert 4: Vienna to Appalachia at St. Andrew’s School Roberts Theater, 3900 Jog Rd, Boca Raton. Guest conductor Gerard Schwarz; horn soloist Gregory Miller. 2 pm pre-concert conversation; 3 pm concert. $50$84. 866-687-4201; thesymphonia.org 3/26 - Presidential Advanceman Mel Cottone part of Friends Speaker Series at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 3-4:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/26 - Delray String Quartet: Debussy, Schubert and Piazzolla at The Colony Hotel, 525 E Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. 4 pm. $35. 213-4138; delraystringquartet.com 3/26 - Naplekova Plays Baroque Keyboard Music at Steinway Piano Gallery, 7940 N Federal Hwy #100, Boca Raton. 4 pm. $25/advance; $30/at the door. 573-0644; pianolovers.org 3/26 - Swank Table Dinner presented by Cultural Council at Swank Farms, 14311 North Rd, Loxahatchee. 5-9 pm. $260/person. 4723340; palmbeachculture.com 3/26 - C.J. Box speaks and signs his book Vicious Circle at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 5 pm. Free. 279-7790; murderonthebeach.com 3/26 - Ultimate Chefs’ Dinner at The Yacht & Racquet Club of Boca Raton, 2271 N Ocean Blvd. Benefits United Cerebral Palsy of South Florida. 6-9 pm. $150. 954-315-4057; ucpsouthflorida.org Monday - 3/27 - The Dream of a Ridiculous Man part of Great Books group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 9:3011 am. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/27 - Joyce Bruck: Travel Through Iceland presented by Friends of the Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of Brown Bag Series. Noon-1 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/27 - The Last Painting of Sara de Vos by Dominic Smith part of Afternoon Book Group at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. 1 pm. Free. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/27 - Four 19th Century Presidents with Ronald Feinman at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Community Institute. Every M through 4/17 2 pm. $50/4 sessions. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/27 - Wine Appreciation Made Fun and Easy with James Gabler, J.D. at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring OneTime Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/27 - 9th Annual Savor the Avenue on Atlantic Avenue in Downtown Delray Beach. 16 restaurants at Florida’s longest dining table that runs more than 5 blocks. Benefits Delray Beach Public Library. Rain date 3/28. 5:30-9 pm. Reservations required; must be made directly with the restaurant of your choice: 243-1007; downtowndelraybeach.com/ savortheavenue 3/27 - Men’s C.I.L. Basketball League at Ezell Hester, Jr. Community Center, 1901 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Community Interactive League of organized play. Ages 18+. Every M through 5/15 6-8 pm. $50/ resident; $63/non-resident. 742-6640; boynton-beach.org 3/27 - Supper Club with Jill & Rich: The

Ladies of Swing at Tavern at The Wick, 7901 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. 6:30 pm. $125. 995-2333; thewick.org 3/27 - Luciano Pavarotti Retrospective: A Musical Life in Seven Arias with Giuseppe Albanese at Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring OneTime Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 7-9 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/27 - New President, New Foreign Policy: Two-Month Assessment by Dr. Jeffrey S. Morton at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $25. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 3/27 ADL Rising And Its Heightened Role In The 21st Century with Jonathan Greenblatt at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Dr. 7:30-9 pm. 988-2924; florida.adl.org 3/27-28 - Linda Lavin: My First Farewell Concert at Old School Square Crest Theatre, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $57$72. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/27-29 - Discover DaVinci & Michelangelo: The Titans Experience at Mizner Park Cultural Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $50-$100. 844-6722849; miznerparkculturalcenter.com Tuesday - 3/28 - The Children Act by Ian McEwan part of Book Club discussion by Friends of the Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 3/28 - Literary Afternoon: Irina Reyn, The Imperial Wife at Levis Jewish Community Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 2:30 pm. $20-$25. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 3/28 - Syria and the Western Jihadi: Tales from the Front with Clarissa Ward part of O’Keeffe Lecture Series at Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 3-4 pm. $35/non-member. 655-7227; fourarts.org 3/28 - Vive la musique Francais From Jongleurs to Jazz with Andrea Gilbert at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 7-9 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/28 - Cantor Stephanie Shore in Concert at Congregation B’nai Israel, 2200 Yamato Rd. 7:30-8:30 pm. $5/non-member. 241-8118; cbiboca.org 3/28-4/1- Royal Room Cabaret Performance: Curtis Stigers at The Colony Palm Beach, 155 Hammon Ave. 8:30 pm. $85$95/show + $50/food & beverage minimum. 659-8100; thecolonypalmbeach.com Wednesday - 3/29 - Sewing Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Group project class with teacher on hand for assistance. Come prepared to work; bring fabric, pattern, scissors, pins, thread, sewing machine. All levels welcome. Every W through 5/31 noon-2 pm $120/resident; $150/nonresident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/29 - How to be Rich, Young & Beautiful on a $1.98 with Joella Cain at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of What’s on Wednesdays series. 1:30-2:30 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/29 - Voices of Women of the ‘60s:

Joan, Joni, Judy, Janis, Carly and Carole at The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St. Lyrics to songs projected for audience sing-along. Part of Feelin’ Groovy: Musical Backstories series. 2 pm. $25. 272-1281 x4; delraybeachplayhouse.com 3/29 - With Friends Like These, Who Needs Enemies? Russian-Israeli Relations Since the End of World War II with Andrew Kahn at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/29 - Intermediate 3D Fundamentals at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/29 - A Fete with Liam Forde at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $40. 237-9000; lynn.edu/events 3/29-30 - Jim Witter with Tiffany Desrosiers and Full Orchestra at Kings Point Theatre, 7000 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Held again 4 & 8 pm 4/1. 8 pm. $48. 800-716-6975; spanishriverconcerts.com Thursday - 3/30 - Dramawise Series: Arcadia by Tom Stoppard at Palm Beach Dramaworks, 201 Clematis St, West Palm Beach. Includes 2 with intermission. Participants may choose to attend all or a portion of the program. Act 1 10-11:30 am; Intermission (at Jardin, 330 Clematis St, #110) 11:45am-12:45 pm; Act 2 1-2 pm. Acts 1 & 2 & Intermission $40-$50; Intermission & Act 2 $30-$40; Act 2 $15-$20. 514-4042 x2; palmbeachdramaworks.org 3/30 - Technology Petting Zoo at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 11 am-12:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary. org 3/30 - Lunch & Learn: The Pirates of Penzance presented by Palm Beach Opera at The National Croquet Center, 700 Florida Mango Rd, West Palm Beach. Noon-2 pm. $84. 833-7888; pbopera.org 3/30 - Movies on Thursdays: The George Eastman House at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 2 pm. Free. 7426390; boyntonlibrary.org 3/30 - The New US Administration: Between Primacy and Realism? with Dr. Robert Rabil at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Spring One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/30 - Gallery Talk: Glass Collection at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 3 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 3/30 - Juliette de Marcellus speaks and signs her book A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Carnegie Hall at 1330 Lands End Rd, Manalapan. Part of J. Turner Moore Library Lecture Series 2017. Refreshments follow. 6 pm. Free. 588-7577; manalapan.org 3/30 - Andrew Gross & K.J. Howe speak and sign their books The One Man and The Freedom Broker at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273

Community Calendar AT27 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 7 pm. Free. 2797790; murderonthebeach.com 3/30 - Canvas & Cocktails at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Create art; enjoy wine, craft beer, signature cocktail. 7-9 pm. $35/includes materials & one drink ticket. 243-7922; oldschoolsquare.org 3/30 - The Sound of Music Theater Show at Center Stage Performing Arts, 7200 W Camino Real #330, Boca Raton. Held again 4/1. 7-9 pm. $20/advance; only sold at the door if not sold out online. 750-7824; centerstageboca.com 3/30 - Ladies Night Out: Mother Can You Not? by Kim Friedman & Kate Siegel at Blue Martini, 550 S.Rosemary Ave, West Palm Beach. Presented by Mandel Jewish Community Center. 7 pm. $36/Literary Society Reader Level; $42/guest. 740-9000; jcconline. com/bookfestival 3/30 - The Music of Andrew Lloyd Webber at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 7:30-9:30 pm. $42-$52. 243-7922; oldschoolsquare.org 3/30 - An Evening of Chamber Music and Poems at Lynn University Snyder Sanctuary, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $10. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets 3/30 - Drumline LIVE! at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 8 pm. $35. 868-3309; duncantheatre.org Friday - 3/31 - Exhibition: Mark My Words at Cultural Council Sanders Foundation Artist Resource Center, 601 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Runs through 5/27. T-Sat 10 am-5 pm. Free. 471-2901; palmbeachculture.com 3/31 - At The Rialto at The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St. Part of Studio Theatre series. 2 pm. $25. 272-1281; delraybeachplayhouse.com 3/31 - Buen Dia Ramon (2013 PG-13) part of Friday Films Series at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30, 5:15 & 8 pm. $5/adult. 655-7227; fourarts.org 3/31 - Light Pollution: Effects on Sea Turtles & You at Florida Atlantic University College of Business, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Complimentary parking lot 7. 3:30 pm. Free. 544-8608; gumbollimbo.org 3/31 - Casino Royale at Arts Garage, 94 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. Benefits Arts Garage arts education, outreach, programs. Open bar, heavy hors d’oeuvres, desserts, live entertainment, classic casino games. 6:30-11 pm. Admission includes 5,000 gaming chips. $100-$125. 560-6357; artsgarage.org 3/31 - Bassoon Master Class with Martin Kuuskmann at Lynn University, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets 3/31-4/1 - My Life on a Diet Starring Renee Taylor at Mizner Park Cultural Center, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. F/Sat 7:30 pm; Sat 3 pm. $40-$65. 844-672-2849; miznerparkculturalcenter.com 3/31-4/1 - Send In The Queens at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. 8 pm. $35. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 3/31-4/2 - I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change (PG-13) at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Held again 4/6-9. F/Sat 8 pm, Sat/Sun 2pm. $25. 347-3948; willowtheatre.org Saturday - 4/1 - Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation One Walk 2017 for a

World Without Type 1 Diabetes at Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 3K walk, complimentary refreshments for walkers. 7:30 am registration; 8:30 am walk begins. Register to raise funds: 801-7273; jdrf. org/events 4/1 - 3rd Annual Hero Walk at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. 9:30 am registration; 10 am-1 pm walk. $25. 3917274 x 133; cmboca.org 4/1 - Delray Beach Initiative and Atlantic High School PTSA’s Mini Golf Event at Putt’n Around Mini Golf & Sports Bar, 350 NE 5th Ave., Delray Beach. Proceeds fund college prep courses & college application fees for Atlantic High students who otherwise could not afford to pay. 12:30 pm. $25/person; $80/ foursome; $10/kids 18 and under. 561-2764422; delraybeachinitiative.com 4/1 - 2nd Annual Throw Down the Mic: FAU & FIU MFA Poets & Professors Performance Event at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 12:30 pm. Free. 868-2063; palmbeachpoetryfestival.org 4/1 - Brew at the Zoo at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Sampling from 25+ breweries, food available for purchase, live music. Adults only. 6-9 pm. $35/general; $65/VIP; $15/designated driver. Advance tickets required: 547-9453; palmbeachzoo.org 4/1 - Mallets & Martinis at National Croquet Center, 700 Florida Mango Rd, West Palm Beach. Benefits Vita Nova, assisting young adults who age out of foster care. 6-10 pm. $125. Malletsandmartinis.com 4/1 - FAU Concert Percussion Ensemble at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $10. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 4/1 - Guest Bassoonist Martin Kuuskmann at Lynn University , 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $20. 2379000; lynn.edu/tickets 4/1 - For the Love of Broadway! presented by Delray Beach Chorale at Saint Andrew’s School, 3900 Jog Rd, Boca Raton. 7:30-9 pm. $25/adult; $5/student under 25 w/ID. 800984-7282; delraybeachchorale.org 4/1 - Pants Down Circus: ROCK at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 8 pm. $27. 8683309; duncantheatre.org 4/1 - Bravo Amici at Old School Square, Pavilion 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8-9:30 pm. $30/general admission. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 4/1-2 - 38th Annual Hatsume Fair at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Celebrates first bud of spring. Taiko, Japanese music, Samurai sword fights, contests, workshops, demonstrations, kids activities, food/beverages. 10 am-5 pm. Advance $12/adult, $6/child; at the gate $15/adult, $10/child; free/child under 3. Discounted tickets, 2-day passes online: 495-0233 x200; morikami.org 3/29-4/2 - 22nd Annual Palm Beach International Film Festival with movies at Keiser University (2600 N. Military Tr, West Palm Beach) and at Cinemark Palace 20 (3200 Airport Rd, Boca Raton). 362-0003; pbifilmfest.org


AT28 

The COASTAL STAR

2017

The Coastal Star March 2017  

Serving Coastal Delray Beach and north to Hypoluxo Island

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