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February 2017

Serving Hypoluxo Island, South Palm Beach, Manalapan, Ocean Ridge, Briny Breezes, Gulf Stream and Coastal Delray Beach

Volume 10 Issue 2

Along the Coast

Healing honey

Locally produced balm sweetens sea turtles’ recovery at Gumbo Limbo By Stacey Singer DeLoye

Caitlin Bovery, sea turtle rehabilitation assistant coordinator, rubs dark, raw honey on Blitzen, an ill adult loggerhead turtle, at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center. The honey speeds healing and fights infection in wounds. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star

Ocean Ridge

Jury to decide if former vice mayor battered police officer By Steve Plunkett

A jury will decide whether former Vice Mayor Richard Lucibella is guilty of felony battery on an Ocean Ridge police officer and resisting the officer with violence. Circuit Judge Charles Burton scheduled the trial to begin at 9:30 a.m. April 10. Lucibella also faces a misdemeanor count of using a firearm while under the influence of alcohol. He has pleaded not guilty to all charges.

“You’ll see this case develop into a lot more,” Lucibella’s attorney, Ocean Ridge Marc Shiner, to hear fired said after a Jan. 10 lieutenant’s appeal, will wait hearing. until election to “There’s fill commission a lot of interesting seat. small-town Pages 8-9 politics in this.” Town police arrived at Lucibella’s oceanfront home Oct. 22 after neighbors

complained of hearing Lucibella gunshots. Officers said they found the vice mayor and one of their supervisors, Lt. Steven Wohlfiel, “obviously intoxicated” on the patio. Officers say they confiscated a .40-caliber Glock handgun and found five spent shell casings on the patio. Police also took a semiautomatic pistol they said Lucibella had in his back pocket. See LUCIBELLA on page 9

Inside Cultivating plants, friendships

Ocean Ridge Garden Club turns 50. Page H1

Festival of the Arts BOCA Cartoonist Bob Mankoff headlines annual event. Page AT9

The gash on the loggerhead sea turtle’s forehead exposes bone, and apparently it hurts. Turtle expert Caitlin Bovery is patting a sticky mixture of honeycomb and raw honey atop its wound, causing the slow creature to recoil. “You see how he’s pulling away, that’s indicative of pain,” says Bovery, the sea turtle rehabilitation assistant coordinator at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton. The staff at Gumbo Limbo Meet Gumbo named this Limbo’s turtle gentle fellow whisperer photographer Blitzen, because of his arrival Page 2 Christmas Eve. A homeowner in Hutchinson Island noticed the turtle listing aimlessly along the beach and phoned the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. State biologists found it unable to submerge, a sign of illness, and covered in barnacles, a sign it hadn’t been moving for a long time. Its plastron, or lower plate, was concave, a sign it had stopped eating quite some time ago.  Blitzen clearly needed medical help. The nearest turtle hospital was the See HONEY on page 25

Along the Coast

Boynton, Delray step up look at sober homes By Jane Smith

The three largest South County cities continue on separate paths to address problematic sober homes in their residential neighborhoods. On Jan. 17, Boynton Beach city commissioners approved a moratorium on all group home applications until June 4. Sober homes fall under the group home category in the city code. The recovery residences cater to people

Atlantic Crossing settlement delayed Page 12

Boynton OKs Riverwalk project Page 16

who want to live together in sobriety. Treatment does not occur inside the houses. Delray Beach is using a two-pronged approach. On Jan. 24, commissioners approved an update to the city’s reasonable accommodation ordinance that requires all group homes to register annually for an accommodation that allows more than three unrelated adults to live together. The city also wants the property See SOBER on page 21

Shopping (and dining) Antique Row

West Palm Beach district offers opportunities for both. Page AT1


2 Editor’s Note/Coastal Star

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Coastal Star Publisher Jerry Lower publisher@thecoastalstar.com Executive Editor Mary Kate Leming editor@thecoastalstar.com

Advertising Executives Yvonne Calvert Mike Mastropietro Jay Nuszer News Operations Tracy Allerton Chad Armstrong Brad Betker Chris Felker Steve Plunkett Victoria Preuss Michelle Quigley Clare Shore Scott Simmons Michele Smith Margot Street Tom Warnke Amy Woods

Advertising Manager Chris Bellard sales@thecoastalstar.com Managing Editors Henry Fitzgerald henry@thecoastalstar.com Mary Thurwachter maryt@thecoastalstar.com Founding Partners Carolyn & Price Patton

www.thecoastalstar.com

The Coastal Star is a monthly newspaper with two editions serving Hypoluxo Island, South Palm Beach, Manalapan, Ocean Ridge, Briny Breezes, Gulf Stream and coastal Delray Beach; Highland Beach and coastal Boca Raton. ©2008-2017

Send letters, opinions and news tips to news@thecoastalstar.com The Coastal Star 5114 N Ocean Blvd. Ocean Ridge, FL 33435 561-337-1553

Editor’s Note

Good governance starts with local elections

T

he 2016 elections are over. Now on to 2017. The March 14 municipal elections are right around the corner. In Boca Raton the candidate qualification period has ended, so you may already be noticing yard signs. In our other coastal municipalities there’s a shorter period for campaigning, but already there is buzz about who is (and isn’t) picking up papers to qualify before the Feb. 14 deadline. Even with all the early election hype and intrigue, The Coastal Star will not be doing candidate endorsements. We will, of course, publish information on everyone running for office and continue to report on major election issues. In fact, we will be dedicating multiple pages to informing you about our coastal candidates in the March edition. But to schedule and meet with each of the candidates from the nine municipalities we cover is simply not feasible with our small staff. And without in-person interviews, we simply cannot provide our readers a fair assessment of each person’s suitability for office. Helping citizens become informed voters is a critical role of news media. And earning readers’ trust — that they are always getting the straight story from us — is the foundation of our work. In the day-to-day operation of the newspaper, however, I frequently encounter trusteroding behavior in our coastal cities’ and towns’ officials. Here are some examples from the past month: One town commission announced from the dais who Call now for extraordinary travel experiences! Cruises. Tours. Group Travel. Family Reunions. Go someplace you’ve never gone before.

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the new mayor will be before the candidate filing period even opened. Commissioners charged with governing an entire city have blocked a large percentage of the population from having temporary representation on the dais for reasons that appear to be purely political. Law enforcement management in one town chose to “manage” the release of information to the local media to avoid timely news coverage. And, of course, there always seem to be candidates for public office who take large contributions from developers while swearing those contributions do not influence their votes on local development projects. Really? I realize many of us have grown to look at the media, government and politics with a callous eye. I understand that. But we aren’t Washington and Tallahassee. These are our neighbors running things, and who gains when trust among neighbors is lacking? Shouldn’t we be better than this? If you, like me, aren’t happy with the behavior of your elected officials or the actions of municipal employees, be sure to get informed and vote. If that alone feels unrewarding, you’ve still got time to go by your town or city hall and pick up a package to qualify as a candidate. Then go out and talk with your neighbors. We all still have time to earn each other’s trust. Mary Kate Leming, Editor

ABOVE: Ben Hicks uses his photos to raise awareness of sea turtles. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star BELOW: A photo by Hicks showing a green sea turtle coming to the surface to breathe.

Friends of Gumbo Limbo to honor ‘the turtle whisperer’ By Rich Pollack

Ben Hicks knows when sea turtles don’t mind him swimming beside them and he knows when they want him to go away. An internationally known nature and surfing photographer — whose images of sea turtles have been in magazines published by prestigious organizations such as National Geographic and the World Wildlife Federation — Hicks has even earned the moniker “the turtle whisperer” from some here in South Florida. “I spend more time with sea turtles than any other animal,” he says. “Over the years, I’ve gotten to understand their social behavior.” For his support of sea turtle conservation and his efforts to bring attention to their struggle for survival, Hicks will be honored this month by the Friends of Gumbo Limbo, a nonprofit organization that supports the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton. During the organization’s annual Sea Coast Toast fundraiser on Feb. 18, Hicks will be given the organization’s CRESTT — Conservation, Research, Education, Stewardship for Today and Tomorrow — Award. “Ben has been a great supporter of Gumbo Limbo,” said Ross Appel, treasurer of the Friends of Gumbo Limbo’s board of directors and chair of this year’s Sea Coast Toast. “He’s used his photographs to raise awareness, which is exactly what we’re looking for.” Hicks, 37, from Boca Raton, says he quickly recognized that his turtle images were more than just eye-catching photographs. “From the get-go I realized how much of an impact I’ve made with these images,” he said. While he’s making an impact on efforts to heighten awareness of turtle conservation efforts, Hicks says the sea turtles have also had an impact on him. He is a fierce advocate for the marine creatures and has donated many hours to Gumbo Limbo, photographing turtle releases as well as other related events and volunteering to serve as the photographer for the Sea Coast Toast for years. The Friends of Gumbo Limbo also raise money by selling prints of his photos at the center’s gift shop. An informal ambassador for sea turtles, Hicks often has the chance to use his art as a medium to communicate the role people can play in protecting the sea creatures and the ecosystems where they thrive. During a handful of art shows or at openings of exhibits — such as the one currently at the Highland Beach Public Library — Hicks has the chance to share his vision for conservation

If You Go

What: Eighth annual Sea Coast Toast, a dinner with live music, dancing and a fundraising auction to benefit the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center When: 6-10 p.m. Feb. 18 Where: Boca Raton Country Club, 17751 Boca Club Blvd. Cost: $125 for members of Friends of Gumbo Limbo, $150 nonmembers Info: Visit www.gumbolimbo.org/ seacoasttoast2017 or email SeaCoastToast@ gumbolimbo.org directly with visitors drawn by his images. “Ben represents a younger generation, and he’s serving as a role model for that generation by raising environmental awareness,” Appel said. Hicks’ introduction to the world of sea turtles began about a decade ago when a friend of his from Florida Atlantic University, where he graduated with a fine arts degree, invited him to document her work with a nonprofit beachmonitoring organization. He photographed her checking nests on the beach, digging up eggs and helping hatchlings make it to the ocean. “I realized I could use the images as a voice,” he said. Soon Hicks was swimming over the shallow reefs off the South Florida coast, photographing young and adolescent turtles. Remarkably, Hicks does not scuba dive, instead shooting all of his images while free diving. “Over the course of my career, I’ve definitely learned many things about the turtles,” he said. One of the most important lessons he’s learned is to respect these graceful animals and to take the photographs without disturbing them. “If they’re not comfortable with me around, I just let them be,” he said. Ú For more information and to see Hicks’ work, visit www.Benjhicks.com.


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

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The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

News 7

Gulf Stream

Judge cites ‘bad faith’ and rejects O’Hare records lawsuit

By Steve Plunkett

A circuit judge has rejected a public records lawsuit against Gulf Stream after an attorney for the town mounted a defense that accused the plaintiff, town resident Chris O’Hare, of “bad faith.” “There seems to be a national Sweetapple awareness that Florida and now other jurisdictions that have liberal public records rights are in fact ripe and becoming the source of abuse for lawyers and individuals to just generate litigation to obtain attorney’s fees,” outside lawyer Robert Sweetapple told town commissioners at their monthly meeting Jan. 13. The case was about “very important public policy,” Circuit Judge Thomas Barkdull III said in a 90-minute hearing Jan. 12. “This was clearly a bad faith attempt and gotcha request, and an attempt to generate litigation and fees, which is inappropriate,” the judge said in rejecting O’Hare’s claim. At issue was O’Hare’s request — made after business hours May 14, 2014, a Wednesday — for “all records in any way related to any correspondence between Jones-Foster on behalf of the town and Martin O’Boyle and created or received during

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the period of time from March 1, 2014, through to the moment you receive this request.” Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs PA is Town Attorney John “Skip” Randolph’s firm, with about 40 lawyers in its West Palm Beach office. O’Boyle began flooding the town with public records requests in spring 2013 after he was refused variances for work on his Hidden Harbour home. The flood of requests soon turned into a tsunami, trapping the town in a years-long battle. In this case, the records O’Hare wanted “include but are not limited to notes, memos, letters, emails, phone logs, phone messages, photos, files, folders, labels, sketches, drawings, layouts, plans, invoices, statements, reports, correspondence, reference material, minutes, audio, video, manuals, drafts and any other record in any way responsive to

this request.” The town answered him that Friday, saying it was “working on a large number of incoming public records requests” and would use “its very best efforts to respond to you in a reasonable amount of time.” O’Hare filed suit 46 days after he made his request, on July 1, 2014, asking a judge to declare the town was making an “illegal withholding” of the records and seeking attorney fees. “After more than 45 days following plaintiff’s original request, defendant still has yet to produce the records requested,” said O’Hare’s lawsuit, filed by the O’Boyle Law Firm, which O’Boyle’s son Jonathan heads. But Barkdull said Gulf Stream was coping not only with records requests but also with creating new parking regulations, deciding what to do about signs on a candidate’s vehicle, fighting a number of

lawsuits and holding an election. The town, he said, made “a good faith effort” to answer a “voluminous” request that was “not clearly worded.” Barkdull also said O’Hare was “angry with his past dealings with the town” and that his suit was “clearly intended to harass and intimidate the employees of the town.” The judge decided O’Hare deserved nothing and the town could ask that he pay its attorney’s fees. Before his ruling, a municipality that successfully defended itself against a public records dispute still had to pay its own legal bill. Barkdull anticipated O’Hare’s appealing his decision to the 4th District Court of Appeal. “I look forward to reading the 4th DCA’s opinion after it comes out on this case,” Barkdull said. O’Hare promised as much during the public comment portion of the commission

meeting before Sweetapple spoke. “I disagree with the ruling. So do my attorneys, and of course we’ll appeal that. My attorneys seem to think that it’s very ripe to go all the way to the Supreme Court because of the issues raised,” said O’Hare, who stepped outside the commission chamber during Sweetapple’s presentation. Barkdull also ruled in favor of the town in two other public records lawsuits. O’Hare began asking Gulf Stream for public records in 2013. From late August through December that year, he made more than 400 requests, Sweetapple has said. Together, he and Martin O’Boyle have filed more than 2,000 requests and dozens of lawsuits. The May 14, 2014, request was one of 10 O’Hare made that day which resulted in seven lawsuits, Sweetapple said. Ú


8 News

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Ocean Ridge Students from Somerset Academy Canyons High School participated in a cleanup of the Ocean Ridge Natural Area on A1A north of Woolbright Road on Jan. 28. They learned a few things about mangrove habitats while filling almost an entire roll-off container with plastic, glass, tires and metal. The students took on the project as a way to do something different and meaningful for the local ecology. Photo provided

Ocean Ridge

Commission sets meeting to hear appeal from fired lieutenant

By Dan Moffett Former police Lt. Steven Wohlfiel will ask Ocean Ridge commissioners to reconsider his firing at a special meeting at 3 p.m. Feb. 6 in the Town Hall chambers. The commission voted unanimously to fire Wohlfiel last month after receiving the results of an internal review that looked into his role in an alleged shooting incident in Wohlfiel October at the home of former Vice Mayor Richard Lucibella. Police Chief Hal Hutchins, who oversaw the two-month investigation, recommended the lieutenant’s dismissal in

the 250-page report, and Town Manager Jamie Titcomb agreed. “As you know, Police Officers are charged with upholding the law and need to exhibit conduct above reproach, they are held to a higher standard,” Titcomb told Wohlfiel in a termination letter. “I don’t feel the standard we expect for our Police Officers has been met by you in this case.” Hutchins said he found “numerous violations of agency policy” in investigating the incident. The chief said he called in the Florida Department of Law Enforcement to investigate the possibility of pursuing criminal charges against Wohlfiel — who was not arrested and is not charged — for discharging a firearm in a residential area. But Hutchins said he decided

against it after consulting with the FDLE and county prosecutors. Among the key assertions in the report: • Grit Ritz, a business associate of Lucibella, and Barbara Ceuleers, Lucibella’s business partner who has listed his address as her residence in public records, told investigators Wohlfiel, who was off-duty, admitted using his personal handgun to fire the shots that touched off the disturbance. “Mr. Wohlfiel started saying that everything was his fault because he shot the pistol and the police officer on duty mishandled the situation,” Ritz said, describing a conversation with Wohlfiel after the arrest. Ceuleers, who was in the house when police came, told investigators Wohlfiel “admitted he was the one who

fired the Glock.” • While officers at the scene said Wohlfiel did not actively interfere with Lucibella’s arrest, he did argue against it and did little to defuse the situation. Officer Nubia Plesnik told investigators that when she mentioned taking the vice mayor to jail, Wohlfiel said, “Nobody’s going to jail. There are no charges here.” Officer Richard Ermeri said: “Wohlfiel did briefly interfere with my investigation when he told Ceuleers ‘don’t say nothing.’” • Wohlfiel declined to give an interview to investigators, saying through his attorney that he is “exercising his constitutional right to remain silent.” • The conduct of the three on-duty officers who responded to the scene was appropriate, Hutchins and Titcomb concluded. Wohlfiel’s attorney, Ralph King of the Palm Beach County Police Benevolent Association, has complained to the town that the report produced no hard evidence that his client fired the shots and that the accounts of Ceuleers and Ritz aren’t credible. King says it’s Lucibella who faces the battery and weapons charges, not Wohlfiel. “Clearly there is circumstantial evidence to suggest the weapon was fired but there is no evidence in the record as to who fired the weapon and where any potential witnesses were during that time,” King has told the town. “The witnesses Ceuleers and Ritz are inherently biased witnesses based on their individual relationships with Mr. Lucibella.” Lucibella resigned Dec. 7 after the Palm Beach County State Attorney’s Office charged him with battery on a law enforcement officer and resisting an officer with violence, both felonies, stemming from his arrest Oct. 22 at his oceanfront home. Lucibella, Ermeri and Plesnik have all complained of injuries from a scuffle during the arrest. Lucibella, 63, has pleaded not guilty to three charges, including a misdemeanor of firing a weapon while intoxicated. His attorney, Marc Shiner, accuses police of overreacting and has called for

the resignation of Ermeri. Wohlfiel, 48, rose through the ranks to supervising lieutenant during a decade of work in Ocean Ridge, serving for a time as the department’s union representative. Commissioners voted 4-0 in January to accept Titcomb’s recommendation to fire Wohlfiel but have the authority to change their decision at the February meeting. According to police reports, officers responding to neighbors’ complaints about gunfire that Saturday night say they found Lucibella and Wohlfiel “obviously intoxicated” on the patio. Officers say they took a .40-caliber Glock handgun from Lucibella and found five spent shell casings in the backyard. Police also confiscated a semiautomatic pistol they said Lucibella had in his back pocket. Both Lucibella and Wohlfiel told police they knew nothing about gunshots. Neither man was tested for gunpowder residue or blood-alcohol content, Hutchins said. Police say Lucibella “grew belligerent” and fought them as they tried to keep him from going inside his house. The officers said that when they entered Lucibella’s back yard, Wohlfiel used an expletive in telling them to leave. The situation turned physical when police tried to prevent Lucibella from re-entering his home. Officers said they knew Lucibella, who publishes S.W.A.T. magazine in Boynton Beach, was a gun collector who likely had more weapons inside. Lt. Richard Jones, the lead investigator in the internal review, said one of the arresting officers, Plesnik, told him that Lucibella “was so agitated and wanted to fight” police, but Wohlfiel did little to calm him: “This whole incident took place in front of Wohlfiel and he never even got up or nothing.” Sgt. Bill Hallahan, who also responded to the scene and recently retired from the department, praised Ermeri and Plesnik in a statement to investigators. “Even while Lucibella was being belligerent and attempting to get Officer Ermeri upset,” Hallahan said, “both officers continued to keep their composure and professionalism.” Ú


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Town will wait until election to replace Lucibella

LUCIBELLA

Continued from page 1 According to police reports, when officers Richard Ermeri and Nubia Plesnik tried to block Lucibella, 63, from entering his house, he resisted. The officers wrestled him to the paver-covered ground and handcuffed him. Lucibella needed treatment for facial injuries, and Ermeri and Plesnik also required medical attention, according to the reports. Through Shiner, Lucibella has claimed that he is the victim of police overreaction. He maintains officers should not have entered his backyard in the first place, and then that they used excessive force, cracking three of his ribs. Lucibella said outside the courtroom that he has not fully recovered. “They’re healing,” he said of the ribs. Lucibella resigned his position as vice mayor and town commissioner Dec. 7, the same day the State Attorney’s Office filed formal charges against him. Wohlfiel was put on administrative duty after the incident and fired Jan. 4 after an internal affairs report concluded the Glock was his personal weapon, not Lucibella’s, and that two witnesses said Wohlfiel admitted he was the one who shot it. He is appealing his dismissal to the Town Commission. Shiner said the internal affairs report undercuts the charge that Lucibella fired the weapon and shows that Ermeri and Plesnik recognized the Glock as belonging to Wohlfiel. “They knew right away,” Shiner said. “For some reason,” he said, Town Manager Jamie Titcomb was called to the police station. Titcomb and Lucibella had publicly skirmished over the town budget just one month before, Shiner said. And Wohlfiel was not the only off-duty officer drinking that Saturday night, he said. “The chief was intoxicated,” Shiner said. “It’s all left out of the report.” Chief Hal Hutchins said earlier his wife drove him to police headquarters that night because he had some wine with dinner. Shiner also said Plesnik’s lawyer learned Lucibella has a $10 million insurance policy and notified him that Plesnik plans to sue for neck injuries. In her report, Plesnik said she went to an urgent care center afterward to have her left shoulder, arm, wrist, leg and foot examined but did not mention having any neck pain. Shiner said in-house video at the Police Department captures Plesnik cautioning Ermeri to watch his temper. “You’re on tape,” he said the video shows her reminding Ermeri, though Shiner pointed out the audio is hard to hear. Ú

News 9

By Dan Moffett

Attorney Marc Shiner, former Vice Mayor Richard Lucibella and his girlfriend, Barbara Ceuleers, make their way to Circuit Judge Charles Burton’s courtroom. Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

Ocean Ridge commissioners have decided to let the voters choose who should fill the seat vacated by former Vice Mayor Richard Lucibella, who resigned in December after prosecutors filed three charges against him stemming from an alleged shooting incident at his home. Mayor Geoff Pugh said because Lucibella’s seat is scheduled to be contested in the March 14 municipal election, it doesn’t make sense for commissioners to appoint someone to fill the position for what would be only one meeting. “It would be almost an exercise in futility if we did appoint someone for just one month,” Pugh said during the Jan. 9 town meeting. Commissioner James Bonfiglio worried that appointing someone might suggest to voters that the commission approved of the

replacement as the permanent choice for the three-year term. “I think it might give somebody, if they decided to run in the election, an implied endorsement in the election if they were appointed by us to the seat a month before the election,” Bonfiglio said. “I think it’s hard to do that so close to the election without seeming to say that we want you folks to vote for this commissioner.” Bonfiglio’s seat also comes up for reelection in March; the other three commissioners’ terms expire next year. The commission also unanimously approved Bonfiglio’s appointment to replace Lucibella as vice mayor. Lucibella faces one count of battery on a law enforcement officer and another felony count of resisting an officer with violence, as well as a misdemeanor firearm charge, after the altercation with town police on Oct. 22. Ú

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10 News

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Gulf Stream

Neighbors protest car dealership’s plans to expand By Steve Plunkett

A proposed redevelopment plan by Gunther Volvo that includes a three-story parking garage at the back of the property has neighboring Place au Soleil up in arms. “We are very concerned about the pending Gunther Volvo development in Delray Beach on Federal Highway,” Chet Snavely, president of the Place au Soleil homeowners association, told Gulf Stream commissioners. “Good municipal planning is at stake here. We need a good relationship between the city of Delray and the town of Gulf Stream.” Quinn Miklos, whose home on Avenue Au Soleil is directly behind the car dealership, is heading up investigative efforts

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for the homeowners group. He listed the neighborhood’s concerns in a Jan. 9 letter to Delray Beach officials, warning that the proposal will have “dire consequences” for his community. Among those concerns: • A 21-foot-tall garage access ramp at the rear of Gunther Volvo that will abut the singlefamily residences, creating “an intensive ‘vertical travel’ vehicular use at the doorstep of our community.” • An extreme “intensity of use” with a 182,473-squarefoot garage, 10,145-square-foot showroom, 9,398 square feet of automobile service area and 11,492 square feet for parts, car wash and service writers. “Unless I am mistaken, there is no existing commercial three-story building on the Federal [Highway] corridor that directly abuts a residential neighborhood — for good reason,” Miklos wrote. The architects took no notice that the garage will be visible in Place au Soleil. “Aesthetically the parking structure is brutally unappealing,” Miklos said. • Increased light pollution. Place au Soleil neighbors have already bought blackout curtains but cannot enjoy their yards at night because of the light spilling from the Volvo dealership, Miklos said. “There is a [7-foot]-high fence between our property with [20-foot]high landscaping on our side and still the light pollutes our home,” he wrote. Snavely brought copies of Miklos’ letter to the Jan. 13 Town Commission meeting and met with Gunther representatives the following week. After that meeting, which he called “polite,” he said his group decided it is “totally against” the proposal. “It’s a quality of life issue,” Snavely said. In other business: • Former Vice Mayor Robert Ganger, who resigned in July after suffering a stroke, spoke during the public comments portion of the meeting. “It’s been a long trip for me — nine months and a couple of weeks — and it’s supposed to get better in nine to 12 months, so this is kind of a little bit early,” he said. “All of you have been so kind and so thoughtful and I’m so, so, so very, very, very thankful. We’ve got a great town here, and an awful lot of awful nice people, and I really appreciate it.” • The construction company putting utility lines underground in the north part of town will bring in a third crew to meet its June 15 deadline. Consulting engineer Danny Brannon relayed a request from the contractor to allow work to be done on Saturdays, but commissioners refused, citing the noise caused by drilling and pumping. Ú


The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

News 11

Manalapan

Town council balks at ban on leaf blowers By Dan Moffett

Controversial brainstorms that hatch in Palm Beach have a way of drifting south to Manalapan. So when the Palm Beach Town Council moved to consider leaf blower legislation recently, it wasn’t surprising that before long the idea would come up in Manalapan. At the Jan. 24 town meeting, Mayor David Cheifetz raised the issue on behalf of resident Jack Staub, who complained about blowers’ many annoyances and said the town should discuss outlawing use of a signature device of modern landscaping. “Nobody likes leaf blowers,” Cheifetz said. “They’re noisy and they don’t do anything. But if we ban them, there has to be some increase in what folks pay to get their lawns done.” Commissioner Simone Bonutti said her 2-acre lot is too big to “have somebody come out with a broom and dust bin” instead of a leaf blower. Police Chief Carmen Mattox told the commission his

department has never had a complaint about them — except once when a contractor tried to blow out the Plaza del Mar parking lot at 5:30 a.m. and was quickly stopped by officers. “The Police Department is going to enforce this, right?” Mattox asked the commission. “I don’t think my group is looking forward to that.” Last year, commissioners passed a noise ordinance that limits sound to 65 decibels between 8 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Vice Mayor Peter Isaac and Mayor Pro Tem Chauncey Johnstone agreed that landscapers should be advised to use modern, muffled blowers that conform to that standard. “When I was brought up, you used a rake,” Johnstone said. Instead of banning blowers, Commissioner Keith Waters suggested a more measured step, closing a loophole in the town’s code by banning landscaping work on Sundays. The commission agreed and decided — you might say — to “leaf” blowers alone. Ú

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12 News

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Delray Beach

Commission postpones vote on Atlantic Crossing settlement

By Jane Smith

The long-delayed Atlantic Crossing development will remain in limbo for another few weeks while Delray Beach city commissioners get more details on the settlement offered by the project’s developer. At the Jan. 24 City Commission meeting, elected officials and homeowner association representatives were hopeful that a mediated settlement would be approved. The deal would end nearly two years of costly litigation that started in state court in June 2015, when the development team sued the city for not approving its amended site plan. The lawsuit was transferred to federal court, where the $25 million-plus damage claims were denied in July, and then the case returned to state court last fall. Commissioners postponed voting on the settlement until they know more about the 2013 site plan and 2011 developer’s agreement that provide the basis for the deal. “Shame on me for not knowing the details that go back to 2011,” Mayor Cary Glickstein said at the meeting. As of Dec. 12, the city had paid nearly $374,000 for legal services with the Weiss Serota Helfman Cole & Bierman firm

The view of the proposed Atlantic Crossing looking southeast from the corner of Northeast First Street and Northeast Sixth Avenue shows residential and related amenities. Rendering provided of Fort Lauderdale. The firm represents the city in the lawsuit filed by the developer. Jamie Cole, a named partner in the law firm, said the settlement included the addition of a two-way road that connects northbound Federal Highway with Northeast Seventh Avenue. “All of the conditions from the 2013 site plan are included, but none from the 2014 amended developers’ agreement because that was not approved,” Cole said. The next day, Glickstein wrote in an email, “While the proposed settlement would have ended the litigation, it left wholly unaddressed a myriad of public and

commission concerns regarding significant on-site operational issues.” Parking and traffic issues would need to be considered during construction and as a completed project, he wrote. Those details are usually included in a developer’s agreement to provide clarity for the developer, city staff and public, the mayor wrote. He wants to see that type of agreement attached to the settlement. “What was submitted for our consideration was a proposed settlement agreement ambiguously tied to a 2011 developer’s agreement that relates to a different site plan,” the mayor wrote.  At the commission meeting, Glickstein directed City Attorney Max Lohman to meet with planning staff and create a timeline of what was agreed to and when, then hold a closed meeting where commissioners can discuss the settlement with Cole and his colleagues. Lohman did not know whether all that could be done in time for the next commission meeting on Feb. 7. As of press time, the closed meeting had not been scheduled. Even so, Glickstein wrote, “I think it was helpful for the developer to hear that the proposed settlement is, in principle, acceptable provided it is linked to a developer’s agreement.” Linking the agreement to the settlement would reflect the most recent site plan changes and many of the additions from the 2014 draft agreement, he wrote. The changes would include at least a $500,000 contribution to improve Veterans Park and provide traffic calming for

the Palm Trail neighborhood, just north of Atlantic Crossing. Traffic calming for the Marina Historic District on the south side of Atlantic is included in the 2013 site plan. At the meeting, Commissioner Mitch Katz pointed out that the site plan shown depicted Veterans Park with improvements. Dean Kissos, chief operating officer of Atlantic Crossing developer Edwards Cos., said in an email: “It is disappointing to have yet another delay after working in good faith, devoting substantial time and money, to reach a proposed settlement by again providing the city what it requested. “While we were hopeful to reach an amicable resolution, we will continue to pursue our rights in court to obtain the final approvals we previously earned and to make Atlantic Crossing a reality.” The 9.2-acre mixed-use project is planned at the northeast corner of Federal Highway and Atlantic Avenue. When finished, Atlantic Crossing will contain 343 luxury condos and apartments plus 39,394 square feet of restaurants, 37,642 square feet of shops and 83,462 square feet of office space. The $200 million project was proposed by a partnership between Ohio-based Edwards Cos. and local resident Carl DeSantis. Edwards bought DeSantis’ share in June for $38.5 million. Atlantic Crossing began in 2008 as Atlantic Plaza II before the recession. Fast-forward five years and Edwards was brought into the project, which was renamed Atlantic Crossing. Meanwhile, the state court

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lawsuit continues. A hearing was scheduled Feb. 2 on the city’s motion to dismiss two of the developer’s damage claims that the city says are identical to the ones denied last July by a federal judge. The next day the judge was to hold a status hearing on the city’s motion to dismiss most of the remaining counts. A trial on those issues is set for the period of Feb. 13 through April 7. In addition, the developer’s attorneys continue to subpoena residents who objected to the project and joined a civic group to work for what they considered responsible development. At the Jan. 24 commission meeting, resident Kelly Barrette said she was asked to produce records, including private emails, which mentioned Atlantic Plaza, Atlantic Plaza II and Atlantic Crossing. The attorneys are seeking items back to 2008. “That’s legal intimidation against private citizens for getting involved in a civic group,” said Barrette, who has announced she is running for a seat on the City Commission in March.

Delray Place South drops appeal

Lohman said the Delray Place South developers withdrew their appeal of a denial by a city board. In late October, the city’s Site Plan Review and Appearance board had denied the project’s site plan. The 30-year-old center sits on the east side of Federal Highway just south of Linton Boulevard, between Eve Street and Tropic Boulevard. Its site plan featured a crosscut connection from Delray Place, home to Trader Joe’s, across Eve Street, into the 22,089-square-foot Delray Place South. The plan also called for a five-lane gateway on Tropic Boulevard. It would be achieved by reducing the 20-foot median to 14 feet and creating three exit lanes going west onto Federal. In late December, the developer’s attorney had requested another delay until the April 4 City Commission meeting. But the commissioners had already agreed to a twoweek delay and denied that later date. Ú


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

News 13

Delray Beach

Commission vacancy continues to spark friction

The Delray Beach City Commission did not violate its charter by declining to hold a special election to fill a vacant commission seat, a circuit judge ruled from the bench in January. At the hearing, City Attorney Max Lohman argued that 60 days had not passed since the last failed vote to fill the commission seat. Vice Mayor Al Jacquet resigned from the commission on Nov. 8 after his election to the state House. The city had two regular commission meetings to try to fill that seat temporarily until the March 14 election, Lohman said. The clock started ticking on Dec. 7, giving the city a Feb. 4 deadline. The lawsuit was filed too soon, the city attorney argued. The judge agreed. After the hearing, J. Reeve Bright said he might refile his lawsuit on Feb. 5. Two weeks later, Bright said he would not do so. He said he didn’t think the special election could be held, giving the 30 days’ notice required by the city charter. “It’s discouraging,” said Bright, who lives on the barrier island. First, he had to prove that he has “standing” to bring the lawsuit against the city and its commissioners. He showed a copy of his voter’s registration card to prove he was entitled to relief. The judge agreed. The commission already had lost the respect of some residents when it failed to fill the seat temporarily. “Nobody was picked, not that I wasn’t picked,” Yvonne Odom said at the Jan. 10 commission meeting. She was the choice of Mayor Cary Glickstein and Vice Mayor Jordana Jarjura. “But 2-2 is not good for anybody. [The tie] means no.” Ten people applied to fill

the seat vacated by Jacquet, a Haitian-American. Two minority candidates were selected in mid-November. “For the optics on the board, we need a minority,” Glickstein said in November when explaining why he voted for Odom. A longtime resident and retired educator, she is still involved with youth sports teams. He said she was “dedicated to this town.” The other minority candidate, Josh Smith, was supported by Commissioner Mitch Katz. Also a longtime resident, Smith is a retired teacher, administrator and coach. He ran unsuccessfully for office in 2015, when his signs and the mayor’s dominated the landscape. “He knows this community like the back of his hand,” said Katz, who won that seat. Odom had the backing of the Northwest/Southwest residents, who wore yellow apparel, her favorite color, to commission meetings to show their support. Smith never spoke publicly at the commission meetings. He did file for the seat now held by Vice Mayor Jarjura. At the Jan. 10 commission meeting, Odom said, “I’d like to thank those who spoke on my behalf in being appointed to that seat. Of course, I was very disappointed. “I’m in mourning,” she said. “We need to put a black sheet, towel or something on that seat until it’s filled.” At the end of January, she still was not happy. “The commission did not follow the will of the people and the city charter,” she said. She said one good result came out of the commission’s inability to agree: “It united the community to get more involved in the local races.” Ú

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14 News

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Lantana/Hypoluxo Island

Lantana rejects proposal to limit parking on Hypoluxo Island

By Mary Thurwachter A proposed law that would limit parking on the street and public rights of way on Hypoluxo Island failed to garner a single vote from Lantana Town Council members. The vote, taken during a Jan. 23 town meeting, came after several discussions at previous meetings about cars having to dodge construction and landscaping trucks on the island. The ordinance would have limited parking to two hours between 6 a.m. and 5 p.m. and would require a parking permit and fee for special events. Mayor Dave Stewart said

Yard work and construction trucks clog a Hypoluxo Island road. Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star the proposal was drafted after Town Manager Deborah Manzo received numerous emails from a resident, Sueann Nichols, about towing away and ticketing cars parked on the roadway. Nichols was unable to

attend the Jan. 23 meeting, but sent another email read aloud by the mayor. Other island residents who did attend asked how the ordinance would be enforced. Police Chief Sean Scheller

said cars would be marked with chalk. But Scheller was no fan of the proposed ordinance. “I’m going to be honest with you, this is going to be a nightmare,” he said. “We’ll get a call, go chalk it [vehicle], then go back in two hours. For the amount of calls we have, we are blowing this out of the water. As of Oct. 31, we only had four calls [about parked vehicles on the island]. “I don’t want people to get a false sense of hope that we’re going to respond right away,” Scheller said. Vice Mayor Phil Aridas said the matter needs more discussion. “Monitoring is a very tough job,” Aridas said. Stewart said he understood Nichols’ frustration. “I wish there were a way cars wouldn’t park all day,” he said. “When my neighbor’s house was under construction, there were times I couldn’t get out of my driveway. It is inconvenient and it does aggravate some

people.” Scheller said there is only a handful of offenders. “I think we have to educate them. I will personally educate” repeat offenders, Scheller said. “I trust the chief will, in a diplomatic manner, address this issue,” Stewart said. The town has been grappling with parking problems on the island for years and has come up with other proposed solutions, including restricting parking to odd or even sides of the road, depending on the month. None of them was deemed satisfactory. Council member Malcolm Balfour said the solution could be simple. “Courtesy would solve the problem,” he said. In other news, the town unveiled its new website, www.lantana.org. Town IT manager William Parker worked closely with a team at EvoGov, a website development and hosting company that specializes in local government website design, to update the site. Features include striking pictures of town landmarks, a new look for the parks page, a link to Facebook and Twitter pages, answers to frequently asked questions, a link for people to pay their water bills or report concerns, and a place for companies to submit bids for projects. “Everything is no more than two clicks away,” Parker said. Ú

Delray Beach

Veteran city clerk leaves for Wellington

By Jane Smith She is part of the glue that holds Delray Beach together. After nearly 13 years as the city clerk, Chevelle Nubin is leaving to take a similar position with the village of Wellington. Nubin will make more money. The Wellington city clerk offers an hourly rate between $42.31 Nubin and $74.04. Even if Delray could match the salary, interim City Manager Neal de Jesus said it couldn’t compete with the nearness to

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NUBIN

Continued from page 14 done.” He also said that when City Commission meetings extended into the wee hours, just looking at Nubin’s smiling face gave him the ability to stay focused. Vice Mayor Jordana Jarjura said someone had sent a text that morning that said: “Heard Chevelle is leaving. Get out. Run.” Commissioner Shelly Petrolia said Nubin’s last day is Feb. 28. Nubin promised that the municipal elections work would be on autopilot so the deputy city clerk could finish it after she is gone, Petrolia said. “And I believe that,” she said. “Nubin is such an asset to our town that it’s crushing to lose her.” In addition to being the supervisor for municipal elections, the city clerk’s office maintains and retrieves official records for the city, prepares the agendas and transcribes the minutes of commission meetings, processes ordinances and resolutions for signing and generally allows citizens to participate in city government. At the end of the Jan. 24 commission meeting, De Jesus started his remarks by giving each commissioner a printout of public records requests for December.

The COASTAL STAR The 345 listed were unusually high for the size of Delray Beach, he said. Some were duplicate requests sent to five department heads, asking for the same records. Other requesters became aggressive when the records were not produced in a timely fashion. He wants the City Clerk’s office to be the central repository for records requests. The next day, the mayor said via email, “I suspect these frivolous requests did motivate one of our most capable employees and department heads to seek employment closer to home.” Nubin respectfully declined to be interviewed for this story. Active in the Florida Association of City Clerks, Nubin was sworn in as its president in June. She has earned the designations of certified municipal clerk in 2003 and master municipal clerk in 2011. If the city hadn’t switched its phone system on Jan. 20, callers to her city extension would be treated to a custom voice-mail greeting recorded by Nubin. “She thanked people for calling the All-America city of Delray Beach,” Petrolia said. “By the time you were asked to leave a message, you felt proud and smiled.” Ú

News 15

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16 News

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Boynton Beach

10-story Riverwalk project approved despite neighbors’ complaints By Jane Smith

Some wore white T-shirts with “WHO’S LISTENING?” written in black across the top. Others wore white tops, each with a black crêpe-paper ribbon tied around the upper arm. Dozens of residents protested outside Boynton Beach’s City Hall before the Jan. 17 commission meeting. They were accusing elected officials of ignoring their complaints and concerns about the increased height and traffic problems the proposed Riverwalk project

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would create. For more than two years, waterway residents have said they don’t want to live in a concrete canyon. Yet, new plans were adopted recently to allow large-scale development in the city’s eastern half. Commissioners approved the proposed 10-story Riverwalk project by a 3-2 vote in midJanuary. Its owners want to build an apartment complex at the southwest corner of the Woolbright Road bridge at the Intracoastal Waterway. Mayor Steven Grant and

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Intracoastal Group, handed out the white T-shirts at the protest. Her group represents six communities with 2,500 residents. “We didn’t feel like we were being heard,” Nagle said. Resident Ed Tedtman suggested Vice Mayor Mack McCray should not vote on the project because he received $3,000 in campaign contributions from Riverwalk’s owners. Shaul Rikman, Riverwalk chairman; his wife, Jean, a residential real estate broker; and son, Mati,

Commissioner Christina Romelus, both new to the commission, sided with the residents. “We’re fighting for our way of life because you guys are trying to take it away from us,” said Harry Woodworth, former head of the Inlet Communities Association, which represents 10 waterfront communities in the city. “We came here for a smalltown environment … not to be like every town from here to Miami.” Mary Nagle, acting president of the Boynton

 

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Riverwalk CEO, each donated $1,000 to McCray’s March reelection campaign. “It’s a way to hide a bribe,” Tedtman said. While the developers’ campaign donations may appear improper to some, they are permitted on all levels of government. McCray defended himself, saying he is not being bought. He said he would vote for the Riverwalk project because the developer promised to hire workers without college educations from his district. However, the commitment was not written into the developer agreement. Commissioner Joe Casello said the project had been vetted for the past two years. “Through this whole debate, we have voted for [higher density in the CRA district],” he said. Isram Realty, the company owned by the Rikmans, is “not a flipper of properties. [Rikman] is community-oriented and will be an asset to Boynton Beach,” Casello said. Boynton Beach lost its innocence in the late 1960s, he said. “Boynton Beach is not going to be a quaint fishing village,” Casello said. “We are growing, people.” Commissioner Justin Katz explained that he was voting for the Riverwalk proposal because he wanted to generate money to save the old high school in the Town Square project. It’s always about money that helps the town, he said. He said the abandoned Winn-Dixie grocery store on the Intracoastal Waterway was an eyesore and blight on the community with homeless people living there. “It’s a desolate, dangerous area,” he said. “Nobody gets everything they want.” The 10-story, U-shaped apartment complex will replace the Winn-Dixie. Residents on its upper floors will have views of the Atlantic Ocean along with the adjacent Intracoastal. That will allow the project to charge as much as $2,200 in monthly rent for some of its 326 units. The developer received approval for an additional 5 feet above the 10 stories for parapets and other architectural embellishments to help hide pipes and air-conditioning units. Construction will be done in phases, with the apartment complex starting by the end of the year. A 4,666-square-foot building will be constructed along Federal Highway in the second phase. The Walgreen’s drug store/Jo-Ann Fabrics and Crafts building, also along Federal, will be renovated in the third phase.Ú


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

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18 News

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Boynton Beach

City names top 3 teams for Town Square bids

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By Jane Smith Three development teams were picked to present their conceptual plans for the 16.5acre Town Square in Boynton Beach. The two local teams are: Boynton Beach Town Square LLC and Boynton Vision LLC. The other team, based in Washington, D.C., is Municipal Consolidation and Construction. The city is seeking a partner to help jump-start the development in Town Square, bordered by Boynton Beach Boulevard on the north and Seacrest Avenue on the west. The area houses City Hall, police headquarters, fire station No. 1, Civic Center, Madsen Center and Arts Center. According to the city proposal, the development can include residential, office and retail space. The City Commission unanimously approved the development team rankings presented Jan. 17. A fourth team, Town Square Partners, consisting of Davis Camalier and William Morris, who are involved in the Ocean One project, was not selected. Assistant City Manager

Colin Groff gave this ambitious timetable to commissioners: final team selection on March 21 and final contract approval April 4. He said the estimated dates were tentative. During the review process, each team will be invited to give a presentation to the selection committee. The public can attend, but state law and county rules forbid people from commenting, Groff said. The two local teams chosen are well known in Palm Beach County. Historic preservation architect Rick Gonzalez, working on the Swinton Commons project in Delray Beach, is part of the Boynton Beach Town Square bid. He also worked on the restoration of the Mar-a-Lago estate for President Donald J. Trump and is involved in Trump’s quest to build a helipad on the estate in Palm Beach. Another participant in this proposal is John Markey, whose firm developed two multifamily projects in the western part of Boynton Beach. Bill Branning, former Delray Beach Community Redevelopment Agency board member and board president of the Old School Square in Delray Beach, and his BSA Construction firm teamed with Atlantic Realty Partners and Kaplan Residential as part of the Boynton Vision bid. Lawyer Michael Weiner, who owns the Post Office building at Seacrest Avenue and Boynton Beach Boulevard, also is participating. Frank Haney, president of Municipal Consolidation and Construction, has committed to hiring local firms for design, engineering, surveying and legal work. Once the final contract is approved, “there will be a lot of public meetings on the open space — landscaping, playground equipment and lighting — and the design of City Hall and the old high school,” Groff said. The historic high school, Public Library and the Schoolhouse Children’s Museum must remain at their current locations, according to the city proposal document. A potential stumbling block to reusing the high school appeared again in early January. On Jan. 6, Juan Contin, the architect who formed the Boynton Old School Partnership, appealed the dismissal of his claims against the city. The partnership sued the city in 2013 after its plan to create an events center was denied on second reading. Since the suit was first filed, it was amended three times. In December, the circuit court judge dismissed it with prejudice, meaning the only avenue for the partnership was an appeal. Ú


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

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February 2017


February 2017

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SOBER

Continued from page 1 owner’s name and signature to prove that the owner knows how the home will be used. The city will use that info if it needs to contact the owner about code violations. The previous week, the city hired planner/lawyer Daniel Lauber to help city staff review ordinances and suggest new ones that do not run afoul of federal anti-discrimination laws. Boca Raton staff is still trying to decide how to address the changes allowed by the revised federal joint statement U.S. Rep. Lois Frankel helped secure, said city spokeswoman Chrissy Gibson. In November, the Justice and Housing and Urban Development departments issued a revised guidance statement that gives local governments the ability to deny a group home application if it violates a city’s “zoning scheme” or puts an undue burden on its finances and administration. Boynton Beach legal and development staffs wanted to stop group home applications from coming in while they reviewed the city’s reasonable accommodation ordinance. They wanted time to decide if it might be revised based on the revised federal statement. They chose June 4 as the moratorium’s end date to give time for review. At the Boynton Beach City Commission meeting on Jan. 17, the mayor and one resident had a testy exchange about the

legality of the moratorium. Citing a federal antidiscrimination law, the male resident — who said he was a recovering alcoholic — insisted that: “No private or public entity shall interfere, restrict or deny any person with a disability any social services, including group homes and halfway houses.” Addicts living together while maintaining sobriety are protected by federal antidiscrimination laws. But Mayor Steven Grant said the moratorium was aimed at sober home owners and operators, not addicts. “You can’t just take [out] one clause, because it’s a big act,” Grant said about the federal law. Boynton Beach City Commissioner Joe Casello asked the city attorney, “Are we within our legal rights to do something like this?” City Attorney Jim Cherof said, “Yes, sir. It wouldn’t be in front of you if I did not think so.” Boynton Beach commissioners unanimously passed the moratorium. But Delray Beach’s consultant thinks Boynton Beach has put itself in a tough legal position. The moratorium is “almost certainly illegal,” Lauber said. “If someone challenged it in court, I doubt it could survive.” Lauber said Frankel’s office staff referred Delray Beach to him. He is past president of the American Planning Association and the American Institute of Certified Planners. He is widely published on topics of group homes and federal anti-

discrimination laws. Based in Illinois, Lauber has primarily worked with cities and group homes in the Midwest, although he has consulted for cities and community residences nationwide. The Delray Beach work will be his second foray into Florida. In 2002, he was a legal consultant for the city of Daytona Beach when it was sued over Fair Housing Act violations, according to Lauber’s résumé. The city settled the case the next year, allowing Hearthstone Fellowship to continue operating the Peabody House treatment center. Lauber said he will examine the situation in Delray Beach, where sober homes are said to cluster in certain neighborhoods. He said more than one group home per block could lead to a de facto social services district and prevent residents of the home from becoming part of the community. “Each group home has to be looked at on an individual basis to determine its impact on surrounding home values,” Lauber said. Delray Beach is compiling a listing of group home locations. The estimated 200 sober homes in Delray Beach are too many for a city of its size, he said. Lauber agreed to be paid $15,000 for 50 hours of work. If the city decides it wants him to help write a sober homes licensing plan, it would cost extra, he said. Lauber fancies himself more of a planner than a lawyer. Ú

News 21

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22 News

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Manalapan/Hypoluxo

Manalapan offers rate cut, freeze in water plan for Hypoluxo

By Willie Howard Manalapan is offering Hypoluxo water customers a 35 percent rate cut and a five-year rate freeze in exchange for a 30year contract extension as the tiny waterfront town competes with Boynton Beach to retain its Hypoluxo water customers. The proposed rate cut would apply to about 550 Hypoluxo water customers served by Manalapan through a contract that expires in 2020. Hypoluxo council members heard the rate-cut offer during a Jan. 18 presentation by Manalapan Town Manager Linda Stumpf and Kevin O’Donnell of Nova Energy Consultants. Under the proposed rates, Hypoluxo customers with a 5/8-inch water meter using 8,000 gallons would pay $48.02 a month — a savings of $25.86 from the current rate. A similar 35 percent rate reduction would apply to Hypoluxo customers

Proposed water rates

Connection Usage Current rates New rates Monthly savings (gallons)

5/8 inch 1 inch 1.5 inch 2 inch 3 inch

8,000 12,000 77,000 160,000 163,000

$73.88 $48.02 $162.24 $105.46 $447.50 $290.94 $783.50 $509.27 $2,083.78 $1,354.45 Discount: 35 percent

$25.86 $56.78 $156.66 $274.23 $729.32

SOURCE: Town of Manalapan

with larger water meters. To further sweeten the offer, Manalapan officials offered to pay for $1.64 million in needed upgrades to water distribution lines in Hypoluxo. Hypoluxo officials also are considering a water-supply offer from Boynton Beach Utilities, and their decision could come as early as this year. Even though the town’s water contract with Manalapan doesn’t expire until 2020, the contract requires 18 months’ notice if Hypoluxo plans to

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switch to a new supplier. Meanwhile, much larger Boynton Beach Utilities, which already supplies water to Hypoluxo customers west of U.S. 1 and handles all of its sewage, has offered even lower water rates to the Hypoluxo customers served by Manalapan. Under Boynton Beach Utilities rates, presented to the Hypoluxo Town Council in August, single-family residential customers with a 5/8-inch meter using 8,000 gallons a month would pay $25.55 to Boynton

$1,450,000

Beach Utilities. That’s $22.47 a month less than the discounted rate offered by Manalapan. Hypoluxo interim Mayor Michael Brown said he liked the quick service provided by Manalapan following water main breaks and other problems. But, he said, “that’s only worth so much.” Stumpf told Hypoluxo officials that Manalapan would keep its water plant and remain in the water production business even without the Hypoluxo customers it has served since 1960. “I find that very interesting,” Brown said. Meanwhile, Boynton Beach Assistant City Manager Colin Groff told council members that Boynton Beach Utilities needs to upgrade water meters for the 550 Hypoluxo water customers served by Manalapan, or charge them maximum sewer rates based on 7,000 gallons of water use. Sewer bills for those Hypoluxo customers are based on water consumption measured by Manalapan. Boynton Beach Utilities employees manually enter the Manalapan water-use numbers every month to generate sewer bills, which often leads to errors, Groff said. For its customers, Boynton Beach Utilities uses smart meters that read water usage every 10 minutes. “We have to move to an automated system to get

accurate sewer bills,” Groff said. “We’re not trying to be mean. We just want it to be fair to everybody.” Brown said the Hypoluxo Town Council would review the water rates presented by Manalapan and Boynton Beach, along with service and other factors, before making a decision on whether to end the Manalapan water-supply contract or extend it for another 30 years. Manalapan Vice Mayor Peter Isaac said he hopes Hypoluxo is swayed by the immediate savings water customers would enjoy. “If they accepted, Hypoluxo residents would save $30,000 a month,” Isaac said at Manalapan’s Jan. 24 meeting. “That’s a lot. If they don’t make a decision, that $30,000 doesn’t get to be retroactive. If they take two months [to decide], that’s $60,000 that’s lost.” Town Manager Stumpf, who is leading the negotiations for Manalapan, said Hypoluxo officials have asked her why this proposed deal wasn’t put on the table months or years ago. She said Manalapan couldn’t offer it until now because the town had to complete a study of its utility and make some management changes. “The answer is that we were not in a position to make the offer back then,” Stumpf said. “Now we are.” Ú Dan Moffett contributed to this story.


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

News 23

Boynton Beach

Ocean One’s requests for land, money get resistance from CRA

By Jane Smith

The Ocean One developer wants a sliver of Boynton Beach public land for a nominal fee and a part of taxpayer dollars generated by the proposed residential and hotel complex. The city’s Community Redevelopment Agency owns the .47-acre lot Davis Camalier needs to square off his 3.1-acre parcel at the southeast corner of Federal Highway and Boynton Beach Boulevard. The CRA land was appraised in December 2015 at $460,000. Camalier’s group wants it for $10. The eight-story, U-shaped apartment complex will have 231 units. A nearby seven-story parking garage will have 463 spaces, with 50 reserved for the public. That will be built in the first phase. The second phase, basically the bottom half of the parcel that borders Ocean Avenue, will have a hotel with an estimated 100 rooms and a 118-unit condo tower that is taller than eight stories. Camalier’s consultant, Chris Brown, who formerly ran the Delray Beach CRA and now has a company that provides those services to cities, made the pitch for the taxpayer dollars. Brown’s tally for anticipated development costs to meet city requirements include $1 million for the 50 parking spaces; $700,000 for wide sidewalks, streetlights and buried utility lines; $500,000 to move Florida Power & Light wires; $500,000 to cover the city’s request to make the project eco-friendly; $500,000 in building permit fees, and $240,000 to cover the city’s request to add retail along Federal Highway. For the first phase, Camalier’s group wants $4.2 million spread over eight to 10 years, Brown said. For the second phase, the group is seeking $3.6 million spread over eight to 10 years. “It’s based on our calculations that the buildings would add to the CRA, but you will pay out what the buildings actually add [in value],” Brown said. That request annoyed Linda Cross, who chairs the CRA’s advisory board and is a retired accountant. “The money the developer is asking for is the costs that any developer would have to pay,” Cross told the CRA board on Jan. 10. “They all have to pay for landscaping, moving utilities and putting utilities in. I don’t see that they are giving the CRA

any more value.” Plus, she said, the money generated is for future projects in the CRA district. She also questioned whether the parking would be sufficient. She lives in the nearby Marina Village condominium, which has 349 units, equal to the number that Ocean One would have when both phases are built. The Marina Village garage has 660 spaces with an additional 120 spaces for public use.

“The concept that millennials don’t drive is not true. They often have more than one car,” Cross said. “We are packed.” Waterway resident Harry Woodworth, who’s a past president of the Inlet Communities Associations, said the CRA board needs to attach performance standards to the taxpayer-dollar request. “Otherwise they won’t get done,” he said. The CRA board

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CRA member Justin Katz wanted to make sure the hotel was built soon after the first phase. He did not want to see a two- to four-year lag between the two phases. The project’s land use attorney, Bonnie Miskel, said the market would dictate when a hotel would be built. “It all depends on the availability of money,” she said. “I don’t have a crystal ball.” Ú

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24 News

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Delray Beach

City boosts pay range in search for manager By Jane Smith A corporate executive search firm will be used to recruit Delray Beach’s next city manager. “I’m not looking for someone on the learning curve or on their last stop,” Mayor Cary Glickstein said. “But someone with demonstrated measurable outcome where they were and who still has a lot of gas left.” City commissioners unanimously agreed in midJanuary when they gave interim City Manager Neal de Jesus the authority to advertise for a recruiting firm and bring the selections back to the commission in early March. Then after the election, with the full commission of five members, the search process would begin, de Jesus said on Jan. 17. The commissioners also agreed to increase the salary range for the city manager by about $75,000. The current

range is $127,000 to $203,000. The new range will be $200,000 to $275,000. “You get what you pay for,” Glickstein said. “The citizens of this town have paid dearly for having ineffective management for years.” He said the previous city manager, Don Cooper, was effective in doing triage, which the city needed. But he was not the change agent the city now needs, Glickstein said, adding “I hate having this conversation in public.” Other commissioners said they wanted the new city manager to be a leader. “The city needs a leader who can enhance the team of leaders we have,” Commissioner Mitch Katz said. “We need someone to hold them accountable and bring everyone up with them.” Vice Mayor Jordana Jarjura agreed. “I want someone who knows how to find the right people, put together a succession plan and rebuild a city that has

had some changes and growing pains,” she said. “If the person has additional expertise in the finance world or the grant world or ran a capital improvements program, that’s all gravy to me.” Commissioner Shelly Petrolia pointed out that providing stability is a crucial attribute. “We were basically going around in circles, like a ship without a rudder,” she said. “Cooper righted the ship and set us in the right direction.” While interim city manager, de Jesus receives an annual salary of $159,000 with a $2,000 monthly housing allowance. In other city news, the Delray Beach Visitor Information Center, managed by the Downtown Development Authority and sitting at the corner of A1A and East Atlantic Avenue, will be closed until late March for renovations. During construction, a temporary center will be open at the Sandoway Discovery Center, 142 S. Ocean Blvd., from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, and noon to 4 p.m. on Sundays. When the center reopens, it will be tripled in size. Wi-Fi will be available for visitors to learn about shops, attractions, dining, entertainment and hotels. In addition, the renovated center will become Visit Florida’s Official South Palm Beach County Visitor Center. Ú


February 2017 2017

The COASTAL STAR

HONEY

Only certain kinds helpful

Continued from page 1 Loggerhead Marinelife Center in Juno Beach, but there was no room at that inn. Gumbo Limbo volunteered.  For the past month, Blitzen has been fed an ample diet of squid, fish and medicine to help his digestive system recover. His barnacles were removed, and now his shell needs to heal. Dressing sea turtle wounds takes time, especially when the turtle weighs 120 pounds.

Honey’s help long known

Bovery squeezes a generous swirl of dark honey onto the turtle’s shell and fins and gently massages it into cracks and crevices. Her warm, gloved hands seem to soothe the creature. The honey isn’t a pain reliever, though. The honey rub is meant to protect the loggerhead’s wounds, speed healing and fight infection. The turtle is left in a drained tank for about a half hour to allow the honey to work its magic.  Honey has been used by humans for centuries to treat lung infections, digestive problems, open wounds, burns and infected skin. Cleopatra used it as a beauty treatment. Egyptian and Roman soldiers may have bound their wounds with it. In the modern antibiotic era, though, its medicinal use has waned in favor of sterile antiseptic ointments.  As germs gain resistance to some antibiotics, honey is attracting new attention from scientists. A 2011 study in the scientific journal PLOS One found certain medical-grade honeys killed off dangerous pathogens, including a strain of notorious supergerm MRSA after exposure for 24 hours.  The honey did this by producing an enzyme that converts glucose into germicidal hydrogen peroxide, and by changing the acidity of the wound, producing a toxin called methylglyoxal. It also contained Celebrating 28 years in Manalapan!

Caitlin Bovery pours honey onto Blitzen’s wound. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star an antifungal and antiviral compound called Defensin-1, the study found.  Bovery says Gumbo Limbo started routinely using honey on injured turtles about three years, ago, with success.  “We’ve seen really good regeneration on these loggerheads since we started using honey on the wounds,” Bovery added.  Honey helps boost fluid movement through wounds, flushing away toxins and moving in nutrients and other healing factors, but that same property means it must be reapplied often. And depending on the plants from which the honey is produced, it may contain different amounts of other useful compounds. A wellstudied New Zealand honey called manuka, for example, is rich in the fatty acid DHA. 

But all honey isn’t equal. Its hydrogen peroxide-producing properties are wiped out by exposure to heat, making most grocery store honey unhelpful for medicinal purposes. In fact, most crystal-clear grocery store honey is barely honey. It has been filtered and heated during processing and handling, destroying most of the healing enzymes and removing useful particles like pollen and beeswax.   At Gumbo Limbo, the turtle caretakers prefer to use dark, raw honey from local beekeepers, Bovery says. That honey isn’t cheap, however. It sells for about $12 a pint retail. Bovery can use up an entire squeeze bottle treating one turtle on one occasion. Gumbo Limbo rehabilitates about 100 turtles a year.   The nature center recently put out a call for honey donations. The Palm Beach County Beekeepers Association and the Hani Honey Co. in Stuart have helped fill the need, but more donations are welcome, Bovery said.  Blitzen’s condition is improved, but he still has a long recovery ahead. He’s gaining weight again, and his plastron isn’t concave anymore. With barnacles removed from his shell, he’s able to submerge again. Recovery will take several months, though.  “He didn’t get this sick overnight, and he’s not going to get well overnight,” Bovery says. The honey will help. Sometime in the spring or summer, Bovery predicts, a totally healed Blitzen will be microchipped and tagged, then taken out to the Gulf Stream, to return to his life of crunching mollusks and slurping jellyfish out in the open sea. Ú Gumbo Limbo Nature Center accepts donations of raw, uncooked, unfiltered honey at 1801 N. Ocean Blvd. in Boca Raton. Call 544-8605 for more information. 

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News News25 7


26 Meet Your Neighbor

10 Questions

E

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR: Acklen Dunning

ight years ago, when Acklen Dunning fell in love with a beautiful gemstone necklace that she saw in a fashion magazine, she had a problem — the exorbitant price tag. So she came up with a plan. She went to a bead show and found a way to duplicate the necklace using much less expensive materials. Her interest in jewelry-making blossomed, and she made more necklaces, one of which caught the eye of someone from a local boutique, who offered to sell them for her. Eventually she began exhibiting her jewelry in shows and selling it on her own website. “It’s a wonderful hobby that’s turned into a very fun small business,” said Dunning, a resident of coastal Delray Beach since 1998. Although jewelry designing is not a full-time job for Dunning, she creates hundreds of pieces a year, including necklaces, earrings and bracelets, using materials such as semi-precious stones, baroque pearls, turquoise, coral, rock crystal, agate and jade. Her new line features a series of collar necklaces made of printed neoprene and big, chunky acrylic beads. “I’m really excited about it. It’s just totally different from what I’ve been doing before,” said Dunning. “It’s very glamorous, I think.” This month, Dunning will be selling her latest creations at the Wayside House Spring Boutique and Trunk Show, Feb. 21–23 at Old School Square in Delray Beach. The annual event is the main fundraiser of Wayside House in Delray Beach, which has been providing addiction treatment services to women since 1974. Now in its 27th year, the trunk show will feature more than 40 vendors from around the country selling home décor, jewelry, high-end adult and children’s clothing and accessories, with a portion of the sales going to Wayside House. The show also features the highly popular Trifles and Treasures section, which sells donated gently used items, such as designer handbags, vintage clothing, costume jewelry and artwork. A preview party will take place Feb. 20. Last year, the preview party drew some 250 people, while more than 3,000 people attended the trunk show. Dunning has participated as a vendor in the Wayside House fundraising event for the past four years, and before that she served as a volunteer. “A lot of people come to the show specifically for her jewelry items,” said Ann Weinwurm, director of development for Wayside House. “She has a following.” Before designing jewelry, Dunning was known for creating the Nuri evening bag, which she launched in 1995. These gilded, hand-lacquered oval bags with flowing tassels were inspired by the miniature inrō cases traditionally carried by Japanese samurai as early as the 15th century.  “I’ve always been fascinated with the Asian cultural arts, and that’s how that started,” Dunning said. The meticulously crafted bags incorporated lacquer finishes that Dunning had learned at the Isabel O’Neil Studio Workshop in New York City, where for five years she studied under O’Neil, a renowned authority on the art of the painted finish. Dunning later became a teacher at the studio. Her Nuri bag was selected for the prestigious Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show, where it won first prize. It

Acklen Dunning of Delray Beach displays jewelry from her new line of collar necklaces. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star was also exhibited at the Smithsonian Craft Show and the American Craft Museum. Each Nuri bag was different, and took about 60 hours to make, with up to 60 layers of lacquer applied, and sanding required every five coats. “It was a very intensive labor of love,” said Dunning. The bags were very successful, and are the creation Dunning is most proud of; but after about 12 years, she stopped making them. Today her creative focus is on her jewelry, which she exhibits at several charity fundraisers in Florida each year, preferring those to the big shows she used to do in New York. In addition to her jewelry, Dunning has time for something she is equally passionate about: bridge, which she has been playing for 10 years. “My life is full,” said Dunning, who is retired. “I have lots of things to do, and jewelry is my creative side, which I love.” — Marie Puleo Q. Where did you grow up and go to school? A. I grew up near Boston and went to the Holton-Arms School in Washington, D.C.; Briarcliffe College in New York, and the Sorbonne University in Paris. Q. What professions have you worked in? What professional accomplishments are you most proud of? A. After college, I worked in New York at the Ford Foundation in the public education department for five years, and at the Wenner-Gren Foundation for anthropological research, then married and moved to Connecticut. I then became involved in taking classes, then teaching at the Isabel

If You Go What: Spring Boutique and Trunk Show. The annual event is the main fundraiser of Wayside House in Delray Beach, which has been providing addiction treatment services to women since 1974. When: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 21–23 at Old School Square in Delray Beach. Cost: $5 per person for a wristband that allows multiple entries for all three days. A preview party will take place 6-8 p.m. Feb. 20. Tickets cost $100 per person, which includes valet parking, cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and nonstop shopping. Info: www.waysidehouse.net. O’Neil Studio for 10-12 years. She taught and perpetuated the art of the painted finish from its origin in the Renaissance using 21st-century materials she formulated. I believe that Isabel O’Neil was a great influence in my involvement in the arts. I left the studio to start my own career designing evening bags, the Nuri bag, that incorporated her lacquer finishes. After moving to Delray Beach, I then started to design jewelry and opened a website to display them. Q. What advice do you have for a young person selecting a career today?  A. Selecting a career today must be a tedious step-by-step process that takes years of investigating. You will probably have several jobs before finding the right one. Be positive and become a person of vision, because nothing is impossible. Q. How did you choose to make your home in Delray Beach?

A. My husband and I had family from this area. Q. What is your favorite part about living in Delray Beach?  A. We love this area and are very happy because there is so much to do; lots of wonderful choices from dining, cultural events, performing arts, museums and most importantly, the people who choose to live here. Q. What book are you reading now? A. I love historical novels and I am reading The Spy, by Paulo Coelho, about Mata Hari. Q. What music do you listen to when you need inspiration? When you want to relax?  A. Classical music for relaxing; guitar music (Ottmar Liebert, Gipsy Kings) for inspiration; and ’60s music, including the Grateful Dead, for fun. Q. Do you have a favorite quote or book that inspires your decisions?  A. Norman Vincent Peale’s The Power of Positive Thinking. Q. If a movie were made of your life, who would you like to play you? A. Helen Mirren.  Q. Do you have a favorite piece of jewelry? A. My favorite piece of jewelry is a bracelet that my grandmother gave my mother, who in turn gave it to me. My grandmother had it engraved with a special greeting to my mother that I cherish. Ú For more information about Acklen Dunning and her jewelry, visit www. acklendunning.com.


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

27

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28 News

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Manalapan

Island’s social ambiance shaped by two clubs

By Mary Thurwachter Social clubs formed by Standard Oil scions Spelman Prentice and William Benjamin II were an important part of Manalapan’s history, according to local historian and author Augustus Mayhew. Mayhew addressed residents Jan. 19 as part of the town’s annual lecture series at the J. Turner Moore Memorial Library. The La Coquille Club, now at Eau Palm Beach (formerly the Ritz-Carlton), was developed by Prentice, one of John D. Rockefeller’s grandsons. “The original 1954 building, designed by architect Byron F. Simonson, was one of the most significant mid-century

modern buildings in the area,” Mayhew said. Club members were captains of industry, congressmen and people with names like Hutton, Ford, Vanderbilt and Rockefeller. It was a place to see and be seen. Guests lounged by the pool, sipped cocktails and danced the night away. After the building was torn down, the Ritz-Carlton was built in its place and the club was housed there from 1991 to 2013, when the hotel became Eau Palm Beach. Manalpan’s other social club, The Manalapan Club, was founded in 1957 in a home once owned by Jacques and Consuelo Vanderbilt Balsan. During the height of the Great Depression in 1934, the

BARNARDS

LEFT: The La Coquille Club, built in 1954, was one of the most significant mid-century modern buildings in the area. The architect was Byron F. Simonson. RIGHT: In 1934, Jacques and Consuelo Vanderbilt Balsan bought land on the south end of Hypoluxo Island, which they named Casa Alva. In 1957, William Benjamin II bought the estate and turned it into The Manalapan Club. Photos provided by the Historical Society of Palm Beach County Balsans bought the south end of Hypoluxo Island and three nearby islands for $75,000. There already was a home on

the 50-acre property, which had belonged to the John Demarest family, and it was called La Linda.

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The Balsans added on to the house and renamed it Casa Alva, with designs by Treanor & Fatio architects. Sir Winston Churchill, a family friend and cousin of Consuelo’s first husband, visited Casa Alva several times and often spent his time painting scenes around the grounds. One of his paintings is hanging on a wall at the town library. Benjamin bought Casa Alva in 1957, added 50 acres and filled in the islands to develop Point Manalapan. He also added rooms to the house. In 1958, Benjamin unsuccessfully lobbied for a bridge between Point Manalapan and A1A. The Manalapan Club had its home in Casa Alva from 1957 to 1976. The club included a nine-hole, par-3 golf course, game room, cocktail lounge, dining room, and suites for members during the season. Gala balls, fashion shows, lectures and bridge tournaments were among the club’s social activities. After the club closed, Benjamin and his wife, Maura, lived at Casa Alva until 2013, when they sold the property to its present owner, investment banker and New York preservationist Gary W. Parr. • Future speakers in the library series include Manalapan gardener and author Jack Staub, who will discuss the private gardens of South Florida on Feb. 16; international cellist Yehuda Hanani, who will talk about the narrative power of music on March 2; Hippocrates Health Institute health educator Philip Nicozisis, who will discuss the philosophy of food, a vegan perspective, on March 9; and musician and writer Juliette de Marcellus, who will give her lighthearted guide to why classical music is on the decline for the March 30 lecture. Lectures are free to library members and $5 for others. For more information, see www. manalapan.org. Ú


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

News 29

Delray Beach

City OKs building pedestrian barrier along FEC tracks downtown By Jane Smith

The days are numbered for people taking shortcuts across the FEC train tracks in downtown Delray Beach. The city plans to install pedestrian barriers by the end of the summer. In mid-January, the City Commission approved a pedestrian barrier of aluminum rail fencing with occasional landscaping along both sides of the track for one block — from Atlantic Avenue north to Northeast First Street. The trespassing problem became a focus last August when a Boca Raton woman was killed by a passing freight train. She was taking a wellused shortcut across the tracks after leaving Johnny Brown’s on Atlantic Avenue when she was struck by a southbound freight train. “I think someone else is going to get killed. We have to do something,” Mayor Cary Glickstein said at the workshop. Citing mature bougainvillea as a good deterrent along the Florida East Coast tracks in West Palm Beach, Glickstein said later, “it is both colorful and thrives in harsh conditions and has an added feature of thorns, which in this context is useful to keep people from jumping over the fence.”  Later this year, Brightline passenger rail service will start on the FEC tracks, offering express travel between Miami and West Palm Beach. The estimated 32 daily trains will have only one stop per county — Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach. By 2019, plans call for extending the service to Orlando. That’s why John Morgan, who runs the city’s Environmental Services Department, is rushing to bring better cost estimates back to the commission. He presented four options in mid-January. Commissioners combined parts of two into one — aluminum fence with intermittent landscaping. After better costs are determined, he then will meet with FEC Railway staff to get approval to construct the barriers. Some part, if not all, of the barriers will sit on FECowned land. Morgan then will ask railway officials to help cover the costs

of the barriers. “FEC is responsible to make it safe, but not pretty,” Glickstein said. The city will look for help with the remaining cost from the county’s Metropolitan Planning Organization. The city also is losing 15 parking spaces in the block just north of Atlantic after the second set of railroad tracks was installed last year, Morgan said. He will use that as an opportunity to reconfigure parking in the lot behind Johnny Brown’s. At a Community Redevelopment Agency board meeting earlier in January, police Sgt. Darrell Hunter told the board about a parking problem that occurred along the railroad tracks. In November, when FEC subcontractors were installing the second set of tracks, they removed the “No Parking” signs just north of Atlantic Avenue. People were parking their cars close to the tracks, which prompted the freight trains to slow down and some even stopped, Hunter said. Trains extend at least three feet beyond the tracks on both sides. Vehicles were ticketed, but the number couldn’t be determined, according to a police spokeswoman. The Police Department uses paper parking tickets that are not tracked. For the next step in the barrier process, Morgan would take the plan to the Downtown Development Authority, which serves merchants and restaurants along Atlantic Avenue. His goal is to have commission approval by early June and the barriers in place before Brightline trains begin zipping through downtown. For a finishing touch, Morgan wants to install a pedestrian promenade on each side of the tracks along the barriers. He will seek financial help from the city’s CRA to build promenades between Atlantic and Northeast First. All this barrier talk pleases Delray Beach safety advocate Patrick Halliday, vice chairman of Human Powered Delray. He pressed for the barriers at the first City Commission meeting after the August tragedy. “It’s a message to people who don’t want to get involved that change can occur if you speak up,” he said. Ú

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30 Obituaries

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Obituaries

Erin Kane Rodriguez

By Rich Pollack HIGHLAND BEACH — On Highland Beach’s Intracoastal Drive in the town’s tight-knit Bel Lido community, Erin Kane Rodriguez was known as a fun-loving neighbor, a rising young tennis star and an athlete full of energy, who always took her studies seriously. So it came as a shock to the whole community — especially the group of 14 young adults with whom she grew up — when neighbors learned that she died at home on Jan. 10, apparently as a result of an underlying medical condition. She was 20. “The whole neighborhood was in shock,” said Peggy Gossett-Seidman, a neighbor and close friend of the Rodriguez family. “We’re all still in shock.” A junior at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, and co-captain of her school’s tennis team, Miss Rodriguez was home for the holidays and staying with her family an extra week in preparation for her team’s match with Florida Atlantic University. Members of the team, including those who made the trip for the match, were among more than 300 people from across the country who attended a Jan. 18 memorial service for Miss Rodriguez. “She reached a lot of people,” Gossett-Seidman said. A natural athlete, Miss Rodriguez started playing tennis competitively at 11 and was a fixture in national tournaments prior to receiving a full athletic scholarship to play for the

Fred R. Marcon

Miami University RedHawks. “Erin was the sunshine of our team,” coach Yana Carollo told the Dayton Daily News. “She was funny, intelligent, compassionate and a very kind girl.” At one point in her playing career, Miss Rodriguez ranked sixth in the state and 27th in the nation in her age group. Although she had considered the possibility of playing tennis for a living, according to Gossett-Seidman, Miss Rodriguez was focused on academics, with a dual major in political science and business legal studies. A dean’s list student who was chosen to serve as an ambassador for the university’s College of Arts and Science, Miss Rodriguez planned to attend law school following her graduation, with a goal of becoming a prosecutor. “She was quiet and serious in her studies but with the other kids in the neighborhood she was just a bundle of energy,” Gossett-Seidman said. “She was always upbeat and smiling.” Miss Rodriguez is survived by her parents, Jorge and Judi; her younger brother, Matthew; grandparents Tom and Dorothy Kane; grandmother Miriam Rodriguez; uncle and aunt John and Suzanne Kane; godparents Jose and Rita Mendez, and many cousins. A scholarship fund has been established at Miami University in her memory. Make contributions payable to the Erin Rodriguez Memorial Scholarship, and mail to Miami University, 725 E. Chestnut St., Oxford, OH 45056. To contribute online, visit www.forloveandhonor.org/ givetomu.

By Emily J. Minor MANALAPAN — Fred R. Marcon, the son of Italian immigrants who grew to great success in business, faith and family, died Jan. 19 in the Manalapan home he’d built for his wife, who died five years ago. He was 79. Mr. Marcon was more of a Northern guy, said his daughter Alison Conti. He loved the family’s other home in Fish Creek, Wis., and followed Chicago sports teams like the Bears and the Cubs. But once his wife, Natalie, fell in love with Florida — something she first did as a girl growing up in Miami and then again as her husband inched toward retirement and they started coming south — he obliged her love for the ocean and palm trees with a beautiful house on a beautiful lot, Conti said. “He really built this house for my mom,” she said.  When Natalie Marcon died in the spring of 2012, the two had been married 49 years. And while Mr. Marcon was in fairly good health at the time, still enjoying golf and travel, he lost more than her companionship when their mother died, Conti said.  He kind of lost the will to live.  “When you lose your life partner, it’s hard to keep going,” Conti said. “He was just sad.” Born Feb. 22, 1937, on the South Side of Chicago, Mr. Marcon was the secondyoungest of seven children, and the only boy. His family calls his life “a true American success story” and he came by hard work honestly. Mr. Marcon’s

father spent 43 years with the George M. Pullman Co., and never took a sick day. After graduating from Chicago’s allboys Mount Carmel High School, Mr. Marcon attended the Illinois Institute of Technology and joined the Illinois Inspection and Rating Bureau as a junior inspector. Various promotions eventually took the family to Flossmoor, a pretty Chicago suburb, where Mr. Marcon was very involved with the Infant Jesus of Prague parish as a lector and coach for the school’s baseball, football and basketball teams. His coaching had an effect on hundreds of young people’s lives. In 1977, another promotion took the family to Ridgewood, N.J., where he climbed the corporate ranks with Insurance Services Office, a riskmanagement firm. When Mr. Marcon retired in 2002, he was chairman and CEO of that company. Through the years, Mr. Marcon found great joy in philanthropy, said family members. He is survived by his five children and their families: Michael, of Alamo, Calif.; Tony, of San Francisco; Michelle, of Chicago; Alison, of Madison, N.H.; and Mark, of Loxahatchee. Ten grandchildren also survive him. Services were in Flossmoor, where Mr. Marcon was buried in the family plot. Memorial donations may be sent to the Men of Carmel Fund, Mount Carmel High School, 6410 S. Dante Ave., Chicago, IL 60637. In retirement, Mr. Marcon enjoyed his kids, his grandkids, church work — and armchair sports. Alison Conti said the family was happy he’d lived to see his beloved Cubs win the World Series. Indeed, Mr. Marcon was buried with his Cubs cap, she said.

Linda Ann Grantham Bryan By Emily J. Minor GULF STREAM — Linda Ann Grantham Bryan, a Memphis-born adventurer who moved to the Philadelphia area with her parents as a child and kept a home there all her life, died unexpectedly Dec. 23. She was 78. Mrs. Bryan’s daughter Sally L. Willis said her mother fell while visiting a daughter and grandchildren in London. She never regained consciousness.  “She fell down the stairs and hit her head,” Willis said.  Mrs. Bryan’s death was particularly jarring because of the good health and active lifestyle she enjoyed, Willis said. An avid traveler, Mrs. Bryan had taken a trip around the world last year and was scheduled for a trip to Colombia this month. In the last 10 years, she had traveled with the National Geographic Society, focusing largely on environmental and cultural locations, her daughter said. With homes in Philadelphia, Minturn, Colo., and Gulf Stream, Mrs. Bryan also

enjoyed golf and hiking. And she loved a party, said her daughter. “She was social,” Willis said. “She absolutely loved to have parties and go to parties.” Mrs. Bryan was an accomplished pianist who often played when she entertained. And she loved dogs. Her Gulf Stream home was long “a haven for many of man’s best friends,” said her family. While she enjoyed traveling and had three homes, it was the Florida home that she really loved, Willis said. At the time of her death, Mrs. Bryan was a member of The Little Club, Gulf Stream Bath and Tennis Club, and the Gulf Stream Golf Club. Married several times, Mrs. Bryan leaves two children from her second marriage, to David P. Willis: Sally, of Frisco, Colo., and Anne S. Willis, the daughter she was visiting in London.  She leaves two sons from her first marriage, to Stanley Malin (who died in 1960): Geoffrey Malin Willis, of Downingtown, Pa., and Brian Malin Willis, of Coatesville, Pa. Most recently, Mrs. Bryan was married to Anthony J.A. Bryan, who died in 2010. Seven grandchildren, a

sister, Kate Grantham Taylor, of Boulder, Colo., and a brother, Jesse Grantham III, of Ojai, Calif., also survive Mrs. Bryan. Memorials for Mrs. Bryan can be made to McCarthy’s

Wildlife Sanctuary in West Palm Beach; the St. Augustine Historical Society, or the Waukeenah United Methodist Church Cemetery in Monticello, Fla., where she is buried in the family plot next

to her father, who died in 2007. The family is planning a celebration of life 5-7 p.m. March 5 at the Gulf Stream Golf Club, 2401 N. Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach.

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February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Obituaries By Ron Hayes OCEAN RIDGE — Bill Finley died while putting the finishing touches on a science fiction novel called Saving the Moon. He’d already made his mark on Earth. At his death from congestive heart failure on Jan. 25, Mr. Finley left behind 93 years filled with innovation and adventure. He had been a warrior, a scholar, a planner, a builder, a writer, a husband, a father, a dreamer and a doer. In Palm Beach County, the Community Partners exists because he did, and so does SunFest. “Bill was a genius in many ways,” said his wife, Anita Finley. “Creative, but such a kind, loving soul. He thought in big terms, and whatever

he did had to be good for the community.” A resident of Ocean Ridge for 28 years, Mr. Finley was born in Chicago on Oct. 29, 1923. After graduating from high school, Mr. Finley enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1943 and flew 35 bombing missions over Germany, for which he was awarded five Air Medals, three Battle Stars and two unit commendations. He earned an A.B. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1949 and, two years later, that school’s first master’s degree in city and regional planning. In 1958, he arrived in Washington, D.C., to serve as director of the National Capital Planning Commission under Presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy. Leaving government in 1962, he made one of his most lasting contributions by joining the Rouse Co. to develop a new city

Bill Finley

in Maryland. In June, Columbia, Maryland, pop. 100,000, will celebrate its 50th anniversary. Mr. Finley came to Miami in 1972 to help create INTERAMA, the InterAmerican Trade and Cultural Center, scheduled to open in 1976 to mark the American Bicentennial. However, the bond market collapsed, and the $200 million project was never completed. Today, it is the site of Florida International University. In Florida, Mr. Finley lost INTERAMA, but found a wife who would share his life for the next 43 years. “I saw her from a distance,” he told The Coastal Star last year. “She was tall and gorgeous with a big smile and waving to everyone.” The couple were married in 1974, and for the next four decades, Florida would benefit from Bill Finley’s presence. In 1980, he went to work for the Banker’s Land Co.,

Obituaries//News 31

a subsidiary of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, to develop the city of Palm Beach Gardens. He helped turn the Royal Palm Festival into SunFest and a 1939 armory building into the Armory Art Center. With his wife, he co-founded Boomer Times and Senior Life, a multimedia company. Mr. Finley’s greatest service to the area came in 1986 when, as chairman of the county’s Affordable Housing Task Force, he led the effort to create and fund the Housing Partnership. In 2001, the partnership took over management of the struggling Parent-Child Center, providing mental health services to families. Today, both agencies operate as Community Partners. In 2012, he received the agency’s first William E. Finley Founder’s Award for his “courageous and visionary leadership.” In his later years, Mr. Finley

turned to writing, publishing both light fiction, Killing in BocaLand (2012), and serious studies, A Bold Proposal for American Cities (2015). And then, as his own time on Earth drew to a close, he turned his attention to Saving the Moon. “I’m so privileged to have had him in my life,” Anita Finley said. “He was just a brilliant guy who was also kind and loving. And now he’s on a new adventure.” In addition to his wife, Mr. Finley is survived by his sons, Kelly Cuthbertson, of California, and Chandler Finley (Stefania) and Joey Richards, both of Miami; a daughter, Kim Finley, of Oregon; and three grandchildren, Colette, Lawrence and Jasmine Finley, of Miami. A memorial service will be held at a later date.

Along the Coast

Survey of homeless people to help county learn how to meet their needs

By Jane Smith One woman at The Caring Kitchen said she was to blame for her homelessness. A man there blamed his stint in prison for his not finding a job and living on the streets. Others complained they lost their jobs when people were willing to work for less. Their stories were among the more than 1,700 collected in a 24-hour period ending Jan. 27. The homeless count, mandated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, was coordinated by Palm Beach County’s Human Services Division. Its staff got help from volunteers and police escorts. When the tally is released, it will provide breakdowns by city with information on age, gender and race. Detailed information on the annual count will be released March 1, said Wendy Tippett, Human Services director. Two teams worked in Boynton Beach, Delray Beach and the Lake Worth/Lantana area, said Keianna Williams, program coordinator for Human Services. One team counted in Boca Raton, she said. In return for the survey responses, homeless people received $5 gift cards to Publix

Marcela Carneiro Millett, of Palm Beach County Human Services, speaks with a homeless man at The Caring Kitchen in Delray Beach. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star or Walgreen’s, or a toiletry kit put together by the county Homeless Coalition, Tippett said. The county will use the information collected to determine how best to assist homeless people, make cities realize they have a homeless problem inside their borders and determine where pockets of need exist. The data also will be used in federal grant applications to help support the requests, according to Tippett. Delray Beach Police Sgt. Darrell Hunter, supervisor of the Clean and Safe program

in the downtown area, said his officers often encounter homeless people in Veterans Park and on the grounds of the historic Old School Square. He told the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency board in early January about the extra patrols that have been done in both places. The agency pays for the Clean and Safe program. “Sixty-eight extra patrols were conducted in November in Veterans Park,” he said. The extra patrols are in addition to the 45 “walk-and-talks” and Segway patrols of Veterans Park. A “walk-and-talk” meeting

happens when officers chat with a homeless person to determine his or her needs. On the Old School Square grounds, because of “vagrant complaints, as well as in anticipation of the holiday-area opening,” 27 extra patrols and four “walk-and-talks” were conducted, Hunter’s November report said. He also told the CRA board about a spike in the homeless population police witnessed in November. Hunter mentioned Veterans Park, Libby Wesley Park and the Public Library as places homeless people frequent. “We go into an area and ask certain information — where are you from and how did you get here,” he said. “A lot of these individuals said they were given vouchers from up North to come down to Delray.” The mention of vouchers prompted CRA board member Paul Zacks to ask, “Who is handing out the vouchers?” Hunter said at the meeting that the police chief was checking on that. Two weeks later via email, he said, “the individuals did not provide our officers with the city or who actually gave them the voucher, which makes it hard to follow up.” The January homeless counters in Delray Beach

started at The Caring Kitchen on Northwest Eighth Avenue just off Atlantic Avenue, which runs a hot meal program for homeless people and others on limited incomes. On Jan. 26, Tippett spent lunchtime in Boca Raton at the Boca Helping Hands center on Northwest First Court near Dixie Manor, where the team interviewed 64 homeless people in one hour. “Last year, 25 surveys were done. There’s definitely an increase,” she said. She said homeless people sleep on the streets and “other places not fit for human habitation.” Her list included stairwells, public bathrooms, alleys and park benches. People are homeless for a variety of reasons, Tippett said. They might lack a living wage in Palm Beach County, where apartment rental rates are rising more quickly than wages; have criminal backgrounds that make it difficult to assimilate; be Vietnam-era veterans who never moved back to their hometowns; have behavioral health issues that include addictions; or be teen runaways. This year, “We’ve seen an increase of seniors and teens who are homeless,” she said. Ú Tim Stepien contributed to this story.

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32 News

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

South Palm Beach

Town attorney, manager to be focus of February meeting By Dan Moffett

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South Palm Beach Vice Mayor Joe Flagello is promising residents “an action-packed, fun-filled agenda” for their Feb. 28 town meeting. After being sidetracked for months with other business, the Town Council is planning to tackle several potentially prickly assignments — the evaluations of the town attorney and town manager, and final approval to an ordinance that would raise council members’ monthly salaries. Last year, Town Attorney Brad Biggs asked the council for a new contract and a pay raise, from $170 an hour to $180. Some council members objected, saying they had problems communicating with Biggs and getting him to respond to their questions. Several members, including Stella Gaddy Jordan, considered putting the position out to bid. “Brad didn’t support the council enough,” Jordan said. She also complained about too much cross-talk during meetings that Biggs should have stopped. After the council had several false starts at negotiating with the attorney, the issue is back on the agenda for February. Biggs has held his position for a decade and is board certified as a municipal specialist. He wants the council to act on his request. “I haven’t raised your rates for years,” Biggs said at the Jan. 24 meeting. “And I didn’t raise them during any of the time we had poor income coming in. I’ve requested it, it’s in the budget, I’m requesting that something be set that either I’m going to get

it or I’m not going to get it.” Flagello, who calls Biggs’ work on the town’s behalf “terrific,” says the attorney deserves an answer this month. “I don’t think it’s fair to him. He’s offered us many options. We’ve even talked about a flat rate,” Flagello said. “We’ve had these options and we’ve done nothing. I think it’s sort of disrespectful.” The town charter requires that the council evaluate the manager annually, so Bob Vitas will get his first formal review at the next meeting. Vitas inherited a mildly chaotic situation when he took the $103,000-a-year position in November 2015. Five months earlier, the Town Council forced his predecessor, Jim Pascale, to resign after only six months on the job. Vitas has received glowing reviews from all council members for his efforts to reboot the town’s administration and advance the council’s issues. Mayor Bonnie Fischer has praised Vitas for working tirelessly to collect easements for the town’s beach restoration project and helping officials develop long-term goals. “Bob has done a wonderful job and really helped us get back on track after going without a town manager,” Fischer has said. Council members were to have given their final approval in January to an ordinance that raises their monthly pay from $250 to $300 — and the mayor’s from $250 to $500 — but postponed the vote until public notice requirements had been met. A first reading of the change narrowly passed, 3-2, in December. Ú


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Business Spotlight 33

Business Spotlight

Manalapan hair salon gets its own beauty makeover

By Amy Woods Posh for Hair in Manalapan has been making customers beautiful for more than three decades. The salon finally did the same for itself. Between cuts and color, manicures and pedicures and a full complement of aesthetic services, the 2,000-squarefoot space in Plaza del Mar underwent a remodeling. White walls received a welcome coat of grayish-plum paint, glass and laminate made way for taupe-stained wood, and outdated tile with worn grout lines was torn up and replaced. “We totally changed the floor,” said Donniel Busey, who bought the business in January 2016 with co-owner Emmanuel Tinebra. “We don’t have popcorn ceilings anymore. Everything is really relaxing.” The remodeling took five weeks to complete and was finished in time for the partners to celebrate their first year at Posh for Hair. “We’ve been getting so much amazing feedback from snowbirds who haven’t seen the change, and they are loving it,” Busey said. “The look of our salon now is really plush. You feel like you’re getting pampered instead of shuffled around, and that’s what I want for my clients.” In addition to the cosmetic improvement, Posh for Hair received a new computer system that creates personal profiles, sets appointments and accepts credit cards. “It was very old-school in here,” Busey said. “It was cash and carry, fast-paced and not relaxing.” Clients who have come to the salon since the remodeling can enjoy a spa-like experience instead of a rudimentary shampoo, trim and blow-dry. “I like being able to set the culture, and I like being part of

Emmanuel Tinebra and Donniel Busey (right), owners of Posh for Hair in Manalapan, bought the salon in January 2016 and recently oversaw its makeover. The salon has been in business for more than 30 years. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star a team,” Busey said. The 47-year-old hairstylist always knew she wanted to enter the beauty industry and found an opportunity to capitalize on her trade by investing in a well-established company. Posh for Hair originally was owned by Edith Burlison, who died in July at age 92. “She was still doing hair up until the end,” Busey said. “For me, I saw a connection with her. I wanted to get approval from her. I felt like she was an excellent professional businesswoman because the salon is still here 35 years later.” When Busey took over with Tinebra, Burlison became an employee and, eventually, a legacy.

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“She made a name for Posh,” Busey said. Fourteen employees work among eight cutting stations, four color areas, three manicure tables, three pedicure chairs and a skin-care room. Tinebra manages it all.

“It’s not easy,” said the 54-year-old concierge of sorts, who regularly drives 10 or so clients to and from the salon to get their hair done. “My job is to make everyone happy. The most important thing is the service we give.” Ú

Posh for Hair, Plaza del Mar, 271 S. Ocean Blvd., Manalapan; 582-4447; 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday, Friday and Saturday; 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Thursday; facebook.com/ posh4hair


34 Business Spotlight

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Business Spotlight

L

New owners for Las Ventanas in Boynton

as Ventanas, a mixeduse development on 15 acres in Boynton Beach, sold for $109.31 million in midDecember. Prudential Insurance Company of America, a New Jersey corporation, and Epoch Properties sold to Pollack Shores Real Estate Group of Atlanta. ARA, a Newmark Co., represented the seller. The development, which was built in 2009 at Woolbright Road and Federal Highway, includes 42,000 square feet of retail space, as well as 494 housing units, which were more than 90 percent occupied at the time of sale, according to ARA. For sale: 7,892-square-foot, single-story building on North Federal in Boca Raton; built in 1981, renovated in 2009, barrel tile roof, lush landscaping, parking for 36 vehicles; asking $3 million. If and when someone pays the price, the American Red Cross will vacate its Boca Raton office and employees will work at home, at the West Palm Beach office, and, of course, at local swimming pools, condo clubhouses — any place where swimming lessons and CPR classes are needed. Real estate is far less important than work done in the community, says Robin

Hicks Nunley, executive director of the local Red Cross chapter. The Red Cross doesn’t need its own building to carry out its work. And, as always, it can use more volunteers. The Morton Group Inc. plans to commission two sculptures for the sculpture garden of its new condominium, Metropolitan. Michael and Brad Morton, a father-son team, have invited South Florida artists to present their portfolios for consideration. Artists should submit portfolios to info@ MetropolitanDelray.com. “Our vision for the Metropolitan is to become the epicenter of the flourishing Delray Beach art scene,” said Michael Morton. “The Sculpture Garden and the Metropolitan reflect our founding principles of creating contemporary, artinspired living with the highest level of design, architecture and quality finishes.” The Metropolitan, a luxury residential project to be completed in 2018, is at 33 SE Third Ave., Delray Beach. Designed by Delray Beach architect Richard Jones, the five-story building will include one- and two-bedroom units up to 1,600 square feet, and priced from the $600,000s. It will also

have retail shops, office space, a rooftop deck and a public plaza. Premier Listings, at Royal Palm Place, 310 S. Federal Highway, Boca Raton, recently launched its luxury division, Premier Listings Luxury, which focuses on properties of more than $1 million. Veteran agent Jennifer Govberg heads the new division. For information, call 844-521-SOLD. Gar Finnvold has joined Douglas Elliman’s Delray Beach office, at 900 E. Atlantic Ave., in its Sports & Entertainment Division. Finnvold has more than 16 years of real estate experience and specializes in East Delray Beach, Boca Raton and south Palm Beach County properties.  Finnvold was a pitcher for the Boston Red Sox in 1994, making eight starts. Bowen Realty has opened a new office at 851 SE Sixth Ave., Delray Beach. Agents are Katy Moraskie, Robert Temelkoski and Kathy Hoynoski, and the broker owner is Darell Bowen. For information, visit www. DarellBowenRealty.com. Hypoluxo Island resident/ Realtor Patricia “Patti” Towle, who moved her license

Las Ventanas has been sold to Pollack Shores Real Estate Group. Photo provided from Illustrated Properties, Manalapan, to Sotheby’s International, Palm Beach, in October, listed two nonwaterfront properties on Hypoluxo Island in January. Neither Towle property has been on the market for more than 20 years. They are: 434 Beach Curve Road, a two-bedroom home priced at $639,999; and 205 SE Atlantic Drive, a two-bedroom home close to the beach, priced at $614,995.  At RE/MAX Complete Solutions, 17 of its 18 agents received company awards in 2016. Of that number, during 2016, eight achieved the Executive Club status for earning $50,000$100,000 in commissions, eight

achieved the 100 percent Club status for earning $100,000$250,000 in commissions, and one achieved the Platinum Club status for earning $250,000$500,000 in commissions. Also, one agent received Hall of Fame status, a RE/ MAX career award for agents who have  earned at least $1 million in commissions during their careers with RE/MAX. The broker/owner of RE/MAX Complete Solutions is Jennifer Lee. Its two locations are 199 SE 12th Ave., Deerfield Beach, and 21301 Powerline Road, Suite 106, Boca Raton. Douglas Elliman released its fourth-quarter South Florida reports in mid-January. Overall, for Boca Raton, the report noted that the condo market outperformed the single-family market this quarter, and it noted a sharp decline in luxury condo inventory.


February 2017

Among luxury condos (starting at $610,000), compared to this time last year median sales price surged 69.2 percent to $1.1 million; days-on-market was 76 days, down from 121 days; and listing inventory fell 29.8 percent to 275. For luxury single-family homes (starting at $869,900), median sales price fell 23.5 percent to $1.31 million; days-on-market was 159 days, up from 117; and listing inventory jumped 36.5 percent to 565. For the Delray Beach market, the report noted that prices closer to the beach were soft, and in general, the luxury market price trends did not keep pace with overall market. Compared to last year, metrics for luxury single-family homes (starting at $1.2 million) showed that median sales price increased 2.4 percent to $1.7 million; and days-onmarket was 143, up from 115. Trends for luxury condos (starting at $285,000) showed that median sales price fell 12.1 percent to $450,000; and days-on-market was 110, up from 84. Club President David Dweck will speak on real estate trends at the 23rd anniversary meeting of the Boca Real Estate Investment Club at 7 p.m. Feb. 9. He will offer tips for investing in the real estate market. Registration begins at 6:30 p.m. The meeting, which costs $20, will be held at the Renaissance Boca Raton Hotel, 2000 NW 19 St., Boca Raton. For information, call 391-7325. The Realtors Association of the Palm Beaches with the City of Boynton Beach will host their fifth Annual Barrier Free 5K Charity Run, Walk & Roll at Congress Avenue Barrier Free Park, 3111 S. Congress Ave., on Feb. 11. The 5K starts at 7:30 a.m. and the registration fee is $35. For information, contact Wally Majors at 742-6255 or majorsw@bbfl.us or visit www. boyntonfoundation.org. Celebrating the completion of extensive renovations, the YMCA of South Palm Beach County will host a ribboncutting ceremony from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 14 at its DeVosBlum Family YMCA branch, 9600 S. Military Trail, Boynton Beach. Renovations include a new performance training area, a wellness center with new cardio and free weight equipment, updated locker rooms, an outside patio area, and new tile and paint. The event is open to the public and there will be door prizes, refreshments, demos and tours. In support of Naoma Donnelley Haggin Boys & Girls Club, more than 200 guests attended the Holiday Trunk Show Preview Party in November and even more shoppers bought holiday gifts during the following two days. The trunk show raised more

The COASTAL STAR

Holiday Trunk Show Preview Party

The Seagate Hotel & Spa, Delray Beach – Nov. 29

The Naoma Donnelley Haggin Boys & Girls Club’s 14th holiday vendor sale helped support programming for more than 400 children in South County. Two hundred-plus guests attended the opening night reception, and more shoppers stopped by the next two days to buy gifts for their families and friends, raising more than $100,000. TOP: (l-r) Walker, Kari and Matt Shipley. ABOVE: Susan Mullin and a few of the children in the Boys and Girls Club. Photos provided by Leonard Bryant Photography than $100,000 for the club. Sponsors included The Seagate Hotel & Spa; Searcy, Denney, Scarola, Barnhart and Shipley PA; Lang Realty; and the Mark Gerretson Memorial Fishing Tournament. Co-chairwomen of the Trunk Show were Susan Mullin, Kari Shipley and Lynn Wilkins. The Naoma Donnelly Boys

& Girls Club of Delray Beach is located at 1451 SW Seventh St. At their fifth annual Toy Giveaway in December, Abe Ovadia and his team at the Ovadia Law Group in Boca Raton gave a holiday toy to each of more than 300 members of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm

Business Spotlight 35

Beach County. The children were bused to the event, where they received toys from Santa Claus their parents had selected from a catalog. Ten Publix locations donated food, which was distributed to the participating families. Ovadia Law Group is at 4800 N. Federal Highway, Suite D204, Boca Raton. The Boca Chamber’s Golden Bell Education Foundation’s Young Entrepreneurs Academy CEO Round Table and Elevator Pitch Contest is 5:30-8 p.m. Feb. 8, in Parrish Hall at Saint Andrew’s School, 3900 Jog Road, Boca Raton, The event is free and open to the public. At this event, 17 students, who have been working for four months on their projects, will each do a 60-second pitch for his or her business. The top three performances will be awarded by judges Michelle Adams from CenterState Bank, Tara Auclair from Modernizing Medicine, Michael Orr from Minuteman Press, and Emily Santos from IBM. Also, a panel of Palm Beach County executives will answer questions from the audience and discuss their paths to professional success. Scheduled to participate are: Daniel Cane, CEO and co-founder of Modernizing Medicine; Andrew Duffel, president and CEO of the Research Park at FAU; John Duffy, founder and CEO of 3Cinteractive; Patricia Maczko, Florida market president at Comerica Bank; and Ira Bornstein, COO of TouchSuite.  In early January, the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s second conversation of this season’s Culture & Cocktails, “Heritage Values,” attracted more than 140 people. Two star appraisers from Antiques Roadshow on PBS, Kathleen Guzman, managing director of New York from Heritage Auctions, and Nicholas Dawes, Heritage’s vice president

of special collections, were interviewed by Scott Simmons. FloridaEscape.com has rated a food tour that stops at emerging art districts in Boynton Beach and Delray Beach as one of the “Best Food Tours” in town. “The best rating from FloridaEscape.com is humbling, which motivates us to keep on striving to make the Taste History Culinary Tour one of the best authentic experiences providing locals and visitors with a fun and insightful cultural food, art and history tour,” said Lori Durante, the nonprofit operation’s executive director. Each tour includes tastings at four family-owned eateries, juice bars, teahouses and pastry shops and showcases art galleries and historic buildings. For information, call 638-8277 or visit www. tastehistoryculinarytours.org. Locals enjoying staycations at the Boca Raton Resort & Club can now try out a new attraction that pairs bocce with booze. The resort’s new Mizner’s Monkey Bar & Bocce Garden offers complimentary play during the day and requires a $30 rental fee in the evening (or free with a $100 bar tab). The garden is just adjacent to the croquet lawn. Hotel guests can wander over to the new HarTru bocce court, and after 6 p.m. they can take a seat at the adjacent Mizner’s Monkey Bar to enjoy cocktails. For information or to make a reservation at the resort, visit www.bocaresort.com. Thom Smith and Amy Woods contributed to this report. Send business news to Christine Davis at cdavis9797@ gmail.com


36

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017


February 2017

Inside

Finding Faith

St. Joan of Arc opening new Mercy Center. Page H4

About 30 members of the Ocean Ridge Garden Club were on hand at the club’s January meeting. The organization is celebrating 50 years of serving the community and developing friendships. Photos by Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star

Secret Gardens

Boardwalk a good place to flee civilization. Page H9

Nurturing plants

friendships

Paws Up for Pets

Show critters Valentine’s Day love. Page H14

House of the Month New construction on the water in Ocean Ridge. Page H23

Ocean Ridge Garden Club marks 50 years of creating beauty, relationships By Ron Hayes The Ocean Ridge Garden Club plants sea oats and sea grapes, bougainvillea and milkweed. From those plantings, friendships grow. From those friendships, a community spirit blooms. From that spirit, the town is beautified. And club members have been doing it since 1966. Beginning March 20, the club will initiate three days of festivities to celebrate its half-century of horticulture. “We’ll have a kickoff reception in Town See GARDEN on page H11

Mary Ann Cody and former club president Joan Beck recite the Pledge of Allegiance at the beginning of a garden club meeting.


H2 

The COASTAL STAR

S T. A N D R E W S

VILLAGE OF GOLF

$2,750,000

$1,997,000

ROBIN TURNER

561-267-5888

VILLAGE OF GOLF MARY WINDLE

$760,000

561-271-5900

MARY WINDLE

3600 S OCEAN LAURA URNESS ROBYN LAWSON

ALLISON MELVIN

561-441-1927

FLAGLER LANDING $424,900 JANINE TOMPKINS

561-909-5139

MARINA VILLAGE ALLISON MELVIN

$278,000

561-441-1927

C A R LY L E H O U S E ANA GUERRA

$249,900

561-543-5046

$759,900

561-239-1911 561-866-1969

LA PENSEE

B AY W O O D AT B O C A W E S T $524,900

561-271-5900

ROBYN LAWSON LAURA URNESS

$499,000

561-866-1969 561-239-1911

561-909-5139

MARINA VILLAGE ALLISON MELVIN

$264,900

561-441-1927

R O YA L S A X O N JACOBA BILL

$239,500

ESTUARY $1,450,000 JOHN DUNNING

VILLAGE OF GOLF 561-665-1028

$595,000 LAUREN BARROCAS

917-327-4133

561-306-5521

$449,000 LAUREN BARROCAS

917-327-4133

561-909-5139

M O O R I N G S AT L A N TA N A HOLLY HICKMAN

$260,000

561-346-5594

561-271-5900

LA PENSEE LAURA URNESS ROBYN LAWSON

$525,000

561-239-1911 561-866-1969

M O O R I N G S AT L A N TA N A HOLLY HICKMAN

VILLAGIO DELMAR $379,900 JANINE TOMPKINS

$1,195,000

MARY WINDLE

M A L LO RY S Q UA R E

J O N AT H A N ’ S C R E E K

FLAGLER LANDING $399,900 JANINE TOMPKINS

February 2017

$448,000

561-346-5594

PA L M S E A $375,000

JACOBA BILL

561-306-5521

M O O R I N G S AT L A N TA N A LAURA URNESS

$259,000

561-239-1911

T H E PA L M B E A C H E R

COUNTRY MANORS

$175,000 / $169,000 / $159,000 CHERYL BARNES 781-749-2992

$140,000 561-543-5046


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

H3

DELRAY BEACH

LUXURY PROPERTIES

LAKE IDA | WATERFRONT

BEACH AREA | DELRAY BEACH $3,695,000

Brand new construction in desirable family neighborhood. Key West styled home offers over 6,000 total sq ft with 5 BR & 5.1 BA. Large, treed lot with private dock/boat lift. Close to Atlantic Ave! Just completed!

Gorgeous newer home in prestigious beach area with 6 BR and 6.1 BA. Over 6,100 total sq. ft. Resort styled pool and large covered Loggia with Fireplace. Designed by noted architect Randall Stofft. Steps from the beach.

Julie Ann Giachetti

Julie Ann Giachetti

PE

N

N DI

561-212-0022

561-212-0022

G

HIGHLAND BEACH | $1,499,000

THE BRIDGES | $1,250,000

This luxurious mansion has an expanded floor plan and is in an exclusive enclave of 17 homes in Highland Beach gated community. 4 spacious BR, 4 BA all ensuite and 4,298 tot. sq.ft. The community has private beach access.

Sebastian estate home located on a quiet cul-de-sec. Very private setting. Huge custom designed Chef’s kitchen featuring Viking and Sub Zero appliances. Oneof-a-kind RESORT STYLE pool and outdoor living space. 4 BR/ 4 ½ BA, 3 CG Robin Winistorfer 561-289-8805 www.8927SydneyHarborCircle.com

Olive Belcher

561-271-6922

MAJESTIC DEEPWATER ESTATE - BOCA RATON | $2,650,000

TROPIC ISLE | $3,395,000

Blue Inlet East exposure home, built in 2012. Shows like a model. 88’ of water frontage, 65’ dock. 5BR/5.1BA/3CG, office/library. Boating paradise. Walk to the beach.

Spectacular 3 level mansion, 6BR/ 6.2 BA/ 3CG. Elevator. Observation room and deck on 4th level. 20,000 lb boat lift. Marble floors, fireplace, media room, club room + office. Heated pool with spa & sun shelf.

Olive Belcher 561-271-6922

Jeanette Alexander

561-573-1454

WALKERS ISLE - BOCA RATON | $2,750,000

BALLANTRAE CONDO | $2,150,000

Unique double waterfront estate home! Exclusive, gated enclave of 9 homes on a peninsula w/ private boat dockage on 185ft on deep water. 4BD+Loft, 4.5BA, (5,500 sf.) New roof. Seller financing. www.854LilacDrive.com Vini Antonacci 561-714-8464 Brian Pearl 561-245-1541

Oceanfront beauty boasting 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths. Highly sought after first floor eastern exposure. 3400+ sq. ft. under air. Stunning ocean views. www.BuyandSellGulfstream.com

Michael M. Mullin

561-441-0635

www.LangRealty.com Delray Beach Office 900 E. Atlantic Avenue, Suite 16B, Delray Beach, FL | 561.455.3300 Connect on Google Plus

facebook.com/langrealty

twitter.com/langrealty

blog.langrealty.com

youtube.com/langrealtytv


H4 Religion

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Finding Faith

New Mercy Center in Boca will accommodate many more activities

By Janis Fontaine It’s a new era at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church and School in Boca Raton, where the old Mercy Center, built in 1989, has been replaced with a new one. A formal blessing and dedication is being planned for mid-March. The church’s timeline began in December 1956, when the first Mass was held in Domina C. Jalbert’s Aerological Laboratories off 20th Street in Boca Raton. In 1960, the founding members funded and built a provisional church and the school’s first classrooms just a few blocks off Dixie Highway in central Boca Raton. The new, permanent church was completed in December 1988. A few months later, the construction began that renovated the provisional

The old Mercy Center is demolished next to the new one (right). Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star church into a parish social center — what became the Mercy Center.

But the church, with more than 3,600 member families, outgrew the Mercy Center.

The development committee first considered expanding the old Mercy Center by adding a

second floor, but the building couldn’t support it. To make way for a center that would meet the needs of the church, the old center had to be torn down. In December, the Mercy Center was demolished with St. Joan’s new, modern Mercy Center ready. For health and safety reasons, the heavy machinery and demolition crews cleared the land while the 500-plus children who attend St. Joan of Arc School were on Christmas break. But seeing the building hauled away as rubble was bittersweet for some parishioners who had seen the church grow over the last 60 years. To help with the transition, the original stained glass windows, a prominent exterior cross, and an Art Deco figure of St. Joan of Arc all became important parts of the new center. Msgr. Michael McGraw offered encouragement to the parish in the church bulletin in November: “Looking past the stained glass windows at the new Mercy Center you can imagine the bright future that we have in front of us, and the wonderful growth that will follow for our parish, ministries and community.” Development and Stewardship Ministry Director Wendy Horton says the stained glass windows are better displayed in the new building. The church hired stained glass experts to remove, preserve and reframe the windows for their new home flanking the doorway into the auditorium at the new Mercy Center. Light pours into the new building and through the windows’ red and yellow panes to light the room with warmth and energy. The $5.5 million, 20,200-square-foot building has clean lines and modern design. There’s a catering kitchen, a huge auditorium with a stage, plenty of room for socializing, classrooms and meeting rooms for Bible study and rehearsal space for the drama, dance and music programs. Double-bookings of meeting rooms will be a thing of the past, Horton laughs. The new building has the same footprint as the old, Horton said. The land that is left vacant by the old Mercy Center will become a playground and sports fields for both children and adults. Horton hasn’t had time to consider what her next project will be, “but there’s always something to be done.” “We’re very excited after all this time that (the new Mercy Center) is finally complete,” Horton said. “Everyone will benefit.” St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church & School is at 370 SW Third St., Boca Raton. For more information, call 392-0007 or 952-2838; www.stjoan.org. Ú


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Health & Harmony Religion H5

Religion Notes

Interfaith discussions coming at Bethesda-by-the-Sea

I

nterfaith Dialogues — On Feb. 7 and March 14, the Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea, 141 S. County Road, Palm Beach, will be the site of interfaith panel discussions. Panelists include C.B. Hanif, a Muslim and former editorial writer for The Palm Beach Post; Tom O’Brien, from the Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea, and Rabbi Howard Shapiro, rabbi emeritus of Temple Israel.The discussions are hosted by the Palm Beach Fellowship of Christians and Jews. Topics: “Different Ways Jews, Muslims and Christians

Read Their Sacred Scriptures” (Feb. 7); and “The Meaning of Israel to Jews, Christians and Muslims” (March 14). Admission is free for fellowship members; $10 for nonmembers. Get a series pass for $20 in advance. 833-6150; www.palmbeachfellowship.net. Music at St. Paul’s takes place at 3 p.m. Feb. 5, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach. It features Gareth Johnson on violin and Tao Lin, piano, performing music of Beethoven, Ysaye and others. $15 adults,

Religion Calendar Note: Events are current as of 1/27 . Please check with organizers for any changes.

FEBRUARY 4

Saturday -2/4 - Grief Share at St Vincent Rectory Conference Room, 840 George Bush Blvd, Delray Beach. Biblicallybased grief support group. Every Sat 10 am-noon through 4/15. Free. 921-5655; stvincentferrer.com

FEBRUARY 5-11

Sunday - 2/5 - Bagels, Lox and Tefillin Club at Chabad of Delray Beach, 7495 W Atlantic Ave. Morning services including donning of tefillin and a torah thought from Rabbi Sholom Korf. Bagels/lox served. Chabad membership not required. 1st & 3rd Sun 9-9:30 am (follows 8 am service). Free. Reservations/donations appreciated: 496-6228; chabaddelray.com Monday - 2/6 - Monday Morning Women’s Bible Study at First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach, 33 Gleason St. Every M 10-11:30 am. Free. 276-6338; firstdelray.com 2/6 - Women’s Bible Study at Seacrest Presbyterian Church Conference Room, 2703 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Every M 10 am. Free. 276-5633; seacrestchurch.com 2/6 - Rosary for Peace at St Vincent Ferrer Adoration Chapel, 840 George Bush Blvd, Delray Beach. Every M 7 pm. Free. 276-6892; stvincentferrer.com Tuesday - 2/7 - Lectio Divina (Divine Prayer) at St Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Traditional Benedictine practice of scriptural reading, meditation, prayer. Every T 9-10 am. Free. 276-4541; stpaulsdelray.org 2/7 - First United Methodist Church of Boca Raton Pub Theology at Biergarten, Royal Palm Place, 309 Via de Palmas #90. Conversation, fellowship, open discussion. 1st T & 3rd W 7 pm. 395-1244; fumcbocaraton.org 2/7 - Rector’s Bible Study at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Every T 10:30 am; Th 7-8:30 pm. Free. 276-4541; stpaulsdelray.org 2/7 - Holy Hands Sign Language Ministry at First United Methodist Church, 101 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 7 pm. Free. 732-3435; fumcbb.com 2/7 - St Mark Bible Study at St Mark Catholic Church St Clare Room, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Every T 7-8 pm. Nominal

Thymes Vitabath Seiko Roger & Gallet Crabtree & Evelyn Eye • bobs Maui Jim Lampe Berger Elizabeth Arden Douglas Paquette

fee/free will offering for study guide. Register: 734-9330; stmarkboynton.com Wednesday - 2/8 - St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Bible Study at Panera, 1701 S Federal Hwy, Delray Beach. Read, discuss upcoming Lesson & Gospel readings. Every W 8-9 am. Free. 276-4541; stpaulsdelray. org 2/8 - Legion of Mary at St Mark Catholic Church Chapel, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Follows 8 am Mass every W. Free. 734-93300; stmarkboynton.com 2/8 - Breakfast & Torah Study at Gramercy Bagels & Deli, 15200 Jog Rd, Delray Beach. Wednesdays. 10:30 am. Congregation Beit Kulam. RSVP: 585-2618: cbkulam.org 2/8 - Bible Study at First United Methodist Church, 101 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Every W 11 am. Free. 7323435; fumcbb.com 2/8 - Wonderful Wednesdays at First Presbyterian Church, 33 Gleason St, Delray Beach. All ages. Every W 5:45 pm dinner; 6:30 pm program. $7/adult; $5/child; $20/ max per family. Reservations: 276-6338; firstdelray.com 2/8 - Rector’s Bible Study at St Gregory’s Episcopal Church, 100 NE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. Every W 6 pm supper (soup & salad, donation requested); 7 pm Bible study (free). 395-8285; stgregorysepiscopal.org Thursday - 2/9 - Prayer Circle at Trinity Lutheran Church Courtyard, 400 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Every Th 8:05 am. 2781737; trinitydelray.org 2/9 - Men’s Fellowship at First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach, 33 Gleason St. Every Th 8:30 am. Free. 2766338; firstdelray.com Friday - 2/10 - Women’s Bible Study Group at St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church Youth House, 266 NE 2nd St, Boca Raton. Every F 9:15 am. Free. 395-8285; stgregorysepiscopal.org 2/10 - Couples’ Bible Study Group at First United Methodist Church Boca Raton, 625 NE Mizner Blvd. Childcare available upon request. Every F 7-9 pm. Free. 3951244; fumcbocaraton.org Saturday - 2/11 - St Mark Council of Catholic Women at St Mark Catholic Church Madonna Room, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. 2nd Sat 10 am. Free. 7349330; stmarkboynton.com 2/21 - Annual Fellowship Dinner at The Breakers, 1 S County Rd, Palm Beach. Ben-

Fanny May Claus Porto Spartina Kent combs Mason Pearson Rowallen Alo Aftertan Caswell Massey Eliza B

4998 N orth o ceaN B lvd . • B oyNtoN B each , FL 33435 Phone: 561-276-4800 Fax: 561-276-5990 Monday-Friday 9 am-5 pm; Saturday 9 am-noon

$5 students. $20 for preferred seating available. Call 276-4541. The Club Singers perform at 3 p.m. Feb. 19 at First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach, 33 Gleason St. This all-volunteer, nonprofit organization of talented singers gives back to the community by providing scholarships and donations to worthy students. Free will offering benefits the scholarship fund. For information, call 276-6338. St. Vincent Ferrer Catholic Church Parish Festival will

efits Palm Beach Fellowship of Christians & Jews. 5:30-9 pm. $250/member; $275/nonmember. 833-6150; pbfellowship.net

FEBRUARY 12-18

Friday - 2/17 - Parents of St. Gregory’s at St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church, 100 NE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. Potluck dinner, topic discussion (targeted to young parents w/children age 2-13), group feedback, childcare available. 3rd F 6-8 pm. Free. 395-8285; stgregorysepiscopal.org

FEB.26-MARCH 4

Thursday - 3/2 - Trinity 4839 Columbiettes at St Mark Catholic Church Madonna Room, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. 1st Th 6:30 pm. Free. 495-6127; stmarkboynton.com 3/2 - Knights of Columbus Trinity Council 4839 at St Mark Catholic Church St Francis Center, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. 1st Th 7 pm. Free. 736-7812; stmarkboynton.com

be Feb. 24-26 at the church, 840 George Bush Blvd., Delray Beach. Carnival rides and games, raffles, live entertainment on two stages, a fish fry on Friday and flea market. Admission is free but for $10 you can get in early at 3 p.m. Feb. 24. For info, call 276-6892 or visit www. stvincentferrer.com.

Janis Fontaine writes about people of faith, their congregations, causes and community events. Contact her at janisfontaine@ outlook.com.


H6 Health & Harmony

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Health & Harmony

490-mile walk in Spain: ‘I can’t believe I did it’

A

s he drank his coffee every morning in October, John Boden could track his wife, Pat, as she made steady progress across the back roads of northern Spain. She was wearing a GPS device that posted her whereabouts on a computer tracking map. She was roughly 2,000 miles east of their Highland Beach condominium on the Atlantic Ocean, heading to a place on the northwestern coast of Spain: “Finisterre,” the end of the Earth. Pat Boden, 73, and five companions walked 490 miles in 34 days on the Camino de Santiago, the Way of St. James. “I still can’t believe I did it,” she says, Boden looking through a pile of guidebooks and maps and a photo of her in her floppy blue hat. If John Boden had been able to zoom in close enough, he might have seen that spot of blue bobbing along the Camino. Pat Boden became fascinated with the Camino after watching The Way, a movie starring Martin Sheen as a grieving father who walks the Camino after the death of his son. She watched it again, and then a third time. She got busy

researching the trip. The Bodens have been all over the world, to Egypt and Turkey, to China and even Spain on a previous trip. But John Boden decided that walking 490 miles was not to his taste. Through a travel service, Patricia Boden joined a group of five strangers with the same fascination and started her training. To allay her husband’s worries, she wore the GPS device. She also texted him daily. After Jesus’ resurrection, believers say, he instructed his disciples to preach the gospel to the ends of the Earth. That’s where St. James (Santiago in Spanish) ended up, at Finisterre, the end of the known world at that time. Remains thought to be those of St. James were discovered there in the 11th century and the church of Santiago de Compostela was built, 30 miles inland from the Atlantic. Trodden by peregrinos (pilgrims) for a thousand years, the Way of St. James, like the roads to Rome and Jerusalem, became one of the most holy pilgrimages for Roman Catholics. Pat Boden had no way to prepare for walking in mountains as high as 5,000 feet, sometimes steeply up, other times down. The highest

Pat Boden lives in Highland Beach and trained on the A1A path. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star local elevation she had was the Linton Avenue bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway near her home. “I trained during the summer in the wicked heat, walking the sidewalks of Highland Beach, Boca and Delray Beach,” she said. “My husband didn’t take me seriously until I bought the plane ticket.” The Camino trip was broken down into daily sections of 10

to 15 miles a day, ending in a private room in an inn each night. The pilgrims’ luggage preceded them in a van, so they carried only what they needed for the day. Some days they ate meals or snacks on the road, some days the tour company cooked hot lunches for them on propane stoves. “To me, at this stage of life, it was perfect,” said Boden. “In the old days, the pilgrims had to walk home, so it was double the distance. A lot of them died.”  

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One man in Boden’s group walked so fast — 3.72 miles an hour —that he was already showered and waiting to greet the rest when they arrived at their inn each day. “We just bonded so well, we laughed so much,” Boden said. “The people really made it for me.” Though she had not embarked on the Camino for religious reasons, she had her share of transcendent experiences. “We came to that great big hill with the big tall cross on it. It’s the highest place on the trip,” she recalled. “You bring a rock with you from home and you are supposed to leave your problems and cares, and pray for anyone who’s sick. “I didn’t think I was doing the walk for any [spiritual] reason, but a lot of friends had said, don’t forget me when you’re there. And I was giving thanks for my friend Brenda, who had a cancer on her spine that just went away two years ago. The doctors couldn’t see it anymore. I put down my rock and I just started crying.” As the pilgrims came within 62 miles of Santiago de Compostela, streams of others were converging on the same road. There are several routes, including walks from Portugal and France, and some pilgrims walk only the last 62 miles, so the small trickle of walkers

became a steady stream as they closed in on their destination. “When the five of us got to Santiago, we all started crying,” said Boden. “Part of it was just, we made it. Part of it was seeing all those peregrinos together.” Boden avoided foot blisters by wearing toe socks under regular socks. One companion had blisters covering the soles of both feet, which had to be drained and bandaged. She never complained. “You’d ask her how she was doing and she would say, oh, fine. I said to myself, I’m through complaining.” By the time they reached the outskirts of Santiago, Boden had developed painful shin splints. “I was near tears. The others said, you don’t have to walk the rest of the way. But I said, I don’t care if I have to crawl on my knees.” And she didn’t complain. She also decided to go back to church. As it happens, she lives within walking distance of St. Lucy Catholic Church in Highland Beach. “Every Sunday, I could make up a reason not to go,” she said. “But for some reason, God put me across from that church, so now I go every Sunday.” Boden is already planning to walk the Way again, this time north from Lisbon, Portugal. Her sister, as well as the woman with the blisters, are planning to join her. “When you’re there, you don’t have any worries in the world,” said Boden. “We didn’t have to worry about anything. It’s just you yourself, nature and your friends.” Lona O’Connor has a lifelong interest in health and healthy living. Send column ideas to Lona13@ bellsouth.net.


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Health Notes /Calendar H7

Health Notes

Treatment Center says farewell to CEO, donates $25,000 to fight overdoses

Bill Russell, chief executive officer and a founder of The Treatment Center of the Palm Beaches, retired in December. Anthony “Tony” Foster, the center’s chief operating officer since 2015, was named interim CEO. Also in December, the center made a $25,000 donation to Palm Beach County Fire Rescue for the purchase of naxolone, an emergency-use medication that can block the effects of opioids and rapidly reverse an overdose. The donation covers the cost of more than 700 doses of naxolone, which is approximately a three- to fourmonth supply. In Palm Beach County, more than 375 people overdosed and died from opioids between January and September 2016, already surpassing the previous year’s total drug overdose deaths. “With this donation, The Treatment Center is taking our efforts to help individuals and our community overcome the battle of addiction a step further. We recognize the scope and magnitude of this public health epidemic, especially now in this time of crisis, and we will continue to do more to restore hope for the still

suffering families and those affected by the disease of addiction,” said The Treatment Center shareholder and recovery advocate Laura Laramee, a Delray Beach resident. Lifespace Communities, a not-for-profit operator of continuing care retirement communities, named Kevin Knopf as its new regional director of operations. He will be responsible for leadership, strategic planning and day-to-day Knopf operations for the five Lifespace communities in Florida: Abbey Delray, Abbey Delray South and Harbour’s Edge in Delray Beach; The Waterford in Juno Beach; and Village on the Green in Longwood. Under the leadership of Bethesda Health’s interventional cardiologist Dr. George Daniel, doctors at Bethesda Heart Hospital and Bethesda’s Research Center, in conjunction with the Research Physicians Alliance, are studying a treatment to end chronic heart

Health & Harmony Calendar Note: Events are current as of 1/27. Please check with organizers for any changes.

FEBRUARY 4

Saturday - 2/4 - P90X Live Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd, Boca Raton. Every M 6-7 pm & Sat 8:15-9:15 am. 5 classes $75-$95; 10 classes $130-$163; 20 classes: $220-$275. Held again 3/4. 393-7807; myboca.us 2/4 - Saturdays @ Sanborn: Yoga Class at Sanborn Square, 72 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. 8:45 am registration; 9 am class. Free. 393-7703; downtownboca.org 2/4 - Kemetic Yoga at Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NE 5th Ave, Delray Beach. Calming, therapeutic yoga using ancient Kemetic postures and teachings. Bring yoga mat, water; wear comfortable clothing. Every Sat 9-10:30 am. $10/person. 279-8883; spadymuseum.com 2/4 - Qi Gong at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Ancient Chinese system of exercise, meditation. Improve flexibility, balance, muscle tone, energy, mental well-being. Adults. Every Sat 9 am. Free introductory class. $40/month. Reservations: 419-5403; facebook.com/WestBocaTaiChi 2/4 - Yoga Class at Train Depot, 747 S Dixie Hwy, Boca Raton. T 6:30-8 pm; T/Th/Sat 9:30-11 am. 5 classes $75/resident, $94/ non-resident; 10 classes $130/resident, $162.50/non-resident; 20 classes $240/ resident, $300/non-resident. 477-8727; myboca.us 2/4-5 - Yoga Class at South Palm Beach Town Hall Chambers, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Every Sat/Sun 9:30 am. $5/class. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 2/4 - Tai Chi/Chi Kung/Meditation Class at Delray Beach Community Center, 50 NW 1st Ave. Sat. Intermediate 9:30-10:30 am; beginner 10:45-11:45 am. Per class: $15/ resident; $17/non-resident. 243-7250; mydelraybeach.com 2/4 - Generations: A Grandparents Guide to Today’s Parenting at Bethesda

Memorial Hospital Parent Education Resource Center, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 10-11:30 am. $20/couple. Payment due before class date. 369-2229; publicrelations@BHInc.org 2/4 - Judo Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Warm-up exercises, instruction, practice, tournament training. W 6:30-8 pm mixed ages & ranks, 8-9 pm advanced; Sat 10 am-noon all groups. Per month $21.50/resident; $27/ non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 2/4 - Yoga at the Beach at Red Reef Park West (Intracoastal side), 1400 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Register/get parking pass at Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Classes held on grass overlooking the Intracoastal. No cash accepted on-site. W 6:30 pm; 1st & 3rd Sat 10-11 am. $10/class; 60-day membership (unlimited classes) $65/resident, $81.25/non-resident. 3937807; myboca.us 2/4 - Capoeira Fitness at Sanborn Square, 72 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. Age 12 & up. Every Sat 10:30 am. Free. 393-7703; downtownboca.org 2/4 - Zumba Class at South Beach Park Pavilion, 400 N State Rd A1A, Boca Raton. Every Sat 10:30 am. Free. 393-7703; downtownboca.org 2/4 - Chair Yoga at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every Sat 1 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach. org 2/4 - Safe Baby: Prepare, Prevent & Respond Class at Bethesda Heart Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. CPR for infants from birth to one year old, how you can assist in an emergency situation. Held again 3 /4. 2-3:30 pm. $20/couple. Payment due before class date. 369-2229; publicrelations@bhinc.org 2/4 - CA (Cocaine Anonymous) at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every Sat 6 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org

failure through a national clinical trial called DREAMHF-1.  The treatment involves harvesting stem cells from healthy matching donors, and later injecting them into the heart muscles of study participants via a catheterization procedure, followed by periodic evaluations with the study team. Post-procedure visits last approximately 24 months and are conducted via office visits and phone interviews. For potential study participants to find out more, they should check with their doctors to see if they may be eligible, and call the Bethesda Health Research Center at 3745020. Amanda Murphy was promoted to dean of the Bethesda College of Health Sciences and director of the Education Resource Murphy Center. With Bethesda for the past seven years, she previously served as a clinical nursing instructor. — Send health news to Christine Davis at cdavis9797@gmail.com

FEBRUARY 5-11

Sunday - 2/5 - Yoga at the Beach at Red Reef Park East, 1400 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Register/get parking pass at Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. No cash accepted on-site. 4:30 pm. $10/class; 60-day membership (unlimited classes) $65/resident, $81.25/non-resident. 3937807; myboca.us 2/5 - CODA (Codependents Anonymous) at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every Sun 6 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org Monday - 2/6 - Fitness on the Beach at Delray Beach at lifeguard stand North I across from the Marriott at 10 N Ocean Blvd. Bring a towel, plenty of water, a cando attitude. Age 18+. M/W/F 7:30-8:30 am. $10/class. 502-523-0284; mydelraybeach. com 2/6 - SoulCore at St. Vincent Ferrer Kelleghan Hall, 840 George Bush Blvd, Delray Beach. Contemporary 1-hour core workout paired w/prayers of the rosary. Every M/W through school year 7:50 am. Free. 665-8566; stvincentferrer.com 2/6 - Circuit Training: Workout for Mom at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Circuit-based workout targets multiple muscle groups to build lean muscles. Modifications accommodate pregnant moms/beginner to advanced fitness levels. M/T/Th 9:30-10:20 am. 1 class $12-$15; 4 classes $40-$50; 8 classes $70-$88; 12 classes $100$125, 15 classes $125-$156. 306-6985; fitmomboca@aol.com 2/6 - Adult Jazzercise Lo at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Workout targets upper body, abs, legs. M/T/F 9-10 am. 12 months $39/month; 6 months $49/month; $25 membership fee. 400-1268; lisajar@comcast.net 2/6 - Flow Yoga Class at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. Slow intuitive vinyasa flow class. M/F 9-10:30 am. $15/class; $60/5 classes. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org

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faulkcenterforcounseling.org 2/6 - Boca Raton Multiple Myeloma Support Group at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Meet, interact with fellow myeloma patients, their family members, friends. Learn new aspects of treatment/management of myeloma. 1st M 6:30-8 pm. Free. 901-5938; 637-4682; myeloma.org Tuesday - 2/7 - Women’s Issues Support Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every T 10-11:30 am. $5/session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 2/7 - Silver Sneakers Cardio Strength Sr. Gold Class at Personal Physician Care Community Center, 4800 Linton Blvd #F111, Delray Beach. Every T/Th 10-11 am. $5/ class. 808-7743; ppcare.net 2/7 - Yoga at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Bring a yoga mat. Every T/Th 10:15 am. $10/session. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/7 - Big & Loud: Parkinson’s Disease Exercise Program at Bethesda Heart Hospital 3rd Floor Conference Room, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 10:3011:30 am. Held again 2/21. Free. 2924950;  RLatino@BHInc.org 2/7 – Breastfeeding Support Group at Boca Raton Regional Hospital Dawson Theater, 800 Meadows Rd. Every T noon1:30 pm. Free. 955-5415; brrh.com 2/7 - Modern Line Dance Class at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Enhance quality of life through modern music, dance. Age 50 & up. Every T 1:302:30 pm. Per class: $5/resident; $6/nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 2/7 - Senior Challenges: Coping with Emotions in Later Life Support Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every T 2-3:30 pm. $5/session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 2/7 - Neighbor2Neighbor hosted by MorseLife at Temple Sinai, 2475 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Resources to help seniors live with better health, safety, independence. 2nd & 4th T 3-4 pm. Free. 531-9844; morselife.org/ neighbor2neighbor 2/7 - Yoga with Cara at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. Slow, intuitive vinyasa flow class. Th 9-10:15 am; Every T 3:30-4:45 pm. $15/class; $60/5 classes. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 2/7 - Community Consciousness with Marisol Yoga at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach.  Every T/Th 5:15-6:15 pm. $5/resident; $6/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 2/7 - Tai Chi: Introductory Demonstration at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Held again 12/13 (3-4 pm). 6-7 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/7 – Tai Chi Class at Christine E. Lynn Women’s Health & Wellness Institute, 690

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2/6 - Chi Kung & Meditation at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. All ages. Every M 9-10 am. Per class: $15/ resident; $16/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 2/6 - Yoga Class at First United Methodist Church Boca Raton, 625 NE Mizner Blvd. Every M 9:30 am. Free. 395-1244; fumcbocaraton.org 2/6 - Get Fit Mom’s Boot Camp at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Circuit-based workout incorporates cardio exercises, strength training, running drills, body weight resistance training, agility drills and core strengthening. M/T/Th 9:30-10:20 am. 4 classes $40-$50; 8 classes $70-$88; 12 classes $100-$125, 15 classes $125-$156. 306-6985; fitmomboca@aol.com 2/6 - Yin Yoga Wellness Classes with Rassika Sabine Bourgi at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Bring mat; check in at Dixon Education Building. Every M through 5/31. 9:30-10:30 am. $20/session. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/6 - Yoga Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. M/W/F 9:30-11 am. 5 classes $75/resident, $94/nonresident; 10 classes $130/resident, $162.50/ non-resident; 20 classes $240/resident, $300/non-resident. 477-8727; myboca.us 2/6 - Chair Massage at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Every M 10 amnoon. $10/10-minute session. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/6 - Tai Chi for Beginners at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Every M 10-11 am. Per class: $15/resident; $20/nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 2/6 - Stretch at Delray Beach Tennis Center, 201 W Atlantic Ave. M/W 10-11 am. $5/member; $10/non-member. Registration: 243-7360; delraytennis.com 2/6 - Parkinson’s Exercise Class at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Improve balance, flexibility, muscle strength. Every M 11:30 am-12:30 pm; W 2-3 pm. 1st class free. 8 classes $32/ resident, $40/non-resident; 16 classes $60/ resident, $75/non-resident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 2/6 - Exercise Class at First United Methodist Church Boca Raton, 625 NE Mizner Blvd. Every M 5:30 pm. Free. 3951244; fumcbocaraton.org 2/6 - Meditation Mondays at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Meditate to enhance overall health, well-being. Every M 5:30-6:15 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/6 - Yoga at the Library with Jenny Broomell at Delray Beach Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Every M. 6 pm. Free. 2660194; delraylibrary.org 2/6 - Men’s Issues Support Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every M 6:30-8 pm. $5/session. 483-5300;

The COASTAL STAR

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Meadows Rd. Every T/Th 6-7:15 pm. $20/ session. 955-7227; WIProgram@brrh.com 2/7 - Adult Personal Self Defense at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Learn how to identify and disarm dangerous situations. Age 18+. Every T through 2/28. 6-7 pm. $60/ resident; $75/non-resident. 742-6640; boynton-beach.org 2/7 - Al-Anon 12-Step Study at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every T 7 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 2/7 - Food Addicts Anonymous at Unity of Delray Beach Prayer Room, 101 NW 22nd St. Every T 7 pm. Free. 742-2121; foodaddictsanonymou.org Wednesday - 2/8 - CPR Class (American Heart Association Heartsaver/AED) at Ocean Rescue Headquarters, 340 S Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach. Open to all Delray Beach residents, taught by AHA CPR-certified Ocean Rescue. Topics include activating the emergency response system; adult, child, infant CPR; choking; defibrillation. AHA Heartsaver Certificate by mail upon completion. CPR masks available for $5 (recommended). Age 12 & up. 1st W 9 am-12:30 pm. Free. 243-7425; mydelraybeach.com 2/8 - Tai Chi Class at South Palm Beach Town Hall Chambers, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Every W 9-10 am. $5/class. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 2/8 - Yoga at Veterans Park, 802 NE First St, Delray Beach. Age 18 & up. Every W 9-10:30 am. Per class $10/resident; $15/ nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach. com 2/8 - Hatha Yoga Wellness Classes with Rassika Sabine Bourgi at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Bring mat; check in at Dixon Education Building. Every W through 5/31. 9:30-10:30 am. $20/session. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/8 - Shared Care at Temple Beth El, 333 SW 4th Ave, Boca Raton. Interfaith respite program supported by Temple Beth El, St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church, and Grace Community Church. W 9:30 am-2:30 pm Sep-May. $25/year. 391-8900; tbeboca.org 2/8 – Yoga Class at Christine E. Lynn Women’s Health & Wellness Institute, 690 Meadows Rd. Every W/F 10-11 am. $10/ class; $50/6 classes. Registration: 955-7227; WIProgram@brrh.com 2/8 - Al Anon Discussion Group at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Every W 10:30-11:30 am. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/8 - Stretching The Mind, Stretching The Body at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Vamps, Arnis (hip circle), hand movements. Adults. Every W/ F through 2/24 1-2:15 pm. $6/class. 477-8814; myboca.us 2/8 - Coloring Club for Adults at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Carefree fun of childhood, de-stress with art therapy. Easy activity for those with memory problems. Use our coloring sheets or bring your own. Every W 1-4 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/8 - Moving Forward for Widows & Widowers: Support and Discussion Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every W 1-2:30 pm. $5/session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 2/8 - Family Caregiver Support Group at St Mark Catholic Church St Anthony Room, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Every W 2:30-3:30 pm. Free. Register: 7353530; stmarkboynton.com 2/8 - AA Big Book Study at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every W 5:30 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org 2/8 - Divorced and Separated Support Group at Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Rd, Boca Raton. Every W 6-7:30 pm. $5/session. 483-5300; faulkcenterforcounseling.org 2/8 - T’ai Chi at First United Methodist Church, 101 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Led by Master William Merkle. Every W 6 pm. Free. 732-3435; fumcbb.com 2/8 - Tai Chi Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Moving meditation for focus, concentration, release of stress, attention skills. Every W 6:10-7:10 pm beginners;

February 2017 7:10-8:10 pm intermediate. 8 classes $48/ resident, $60/non-resident; 12 classes $66/ resident, $82/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 2/8 - Soulcore at St Mark Catholic Church St Clare Room, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Bring floor mat/optional hand weights. Every W 6:30-7:30 pm & Thu 8:30-9:30 am. Free/donations accepted. 734-9330; stmarkboynton.com 2/8 - Food Addicts Anonymous at The Crossroads Club Room E, 1700 Lake Ida Rd, Delray Beach. Every W 7 pm. Free. 6800724; foodaddictsanonymou.org Thursday - 2/9 - Wellness Program at South Palm Beach Town Hall Chambers, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Talks by local physicians; no physical exercise. Every other Th through Mar 10 am-noon. Free. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 2/9 - Yoga at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Every Th 10:15-11:15 am. $10/ session. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/9 - Grief Support Group at St Mark Catholic Church St Anthony Room, 643 St Mark Pl, Boynton Beach. Every W 2:30-3:30 pm. Free. Register: 735-3530; stmarkboynton.com 2/9 - Yoga Class at First United Methodist Church Boca Raton, 625 NE Mizner Blvd. Every Th 6:30 pm. Free. 395-1244; fumcbocaraton.org 2/9-10 - Zumba Gold at Veterans Park, 802 NE First St, Delray Beach. Age 18 & up. Th/F 9:30-10:30 am. Per class $5/resident; $6/nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach. com Friday - 2/10 - Pilates, Yoga, Floor Barre Wellness Classes with Rassika Sabine Bourgi at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Bring mat; check in at Dixon Education Building. Every F through 5/31 9:30-10:30 am. $20/session. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/10 – Breastfeeding Support Group at Boca Raton Regional Hospital Dawson Theater, 800 Meadows Rd. Every F 1-3:30 pm. Free. 955-5415; brrh.com 2/10 - Adult Ballroom Dance Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Instructor: Lee Fox. Singles and couples welcome. Every F through 3/17. Beginner (Two-Step) 6:30-7:30 pm; Intermediate (Samba) 7:45-8:45 pm. $60/ resident; $75/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 2/10 - Open AA Meeting at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every F 7 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org Saturday - 2/11 - Boot Camp for New Dads at Bethesda Memorial Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Join veteran dads (with their babies), who tell how they made it through the first months of parenthood and resurfaced as confident, on-the-job fathers. 9 am-noon. $20/at the door includes class, refreshments, book. 369-2229; bootcampfornewdads.org 2/11 - Countywide CPR Day at designated fire stations throughout Palm Beach County. Hands Only CPR taught by students from Palm Beach County School District Magnet Program and Palm Beach State College Paramedic students. Check website for locations. 9 am-noon. Free. pbcems.org 2/11 - Family Yoga at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Breathing exercises, relaxation techniques, yoga, poses for concentration, balance, flexibility, meditation, lessons in selfacceptance, positive thinking. Open to extended family and caregivers. Sat through 3/4. 11:15 am-12:15 pm. $60/ resident; $75/nonresident. 393-7807; myboca.us

FEBRUARY 12-25

Friday – 2/13 – EAUmmm Yoga Social Night at Eau Spa, 100 S Ocean Blvd, Manalapan. Yoga, champagne, cupcakes, 7-8:15 pm. $40. 540-4960. Eauspa.com Tuesday - 2/21 - Tahitian Dance Workshop at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Strenuous-hypnotic dance, good for the figure, great fun. Every T through 3/14. 2-3 pm. $40/resident; $50/non-resident. 3677035; myboca.us 2/21 - Exercise: Activity with Wonderful Side Effects! presented by

Mike Cortese, MS, PT, OCS, ATC, at Bethesda Hospital East Clayton Conference Center, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 4:305:30 pm. Free. 731-2273; publicrelations@ bhinc.org Wednesday - 2/22 - Riding the Waves: Tools for the Management of Bipolar Disorder at Mental Health Association of Palm Beach County, 909 Fern St, West Palm Beach. 10 am-noon. $25/MHA member; $30/non-member. RSVP: 832-3755; mhapbc.org 2/22 - Basic Exercise for Parkinson’s Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Every M & W through 3/29. M Noon-1pm; W 11:30am12:30pm. $6/class. 367-7035; myboca.us 2/22 - Advances in Immune Regenerative Medicine by Dipnarine Maharaj, M.D., Hematology/Oncology, at Bethesda Hospital East, Clayton Conference Center, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. 731-2273; publicrelations@bhinc.org Thursday - 2/23-26 - Aromatherapy Certification Florida Program (Level 1) at Holistic Organic Wellness, 3200 N Federal Hwy #124, Boca Raton. Intensive 4-day course: learn foundational principles of aromatherapy, become qualified in therapeutic uses of essential oils. $795. Call for hours. 955-0099; aromahut.org

FEB. 26-MARCH 4

Wednesday - 3/1 - Belly Dance Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Age teen to adult. Every W through 4/5 6:30-7:30 pm. $65/ resident; $81/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us Saturday - 3/4 - Sibling Class at Bethesda Heart Hospital, 2815 S Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Learn about their new role, the new baby joining their family. Decorate a onesie for new little brother or sister, celebrate with a birthday cupcake. Age 2-6; must be accompanied by parent. 10-11:30 am. $20/parent & child; additional siblings $10/each. Payment due before class. 369-2229; publicrelations@bhinc.org 3/4 - Kemetic Yoga at Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NE 5th Ave, Delray Beach. Calming, therapeutic yoga using ancient Kemetic postures and teachings. Bring yoga mat, water; wear comfortable clothing. Every Sat 9-10:30 am. $10/person. 279-8883; spadymuseum.com 3/4 - Yoga Class at Train Depot, 747 S Dixie Hwy, Boca Raton. T 6:30-8 pm; T/Th/Sat 9:30-11 am. 5 classes $75/resident, $94/ non-resident; 10 classes $130/resident, $162.50/non-resident; 20 classes $240/ resident, $300/non-resident. 477-8727; myboca.us 3/4 - Yoga Class at South Palm Beach Town Hall Chambers, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. Sat 9:30 am. $5/class. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/4 - Tai Chi/Chi Kung/Meditation Class at Delray Beach Community Center, 50 NW 1st Ave. Every Sat. Intermediate 9:30-10:30 am; beginner 10:45-11:45 am. Per class $15/resident; $17/non-resident. 243-7250; mydelraybeach.com 3/4 - Judo Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Warm-up exercises, instruction, practice, tournament training. W 6:30-8 pm mixed ages & ranks, 8-9 pm advanced; Sat 10 am-noon all groups. Per month $21.50/resident; $27/ non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/4 - Yoga at the Beach at Red Reef Park West (Intracoastal side), 1400 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Register/get parking pass at Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Classes held on grass overlooking the Intracoastal. No cash accepted on-site. 1st & 3rd Sat 10-11 am. $10/class; 60-day membership (unlimited classes) $65/ resident, $81.25/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 3/4 - Zumba Class at South Beach Park Pavilion, 400 N State Rd A1A, Boca Raton. Every Sat 10:30 am. Free. 393-7703; downtownboca.org 3/4 - Chair Yoga at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every Sat 1 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach. org 3/4 - CA (Cocaine Anonymous) at Unity of Delray Beach Fellowship Hall, 101 NW 22nd St. Every Sat 6 pm. Free. 276-5796; unityofdelraybeach.org


February 2017

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Secret Gardens H9

Secret Gardens

Baton Rouge, a lichen, grows where the air quality is good.

T

Spider lilies are among the varied flora in the national refuge.

Purple beautyberry offers a spot of color to boardwalk visitors.

A pileated woodpecker drills on one of the swamp’s tree trunks.

Boardwalk could change your view of a swamp

he Cypress Swamp in Boynton Beach may be one of our area’s best kept secrets. “People don’t seem to know we are out here,” says Bruce Rosenberg, a volunteer at the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, where the swamp is located. And that’s too bad, because as you walk through the swamp on a 0.4-mile boardwalk, you discover what’s special about this unique ecosystem that used to stretch from Fort Lauderdale north past Lake Okeechobee. “Today there are only about 500 acres of swamp left, but what’s here is an environmental jewel,” says Rosenberg, who is an encyclopedia of information about the flora and fauna. He points out the trees that tower overhead and filter the light. These pond cypress and bald cypress are at home with their feet and knees in the water. But this time of year they look like they are on dry land. Don’t be fooled, says our guide as he explains that October to May is the dry season when the water is stored in layers of peat and muck lying atop an underground base of limestone. Notice one large specimen bordering the walkway has striations in its trunk. These are markings of a resident bobcat that uses the tree for honing his claws so he can hunt for raccoons and possums. Take a look on the railing lining the walk and you may find some of his scat. Overhead, hanging Spanish moss adds a bit of intrigue to the trees. The Seminoles used the moss as blankets when nights got chilly, Rosenberg tells us. On other trees you’ll notice small ferns that may be brown or green depending upon when

Garden Calendar Note: Events are current as of 1/27. Please check with organizers for any changes.

FEBRUARY 5-11

Tuesday - 2/7 - Changing Landscapes, Olmstead and Christo with Dr. Terryl Lawrence, at Boca Raton Garden Club, 4281 NW 3rd Ave. 1 pm. Free. 395-9376; bocaratongardenclub.org Wednesday - 2/8 - Les Jardins AngloChinois (the Landscape Garden) at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30 pm. $25. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/8 - Delray Beach Orchid Society: How To Grow Miniature Orchids by Sandi Jones at Veterans Park Recreation Center,

If You Go

The Cypress Swamp is part of the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, 10216 Lee Road, Boynton Beach. The Visitor Center is open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. It’s closed Thanksgiving and Christmas.  The swamp boardwalk that you enter behind the center is open daily 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. Entrance fee is $5 per private vehicle. If it’s not being collected at the gate, please pay in the Visitor Center. Several types of passes are available. For information, call 734-8303 or visit www.fws.gov/refuge/arm_loxahatchee/ or loxahatcheefriends.com.  Volunteer Bruce Rosenberg, a self-taught ethnobotanist, offers a free swamp tour from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays. To find out about this and other tours, call or visit the websites. Always call before attending any event or tour to be sure it will take place as scheduled.

Gardening Tip

“You should treat plants that you find growing in South Florida like you would mushrooms up North. Avoid eating them unless you know they are safe. Many of the plants you’ll see here are very poisonous.” A father and son take in the peacefulness of the Cypress Swamp. Photos by Jerry Lower/The Coastal Star you visit. This is the resurrection fern that can live for 100 years without water. When it’s dry, the plant looks desiccated and gray but when it detects moisture, it turns bright green. There are 11 species of ferns in the swamp, including the giant leather fern that can grow to 12 feet, plus the strap fern, the Hottentot fern, the royal fern and the sword fern. Also look on the tree trunks for lichens. The swamp is home to five varieties, ranging from red velvety splashes of Baton Rouge to the greenish tangles that are old-man’s-beard.

“You only get lichens growing where there’s good air quality,” says Rosenberg. Take a deep breath and the air does seem pure. But as you near the center of the swamp, you’ll notice there’s very little breeze. Rosenberg explains that the ferns and other plants block the wind and keep the air still. Look closely and you’ll even see flowers growing here. Blue mist flower has colorful fuzzy blooms. There also are the purple blooms of the climbing aster. And if you look up you may even see a stiff flower

802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. 2nd W 7 pm. Free. delraybeachorchidsociety.com Saturday - 2/11 - Hearts-n-Bloom Garden Tea Party at Mounts Botanical Garden, 531 N Military Tr, West Palm Beach. 11 am. $35/member; $85/non-member. Registration: 233-1757; mounts.org Thursday - 2/16 - Private Gardens of South Florida with Jack Staub at J. Turner Moore Memorial Library, 1330 Lands End Rd, Manalapan. 6 pm. Free. 588-7577; manalapan.org

through 3/19. Intermediate 9 am-noon; Beginner 1-4 pm. $45 materials fee + $81/ member, $91/non-member. Registration: 495-0233; morikami.org Tuesday - 2/21 - Florida Native Plant Society Chapter Meeting at 531 N Military Tr, West Palm Beach. Harper Carroll: Prescribed burns. Program, native plant drawing, refreshments. 3rd T 7 pm.  Free. palmbeach.fnpschapters.org

FEBRUARY 19-25

Sunday - 2/19 - The Art of Bonsai at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Bring your own tree, pruning tools, bonsai pots, soil, wire as needed. Every Sun

— Bruce Rosenberg, volunteer guide at the Cypress Swamp, Boynton Beach

star orchid with its pale green flowers growing in a tree. When you tire of looking at what’s growing in the swamp, consider what else lives here. Dragon flies dart from plant to plant. Pileated woodpeckers find the perfect spot to drill into the saw palmettos. Eastern screech owls and great horned owls with their 5-foot wingspans

have been spotted. And the air is filled with the chirping of insects and frogs. In fact, Cuban tree frogs are the reason you’ll see about 100 numbered lengths of white plastic pipe stuck into the muck. They trap these invasive frogs, which are being counted for a census of their population. Although this boardwalk is relatively short, it’s a good place to get away from civilization, and a visit may change preconceived notions you have about swamps. “This is a very peaceful place,” says Rosenberg. Deborah S. Hartz-Seeley is a certified master gardener who can be reached at debhartz@ att.net.

Completely remodeled 2 bedroom, 2 full bath condo with large screened-in porch. Assigned parking. Pool plus low HOA fees + taxes. By Owner $310,000 Call Mike 609-231-9230

FEB. 26-MARCH 4

Tuesday - 2/28 - Boynton Beach Garden Club Auction/Potluck Luncheon at Boynton Beach Woman’s Club, 1010 S Federal Hwy. Benefits children & teens going to Camp Wekiva and S.E.E.K. 11:30 am. Free w/dish to share. RSVP by 2/22: 736-2909

313 N. Railroad Avenue Boynton Beach, FL


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The COASTAL STAR

February 2017


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Gardens H11

Garden Club members Blanch Matthews, Catherine Mangione, Mary Artsman and Dorothy Guzzo at a 1984 Christmas party at Crown Colony Yacht Club.

GARDEN

Continued from page H1 Hall, which will be beautifully and exquisitely decorated with award-winning arrangements,” promises Lynn Allison, chair of the club’s 50th anniversary committee. A floral decoration will In 1992, Pat Piche and thenadorn the hall’s exterior. A President Wanda Phillips. colorful slide show will play within, and signs will rise Currently there are only two, along Ocean Avenue. but they are welcome. A commemorative pamMost significant, the club’s phlet, A Gardening Guide for priorities expanded from floLiving on the Barrier Island, ral table settings and Christis being prepared, and guest speakers such as landscape ar- mas wreaths to a community spirit that has championed chitect Pamela Crawford and beach cleanups, dune resJohn Lopez, past president of toration and beautification the Tropical Orchid Society, projects. will appear throughout the week. “When I started, it was “And we’ve scanned 50 the Christmas bake sale and years of scrapbooks to create a arts and crafts at the Town memorabilia book of highHall,” Joan Beck remembers. lights that will be on display,” “Now the shift is toward more Allison adds. hands-on projects.” But the Ocean Ridge As early as 1974, club Garden Club that’s pressed members were fighting a plan between the pages of those to desecrate the town’s hamearly scrapbooks is not the mock dunes in favor of 47 same club that thrives today. parking spaces. Like its gardens, the club also Zoanne Hennigan became has grown. a member in 2006. When it was formed in “To be honest, I joined 1966, about 24 members paid to meet my neighbors,” she annual dues of $5 to join. Two admits. “I knew little about years later, the club had grown gardening.” Six months later, Hennigan to 29 members and the annual dues to $10. was elected the club’s 31st Today, the club boasts 45 president. She served for the members and $50 dues. But as next five years, during which the wider culture has changed, members participated in eight the club has reflected those beach cleanups, volunteered at changes. dune restoration Glance and established at a list of the Town Hall past presinative garden, dents. koi pond and The first library. They raised was Mrs. Cyril more than Schley (1966$11,000 from 67), and then annual rumMrs. Alfred mage sales Rush (1967and used the 68). There was money to Mrs. John Ware award $1,500 (1973-74) and in scholarMrs. Donald ships and Lambert (198182). send 21 Then, without children An Ocean Ridge Garden warning: Joan to Wekiva Beck (1994-96). Club program from 1970-71. horticulture Women were no youth camp longer identified by their hus- at Apopka. band’s name. “We’re not afraid to get our The morning meetings hands dirty,” says Kristine de were moved to evenings as Haseth, a member since 2008. more women went to work For the club members, outside the home, and men nurturing friends and neighwere welcomed as members. bors is no less important than

Grace Browner, Mary Westaphal, Catherine Mangione, Pat Piche, Jenny Rollyson and Mayor Eric Mangione during a 1986 beach planting.

If you go Feb. 18: Rummage sale from 8 a.m. to noon at Ocean Ridge Town Hall, 6450 N. Ocean Blvd.

The Garden Club and some neighbors came together for a planting at Beachway Drive and Old Ocean Boulevard.

A dune restoration project underway at the south end of Old Ocean is one of the club’s most recent efforts. nurturing flora and fauna, and they make no apologies for being both a gardening and social club. Some, like Tami Tabshey and Ann Alexander, are seriously avid gardeners, growing peppers and lettuce, kale and broccoli at the Cason United Methodist Church’s community garden, to be donated to the Caring Kitchen for homeless people. “But I joined because of Carol Burrows, my dear friend next door,” Tabshey adds. “It was a good excuse to be with her.” Kimberlee Duke Marshall, the club’s current president, had lived in Ocean Ridge for 12 years before joining the club. “I was busy raising kids and building a business, but since joining, I’ve met a lot of neighbors and gained a real sense of living in the community,” she says. “We have a variety of economic classes

here. Seasonal residents, some more accomplished, some young families. But the common bond is that we all really care about this 1.3-mile barrier island we live on.” From October to April, the gardening and socializing come together at the club’s monthly meetings, held at 6 p.m. in members’ homes. “The Boynton Beach Garden Club meets at noon and they have tea and coffee,” Hennigan says with a smile. “We have wine.” At the January meeting, hosted by Tabshey, about 30 members feasted on chicken sandwich wraps and fresh fruit, cheese and crackers, nuts and hummus. And wine. Lisa Ritota had lived in town 22 years before joining. “I joined so I could be with a friend,” Ritota said. “And then she quit. I didn’t know 80 percent of the women in the group, and now they’re my

50th Anniversary Lecture Series and various exhibitions from 2-5 p.m. each day at Town Hall. March 20: Opening ­reception for club members and invitees. March 21: Patricia Crawford, landscape architect, plus vendors. March 22: John Lopez, former president of Tropical Orchid Society; discussion and sale of orchids; and vendors. friends. And I have a butterfly garden.” She whipped out her smartphone, spun through some family photos and found a new photo. “My first caterpillar,” she announced proudly. Eventually, the group settled down to hear the month’s featured speaker. Yavonne Tudisco is an expert on vermiculture — the breeding of earthworms to aerate soil and convert organic matter into compost. “There are 6,000 different species of worms,” Tudisco told club members. And then she produced a visual aid, a small plastic bin housing red wigglers. The bin was passed around the living room from club member to club member. Some studied the worms with interest. Some took a polite look and passed the bin. Some looked away and passed the bin. Chances are, worms were not passed around when the ladies of the Ocean Ridge Garden Club first met in 1966. But that was 50 years ago. “The club today,” says Stella Kolb, who joined in 1996, “it’s a lot more than clipping flowers and putting them in a vase.” Ú


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February 2017H13 The COASTAL STAR


H14 Pets

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Paws Up for Pets

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Puppy love: Show pets you care on Valentine’s Day

et’s be candid. Valentine’s Day dates can be hit and miss. Even if you are blessed to be with “the one,” this holiday can generate a lot of stress triggered by trying to find the right gift, making reservations at the right restaurant and coming up with the right words to describe your affection for that special person in your life. So, why not shift your focus on this holiday to that special four-legger in your life who showers you with love and affection 365 days a year, 24/7? That’s my game plan this Valentine’s Day for Cleo, my 15-year-old retired canine surf dog; Kona, my 2-year-old terrier mix; and Casey, my 2-year-old orange tabby. Fortunately, Palm Beach County puts out the welcome mat to pets in a variety of ways. Here are some ideas on how you can celebrate this heartfelt holiday with your pet: Make a splash. Weather permitting, escort your waterloving dog to the Dog and Bark Beach, 3001 N. Ocean Blvd., Boca Raton. Please note that you must obtain a permit and show proof of residency before unleashing your pup to race across the shoreline. Dine in style. Look for dog-friendly eateries that allow your well-mannered, leashed dog to join you in patio seating. Consider places like

From my Real Food for Dogs, here is the recipe for Marvelous Mutt Meatballs: 1 pound ground beef or ground turkey 2/3 cup grated cheddar cheese 2 carrots, finely chopped 1 cup bread crumbs 2 eggs, whisked 3 tablespoons tomato paste (low-sodium) Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl. Scoop out spoonfuls of the mixture and roll into mini meatballs, each about the size of a quarter. Place the meatballs on a cookie sheet sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes. Cool before serving. Serves 10 to 15 canine guests.

From my Fit Cat book, here is the recipe for Tuna Patties: 2 eggs One 6 1/2-ounce can of water-packed tuna, drained 1 cup bread crumbs 1 teaspoon brewer’s yeast 2 tablespoons margarine

Ocean Ridge resident Natalia Smith takes a selfie with Coco, her 3-month-old Maltipoo, a Maltese Poodle mix. Tim ­Stepien/The Coastal Star the Hurricane Alley, 529 E. Ocean Ave., Boynton Beach, or Boston’s on the Beach, 40 S. Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach. Both restaurants feature doggy menus your canine chum will drool over.

The BRINY BREEZES BAZAAR/FLEA MARKET will be held in the Briny Auditorium on Saturday February 4, 2017 from 9:00am-2:00pm. Huge selections of furniture, electronics, bikes, lamps, kitchen items, clothing, baby items, jewelry, homemade baked goods and more. Plus, there will be a raffle of original artwork, woodwork and anything else donated with all proceeds from the raffle going to charity. Treasures galore! DIRECTIONS: Take I-95 to Woolbright. Go East to A1A and turn right (south). Proceed to the 1st traffic light and the auditorium is on the right. Look for signs and human guides to help you park!

For more info call 561 450-5688

Unleash energy at a dog park. Treat your dog-friendly, athletic dog to a sniff-and-greet outing at a dog park where she can romp and run without a leash inside a safe enclosed park. Here are parks earning high approval ratings from the www. BringFido.com website: Canine Cove at South County Regional Park, 12551 Glades Road, Boca Raton; Lake Ida Dog Park, 1455 Lake Ida Road, Delray Beach; City Paws, 1401 Lake Ave., West Palm Beach, and F.I.N.D. Park, 211 River Park Drive, Jupiter. Attend a special dog event. The PetSmart stores in the county will host a “Puppy

Pet Calendar Note: Events are current as of 1/27. Please check with organizers for any changes.

FEBRUARY 19-25

Wednesday - 2/22 - Dog Obedience Class at Train Depot, 747 S Dixie Hwy, Boca Raton. Every W through 3/29. Puppy kindergarten (dogs 10 weeks-5 months old) 6:30-7:30 pm; beginner dog class 7:30-8:30 pm. $95/resident; $117/non-resident. 3937807; myboca.us Saturday - 2/25 - Puppy Kindergarten Class at Boca Raton Community Center Annex, 260 Crawford Blvd. Every Sat through 4/1 11:30 am-12:30 pm. $95/resident; $119/ non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us

FEB. 26-MARCH 4

Sunday - 2/26 - Dogs’ Day in the Garden at Mounts Botanical Garden, 531 N Military Tr, West Palm Beach. Complimentary water/treats for dogs. Family fare. 10 am-3 pm. $5/non-member. 233-1757; mounts.org Monday - 2/27 - Beginner Dog Obedience Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Every M through 4/3 6-7 pm. $95/resident; $117/nonresident. 393-7807; myboca.us

In a medium bowl, whisk eggs. Add the tuna, bread crumbs and brewer’s yeast. Blend with a wooden spoon until moistened and thoroughly mixed. Form the mixture into 6 patties. In a large skillet, melt the margarine over medium heat. Place each of the patties into the skillet. Cook each side for 3 to 5 minutes or until golden brown. Allow the patties to cool and then crumble into small pieces. Sprinkle over your cat’s kibble or put in a wide bowl. Makes 6 portions. Love” event from noon to 3 p.m. on Feb. 11. Dog trainers will be available to offer tips on puppy nutrition, dental health and training. There will be drawings and photo opportunities and plenty of Valentine’s Day-themed toys and treats, according to Robin Burger, assistant store leader at the PetSmart in West Palm Beach and proud pet parent to a pair of Australian cattle dog mixes named Iviza and Pacha. Fetch some fido fashion. Adorable Yorkshire terriers named Charlie and Spike serve as inspiration for a line of fashionable-yet-functional dog harnesses created by Jamie Broder. Her Boynton Beachbased company showcases the WagSwag Collection with lots of selections, including those that illuminate puppy love for Valentine’s Day. Use the “Be Mine 20” coupon code for added savings at www. charlieandspike.com. Head for a pampered getaway. The Alfond Inn at Rollins College in Winter Park is offering a special puppy love package through Feb. 28 that includes a two-night stay, room service for your dog and a variety of treats and gifts at rates starting at $580. Learn more at www.thealfondinn.com. To find other pet-friendly lodgings, go to www.BringFido.com. Showcase your camera hound. Honor your dog or cat by booking a photo session with pet professional photographers and frame your favorite pose. Or take some silly selfies with your furry pal. For a list of

pet photographers featured on Thumbtack, go to: www. thumbtack.com/fl/west-palmbeach/animal-photography/. Bring out the inner hunter in your tabby. Enrich the life of your indoor cat while working his brain and his muscles with food puzzle toys that he can swat and figure out how to get the tasty kibble to spill out for consumption. Don an apron and be a pet chef for a day. Instead of buying store-bought treats, find a healthy dog or cat cookie recipe you can make for your favorite pet. My dogs love “Marvelous Mutt Meatballs” from my book Real Food for Dogs, and Casey pumps up his purr for “Tuna Patties” from my book Fit Cat. (The recipes are in the boxes at left.) If you are fortunate to share your home — and your heart — with a pet, you will never be alone on Valentine’s Day. Your pet will be there to help you celebrate in whatever manner you choose — guaranteed. Arden Moore, founder of www.FourLeggedLife.com, is an animal behavior consultant, editor, author, professional speaker and master certified pet first aid instructor. Each week, she hosts the popular Oh Behave! show on www. PetLifeRadio. com. Learn more by visiting www. fourleggedlife. com.


February 2017H15 The COASTAL STAR


H16 Tots & Teens/Calendar

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Tots & Teens

Boca Raton chef amazed by kids’ appetite for cooking classes cooking113@surlatable.com.

By Janis Fontaine Daniel Diaz didn’t intend to have a career teaching cooking to kids. The culinary leader, who trained at Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts Miami in Miramar, took a part-time gig teaching cooking classes at Sur La Table in Boca Raton. “The enthusiasm of the kids really got to me,” Diaz said. “They had an absolute blast, and I did, too. When they offered me the full-time position as the lead chef for the cooking school, I was thrilled.” These classes are hands-on, interactive, and the youngsters leave with new skills, Diaz said. Class sizes are small, usually limited to 16 students so each child gets the attention he or she needs. And where else is a gourmet meal part of the curriculum? “The quality of the students blows my mind,” Diaz said. “Some of the cooking skills and knowledge the younger kids have acquired is baffling. It’s like they grew up watching the Food Network instead of Sesame Street.” The Sur La Table Mizner Park school offers more than 20 classes a week in all varieties of cooking and for all kinds of students, but most are geared toward adults.

Sur La Table classes

Upcoming offerings include: Family Fun/Valentine’s Day Treats — Feb. 11. An adult and a child age 6 or older work together to make strawberry jam sweetheart tarts, oldfashioned chocolate fudge and Valentine chocolate kiss cookies. Kids Pasta Workshop — 10 a.m.-noon or 1-3 p.m. Feb. 20. Learn to make fresh pasta dough from scratch. For ages 8-12. $49.

Other options

FEBRUARY 4

Saturday - 2/4 - Diamonds & Pearls Dance Team at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Community dance team program prides itself on passion, dedication, excellence, respect; participates in local and collegiate homecoming parades and statewide special events. Middle, high school & college students. T/Th 6-8 pm & Sat 9 am-1 pm. Yearly: $30/resident; $40/non-resident. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com 2/4 - Tiny Toes Ballet/Tap Class at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Age 3-7. Every Sat 9:30-10 am. $10. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com 2/4 - Little Wonders at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Hike, crafts, stories. Age 3-4. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Held again 3/4. 10-11 am. $5/member; $8/non-member. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org 2/4 - Drop-In Story Time at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Music, stories, finger plays, action songs. Children all ages accompanied by an adult. Every Sat 10-10:30 am. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 2/4 - Acro Class at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Age 3-7. Sat 11-11:30 am. $10. 3942626; showtimeboca.com 2/4 - Story Time at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Stories, songs, fingerplays parents and children enjoy together. All ages. W 11 am; Th 10:30 am &

choices. This is tactile, hands-on learning that engages all the senses. Diaz agrees. “The best thing is to see a kid come in with no skills and by the end of the week, we’re seeing real creativity and artistry.” Sur La Table is at 438 Plaza Real in Mizner Park, Boca Raton. For reservations, call 9537638 or 953-7670 or email

2/5 - Super Bowl Party at 505 Teen Center & Hobbit Skate Park, 505 SE 5th Ave, Delray Beach. Hamburgers & hot dogs. Absolutely no gambling. Age 12-19. 4 pm. Free. 2437158; mydelraybeach.com Monday - 2/6 - Baby Bookworm at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Storytime for infants accompanied by an adult. Age 3 months to walking. Held again 2/13. 11-11:30 am. Free. Registration: 3937968; bocalibrary.org 2/6 - Adventures in Reading at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 4-6. Held again 2/13. 3:30-4 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 2/6 - Healing Emotional Legacies Class at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Part of Youth Empowerment Center. Teens get insight into their personal nature, learn how to process feelings, be aware of their behavior, relate with others in an emotionally honest, authentic way. Age 13-18. Every M through 5/1 4-6 pm. Free. 742-6641; boynton-beach.org 2/6 - Tennis Whiz Kids at Tennis Center, 3111 S Congress Ave, Boynton Beach. Key elements (space, object, people, brain, body, movement) combined in every on-court session. Age 3-5 (age 5 w/no experience). Every M through 2/27. 4-4:30 pm. $30/ resident; $38/non-resident. 742-6575; boynton-beach.org 2/6 - Kidsnastic Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Musical activities, team-building challenges, relays, group games, small obstacle courses for inside fun. Age 5-10. Every M through 4/10. 4:15-5 pm. $112/resident; $140/nonresident. 393-7807; myboca.us 2/6 - Tennis Fundamentals at Tennis Center, 3111 S Congress Ave, Boynton Beach.

Based on USTA Florida Youth Tennis Pathway. Smaller courts, shorter racquets, slowermoving and lower-bouncing balls. Every M through 2/27. Age 5-8 4:30-5:15 pm $36-$45; age 9-12 5:30-6:15 pm $45-$54. 742-6575; boynton-beach.org 2/6 - Kids Activity Lab at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Board/video games using Wii, Wii U, PS3 or Xbox 360, or make wearable art w/Rainbow Looms. Grades K-5. Held again 2/27. 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. 742-6393; boyntonlibrary.org 2/6 - Happy Sunshine Yoga: Kids & Teens at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Focus on building self-confidence, physical strength, concentration. Age 7-18. Held again 2/13 & 27. age 7-14 4:45-6:15 pm; age 13-18 6:30-8 pm. Per class $15/ resident, $18.75/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 2/6 - Musical Theater & Props Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Children sing, dance, act. Class builds confidence, coordination; introduces prop dances. Every M through 4/10. 5-5:45 pm. $112/resident; $140/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 2/6 - No Filter Teen Group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Keep it real with Mr. Irijah; talk about issues that matter to you and your friends. Topics/ activities change each week; snacks served. Grades 8-12. Held again 2/13 & 27. 6-7 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/6 - Youth Knitting Club (Beginner) at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Children attend independently. Age 9-12. Held again 2/13. 6-7 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 2/6 - Delray Divas Step Teams at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach.

Organized, structured team performs at local events and statewide competitions. Program reinforces role of youth as positive members of the community. Grades K-12. M/W 6-8:30 pm. Yearly $30/resident; $40/non-resident. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com 2/6 - Rise and Grind Sports Class at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Part of Youth Empowerment Center, keeping teens active, competitive. Flag football, kickball, dodgeball, basketball. All skill levels welcome. Age 13-18. Every M through 5/1. 6-8 pm. Free. 742-6641; boynton-beach.org 2/6 - Fencing/Epee Class at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Fun, exciting introduction to fencing; learn skills, forge new friendships, have a blast. Beginners M/F 7-8:15 pm $90-$112.50/ monthly; intermediate/advanced M/W/F 7-10 pm $135-$168.75/monthly. 954- 854-7843; sugarsandpark.org Tuesday - 2/7 - Little Sunshine’s Mommy & Me Yoga Class at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 3-6. Held again 2/14. 8:30-9:30 am. $15/resident; $18.75/ non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 2/7 - Toddler Tales at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Delightful stories, songs, puppets teach the love of books. Age up to 3 years; children must be accompanied by an adult. Every T through 2/21 10-10:30 am. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary. org 2/7 - Music & Movement at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Presented by the YMCA. Parents w/kids age 2-4. Every T 10 am. Per session $12/member +1 child, $6/sibling; $15/non-member +1 child, $7.50/sibling. Registration: 368-6875; cmboca.org

Daniel Diaz, resident chef for Sur La Table, teaches a Mediterranean cooking class on a Saturday morning at the store’s Mizner Park location. Tim Stepien/The Coastal Star Children’s classes are usually in the form of weeklong camps during the summer and winter breaks, but a few children’s classes are scheduled on Saturdays during the school year. And most classes are separated into age groups of 8 to 12 and 13 to 17. For special occasions, Sur La Table offers family fun classes designed for a child and adult to cook and learn together. The classes are perfect for one-on-

Tots & Teens Calendar Note: Events are current as of 1/27. Please check with organizers for any changes.

one bonding with parents or grandparents, Diaz said. Diaz says the cooking reality shows for kids on TV have driven the demand for classes, and classes do fill up quickly. “I’m surprised how knowledgeable the kids are. They have very mature palates for their age.” Experts say children who get involved in cooking are more likely to try new foods and make smarter, healthier food

Classes offered at Publix at Polo Club Shoppes, 5050 Champion Blvd., Boca Raton, include spring break camps for youngsters ages 8-10 and 11-13. Both groups get an introduction to the culinary world and learn basic skills, prep and cooking methods. Camps meet in the morning or afternoon March 20-22. Publix is also offering a Teen Chef’s Camp at 6 p.m. March 20-22 for ages 14 and older. Teens learn advanced skills and get a sound culinary base to launch future culinary expeditions. For information or to register, call the Publix Aprons Cooking School at 994-4883. Ú

4:30 pm; Sat/T/F 11 am & 4:30 pm. Free w/ paid admission. 368-6875; cmboca.org 2/4 - Nature Detectives at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. New mystery each month. Age 5-7 w/an adult. 1st Sat 11:30 am-12:30 pm. $5/ member; $8/non-member. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org 2/4 - All Art Class at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Age 2-9. Th 3 pm & Sat 11:30 am & 3 pm. $5/member; $8/ non-member. 368-6875; cmboca.org 2/4 - Science Stories at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hear science inspired stories. Age 5 & up. Every Sat 11:30 am. Free. 347-3912; scienceexplorium. org 2/4 - Busy Babies (Mommy & Me) at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Age 1-2. W 10 am & Sat 3:30 pm. Per session: $12/member; $15/non-member. 368-6875; cmboca.org 2/4 - 8th Annual Daddy-Daughter/ Mother-Son Date Night at Lake Worth Casino Ballroom, 10 S Ocean Blvd. Age 3-14 w/parent/guardian. 6-9 pm. $30/couple; $15/ additional guest. 533-7363; lakeworth.org FEBRUARY 5-11 Sunday - 2/5 - Science Make & Take at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. 1st Sun 11:30 am. $5/project. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 2/5 - Jr. Shark Biologist at Sandoway Discovery Center, 142 S Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach. Age 5-12. Every W & Sun 3:15 pm. Free w/$5 admission. 274-7263; sandowayhouse. org

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February 2017 2/7 - Baby Storytime at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Stories, rhymes, sing songs promote learning/development; meet other babies & parents. Age birth-2 years. Every T 10:30-11 am. Free. 742-6380; boyntonlibrary.org 2/7 - Mother Nature & Me: Love Bugs at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Stories, puppets, games, role play, nature walks, crafts. Age 2-5 (w/ guardian). 10:30 am. $4/child. RSVP: 6298760; pbcgov.com/parks/nature 2/7  - Tots in Tutus at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Preschoolers ballet. Age 2-5. Every T through 2/21 11:30 am. Per session: $8/member; $10/nonmember. 742-6782; schoolhousemuseum.org 2/7 - Inspired Art at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Age 2-11. T/W/ Th 11:30 am-noon. $5/member; $8/nonmember. 368-6875; cmboca.org 2/7 - Imagination Playground Open Play Session at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Age 2-11. Every T noon2:30 pm. $5/member; $8/non-member. 368-6875; cmboca.org 2/7 - It’s Great to Create at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Age 2-11. Every T 3-3:30 pm. $5/member; $8/nonmember. 368-6875; cmboca.org 2/7 - Art Studio at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Age 3-5. Every T through 2/21. 3-3:45 pm. $4/museum member; $5/ non-member + admission. Registration: 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 2/7 - All About the Nails Class at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Part of Youth Empowerment Center. Cosmetology: manicuring, pedicuring, nail art, acrylics as done by the professionals. Age 13-18. Every T through 4/11 4-6 pm. Free. 742-6641; boynton-beach.org 2/7 - USCA Tiny Stars Cheer Level I at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 4-6. Every T through 2/28 4:30-5:30 pm. $40/resident; $50/nonresident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 2/7 - Black History Month Collaboration Poster at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Celebrate Black History Month; create a mosaic poster honoring Ruby Bridges. Grades K-6. 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. 7426390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/7 - USCA Super Stars Cheer Level II at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 6-8. Every T through 2/28 5:30-6:30 pm. $40/resident; $50/nonresident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 2/7 - Valentine’s Day String Art at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Make a colorful Spirograph for a great Valentine’s gift. Grades 6-12. 5:30-7 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/7 - Adobe Photoshop Basics 1 at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 8+. Every T through 3/14. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary.org 2/7 - Healthy Chefs Class at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Part of Youth Empowerment Center. Learn to select, prepare, cook, store healthy foods. Help reduce preventable diseases through behavior/lifestyle modifications, minimize exposure to toxic chemicals. Age 13-18. Every T through 4/11 6-8 pm. Free. 742-6641; boynton-beach.org 2/7-8 - Group Swim Lessons at John Denson Pool, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Young children must be potty trained. Age 3 & older; Level 1 T/Th through 2/23 or W/F through 2/24 4, 4:30 & 5 pm. $40/ resident; $50/non-resident. 742-6645; boynton-beach.org 2/7-8 - Explorium Science Squad: Slide Science at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Kids explore, experiment, trying something new every month. Tue Age 5-6 (w/parent); W Age 7-9. Both days 4-5 pm. $10/resident; $12.50/nonresident. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org 2/7-8 - Sensational Story ‘n More at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Children’s books come to life through interactive performance, singing, movement, props. Age 2-5. Every T 10:30 & W 2 pm. Free w/paid museum admission. 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org Wednesday - 2/8 - Family Storytime at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Age infant to 5 yrs. Held again 2/15 & 22. 10-11 am. Free. 742-6380; boyntonlibrary. org 2/8 - Shape, Rattle, and Roll at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Age-specific crafts, activities, upclose animal encounters, stories, more. Age 2 W 10-11 am; age 3-4 10-11:30 am Sat 2/11; minimum 1 adult/family required. $20/ member; $40/non-member. Registration: 533-0887 x229; palmbeachzoo.org/

The COASTAL STAR childrens-workshops 2/8 - Music and Movement for 2’s & 3’s at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Every W through 2/22 10-10:30 or 11-11:30 am. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary. org 2/8 - Lil’ Explorers: Super Sensory Messy Play at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Explore, develop important readiness skills. Age 18 mos-5 yrs. Every W 3-3:45 pm. Per class: $3/member; $4/non-member + admission. 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum. org 2/8 - Singing Starz Group Voice Class at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Age 4-7. Every W 4-4:45 pm. $15. 394-2626; showtimeboca. com 2/8 - Yoga Kids Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Multisensory learning combines yoga positions with music, storytelling, art; conveys lessons in positive thinking, self confidence, environment awareness. Wear comfortable clothing, bring a yoga mat. Every W through 3/1. Age 5-7: 4-4:45 pm; Age 8-12: 5-6 pm. $48/resident; $60/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 2/8 - CEO Round Table & Elevator Pitch Contest at St. Andrew’s School Parrish Hall, 3900 Jog Rd, Boca Raton. Hosted by Boca Chamber’s Golden Bell Education Foundation Young Entrepreneurs (YEA!) Program. 5:30-8 pm. Free. 395-4433 x235; bocachamber.com 2/8 - Introduction to Tinkercad at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 8+. Held again 2/15. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 3937906; bocalibrary.org 2/8 - T.E.A.M. Mentoring Class by Petty Investments at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Part of Youth Empowerment Center. T.E.A.M./Together Each Achieves More. Educational, cultural, social activities designed to instill good life skills, prepare young teens to become wholesome, successful members of the community. Employment skills, sporting activities, guest speakers, team building activities. Age 13-18. Every W through 5/3 6-8 pm. Free. 742-6641; boynton-beach.org 2/8 - Tween Explorers: Design a Japanese Garden Terrarium at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 9-12. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org Thursday - 2/9 - Drop-In Story Time at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Music, stories, fingerplays, action songs. Children of all ages; 8 & younger must be accompanied by an adult. Every Th 10-10:30 am. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 2/9 - Little Artists at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Explore creativity, showcase your artistic side. Age 2-5. 10-11 am. Free. 742-6380; boyntonlibrary.org 2/9 - Y-Kids Yoga at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Presented by the YMCA. Parents w/kids age 3-5. Every Th 11 am. Per session: $12/member +1 child, $6/ sibling; $15/non-member +1 child, $7.50/ sibling. Registration: 368-6875; cmboca.org 2/9 - Knitting Club at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Age 7 to adult. Every Th 3:30-4:30 pm. Free w/museum admission. 368-6875; cmboca.org

2/9 - Fat Tuesday Craft at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Explore pageantry & fun of Mardi Gras; make a parade mask. Grades K-5. 4-5 pm. Free. 7426393; boyntonlibrary.org 2/9 - Improv Classes with Laura Graham at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. Every Th through 4/20. Beginning Improv age 7-10 5-6 pm; Intermediate Improv Age 11-14 6-7 pm. $150. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 2/9 - Teen Book Discussion at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest. Grades 6-12. 6-7 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary. org 2/9 - Adobe Photoshop Basics 1 at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 8+. Every Th through 3/16. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary.org 2/9 - Introduction to Tinkercad at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 8+. Held again 2/15. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 3937906; bocalibrary.org 2/9 - DIY Art Projects: Shapes and Colors Galore at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Families participate in self-guided gallery activity, then visit the Atrium for related DIY art project. All age. 6-8 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton.org 2/9 - Master Peace Productions Studio Class at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Part of Youth Empowerment Center. Record vocals w/a dedicated engineer who captures the feel of the project. Work w/in-house beat-makers/ producers, create customized tracks, then record/polish it, mixing/mastering for a radio-ready song! Age 13-18. Every Th through 4/20 6-8 pm. Free. 742-6641; boynton-beach.org 2/9 - 4 Knowledge is Power Class at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Part of Youth Empowerment Center. Supports healthy development, academic achievement, leadership, growth, success. Build values, raise selfesteem/confidence, instill values of social responsibility/integrity. Age 13-18. Every Th through 4/20 6-8 pm. Free. 742-6641; boynton-beach.org 2/9 - The Nest by Kenneth Oppel part of Tween Book Jam at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. ALA Notable Children’s book is critically acclaimed for middle grades, but features some frightening scenes. Age 9-12. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Registration: 3937968; bocalibrary.org 2/9-10 - Karate/Martial Arts Classes at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Karate and blend of other combat martial arts. Age 9 to adult. Every Th/F 6-7:30 pm. Per month: $10/resident; $12/non-resident; + $25/one-time uniform fee. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com Friday - 2/10 - Stories in the Garden: See, Hear, Smell & Touch at Mounts Botanical Garden Pavilion, 531 N Military Tr, West Palm Beach. Youth services librarian leads stories, songs. Age 2-6. 10-11:30 am. Free. 233-1751; mounts.org 2/10 - Tot Time at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Enjoy crafts, snacks, indoor play stations. Drop in anytime during the program. Age 2-5. 10 am-noon. $5/child. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 2/10 - Sensory Art for Tots at Boca Raton

Tots Tots&&Teens TeensCalendar Calendar H17 Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Age 1-4 w/parent or caregiver. Every F 11:30 am & 3 pm. Per session $3/member; $5/nonmember. 368-6875; cmboca.org 2/10 - Youth Chess Club at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Learn rules/ basic strategies of chess. Sponsored by Boca Raton Education Advisory Board. Age 7 to 17. 4:30-5:30 pm Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 2/10 - Unity Dance Team at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Enhances balance, provides exercise, teaches how to gracefully dance, execute interpretive movement. Age 7-15. F 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com Saturday - 2/11 - Family Saturdays at the Cultural Council at Cultural Council of Palm Beach County Main Gallery, 601 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. 10-11:30 am. $5/family. 471-2901; palmbeachculture.com 2/11 - Drop-in Craft at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Age 3 & up. Every Sat 10:30-11:30 am. Free w/ paid admission. Registration: 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 2/11 - Cloak & Dagger: Codebreaking & Cryptography at Society of The Four Arts King Library, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Age 12-18. 10:30 am-12:30 pm. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/11 - Family Studio: An American Story at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Children w/adult partner tour the current special exhibition, then create their own artwork. Age 5-12 w/ parents. Held again 2/25, 10:30 am-12:30 pm. Free. 832-5196 x1196; norton.org 2/11 - Group Swim Lessons at John Denson Pool, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Children must be potty trained. Levels 1-3. Age 3 & older. Every Sat through 3/4 10:30 & 11:15 am. $40/resident; $50/non-resident. 742-6645; boynton-beach.org 2/11 - Weekend Family Fun: New Shanghai Circus at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 11 am & 1:30 pm. $15. 868-3309; duncantheatre.org 2/11 - 2nd Annual Ladybug Release Party at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Kids enjoy ladybug crafts, face painting, costume contest, ladybug releases. 11:30 am, 12:30 or 1:30 pm ladybug release. Free w/regular admission. 533-0887; palmbeachzoo.org 2/11 - Playdate at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Get info about upcoming programs, enjoy free kid’s activities. 11 am-12:30 pm. Free. 347-3900; SugarSandPark.org 2/11 - Realistic Drawing/Painting Instruction Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Learn basic techniques essential to quality, realistic paintings. Every Sat through 3/4. Adult class 12:30-2:30 pm $65/resident, $81/nonresident; Child class age 7-12 2:30-4:30 pm $40/resident, $50/non-resident; + additional materials to be purchased by parents after first class. 367-7035; myboca.us 2/11 - 12 & Under Tennis Tournament at Patch Reef Park Tennis Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 1 pm. $30/resident, $37.50/non-resident. Includes t-shirt, pizza,

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refreshments. 367-7090; patchreefpark.org 2/11 - Art-E-Ology: Alexander Calder: Colorful 2D Shapes and 3D Forms at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Learn about a master artist on exhibit, create a masterpiece in the style of the selected artist. Grades 3-5. 1-2:30 pm. $5/child; free/ member. Reservations: 392-2500 x106; bocamuseum.org 2/11 - Adobe Photoshop Studio at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 8+. 1:30-3:30 pm. Free. 393-7906; bocalibrary.org 2/11 - Tail Waggin Tutor with Dolce at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Elementary school children read to certified therapy dog. Grades K-5. 1:30-3 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 2/11 - Annual Daddy/Daughter Dance at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Special night of music/dancing, dinner/ dessert. 5-8 pm. $12/person.Registration: 742-6243; boynton-beach.org 2/11 - Daddy Daughter Dance at The Art of Dance Boca, 153 SE 1st Ave. Movie follows. Benefits Eat Better Live Better. 6-10 pm. $75.  678-428-3370; eblb.org 2/11 - USA Netball Association at Pompey Park Recreation Center, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Fast, skillful team game based on running, jumping, throwing, catching. Females age 6 & up. 2nd & 4th Sat 6-8 pm. Free. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com 2/11-12 - Science Demonstrations at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hear favorite science-inspired stories. Age 5 & up. 3:30 pm. Free. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org

FEBRUARY 12-18

Sunday - 2/12 - Sunday Movie: Ice Age 5: Collision Course (PG) at Sugar Sand Park Community Center, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. 11 am. $1 admission includes popcorn & beverage. 347-3948; sugarsandpark.org Monday - 2/13 - Early Afternoon Explorers: Playground Physics at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 6-9 1-2 pm; age 10-12 2-3 pm. $10/resident; $12.50/non-resident. 3473912; scienceexplorium.org 2/12 - Geometric Painting at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Part of ARTful Adventure Sunday series. Art workshops or live performances: interactive opportunity to learn, create, enjoy the arts. Family fare. 2-3 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/13 - Valentine’s Day Card Making at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Grades K-6. 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. 7426393; boyntonlibrary.org 2/13 - Teen Maker Lab: 3D Printing Valentines at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Use the 3D printer to make a Valentine. Grades 6-12. 4:30-7 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org Tuesday - 2/14 - Valentine’s Day Party at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Play games, have a special snack. Grades K-5. 4-5 pm. Free. 742-6393; boyntonlibrary.org 2/14 - Stupid Cupid Anti-Valentine’s Day Party at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S

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H18 Tots & Teens Calendar Seacrest Blvd. Tired of all the talk about love and the hearts everywhere? Anti-Valentine’s crafts, snacks, games. Grades 6-12. 6-7 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/14 - Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens’ Agenda by Becky Albertalli part of Teen Book Club at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 13-17. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org Wednesday - 2/15 - Casey at the Bat presented by Atlantic Coast Theatre at Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave. Audience participation welcome. Grades K-8. 11 am. $8/adult; $6/child. 586-6410; lakeworthplayhouse.org 2/15 - Booktastic Book Club for 7s & 8s: Space Taxi: Archie Takes Flight by Wendy Mass & Michael Brawer at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Free copy of book upon registration. Child attends independently. Registration: 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org Thursday - 2/16 - Drawing & Painting for Kids at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Experiment with different art materials to create different animal projects. Age 6-13. 3-5 pm. $28/resident; $35/nonresident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 2/16 - DIY Art Projects: Collaged Identities at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Families participate in self-guided gallery activity, then visit the Atrium for related DIY art project. All ages. 6-8 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton.org 2/16 - Create it @ Your Library: Learn to Cook Bibimbap, a Classic Korean Dish! at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Grades 6-12. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org

SWEET indulgences

The COASTAL STAR Friday - 2/17 - Fabulous Fun Fridays! at Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Age 2-7. 1st & 3rd F 10:30-11:15 am. $3/member; $4/non-member + admission. Registration: 742-6780; schoolhousemuseum.org 2/17 - Fun Chefs with Stacy Stolman at Society of The Four Arts Rovensky Administration Building Kitchen, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30 or 3:30 pm. Free. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/17 - Friday Special: Holy Cow! The Breakdancing Cow Storytelling Show at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. All ages. Children 8 & under must be accompanied by an adult. 3:30-4:15 pm. Free. Registration: 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 2/17 - Friday Night at the Museum at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. A night out without your parents! Wear comfy clothes, hang out in the Explorium after hours, watch a movie, do a fun experiment. Age 7-12. 6-9:30 pm. $20/resident; $25/non-resident. 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org Saturday - 2/18 - Gymnastics at Ezell Hester, Jr. Community Center, 1901 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach.  Develop strength, flexibility, coordination; classes designed for introductory skill development on vault, bars, beams, floor. Every Sat through 4/1. Age 4-7 9-10 am; age 8-16 10-11 am. $66/resident; $83/non-resident. 7426550; boynton-beach.org 2/18 - Pajama Jams Story Time with Miss Mij at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Stories, fingerplays, poems, songs, props, puppets. Age 18 mo-2 yrs 10-10:45 am; 3-4 yrs 11 am-noon. $5/drop in (includes one carousel token/paid child).

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347-3900; SugarSandPark.org 2/18 - Meet the Orchestra: The Symphonia at Saint Andrew’s School Roberts Theater, 3900 Jog Rd, Boca Raton. Interact with The Symphonia’s conductor & musicians at live dress rehearsals, discover how classical music inspires creativity. 10:30 am-noon. $5/adult; free/child. Reservations: 866-687-3848; thesymphonia.org

FEBRUARY 19-25

Sunday - 2/19 - Arts Spark Kids Fest at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Interactive creative, performing & visual arts; hands-on workshops, demonstrations, make & takes, balloon art, performances, food trucks, face painting, strolling characters, more. 11 am-4 pm. $10 all-day wristband/kids 16 & under; free/ adult w/paid child. Additional fees for select activities/food. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org Monday - 2/20 - Great Escape Day at Children’s Science Explorium, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Experiments, outdoor fun. Age 6-12. 10 am-2 pm. $25/resident; $31.25/ non-resident. Registration: 347-3912; scienceexplorium.org Tuesday - 2/21 - One Two Three...Come Read With Me at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Each day a different children’s book is read & a craft project made that goes along with the book. Children must be potty trained. Age 3-4 yrs. Every T through 4/4. 10-11 am. $30/resident; $38 nonresident. 742-6240; boynton-beach.org 2/21 - Mother Nature & Me: Nature Explorers at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Stories, puppets, games, role play, nature walks, crafts. Age 2-5 w/guardian. 10:30 am. $4/ child. RSVP: 629-8760; pbcgov.com/parks/ nature 2/21 - Bubble Painting at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Play with bubbles in a whole new way by painting with them to create abstract art. Grades K-6. 4:305:30 pm. Free. 742-6393; boyntonlibrary.org 2/21 - Open Mic Night in Honor of Black History Month at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Read a passage or poem by a favorite African American author or recite your own work. Grades 6-12. 6-7 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org Wednesday - 2/22 - Happy Kids Yoga at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Designed for parent-educated children. Age 6-12. Every W through 4/5. 10-11 am. $66/resident; $83/non-resident. 968-4011; boynton-beach.org 2/22 - Movin’ and Groovin’ at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Singing/ dancing to popular music, crafts. Children must be potty trained. Age 3-4 years. Every W through 4 /5. 10-11 am. $30/resident; $38/ non-resident. 968-4011; boynton-beach.org 2/22 - Tween Explorers: Game Day at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 9-12. 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org Thursday - 2/23 - Playful Kids Yoga at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Classes focus on self-confidence, awareness and kindness. Every Th through 4/6. Age 3-5 years. 10-11 am. $66/resident; $83/nonresident. 968-4011; boynton-beach.org 2/23 - Lego Club at Boynton Beach City Library, 508 S Seacrest Blvd. Monthly build challenge or free build. Grades K-6. 4-5 pm. Free. 742-6380; boyntonlibrary.org 2/23 - African-American History of Boynton Beach at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Celebrate Black History Month with historian/genealogist Victor Norfus. Grades 6-12. 6-7 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/23 - Suicide Squad (PG-13) part of Teen Movie Night at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 13-17. 6-8:15 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org Friday - 2/24 - Kabam! It’s Chemistry Night At The Museum at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Science crafts, activities, entertainment, exhibits, planetarium shows, a chance to view the night sky. Family fare. 6-9 pm. $13.95/adult; $11.95/senior; $9.95/child (3-12), $6/adult member; free/ child member & kids under 3. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org Saturday - 2/25 - Claying Around at Boynton Beach Art Center, 125 SE 2nd Ave. Basic techniques of pottery including wedging, centering clay. Age 8-14. Every Sat through 4/8. 9-11 am. $55/resident; $69/nonresident. Registration: 742-6650; boyntonbeach.org 2/25 - Story & Craft Time at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Discover nature through crafts, stories about animals, other naturerelated themes. Age 4-10. 10 am. $2. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcgov.com/parks 2/25 - I Love Art Classes at Intracoastal

February 2017 Park, 2240 N Federal Hwy, Boynton Beach. Create amazing art utilizing recycled items. Age 4-10. Every Sat through 4/1. 10:30 amnoon. $36/resident: $45/non-resident. 7426650; boynton-beach.org 2/25 - Family Fun: The Magic Tea Kettle: Kamishibai Storytelling at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. A craft activity follows. Noon, 1 & 2 pm. Free w/paid admission. 495-0233 x237; morikami.org 2/25 - 3D Printing Studios at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Age 8+. Held again 3 /4. 1:30-3 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary.org 2/25 - 9th Annual Hobbit Skate Tournament at 505 Teen Center & Hobbit Skate Park, 505 SE 5th Ave, Delray Beach. Live music, prizes, giveaways, food, fun, local skate vendors. Age 5 to adult. 3-6 pm. $5/ entry fee. 243-7158; mydelraybeach.com

FEB. 26-MARCH 4

Sunday - 2/26 - King Guys: The World’s Smallest Big Band (PG) at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. 2 pm. $25. 347-3948; willowtheatre. org Monday - 2/27 - Once Upon A Happily Ever After: A Workshop for Young Writers at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Get ideas, create characters, find new stories to tell. Age 9-12. 4-6 pm. $35/resident; $43.75/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 2/27 - Karate at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Basics of traditional karate: socialization skills, self-discipline, confidence, respect, staying physically and mentally active. Every M/W/Th through 4/13. Beginner 5:30-6:30 pm; Intermediate 6:30-7:30 pm; Adult (16 & up) 7:30-8:30 pm. $99/resident; $124/non-resident. 742-6240; boyntonbeach.org Tuesday - 2/28 - Daggerwing Visits the Library: Turtles at Glades Road Branch Library, 20701 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Special program features live animal ambassadors. Age 5-10. 3:30 pm. Free. RSVP: 470-1600; pbcgov.com/parks/nature 2/28 - Miss Sara’s Dance Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Basics of ballet, tap, gymnastics, fitness, creative movement. Adults wait outside the classroom. Every T through 4/11. Age 4-5 3:30-4:15 pm; age 6-8 4:30-5:15 pm. $78/resident; $98/nonresident. 367-7035; myboca.us 2/28 - Kidokinetics at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Children learn a new sport each week. Soccer, hockey, tennis, basketball, volleyball, golf, hula hoops, obstacle courses, T-ball, more. Age 2-5. Every T through 4/18 . Age 3-5 3:45-4:30 pm; age 2-3 4:30-5:15 pm (some parent involvement). $77/resident; $96.25/non-resident. 954-3858511; kidokinetics.com 2/28 - GEMS Club: Kabam! It’s Chemistry at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Empower young girls to explore STEM fields. Girls grades 3-8. High school girls can volunteer to be mentors. 5-7 pm. $7/child. Registration: 370-7710; sfsciencecenter.org/ gems 2/28 - Teen Team Up! at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Grades 6-12. 6-7 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/28-3/1 - Group Swim Lessons at John Denson Pool, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Young children must be potty trained. Age 3 & older; Level 1. T/Th through 3/16 or W/F 3/1-3/17. 4, 4:30 & 5 pm. $40/resident; $50/non-resident. 742-6645; boynton-beach. org Wednesday - 3/1 - Miss Sara’s Dance Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Basics of ballet, tap, gymnastics, fitness, creative movement. Adults wait outside the classroom. Every W through 4/12. Age 2 10:15-10:45 am $60-$75; age 3-5 11-11:45 am $78/resident; $98/nonresident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/1 - Children’s Fitness Classes/ Gymnastics at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Build confidence, coordination. Every W through 4/19. Age 3-4 Two 40-minute classes: 2 & 2:45 pm; age 5-6 3:45 pm & 4:45 pm; age 7 & up 3:45 pm & 4:45 pm; Age 2-3 Parent/ Child 1:15 pm; 40-minute class $63/resident, $78.75/non-resident; 55-minute classes $91/ resident, $113.75/non-resident. 347-3950; sugarsandpark.org 3/1 - Youth Archery Class at Meadows Park Tennis Court, 1300 NW 8th St, Boca Raton Skill development, paper target practice. Age 8-13. Every W through 4/12. 6-7 pm. $60/resident; $75/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us Thursday - 3/2 - Hack Shack Tech Club at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach.

Experiment w/computer programming, design video games. Grades 5-8. 5-7 pm. $15/ member; $20/non-member. Registration: 832-2026; sfsciencecenter.org 3/2 - Taylored Athletes Elite Training Basketball Class at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. High-quality instruction for aspiring young professional athletes. Age 9-14. Every Th through 3/30. 5:30-6:30 pm. $100/ resident; $125/non-resident. 347-3950; tayloredathletes.com 3/2 - Taylored Athletes Basketball Fundamentals Class at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. High-quality instruction for aspiring young professional athletes. Age 5-8. Every Th through 3/30. 5:30-6:30 pm. $100/ resident; $125/non-resident. 347-3950; tayloredathletes.com 3/2 - Futsal (Indoor Soccer) at Sugar Sand Park Field House, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Demands quick reflexes, fast thinking, pinpoint passing. Every Th through 3/30. Age 4-8 6:30-7:30 pm; age 9-14 7:30-8:30. $40/resident; $50/non-resident. 347-3916; sugarsandpark.org Friday - 3/3-5 - Family Fun: Hina Matsuri: Japanese Doll Festival Craft at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Features fun craft activity. 10 am-5 pm daily. Free w/paid admission. 495-0233 x237; morikami.org Saturday - 3/4 - Lil Sluggers Baseball at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Specially designed to introduce children to baseball. Every Sat through 4/22. Age 3 9-9:45 am; age 2 10-10:45 am; age 4-5 11-11:45 am. $126/resident; $157.50/nonresident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 3/4- Diamonds & Pearls Dance Team at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Community dance team program prides itself on passion, dedication, excellence, respect; participates in local and collegiate homecoming parades and statewide special events. Middle, high school & college students. T/Th 6-8 pm & Sat 9 am-1 pm. Yearly: $30/resident; $40/non-resident. 2437356; mydelraybeach.com 3/4 - Kidz On Stage Class: The Minions at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd #73, Boca Raton. Children audition, act, sing, dance, perform. Age 3-7. Performance date 5/20. Every Sat through 5/20 10-11 am. $300. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com 3/4 - Archaeofest at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Uncover the past and, Florida’s history through the eyes of archaeologists. Hands-on science demos, interactive presentations, immersive planetarium shows, fossil digs. All ages. 10 am-3 pm. $16.95/adult; $14.95/senior; $12.95/ child (3-12); free/kids under 3. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org 3/4 - We Care Kids Fair at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Features entertainment, vendors, lots of fun. 10 am-4 pm. Free w/regular admission. 5330887; palmbeachzoo.org 3/4 - Story Time at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Stories, songs, fingerplays parents and children enjoy together. All ages. W 11 am; Th 10:30 am & 4:30 pm; Sat/T/F 11 am & 4:30 pm. Free w/ paid admission. 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/4 - All Art Class at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Age 2-9. Every Th 3 pm & Sat 11:30 am & 3 pm. $5/member; $8/non-member. 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/4 - Mother Daughter Tea at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Traditional tea service, receive a copy of the book The Little Princess at time of enrollment. Book discussion, fun activities. Girls age 9-17, 11:30 am-1:30 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary.org 3/4 - Art-E-Ology: Sculpture Using Found Objects at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Learn about a master artist on exhibit, create a masterpiece in the style of the selected artist. Grades 3-5. 1-2:30 pm. $5/ child; free/member. Reservations: 392-2500 x106; bocamuseum.org 3/4 - Glamour Spa Party for Girls Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Age 4-12. 1:30-3 pm. $55/ resident; $65/non-resident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/4 - Busy Babies (Mommy & Me) at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Age 1-2. Every W 10 am & Sat 3:30 pm. Per session: $12/member; $15/non-member. 368-6875; cmboca.org 3/4 - Mulan at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. Every Sat through 4/8. 4 pm. $14.50/ adult; $10.50/child under 12. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com


February 2017

Golf

The COASTAL STAR

Golf H19

Kids get into swing of after-school golf

By Brian Biggane As club pro Wanda Krolikowski hauled several sets of undersized clubs from the bag room at The Little Club in Gulf Stream on a recent sunny late afternoon, a cluster of children appeared in the distance, marching down the No. 4 fairway on their way to the driving range. Skipping, jumping and clearly excited to be outside after another long day in the classroom, the group — all students from Gulf Stream School, ranging in age from 7 to 10, first to fourth grade — soon spread out across the range, grabbed clubs, balls and tees and launched into a range session. “The school actually approached me about it a couple of years ago,” Krolikowski said before fanning out to give individual instruction to each of nine junior golf wannabes. “It’s worked out great; I think even better than we expected.” Many, but not all, of the students’ parents are members at The Little Club, and the youngsters say the most enjoyable part of the exercise is that they see enough improvement to encourage their parents to bring them along when they play a round. “This helps me a lot,” said Ryan Fenton, a 9-year-old fourth-grader who said he’s been playing about three years. “I practice at least three times a week, and my handicap is about a 20 on this course. I come out and play 18 (holes) with my dad.” Eight-year-old Phoebe Condon, a third-grader, already has set high goals for herself. Asked how good she thinks she can be, she replied, “As good as my dad. No, better than my dad.” That will take a while. Fenton, clearly the best of the group on this day, has enough control over a sand wedge, which he says is his favorite

The Little Club pro Wanda Krolikowski works with firstgrader Colton Ettwein. club, that he can flip shots toward a natural bunker about 50 yards away and almost make them stick. Many of the others swing and alternately connect and miss the balls, all of which are teed up to improve the chances of contact. There is plenty of banter back and forth, and much of it brings smiles to those within hearing range. “That tee is very unlucky,” one girl comments after several poor hits. “Oh my God, you should have recorded me!” another cries out to a photographer who was looking the other way. Gulf Stream School art director Holly Pemberton, who is the chaperone on this day, watches one of the smallest boys swing a driver and says, “It’s like the weight of the club throws his whole body backward.” Krolikowski had predicted some students would start losing interest after a time, and sure enough, water breaks and bathroom breaks become the norm about halfway through. Krolikowski said the number

TOP LEFT: Third-grader Phoebe Condon is the picture of concentration as she lines up a shot. TOP RIGHT: Ryan Fenton, a fourth-grader at Gulf Stream School, hits an iron at The Little Club range. He has played golf for about three years. BELOW: After the practice session ends, the students gather, some holding hands, for the quarter-mile walk back to Gulf Stream School. Photos by Jerry Lower/ The Coastal Star of students who turn out for the twice-weekly lessons depends largely on the schedules of their parents. “One reason some of the parents like the program is they don’t have to pick them up until 4:15, which gives them a little more time at work or whatever,” she said. “It really is a part of their after-school program, and it’s more than just playing in the playground. They come here and learn golf, so it’s more beneficial.” Twice a year Krolikowski puts on what she calls a “golf-a-

rama,” a daylong event with several skill competitions — closest to the pin, a six-hole putting contest and a threehole scramble — followed by a barbecue with pictures and prizes. “I limit it to 16 teams, which is 16 parents and 16 children, with complimentary food and drink,” Krolikowski said. “And the parents don’t have to be members. I give the Gulf Stream School top priority, and then I open it up to our members. We fill it right up and they have a great time.”

Soon enough, Pemberton checks her watch and sees it’s time to head back. Worn out by the exercise, the students line up and trudge the quarter-mile back to campus. “A lot of these kids come to my summer camp, and we have Thanksgiving and Christmas camps too,” Krolikowski said. “Our junior program is growing; we had 13 at my Christmas camp and I was like, ‘Oh, my gosh.’ My main goal is to let them have fun while learning the game, and that seems to be working.” Ú


H20 Outdoors

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

On the Water

B

Boating zones enforced when Trump visits Mar-a-Lago

oating the waters near Mar-a-Lago was restricted when then President-elect Donald Trump visited his luxurious estate in Palm Beach for the holidays during late December and early January. Boaters enjoying the waters near the Southern Boulevard Bridge probably noticed the orange Coast Guard boat with a machine gun mounted on the bow stationed in the Lake Worth Lagoon just west of Mar-a-Lago. Offshore boaters might have noticed the Coast Guard cutter in the ocean east of Mar-aLago. But it’s not clear how many boaters were aware of the three “security zones” on the water established by the Coast Guard and other law-enforcement agencies to protect Trump. The Coast Guard announced the zones with a press release and with postings on its Twitter and Facebook accounts. (Search for U.S. Coast Guard Southeast on Facebook and use @ uscgsoutheast on Twitter.) The Coast Guard will not say whether the same security zones will apply whenever Trump comes to Mar-a-Lago, but it’s safe to say that some sort of boating zones are likely. Penalties for violating the boating security zones included a civil fine of $88,000, a criminal penalty of up to $10,000 and/or imprisonment of up to 12 years, according to the Coast Guard. No boaters were found in violation of the boating zones when Trump visited over the holidays, according to the Coast Guard’s District 7 public affairs office in Miami. “Several boaters were reminded of the security zones, but there were no repeat offenders that resulted

< Mar-a-Lago

SOURCE: U.S. Coast Guard

Expect to see boating security zones when President Donald Trump is at Mar-a-Lago. The zones from Trump’s holiday visits: Zone 1: No boats or people were allowed to enter this zone in the Lake Worth Lagoon, immediately west of Mar-a-Lago. Zone 1 extended about halfway across the lagoon, from the southern tip of Everglades Island to about 1,000 yards south of Southern Boulevard. Zone 2: This zone was located on the west side of the Lake Worth Lagoon, west of Zone 1. Boats moving through this zone were required to maintain a steady speed and not slow or stop — unless they were waiting for the Southern Boulevard drawbridge to open. Zone 3: This ocean zone extended from Banyan Road south to Ocean View Road in Palm Beach and 1,000 yards east of the beach. Boats entering this ocean zone off Mar-a-Lago were required to maintain a steady speed and not slow or stop. Boaters who needed to move through Zone 1 were required to ask permission first by calling the Coast Guard on VHF radio channel 16. in fines,” said Eric Woodall, a Coast Guard public affairs specialist.

Bahamas requires license, guides for flats fishing Anglers ages 12 and over intending to fish flats in the Bahamas for bonefish, permit and other shallow-water fish

must first buy a license. The Bahamas Ministry of Tourism recently announced the flats fishing license requirement, effective Jan. 9. A “personal angler’s license” is $15 daily, $20 weekly and $30 monthly. Annual nonresident licenses cost $60. Also, a certified guide must be hired for every two anglers. The new regulations were called “unnecessary and counterproductive” by the Abaco Fly Fishing Guides Association. The regulations define “flats” as areas with 1 to 6 feet of water with habitats such as sand, mud and mangroves. Bonefish, permit, tarpon, snook and cobia caught on the flats must be released under the regulations. Bahamians can keep one flats fish daily for personal consumption, but Americans and other visitors must release all fish caught on the flats, said Richard Treco, a manager with the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism office in Plantation. The regulations ban commercial fishing on the flats. Applications for a personal angler’s license must be submitted in hard copy (until an electronic processing system is established) at administrators’ offices throughout the Bahamas. For

visitors, they must be stamped at the port of entry. Many guides and lodges are buying licenses ahead of time for their clients as a service, said Cindy Pinder, secretary of the fly fishing guides association. “Rollout of the licensing scheme before the online mechanism was in place was a foolhardy decision on the minister’s part,” Pinder said. Penalties for violating the Bahamas flats fishing regulations include fines of up to $5,000, up to three months in jail (or both), as well as possible forfeiture of boats, fishing gear and vehicles. For more information, go to www.Bahamas.com/fishing or call the Bahamas Tourist Office in Plantation, (954) 2369292.

Fishing poetry contest

South Florida fishing fans will have a chance to test their skills at writing poems based on the Delray Beach Historical Society’s Fish Tales! exhibit. The free poetry contest based on the popular exhibit is being organized as part of the Palm Beach Poetry Festival. Contest organizers suggest that contestants first visit the Fish Tales! fishing history exhibit, then write a poem of up to 30 lines for the contest, inspired by the exhibit. Only one poem per person will be reviewed. The deadline for submission is March 1. Winners will be announced in April. Prize for the best poem: $100. Four $25 prizes also will be awarded. The 10 best entries will be published online. For details on the poetry contest, visit: www. palmbeachpoetryfestival.org/ news/fish-tales-poetry-contest/ Winnie Edwards, the historical society’s executive director, said the Fish Tales! exhibit has attracted about 2,000 people and will remain open through late spring. The exhibit features more than 300 historical photos of fishing, diving and related events, along with antique rods, reels, fishing tackle and diving gear. It’s open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday at the Delray Beach Historical Society’s campus, 3 NE First St., Delray Beach.Admission is free. Donations are appreciated. 274-9578 or www. delraybeachhistory.org.

Double Take wins Silver Sailfish Derby

The Key Largo-based fishing team on Double Take, led by Capt. Mike Laufle, released nine sailfish to win the 80th annual Silver Sailfish Derby, a sailfish release tournament hosted Jan. 5-6 by the West Palm Beach Fishing Club. The Juno Beach-based fishing team on Goin’ Raptor, led by Capt. Will Sabayrac,

also posted nine releases for the tournament but finished second overall based on the time of the releases. Capt. Jamie Ralph and his team on Pro Payroll, based in Lantana, finished third with eight releases. Fishing was relatively slow. Anglers on 40 boats released 153 sailfish in two days of fishing — down from 166 sailfish released by 37 boats in the 2016 Derby. But when winter winds kicked up heavy seas a few days later, it stoked the sailfish action in the 45th Annual Gold Cup Invitational Team Fishing Tournament, held Jan. 8-12. A record 448 sailfish were released by 21 boats in three days of fishing during this year’s Gold Cup. Heavy seas kept most at the docks in the first day of the tournament, but on the second day 20 boats released 199 sailfish, a one-day tournament record. Capt. Jon Brooks and his fishing team on Ditch Digger won top boat and took home the Gold Cup trophy, with 38 sailfish releases posted in three days of fishing.

Fly fishing for billfish

Renowned billfish angler Nick Smith will speak on fly fishing for sailfish and marlin Feb. 22 at the West Palm Beach Fishing Club. Smith is a lifelong bluewater angler who won the fishing club’s Donald S. Leas III International Angling Trophy for numerous sailfish and marlin releases on fly during 2016. The free speaker meetings, held the first and fourth Wednesdays of most months, begin at 7 p.m. in the club’s headquarters at 201 Fifth St. in downtown West Palm Beach. At the March 1 meeting, angler Rich Vidulich will share methods and locations for catching pompano. For more information about the fishing club and upcoming speakers, go to www. westpalmbeachfishingclub.org or call 832-6780.

Coming events

Feb. 4: Basic boating safety class offered by Coast Guard Auxiliary, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the headquarters building at Spanish River Park, 3939 N. Ocean Blvd., Boca Raton. Fee $35 adults, $20 ages 12 to 19. Register at the door. Bring lunch. 391-3600 or fso-pe@ cgauxboca.org. Feb. 16-20: The 2017 Progressive Insurance Miami International Boat Show will be at the Miami Marine Stadium on Rickenbacker Causeway. (Strictly Sail Miami will be held on the same dates at Miamarina at Bayside Marketplace.) Show hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Adult admission is $25 except Feb.


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

16, when admission is $40. For details about this year’s boat show, including tickets for the show and parking, go to www. miamiboatshow.com or call (954) 441-3220. Feb. 25: Boating safety class offered by Coast Guard Auxiliary, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the classroom building next to the boat ramps, Harvey E. Oyer Jr. Park, 2010 N. Federal Highway, Boynton Beach. Fee $20. For ages 14-18, fee is $10. Family rate for three or more people $50. Under age 14 free. Register at the door. 704-7440.

Tip of the month

Snook season opened Feb. 1 and will remain open through May 31 along Florida’s east coast. Spring can be a great time to catch snook at spillways, at fishing piers, inlet jetties and from boats in the Lake Worth Lagoon. Snook are both beautiful and delicious, but anglers should brush up on the state’s strict snook regulations before heading out to fish for the popular silver fish with distinctive black lateral lines. To be legal to keep on the state’s east coast, snook must measure between 28 inches and 32 inches in total length. The daily bag limit is one snook. No multiple-pronged hooks may be used to take snook

Outdoors H21

when fishing with live or dead bait. Spearing snook is prohibited. Anglers who plan to keep a snook must have a snook permit in addition to a Florida saltwater fishing license — unless they’re under age 16, Florida residents age 65 or older, or otherwise exempt from the license requirement. When fishing for snook, be sure to have a measuring device ready. Because so many snook are not of legal size, anglers should think ahead about how they will handle them before they’re released. Keep snook in the water as much as possible. For photos, ready the camera before lifting them out of the water for a few seconds — or photograph them in the water. Support snook under the belly when lifting them, and lower them gently back into the water. Try using non-offset circle hooks to reduce the chance of deep-hooking snook, especially when fishing with live bait. Consider flattening the hook barbs on lures used to target snook. Willie Howard is a freelance writer and a licensed boat captain. Reach him at tiowillie@ bellsouth.net.

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H22 Outdoors Calendar

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Outdoors Calendar Note: Events are current as of 1/27. Please check with organizers for any changes.

FEBRUARY 4

Saturday - 2/4 - Sand Sifters Beach Clean Up at Oceanfront Park, 6415 N Ocean Blvd, Ocean Ridge. Meet at pavilion in lower parking lot. 8-10:15 am. Free. jefflev02@gmail.com 2/4 - Tram Tours of the Marsh at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, 10216 Lee Rd, Boynton Beach. M/W/Th 1-2:30 pm; M/W/Th/ Sat 10-11:30 am. $5/automobile; $1/ pedestrian. Reservations: 733-0192; loxahatcheefriends.com/events/events. shtml 2/4 - Outdoor Marine Aquarium Feedings at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. All ages; children must be accompanied by an adult. Mangrove & nearshore reef aquariums daily M-Sat 10:30 am; tropical coral reef & shipwreck aquariums 12:30 pm. Free. 5448605; gumbolimbo.org 2/4 - Boardwalk Tours at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Docent-guided tour of wetlands. All ages. Times vary, call for details. Free. 966-7000; pbcgov.com/parks/ nature

FEBRUARY 5-11

Tuesday - 2/7 - Audubon Society of the Everglades at FAU Pine Jog Environmental

Education Center, 6301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Frank Ridgley, DMV: Florida’s Forgotten Wading Bird. 1st T 6:30 pm doors open/refreshments; 7 pm meeting. Free.  auduboneverglades.org 2/7-8 - A Walk On The Ashley Trail at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Guided walk along 1/4-mile natural trail winds through the butterfly garden, coastal hammock, mangroves to a sandy beach by the Intracoastal. All ages; children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Every T/W 11 am-12:30 am. Free. 544-8605; gumbolimbo.org Wednesday - 2/8 - Everglades Bird Walk at Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, 20216 Lee Rd, Boynton Beach. Meet at the Marsh Trail. Moderately difficult walk, over 1.5 miles. 7:30-11:30 am. $5/car. Auduboneverglades.org 2/8 - Beach Treasures at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Learn about seashells, the animals that make them. Caravan to Red Reef Park, 1400 N State Rd A1A, to search for ocean treasures. All ages; children must be accompanied by an adult. Held again 2/22. 3:30-5 pm. $5/member; $8/non-member. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org 2/8 - Eco-Watch: Loggerhead Gender Ratios at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Presented by Alexandra Lolovar as part of Lecture Series Talks followed by light refreshments,

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FEBRUARY 12-18

Friday - 2/17 - Wetlands & Wildlife at Wakodahatchee Wetlands, 13026 Jog Rd, Delray Beach. ¾-mile guided boardwalk tour. Bring camera, binoculars. Ages 7 to adult; children must be accompanied by an adult. Held again 8:30-10:30 am 3/3. 3-5 pm. Free. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org

FEBRUARY 19-25

Dry Cleaners

Flood, Smoke and Mold Remediation Robin Domenici

an opportunity to talk with the speaker. Ages 14 & up; children under age 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 7-8:30 pm. $5/suggested donation. Reservations: 5448615; gumbolimbo.org Thursday - 2/9 - Birds & Breakfast at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Coffee, refreshments, 1-hour walking tour w/ naturalist. Ages 9+. 9 am. $3. Reservations: 966-7000; pbcparks.com Saturday - 2/11 - 18th Annual Everglades Day Festival at Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, 10216 Lee Rd, Boynton Beach. Live animal exhibits, wildlife presentations, nature walks, canoeing, walking tours, food trucks, live music, more. Offsite parking; free shuttle. 9 am-4 pm. Free. 734-8303; fws.gov 2/11 - Seining the Lagoon at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Explore grasses and flats of the Intracoastal Waterway behind Gumbo Limbo. Participants catch and release a variety of fish, shrimp, crabs and marine life. Wear clothes that can get wet. No flipflops or sandals. Sneakers or water shoes only. Ages 10 to adult; children must be accompanied by an adult. Held again 2/25. 3-4:30 pm. $7/member; $10/non-member. Reservations: 544-8615; gumbolimbo.org

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Wednesday - 2/22 - Eco-Watch: Green Sea Turtles and Seagrass Ecosystems at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Presented by Alexandra Gulick as part of Lecture Series Talks followed by light refreshments, an opportunity to talk with the speaker. Ages 14 & up; children under age 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 7-8:30 pm. $5/ suggested donation. Reservations: 5448615; gumbolimbo.org Thursday - 2/23 - The Night Stalkers at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Join a naturalist on a boardwalk tour looking at nature from the point of view of its nocturnal residents. Age 9+. 6 pm. $5/person. RSVP required: 966-7000; pbcgov.com/parks Friday - 2/24 - Night Hike at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Walk through wetlands, call for owls, shine for gators! Bring bug spray, flashlight. All ages. 6 pm. $5. Reservations: 629-8760; pbcgov.com/parks/nature Saturday - 2/25 - Sea Angels Beach Cleanup at Ocean Inlet Park, 6990 N Ocean Blvd, Ocean Ridge. Last Sat 8-10:30 am. 369-5501; seaangels.org 2/25 - Beginner Bird Walk at Wakodahatchee Wetlands, 13206 Jog Rd, Delray Beach. Meet at top of boardwalk. 8-10 am. Free. auduboneverglades.org

FEB. 26-MARCH 4

Tuesday - 2/28 - Boynton Beach Fishing Club at Harvey E. Oyer, Jr. Park, 2010 N Federal Hwy. Join other fishermen, discuss hot topics, learn tricks of the trade. 4th T 7-9 pm. Free. 703-5638; boyntonbeach.org Wednesday - 3/1 - Eco-Watch: Nest to Surf Survival of Loggerhead Sea Turtle Hatchlings at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, 1801 N Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton. Presented by Victoria Erb as part of Lecture Series Talks followed by light refreshments, an opportunity to talk with the speaker. Ages 14 & up; children under age 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 7-8:30 pm. $5/suggested donation. Reservations: 5448615; gumbolimbo.org Saturday - 3/4 - Outdoor Adventure Day at John Prince Park Smythe Pavilion, 4759 S Congress Ave, Lake Worth. Presented by Palm Beach County Parks & Recreation Department in partnership w/Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation. Canoeing, fishing, archery, rock climbing, more. Family fare. 10 am-3 pm. Free. 9636749; pbcparks.com


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

House of the Month H23

House of the Month

Each month, The Coastal Star features a house for sale in our community. The House of the Month is presented as a service to our advertisers and provides readers with a peek inside one of our houses.

This Ocean Ridge house has a 35-foot dock in a nowake zone with 107 feet of water frontage.

The house has wood-grain-patterned porcelain tile floors and hurricane-impact windows throughout. The room abuts a 40-foot saltwater pool.

Sleek contemporary in Ocean Ridge This newly constructed modern two-story residence offers dramatic views from every angle. Just beyond the foyer, guests are greeted by a grand room surrounded by floor-to-ceiling pocket doors (with integrated and automated electric shades) affording extensive views of the Intracoastal Waterway and lush and tropical landscaping. The home has 107 feet of water frontage and a superb open floor plan with 4,448 total square feet. It has four bedrooms and 41/2 baths. Recessed baseboards and reglet details add to the allure of every room. The ground floor luxurious

master suite is the perfect backdrop for serenity with vaulted ceilings and features a Zen-like master bath with a rain head body spray. A state-ofthe-art sound system is prewired in the master as well as the family room, kitchen, living room, lanai/loggia and upstairs den. The second floor is solid CBS construction and houses the den along with the three additional en suite bedrooms and laundry. Offered at $3,595,000 by Candace Friis, The Corcoran Group. (561) 5739966. candace.friis@corcoran.com or www.candacefriis.com/

ABOVE: The kitchen has Italian-made, highgloss white cabinetry, Thermador appliances, a full-height 80-bottle wine cooler and Neblina marble countertops. LEFT: The master bath has a free-standing Victoria and Albert tub and heated floors.


H24 

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017


INSIDE:

Cartoon Editor Bob Mankoff coming to Festival of the Arts Boca ... Page AT9 Pay it Forward - Page AT2 Celebrations - Page AT5 Thom Smith - Page AT7 Calendar - Page AT17

February 2017

Shopping

Antique Row on South Dixie Highway includes the Cholo Soy Andean-American eatery and James & Jeffrey Antiques, which offers Continental designs.

A LONG THE ROW West Palm Beach’s Antique Row is a collection of shops and galleries unique in the county Story by Mary Thurwachter Photos by Ruth Cincotta Considered one of the East Coast’s premier antique shopping destinations, the Antique Row Art & Design District (www.westpalmbeachantiques.com) in West Palm Beach is unique in Palm Beach County. It’s made up of more than 40 shops with 17th- to 20thcentury antiques, fine and decorative arts, period deco, vintage and moderne furnishings. The antiques stores, specialty shops, art galleries and restaurants line South Dixie Highway between Belvedere Road and Southern Boulevard. Customers can park their cars and walk from shop to shop and have a gourmet lunch, too. What else can you do there? See design through the eyes of an artist (at right). At Sean Rush Atelier (3700 S. Dixie Highway, www. seanrush.com) we found all kinds of treasures, many created by the artist/interior designer himself. Sean Rush’s equestrian oil painting is called His Noble Profile. The nude is I Circle The Sun Like A Shadow. It’s an oil and conté pencil work on a stained handmade French paper. The asking price for each is $10,000.

More ideas for visiting the Row, Page AT16

If you go

Evening on Antique Row, a benefit for the Historical Society of Palm Beach County sponsored by the Young Friends of the Historical Society, will be from 6-9 p.m. March 4 between Southern Boulevard and Monroe Drive. The event includes special entertainment, gourmet food tasting, beverages, live music and shopping. Tickets are $40 in advance or $65 the night of the event. Tickets for the VIP after-party from 8-11 p.m. are $100 in advance or $125 at the event. Info: www.hspbc.org Antique Row is on South Dixie Highway in West Palm Beach between Belvedere Road and Southern Boulevard. Info: www.westpalmbeachantiques.com


AT2 Pay it Forward/Calendar

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Pay it Forward

february

Pay it Forward

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Events are current as of 1/29. Please check with organizers for any changes.

FEBRUARY

Saturday - 2/4 - Diamond Centennial International Red Cross Ball at The Mar-a-Lago Club, 1100 S. Ocean Blvd., Palm Beach. White tie. 7 pm. $1,000. 650-9105 or redcross.org 2/4 - Norton Museum of Art Annual Gala at 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Benefits the museum collection. Cocktails, dinner, late-night dancing. 7 pm. $1,000. 832-5196, Ext. 1118 or norton.org/ gala2017 Monday - 2/6 - Boca West Charitable Foundation’s inaugural “Walk in the Woods” at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Drive, Boca Raton. Walk the Fazio II golf course and enjoy trios, string quartets and individual musicians from Lynn University’s Conservatory of Music, along with food and wine, to raise funds for 24 local nonprofits. 3-5 pm. $50. 488-6980 or bocawestfoundation.org. Wednesday - 2/8 - Alzheimer’s Community Care’s “Celebrating 20 Years” Palm Beach Luncheon at The Beach Club, 755 North County Road. Celebrate the organization’s 20th anniversary with a gourmet meal and an upscale silent auction benefiting the ID Locator Service. 10:45 am. $200. 683-2700 or alzcare.org/palmbeachluncheon. Thursday - 2/9 - À Votre Santé (To Your Health) at Club Colette, 215 Peruvian Ave., Palm Beach. Proceeds benefit FoundCare. 5:30-7:30 pm. $225. 432-5849 orfoundcare. org Saturday - 2/11 - Mounts Botanical Garden of Palm Beach County’s Hearts-n-Bloom Garden Tea Party at 531 N. Military Trail, West Palm Beach. Join the organization’s Friends group for a traditional tea party on the lawn, as well as a Designer Hat Fashion Show. 11 am. $30 for members, $80 for nonmembers. 233-1757 or mounts.org/eventscalendar. 2/11 - Kravis Center’s “Night of Stars” at 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Celebrate the venue’s 25th anniversary at a star-studded extravaganza. 6 pm. $500$1,000. 651-4320 or kravis.org. Sunday - 2/12 - Hanley Center Foundation’s Family Picnic at National Croquet Center, 700 Florida Mango Road, West Palm Beach. Have a day of fun with the entire family to underscore the foundation’s belief that family time is wellspent time. Noon-2:30 pm. $195 for adults, $50 for children ages 4 to 17. 841-1212 or hanleycenterfoundation.org Tuesday - 2/14 - Palm Beach Heart Ball at The Breakers, One South County Road, Palm Beach. 7 pm. $800. 697-6621 or heart.org Thursday - 2/16 - The American Ireland Fund Palm Beach’s Emerald Isle Dinner Dance at The Breakers, One South County Road, Palm Beach. Celebrate the 27thannual affair in all its black-tie splendor and honor the recipient of the organization’s Business Leadership Award. 7-10pm. $600. 212-213-1166 or theirelandfunds.org. Friday - 2/17 - Flagler Museum’s 2017 Bal Poudré and Soirée Poudré at One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Honor Henry Flagler’s extraordinary life and legacy at back-to-back events supporting education programs for children. 6:30 pm. Bal Poudré, 9 pm Soirée Poudré. $1,000 Bal Poudré, $150 Soirée Poudré. 655-2833, Ext. 16 or flaglermuseum.us. Saturday - 2/18 - The Caridad Call

to Heart Ball at Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa, 100 S. Ocean Blvd., Manalapan. 6-11 pm. $350-$500. 853-1622 or caridad.org 2/18 - Sea Coast Toast 2017 at Boca

Country Club, 17751 Boca Club Blvd. Benefits Gumbo Limbo Nature Center. Hosted by Friends of Gumbo Limbo. Cocktails, dinner, dancing, tropical music, live and silent auction. 6-10 pm. $125 for members, $150 for nonmembers. 5448608 or gumbolimbo.org 2/18 - Everglades Foundation Annual Dinner Dance at The Breakers, One South County Road, Palm Beach. 7 pm cocktails, 8 pm dinner and entertainment. $1,000. 212245-6570 or evergladesfoundation.org Monday-Thursday - 2/20-23 - Wayside House’s Spring Boutique & Trunk Show at Old School Square, 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach. Shop at the signature fundraising event that features vendors from throughout the country. 6-8 pm Feb. 20, 10 am-5 pm. Feb. 21-23. $100 Feb. 20, $5 Feb. 21-23. 666-9162 or waysidehouse. net. Tuesday - 2/21 - AVDA’s Heart of a Woman Luncheon at Boca Raton Resort & Club, 500 E. Camino Real. Benefits Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse. 10:30 am-1:30 pm. $150. 265-3797 or avdaonline.org Wednesday - 2/22 - Cancer Alliance of Help & Hope’s Shop The Day Away Spring Luncheon at The Breakers, One S. County Road, Palm Beach. Take part in an inaugural event benefiting the organization dedicated to financially supporting those struggling with cancer. 10:30 am-2 pm. $400. 748-7227 or cahh.org. Thursday - 2/23 - Lighthouse Guild’s A Visionary Evening at Club Colette, 215 Peruvian Ave., Palm Beach. Support vision health at the dinner dance and gala that will recognize Frances Scaife and daughter Jennie Scaife. 7-10pm. $950. 828-1522 or lighthouseguild.org. Saturday - 2/25 - George Snow Scholarship Fund’s Cowboy Ball at Mizner Park Amphitheatre, 595 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Help deserving students achieve their dream of attending college while enjoying whiskey tasting, riding a mechanical bull and bidding in a live auction. 6-11 pm. $175. 347-6799 or scholarship.org. 2/25 - Miracle League of Palm Beach County’s “Boundless Dreams - Dinner on the Diamond” at Miracle League Field, 1905 S.W. Fourth Ave., Delray Beach. Help raise money for an inclusive playground garden for children with mental and physical disabilities during a night of dinner, entertainment and auctions. 6-10 pm. $80. 414-4441 or miracleleaguepalmbeachcounty.com 2/25 - Congregation B’nai Israel’s 2017 Gala: Speakeasy Soiree at VIP Ballroom 2200 Yamato Road, Boca Raton. 7-11 pm. $75. 241-8118 or cbiboca.org

MARCH

Saturday - 3/4 - Palm Beach Day Academy’s The Great Gatsby Feather Ball at 241 Seaview Ave. Be transported back to the 1920s, when the school got its start as Florida’s first independent one, and enjoy a roarin’ good time. 6 pm. $195. 6551188, Ext. 125 or pbday.org. 3/4 - 211 Palm Beach / Treasure Coast’s Under the Sea Spring Gala at The Colony, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Join event Chairmen Richard Gaff, Ozzie Medeiros and Edward Schmidt for an evening complete with cocktails, dinner, dancing, live performances and sensory entertainment all in support of a valuable resource. 6-11 pm. $350. 383-1128 or 211palmbeach.org/ spring-gala. Sunday - 3/5 - Zonta Club of Greater Deerfield Beach’s Cabaret Brunch at Boca West Country Club, 20583 Boca West Drive, Boca Raton. See who wins the “Heart, Soul & Service Award” while savoring food, bidding in a silent auction, taking a chance in the raffle and


The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Pay it Forward AT3

Pay it Forward

Cowboy Ball adopts rodeo theme, moves to Mizner Park

By Amy Woods Bull riding, line dancing and whiskey tasting will have guests scootin’ in their boots at this year’s George Snow Scholarship Fund’s Cowboy Ball. The event kicks up its heels Feb. 25 with a new theme and a new location: country-Western at Mizner Park Amphitheater. “We wanted to change things up a bit, which will bring a new dynamic to the ball itself,” event Co-Chairwoman Katherine Regna said. “We wanted to keep the event fresh.” Billed as the All New Cowboy Ball, the fundraiser will feature games such as cornhole and ring toss, live music by a fiddle player, rustic décor that includes haystacks and wooden fences and a replica of an old saloon. There will be a photo booth with props that make event-goers look like characters from Bonanza. “It will have more of a rodeo feel to it,” Regna said. In the past, the event had a Caribbean theme and took place at Red Reef Park. The live auction remains, featuring everything from jewelry to travel to an overnight experience at Camp Deliverance, a cabin in the Everglades owned by George Snow Scholarship Fund President Tim Snow. “Ticket sales have already gotten off to a great start,” Regna said. “My goal is to have listening to live entertainment. 11 am-2 pm. $80. 715-0416 or facebook.com/ zontaclubofgreaterdeerfieldbeach. Wednesday - 3/8 - Hanley Center Foundation’s Palm Beach Dinner at The Beach Club, 755 N. County Road, Palm Beach. Enjoy an evening under the stars with an elegant reception, live music and a silent auction to raise funds for the foundation’s life-enhancing work. 6:30 pm. $350-$500. 841-1212 or hanleycenterfoundation.org. Thursday - 3/9 - Achievement Centers for Children & Families’ Home Tour in coastal Delray Beach from Atlantic Avenue to George Bush Boulevard. Explore inviting residences, enjoy a catered luncheon and take advantage of trolley service along the route. 10 am-4 pm. $100. 266-0003, Ext. 16 or delrayhometour.com. Friday - 3/10 - Palm Beach International Film Festival’s Student Showcase of Films at Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Recognize outstanding students who will receive more than $11,500 in scholarships and awards in the varied categories. 9:30 am. Free. 233-1000 or pbifilmfest.org. 3/10 - Alzheimer’s Association’s Rita Hayworth Luncheon at The Colony, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Party with Princess Yasmin Aga Khan, daughter of the legendary movie star and event namesake who died from Alzheimer’s disease. 11:30 am. $300-$500. 312-604-1680 or alz.org. 3/10 - KidSafe Foundation’s “Shine The Light” Gala at Woodfield Country Club, 3650 Club Place, Boca Raton. Hear from guest speaker and Palm Beach County State Attorney Dave Aronberg and participate in a live auction to raise funds for the prevention of bullying and child abuse. 7-11 pm. $175. 855-844-7233 or kidsafefoundation.org. Thursday - 3/16 - Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County’s Love of Literacy Luncheon at Kravis Center,

Committee members and sponsors of the George Snow Scholarship Fund Cowboy Ball include (l-r, in front) Logan Rae, Kimmie Hruda, Katherine Regna, Richard Murdoch, Elizabeth Murdoch Titcomb, Jackie Reeves, Brenda Husinka, (middle) Lisa Valko, Tim Snow, Sherry Winter, Melanie Deyo, Michelle Adams, Jayne Scala, (in back) Joe Valko, Lewis Fogel, Samir Changela, Jamie Hagen and Frank Feiler. Photo provided a sold-out, fun, entertaining evening with Boca’s finest supporters.” Proceeds from the Cowboy Ball will help provide highschool graduates in financial need with college grants. Since 1982, more than $8 million has been awarded to 1,600 scholars. “It’s an incredible organization that we’ve been close to for quite some time,” said Regna, whose father, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Enjoy speaker Diane Ackerman, an awardwinning poet, author and naturalist. 11:30 am. $150. 279-9103 or literacypbc.org.

APRIL

Sunday - 4/2 - Mounts Botanical Garden of Palm Beach County’s Spring Benefit at a private garden in Palm Beach. Join the organization’s Friends group for a fundraising event that will include cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and a live auction of rare plants. 5:30 pm. $175. 233-1757 or mounts.org/eventscalendar. Monday - 4/3 - Navy SEAL Foundation’s Palm Beach Evening of Tribute at Mara-Lago Club, 1100 S. Ocean Blvd., Palm Beach. Get patriotic while raising money for the Navy SEAL Museum. 5:45 pm Navy SEAL demonstrations, 7-10 pm dinner. $750. 2810481 or www.navysealfoundation.org.

Richard Murdoch, serves as board chairman. “It’s not just about the scholarships themselves, it’s about the students and their future.” In addition to the scholarships, the nonprofit offers several support programs aimed at ensuring students’ academic success. The Monday Morning Motivational Message is weekly communication consisting of inspirational stories and quotes.

The College Supply Program is a gift bag of products scholars receive to use throughout their college careers. The Summer Jobs Program is designed to help young adults enter the workplace. “We provide a support system that many of our scholars are lacking at home,” spokeswoman Debi Feiler said. Ú

If You Go

What: Cowboy Ball When: 6 to 11 p.m. Feb. 25 Where: Mizner Park Amphitheater, 595 Plaza Real, Boca Raton Cost: $175 Information: Call 347-6799 or visit scholarship.org

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AT4 Philanthropy Notes

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Philanthropy Notes

Pashmina sales helping local nonprofits

A

t Evelyn & Arthur, when you buy a pashmina, you support a cancer patient, a child managing autism or a woman overcoming heart disease. In the past, the boutiques gave pashminas to nonprofits as gifts; but now, for more efficiency, they sell them, donating the price of the proceeds back to a charitable organization. When an organization wants to encourage sales with an in-store event, Evelyn & Arthur offers a particular hue of pashmina for a week or month, giving the organization’s supporters a chance to buy and share. The pashminas cost $28 and 100 percent of the proceeds benefit the charity. 

Publisher Jerry Lower publisher@thecoastalstar.com Executive Editor Mary Kate Leming editor@thecoastalstar.com Advertising Manager Chris Bellard sales@thecoastalstar.com Managing Editors Henry Fitzgerald henry@thecoastalstar.com Mary Thurwachter maryt@thecoastalstar.com Founding Partners Carolyn & Price Patton

In February, red pashmina sales support the American Heart Association and Go Red for Women heart health awareness campaign. In March, orange pashmina sales support the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network. In April, blue pashmina sales support autism support and work, and in May, orange pashmina sales support The Great Give, an online giving campaign through the Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties. For more information, call 572-0900 or visit www. evelynandarthur.com. The coastal South County Evelyn & Arthur is at 277 S. Ocean Blvd., Manalapan.

Advertising Executives Yvonne Calvert Mike Mastropietro Jay Nuszer

ArtsPaper editor Greg Stepanich gstepanich@pbartspaper.com

News Operations Tracy Allerton Chad Armstrong Brad Betker Chris Felker Steve Plunkett Victoria Preuss Michelle Quigley Clare Shore Scott Simmons Michele Smith Margot Street Tom Warnke Amy Woods

The Coastal Star is a monthly newspaper with two editions serving Hypoluxo Island, South Palm Beach, Manalapan, Ocean Ridge, Briny Breezes, Gulf Stream and coastal Delray Beach; Highland Beach and coastal Boca Raton. ©2008-2017

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Send letters, opinions and news tips to news@thecoastalstar.com The Coastal Star 5114 N Ocean Blvd. Ocean Ridge, FL 33435 561-337-1553

3 new board members join FAU Foundation

The Florida Atlantic University Foundation’s board of directors welcomes Marny Glasser, Michael Miller and Bernard PaulHus, a trio that Chairwoman Patricia McKay described as having broad experience and insights that Glasser will benefit the school community as a whole. “I look forward to working with them,” McKay said. Glasser chairs the College of Arts and Letters advisory board and established the Harold L. Glasser Collection at the Wimberly Library. Miller is president and CEO of the IBM Southeast Employees’ Credit Union, which serves FAU’s financial needs with 16 branches. Paul-Hus is president and CEO of Hypower Electrical & Utility Contractor. Their combined goal will be to spearhead fundraising efforts and manage the foundation’s assets. In other FAU news, the Jerry and Devon Love Endowed Commercial Music Scholarship has been established by Fara Love to create scholarships for students in the school’s

Pashminas like these are being offered at Evelyn & Arthur to help nonprofits. Photo provided commercial music program. Fara Love set up the fund in honor of her late husband and daughter. Jerry Love played an important role in building the commercial music program, which is part of the College of Arts and Letters. “Jerry Love was my business partner and good friend for many years,” program director Michael Zager said. “Devon … was very artistic and had a great love of music and the record business. While losing a daughter and then a husband in two years is difficult, their legacy will live forever because of Fara’s generosity.”

Spady Museum receives $10,000 grant from NEA

National Endowment for the Arts Chairwoman Jane Chu has approved more than $30 million in grants as part of the NEA’s first major funding

announcement for 2017, and included in it is a Challenge America grant of $10,000 to the Spady Cultural Heritage Museum. The funds will be used for the Spady Living Heritage Festival, set for Feb. 18 in Delray Beach. “The arts are for all of us, and by supporting organizations such as the Spady Museum, the National Endowment for the Arts is providing more opportunities for the public to engage with the arts,” Chu said. “Whether in a theater, a town square, a museum or a hospital, the arts are everywhere and make our lives richer.” Submit your event or lisiting to Amy Woods at flamywoods@ bellsouth.net.


The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Celebrations AT5

Celebrations All Branches Formal Military Ball & Gala Ibis, West Palm Beach – Nov. 5

Wounded Warriors of South Florida and the Military Officers Association of America celebrated their fifth-annual Red Carpet Bash, which included the unveiling of the Wounded Warriors of South Florida’s new logo and name: Wounded Veterans Relief Fund. More than 315 attended the event, and enjoyed a cocktail reception, an auction and live entertainment. Proceeds exceeded $146,000. ABOVE: (l-r) Tonia Padgett, Sophia Eccleston and Dorinda Spahr. Photo provided by Michael Price Photography

Impact 100 - ‘Bubbles & Bites’

Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa, Manalapan – Jan. 10

‘Lady in Red’ Gala

The Mar-a-Lago Club, Palm Beach – Dec. 3

A 2½-year-old golden retriever/poodle mix stole the show at the 23rd annual fundraiser. Chairwoman Lois Pope introduced the raven-haired dog, named Patton, to a crowd of more than 600. Patton is the offspring of a long line of U.S. military war dogs. He wasn’t the only highlight of the evening, as the Palm Beach Symphony entertained guests at a poolside reception and a 1920s speakeasy theme took over the ballroom. Gladys Knight was the featured performer, and organizers raised more than $1.2 million to benefit American Humane. ABOVE LEFT: Lois Pope with American Humane CEO Robin Ganzert. ABOVE RIGHT: Maude Cook and Christine Lynn. Photos provided by Capehart Photography

King David Society Welcome Back Reception Jewish Federation, Boca Raton – Nov. 6

Members and friends of Impact 100 Palm Beach County enjoyed a pampered party in the garden setting of the resort’s lavish spa. Everyone was treated to champagne and hors d’oeuvres, received mini-treatments and left with a goody bag. ‘With an open courtyard, lush landscaping and a spectacular full moon overhead, it was an amazing setting for members to reconvene after the holidays and to introduce new women to our organization,’ event Co-Chairwoman Karen Rogers said. TOP: (l-r) Janet Little, Patricia Maguire and Ellen Elam. ABOVE: Mary Donnell and Athena Economou. Photos provided by Sherry Ferrante Photography

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Sixty donors of the federation reunited for the new season. They heard about the importance of their work and the exciting year ahead. Also discussed was ‘SHOAH: How Was it Humanly Possible – Telling the Story of the Holocaust, 1933-1945,’ a new multimedia traveling exhibit from Yad Vashem. ABOVE: (l-r) Jeff Rosenberg, Beth Mishkin, Barbara Rosenberg and Joe Mishkin. Photo provided by Jeffrey Tholl Photograph

Dreyfoos Prism Concert

Kravis Center, West Palm Beach – Nov. 30 Jim and Sue Patterson were honored by the Dreyfoos School of the Arts Foundation for their ongoing support of the institution’s signature holiday event, The Prism Concert. For five consecutive years, the Pattersons have underwritten the expense of presenting the concert, which gives music students the opportunity to perform on a world-class stage in front of a large audience. Tickets to the much-anticipated show sold out in less than one hour. LEFT: Dreyfoos Principal Susan Atherley with Lisa Marie Browne. Photo provided by Capehart Photography


AT6 Celebrations

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Wonderland Ball

Celebrations

Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa, Manalapan – Dec. 10

Celebrity Celebration

Gallery 22, Boca Raton – Dec. 4

It was party time for members of the Soroptimist International of Boca Raton/Deerfield Beach chapter and their friends and benefactors during a celebration organized by new recruit Sue Heller, whose husband is artist Yaacov Heller. Yaacov Heller’s gallery was filled with larger-than-life canvases and sculptures of iconic entertainment celebrities. Guests also enjoyed music, dinner-by-the-bite and raffle prizes. ABOVE: (l-r) Dr. Heidi Schaeffer, Mariela Montgomery, Kim Champion, Dr. Ron Rubin, Judith Hinsch and Carole Wilson. Photo provided by Barbara McCormick

Opera @ The Waterfront

Meyer Amphitheatre, West Palm Beach – Dec. 10 More than 100 supporters of the Palm Beach Opera packed a VIP tent prior to the highly anticipated free concert and were greeted with champagne and sparkling water, then escorted to their seats for the show. Immediately following, they enjoyed a meet-and-greet with the artists and ate passed hors d’oeuvres. In all, a total of 1,000 guests came out to experience the 90-minute outdoor event. RIGHT: (l-r) Suzanne Niedland, Daniel Biaggi and Marsha Laufer. Photo provided by Kelly Wagner

Alice and her fanciful friends joined the tea party to benefit Nat King Cole Generation Hope. Guests immersed themselves in the magical mayhem, sipping cocktails and savoring hors d’oeuvres while being amazed by fire dancers, stilt walkers and a one-of-a-kind balloon artist. ‘It makes the holiday a little sweeter knowing that we helped the organization’s mission of providing music education to children with the greatest need and fewest resources,’ said Catherine Warren, the resort’s spa and leisure director. ABOVE: AJ and Francesca Lewis. Photo provided by Brian Lester

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The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Around Town AT7

Around Town

T

McDonald’s movie has quiet link to Palm Beach

he Founder, one of the year’s hottest movies, chronicles the exploits of Ray Kroc from hapless seller of milkshake makers to fast food phenom. Michael Keaton plays Kroc and, as often happens with Keaton, critics are raving. Of course, it doesn’t hurt to have a strong supporting cast with the likes of Nick Offerman, B.J. Novak and Laura Dern. And though you won’t find a Big Mac on The Island, the story has a Palm Beach connection: June Martino, played by Katie Kneeland. If the business world gave Kneeland out Oscars, Martino would be shoo-in for supporting actress. Though she had no bookkeeping experience, Kroc hired Martino as his bookkeeper in 1948. But she evolved into the unofficial “vice president of equilibrium,” the glue that held the early McDonald’s organization together. In Behind the Arches, author John Love wrote: “Martino was a den mother to McDonald’s young managers. And while she got little formal recognition for that role, it made her perhaps the only universally liked executive in McDonald’s.” In 1963 she hired a broke Michael Quinlan, roommate of her son John at Loyola University in Chicago. In 1987 he was named president and CEO of McDonald’s. Kroc rewarded Martino with a stake in the company. She was worth millions when she retired in 1968. A decade later, she and husband Lou settled in Palm Beach. They bought the oceanfront lot formerly owned by car builder Horace Dodge and built a main house and five cottages with very un-Palm Beachy blue tile roofs. But it was the 7-foot-high perimeter wall that spurred occasional run-ins with town authorities. For several years in the late ’80s, her gardener, John Hochella, decorated the walls with paintings of Christmas and cartoon characters — Santa Claus, Garfield, Snow White and her dwarfs. That’s a no-no in Palm Beach, and the town ultimately planted 8-foot-tall sea grapes along North County Road to obstruct the view. “Spiteful and nasty,” Martino said of the town officials. In the early ’90s, the Martinos put the estate on the market for $7.5 million. Michael Jackson took a gander but said the 7-foot wall didn’t offer enough privacy. It sold in 1994 for $5.5 million. A big fan of classical music, Martino served as president of the Palm Beach Symphony and was its greatest patron, but as son John wrote after her death in 2005: “She did not usually

June Martino was Ray Kroc’s secretary and indispensable right hand at McDonald’s. Photo Provided give to big organizations, but to people of her own choosing. June worked hard, had an amazingly good life and she always did what she wanted most. She made a difference and left the world a better place.”      For decades Bob Vila led viewers through televised renovations of bungalows and estates, row houses and ranches. But now “this old house” has a new meaning. Bob Vila was born in Miami. His father, an intelligence officer in the Cuban army, had moved the family to Florida at the end of World War II. They returned to the island in 1956, only to return to Florida as Fidel Castro built his Vila revolution. Vila, 70, became a TV star on This Old House, and now calls Palm Beach home. He doubted he would ever see Cuba again, but even before former President Barack Obama began to open a dialogue with the Cuban government, Vila was on his way. Ironically, he was approached by the Finca Vigia Foundation to help restore the legacy of an American — but not just any American. The foundation is named for the 12-acre estate of Ernest Hemingway, and it has restored the house and the author’s iconic fishing boat, Pilar. The house is a museum, the most popular in Cuba. Vila, who co-chairs the foundation’s board, is helping to build a conservatory and archive storage center to restore and preserve thousands of documents, photos and manuscripts. He’ll no doubt have lots of stories to tell Feb. 6 at the next Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s Culture & Cocktails event at The Colony hotel. (Tickets, $65 advance, $75 door, 472-3330.)

  The Frost family has been in the wine business for more than six decades. As a youngster, David Frost hit his first golf balls between rows of grapes in his father’s vineyard in South Africa. With the money he made picking grapes, he bought his first set of clubs. Over the years he’s done very well with both. On Feb. 9, the night prior to the tee-off of the Allianz Championship at Broken Sound in Boca, David Frost Wines is a sponsor of the eighth annual Grapes of the Green — a party mingling wine,

food and the opportunity to meet many of the competing pro golfers. (Tickets at www. grapes2017.eventbrite.com) Though the family has been making wine in South Africa for more than six decades, in 2010 Frost made Palm Beach County his home away, first renting in West Palm Beach and eventually buying in Delray Beach. He needed a place to practice and since he had partnered with now President Donald Trump at a pro-am in Pebble Beach, he asked if something might be arranged. The deal was cut: In exchange for practice time at Trump International, he wears Trump’s logo on his shirt, and as he joked in one interview, “I make sure I tell him how much people give me a hard time that I have his name on my chest.” Colene Frost, David’s wife, also is South African. Her father and the Frosts have been friends for more than half a century, but she didn’t meet David until the late ’90s. A budding romance cooled until they met again in South Africa in 2011. Three weeks later he proposed, but they didn’t marry until 2015. … Reception at Trump International, photos at Mara-Lago and the Rolls-Royce courtesy of Trump.   Morgan Pressel is only 28, but it seems like she’s been making headlines on the

women’s golf tour forever. As a 12-year-old the Boca resident became the youngest qualifier ever for the U.S. Women’s Open. She tied for second as a 17-yearold amateur. She’s won five tournaments as a pro, but it’s her work off the course that merits special attention. In 2003, Morgan’s mother died of breast cancer, and in 2008 she launched the first Morgan and Friends tournament to raise money to fight the disease. For the second consecutive year, the 2017 edition at St. Andrews Country Club topped the $1 million mark, bringing the total raised beyond $6.5 million. It’s a loyal group. At least half of this year’s attendees played in the inaugural. “I’ll keep fighting as long as I can,” Pressel said.   Response from potential customers and the curious was so great that Frank McKinney delayed and expanded the “Grand Unveiling” of his first micro-mansion, a lavishly appointed but almost miniature $3.9 million estate in Ocean Ridge. The Delray developer had planned to host 113 invitees on Jan. 13, but when the guest list filled in 88 minutes, he added a second showing. It overfilled in See THOM on page AT8


AT8 Around Town/Dining

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

THOM

Continued from page AT7 two hours, so McKinney moved the party to Feb. 4 and added an earlier third showing complete with martinis and mermaids in the two pools. The additional showings should provide a bigger boost for McKinney’s Caring House Project Foundation as donations are encouraged. Launched in 2003, the program is building its 24th self-sufficient village in Haiti, each housing more than 200 children and their families. Call 655-8178. Fred Conrad has seen it all … and shot it all. Before landing permanently with The New York Times, he freelanced for Time, Newsweek, New York magazine, Rolling Stone, Ms. and the Times. He’s covered the violence of earthquakes in Haiti and wars around the globe, but he is also celebrated for his elegant portraits and architectural

Xanadu will be presented Feb. 17-19 at Old School Square in Delray Beach. Photo Provided studies. Conrad’s master photography class and seminar on interactive lighting will headline the High School Pilot Project Photography Exhibition

Beaulieu-Fawcett Law Group, P.A. is a well-known, well-respected team of family law attorneys dedicated to providing God-honoring, high-quality legal services. Stacy Beaulieu-Fawcett is a Board Certified Marital and Family Law Attorney whose team negotiates when possible, and aggressively litigates when necessary. Her legal team provides the highest level of legal service and personalized attention to every client.

sponsored by the Florida East Coast Chapter of the National Society of Arts and Letters. The Feb. 25-26 exhibition at FAU’s University Theatre Lab will highlight the work of more than 60 student photographers from Boca Raton High, Dreyfoos School of the Arts, American Heritage and Pembroke Pines Charter. The program runs daily, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., and the public is invited. (Info at www. nsalfloridaeast.org) The Chinese New Year — the “rooster” — arrived Jan. 28, but no one complained two days before at Delray Beach’s Crest Theatre when Al Stewart performed Year of the Cat. Stewart, 71, who still tours regularly, actually penned the melody half a century ago. Thank MusicWorks, which is bringing to South Florida an assortment of veteran performers and tribute bands: Judy Collins and Livingston Taylor played earlier; Rus Anderson’s “Rocket Man” tribute to Elton John (Feb. 15); The Weight (March 1), featuring players from The Band or deeply connected to its legacy, including Band guitarist Jim Weider and Brian Mitchell from Levon Helm’s band.

Singer-songwriters John Sebastian (March 8) and Karla Bonoff (March 15) close it out. (www.musicworksconcerts.com) The lights at Old School Square may never go out this month. By month’s end nine shows will have played. They range from Pump Boys and Dinettes (Feb. 3-5) to Philip Fortenberry: The Hands of Liberace (Feb. 24) and Catch a Rising Star Comedy: Julia Scotti (Feb. 25). Tickets range from $22 for the cheap seats at Xanadu (Feb. 17-19) to $67 for Scotti, the transgender America’s Got Talent finalist, and for Defying Gravity (Feb. 13-14), a revue of the Steven Schwartz songbook by an ensemble that includes Jason Graae and Tony winner Debbie Gravitte. (Tickets: www. OldSchoolSquare.org or 2437922). For music of a more symphonic nature, Symphonia|Boca Raton has three Connoisseur Concerts on tap in the next three months at Saint Andrew’s School’s Roberts Theater. Plus, supporters will have a chance to mix and mingle with Symphonia members at

a rehearsal, luncheon, auction and performance of Paris Impressions at Via Mizner Country Club in Boca del Mar on Feb. 17. For tickets, $75, or $90 for VIP, visit www. thesymphonia.org or call 3763848. Kids can shed their headphones and “Meet the Orchestra” at dress rehearsals prior to each concert at Saint Andrews for free. Adults pay $5. On March 24 at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship on St. Andrews Boulevard, grown-ups can go behind the scenes for a rehearsal and box lunch ($35). Reservations a must. Formal concerts are set for Feb. 19 with Alastair Willis conducting Paris Impressions, March 26 with Gerard Schwarz conducting Vienna to Appalachia, and April 23 (Holocaust Remembrance Day) with Michael Stern conducting the Florida premiere of I Will Not Remain Silent as well as Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3, Eroica. It’s time for Garlic Fest, but not in Delray Beach. The “Best Stinkin’ Party in South Florida,” now known as the South Florida Garlic Fest, is moving to John Prince Park in Lake Worth Feb. 10-12. It’s a casualty of a new Delray city policy that limits major events to one a month. The three-day event had been around for 17 years, but the Delray Beach Open tennis tournament later in the month is a year older and lasts 10 days. Lamentable loss for Delray Beach, but suburban Lake Worth hopes to make the best of it, and use the garlic to attract festivalgoers downtown. Thom Smith is a freelance writer who can be reached at thomsmith@ ymail.com.

Dining

They’re not just blowing Smoke at barbecue The plate: Chicken and rib combo The place: Smoke, 8 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach; 330-4236 or www. eatbbqnow.com. The price: $22.99 The skinny: The chicken on this combo platter was among the best I’ve tasted anywhere. Tender, juicy barbecued chicken that was infused with the essence of hardwood smoke and that boasted skin the color of mahogany. The ribs? Well, they were wonderfully crusted, courtesy of chef Bryan Tyrell’s spice rub, but were rather dry, not falling-off-the-bone tender as one might expect. Granted, I stopped in for lunch after the rush, but I had higher

expectations than this. And while the slightly sweet slaw was fresh, it was off-putting to see it served in Styrofoam, especially at this price point. Still, I would come back for that chicken alone. Outstanding. — Scott Simmons


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

ArtsPaper AT9

Must See

www.palmbeachartspaper.com

Festival of the Arts Boca Theater

Bertolt Brecht's Mother Courage and Her Children is genesis for modern tale of AfricanAmerican lives. Page AT13

Theater

Kravis show highlights songs of Broadway composer Jerry Herman. Page AT12

MANKOFF

ON CARTOONING AND CAPTIONS Images provided

New Yorker cartoon editor reveals secrets of the humorist's shop is not for every taste. Once that taste is acquired, however, the cartoons lurk amid the gray After these many decades as columns of text like miniature an elegant magazine tableaux from a darkly of literature, politics, winsome sideshow. Festival and culture, The New “If you find anyone lineup, who laughs out loud, we Yorker harbors one vestige of its origin as Page AT10 take that cartoon out of a humor magazine. the magazine,” says Bob That, of course, is the Mankoff, the cartoon New Yorker cartoon. Droll and editor of The New Yorker since wry rather than laugh-out-loud See MANKOFF on Page 10 funny, The New Yorker cartoon By Chauncey Mabe ArtsPaper Arts Writer

Books

Author offers defense of books and celebration of the wonders of reading. Page AT15

Write a caption for this cartoon, win tickets: See page 10.

Music

Corea, Rubalcaba to team for night of piano-duet improv By Bill Meredith ArtsPaper Music Writer

Calendar

Running now through April 16 at the Flagler Museum is Harem: Unveiling the Mystery of Orientalist Art. Page AT14

Chick Corea. The name is as unique, identifiable and indelible as the sounds from the 75-year-old jazz pianist’s recording and touring career. From solo and duet to big band and orchestral projects, Corea has proven restless and amoebic for more than 50 years. His early classical and

jazz training is most evident on his acoustic catalog, much of which ranges from solo to quartet; but the Chelsea, Mass., native is anything but the product of a music school or conservatory. The benefits of his selfteaching and open-mindedness will be on display Feb. 24, when he performs in a dual show with another trail-blazing pianist a generation younger,

53-year-old Cuban sensation Gonzalo Rubalcaba, at Knight Concert Hall in Miami.  Corea had short educational stints at both Columbia University and the Juilliard School after moving to New York City in the early 1960s. Big Apple sideman work with trumpeter Blue Mitchell, flutist Herbie Mann, and percussionists Willie Bobo and Mongo Santamaria led to

Corea’s 1966 debut recording Tones for Joan’s Bones. And one particular association a couple years later would further the young pianist’s musical tributaries. From 1968 to 1970, Corea was part of trumpeter Miles Davis’ band, appearing on multiple live recordings and studio epics like Filles de See PIANOS on Page 11


AT10 ArtsPaper/Arts

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Arts

In its 11th year, Boca festival settles into rich medley of cultural offerings For writers Greene and Egan, time is of the essence

Palm Beach ArtsPaper Staff The annual Festival of the Arts Boca, now in its 11th season, returns to Mizner Park from March 2 to 12, with musical performances and author discussions at the Mizner Park Amphitheater and Cultural Arts Center. “We are so excited to present the 2017 Festival of the Arts Boca season and we think the audience will be, too,” said Charlie Siemon, co-founder and co-producer. “We have stars from all over the world, from Brazil to Indonesia to Mexico and the United States, and famous music from the most beloved films and opera, by the world’s greatest composers,” Siemon said. “And three of the headliners have a combined age of 45.” At 7 p.m. March 3, the festival welcomes Grammy Award-winning saxophonist Branford Marsalis, who will join with The Symphonia Boca Raton conducted by Constantine Kitsopoulos, in a program that includes movie music by John Williams from Catch Me if You Can, Star Wars and the Harry Potter films. One of the most popular events from past seasons is back — movies in the park — is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. March 11. The University of Miami’s Henry Mancini Institute Orchestra, conducted by Kitsopoulos, will play Mancini’s score to the 1963 film The Pink Panther, as an accompaniment to the comedy that introduced Peter Sellers’ bumbling Inspector Clouseau. At 7:30 p.m. March 4, the Festival will feature a semistaged version of Puccini’s La Bohème, with The Symphonia and a cast of young singers including Jennifer Goode as Mimi and John Kaneklides as Rodolfo. Joey Alexander, a 13-year-old

MANKOFF

Continued from page 9 1998 and a veteran cartoonist himself. Despite the mirth in his voice, he doesn’t seem to be kidding. The psychology of humor is such, he says, that looking at a cartoon alone seldom incites laughter. “If you see a comedy in a movie theater you laugh, because other people laugh with you,” Mankoff says. “A lot of factors cause laughter, but being by yourself is not one of them.” Mankoff has found at least one way to get around the solitary nature of magazine reading, and that is the public cartoon caption contest on the very last page of each issue. After going weekly in 2005, it quickly became one of the most popular features. The late film critic Roger Ebert famously entered the contest 107 times

Violinist Sarah Chang will perform on Friday, March 10. Photo by Colin Bell Nada.” “The diversity of the If You Go programming from the musical Festival of the Arts BOCA performances to the authors runs March 2-12. to the entertainers makes it Tickets: $9.99 to $125. exciting,” says festival Director Multi-event, full festival Joanna Marie Kaye. “There’s packages and sponsorships a lot to choose from and are also available. something for everyone.” Info: festivalboca.org; 866The Authors and Ideas 571-2787. program will include novelist Jennifer Egan, historian Jon Indonesian jazz piano prodigy, Meacham, New Yorker cartoon returns at 7 p.m. March 5 for editor Bob Mankoff, and his second appearance at the theoretical physicist and author festival in a double bill with Brian Greene. 14-year-old Mexican classical “Our Authors and Ideas pianist Daniela Liebman, who program is extremely varied, will play Mendelssohn’s Piano exploring areas of politics, Concerto No. 1.   the arts, science and fiction,” The celebrated violinist Siemon said. Sarah Chang is headlining at Kaye said the festival is 7:30 p.m. March 10, performing proud of its history and its the Violin Concerto in G Minor upcoming offerings. by Bruch. Completing the “After 11 years in Boca, program is pianist Daniel Hsu, people know they can count who will perform Tchaikovsky’s on us for quality,” she said. Piano Concerto No. 1. “We’ve built a reputation over Sergio Mendes & Brasil 2017 the years. Many people plan are the closing night act, at 7 their trips to Florida around p.m. March 12, performing the festival. We’re very proud their hits including “Mas Que of this.”

Time weighs heavily on the minds of both theoretical physicist Brian Greene and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jennifer Egan, author of A Visit from the Goon Squad. Both writers are part of the Author & Ideas Program at this year’s Festival of the Arts Boca. For Greene, author of The Elegant Universe and Icarus at the Edge of Time, time is not a static notion, but one that can Greene expand and contract with one’s position in the universe. “Einstein smashed Isaac Newton’s theory of time,” says Greene by phone from his office in New York. “Newton’s image of time is one we all have in our minds. That of a big clock ticking forward. Einstein showed that when you move, the rate at which time elapses for you is different than for someone who is not moving.” Time, he says, “depends on what the beholder is doing; you can arrange things so time goes slower for you.” Growing up across the street from New York’s Hayden Planetarium piqued Greene’s interest in science early on. “Physics is one approach to the truth and makes me feel more connected to the universe,” he says. According to the laws of physics, time travel is a reality. “We already know how to leapfrog forward in time,” says Greene, noting that only the technological challenge of getting there is holding us back. He will speak at 7 p.m. March 7 at the Amphitheater.

Tickets are $30–$45 per person. The notion of time is also a challenge for Egan, who explores its mysteries in A Visit from the Goon Squad. The novel defies the chronological linear format, fast-forwarding and jumping backward in Egan time to other characters and places and other tangential storylines. For Egan, whose novel also won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction, time is the goon squad: “Time’s a goon, right? You gonna let that goon push you around?” her character asks. Inspired by Marcel Proust’s musings on time in À la Recherche du Temps Perdu, and the TV show The Sopranos, Egan was fascinated by marginal characters in the show who came and went and occasionally took over the storyline. “My stories are not happening in reality as we know it,” she says, “but in an exaggerated version of reality. There’s a lot of chance in this. My characters evolve out of time and place; that’s my way into the story.” Growing up in San Francisco at the tail end of the HaightAshbury era, Egan was later taken with punk rock and the idea of concept albums such as The Who’s Tommy and David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust. After a tumultuous childhood, Egan, now living in Brooklyn with her husband and two children, prizes her conventional life. But her books are anything but conventional. “I have a rich fantasy life,” Egan says. “That’s where I get my kicks.” She will speak at 7 p.m. March 2 at the Cultural Arts Center. Tickets are $30.

benign.” On the other hand, appreciating the cartoons, he says, is a part of understanding the New Yorker itself. “Just the fact that it has cartoons makes it what it is,” Mankoff says. The cartoon very often makes fun of the kind of person who reads the New Yorker. “Our cartoons don’t punch up or down,” Mankoff says. “They elbow to the side.” As a young cartoonist, Mankoff submitted 500 cartoons before his first acceptance in 1977. He went on to produce one of the magazine’s most emblematic cartoons. A man stands at a desk, the Manhattan skyline at his back, consulting a datebook while speaking into the phone. The caption: “No, Thursday’s out. How about never — is never good for you?” Since his arrival at The New

Yorker, Mankoff has focused on the development of cartoonists in their 20s and 30s. “Humor has to be refreshed by each new generation,” he says. “Now these are the cartoonists doing most of the work in the magazine.” But it hasn’t been easy. “The process is more complicated now,” Mankoff says. “I almost had to train this new generation. Humor has changed. Humor today has a shock value. Our young cartoonists have to become acclimated to our audience.” The cartoon caption contest began in 1998 as a yearly event. Mankoff and his colleagues knew it would be a logistical nightmare — and it was, with more than 5,000 entries — and yet by 2005 they decided to try a weekly caption contest. “How could we possibly judge all these captions?” Mankoff asks.

“We get 5,000 to 10,000 every week. We wouldn’t have time.” The cartoon for each week’s caption contest is chosen from 10 or 15 cartoons that almost but not quite made it into the magazine. “We always pick a cartoon that has some incongruous element.” Judging is strictly blind. Mankoff had no idea he was judging captions submitted by Ebert until the film critic won. Ebert was so delighted he wrote an essay about the experience, while Mankoff went back to look at his other entries. “Generally, he was pretty good,” he says. “It’s hard. The most successful contestant has won seven times. His name is Lawrence Underwood, a great guy. He’s a surgeon. He keeps a diary of his humor thoughts.” Pausing, Mankoff adds, “But remember, he’s entered 500 times.”

Palm Beach ArtsPaper Staff

Caption Contest Write a caption for the cartoon on page 9. To enter, visit www. festivaloftheartsboca.org/ cartoon until Feb. 10. The winner will receive two VIP tickets to any festival event. before winning. Now anyone in South Florida can play a local, interactive version of the contest in anticipation of Mankoff’s appearance at the Festival of the Arts Boca on March 4, when he will talk about the contest entries, humor, and the New Yorker cartoon. The cartoon is a tricky critter. It appears in an essentially serious magazine. As a result, Mankoff says, the cartoons “have to be


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

PIANOS

Continued from page 9 Kilimanjaro, In a Silent Way, and Bitches Brew. It was Davis who encouraged Corea to switch to a Fender Rhodes electric piano, furthering the pianist’s serpentining voices on multiple instruments. Through the 1970s, Corea’s band Return To Forever featured him morphing from electric piano on the group’s early Latin jazz explorations (with vocalist Flora Purim, saxophonist Joe Farrell, bassist Stanley Clarke and drummer Airto Moreira) to synthesizers as it transformed into the amplified jazz/fusion era. Still, Corea has consistently mixed tradition with transition by returning to his roots, which include his Italian and Spanish heritage. And in Rubalcaba, he finds a percussive, propulsive inspiration for musical conversation.  “I can honestly say that no one else reminds me of Gonzalo,” Corea says. “He’s a genius and one of a kind. And I’m certainly looking forward to some fun with him at our upcoming show.” The historic Corea imprint continually deepens as he jumps from project to project, always seeming to land on his feet with perfect balance. “Chick is such an inspiration that my master’s jazz recital was all Chick Corea compositions,” says Brad Keller, one of Palm Beach County’s top keyboardists and musical educators. “I first heard Chick on Return To Forever’s Light As a Feather

ArtsPaper/Music AT11

If You Go Chick Corea and Gonzalo Rubalcaba play solo sets and duets starting at 8 p.m. Feb. 24 at Knight Concert Hall, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami. $45-$125.  305-949-6722.

Chick Corea and Gonzalo Rubalcaba have each enjoyed illustrious careers as jazz pianists. Photo provided album,” Keller says of the band’s second offering from 1973, “and I first saw that band live at FSU in 1974. My love and respect for his playing and composing are limitless.” Light As a Feather featured Corea’s composition “Spain,” one of several of his works that have since become considered jazz standards, along with “La Fiesta,” “500 Miles High” and “Windows.” The 1974 incarnation of Return To Forever that Keller saw live had transformed into the synthesized fusion vehicle that earned Corea the first of an astonishing 22 (and counting) Grammy Awards for Best Jazz Instrumental Performance by a Group for the 1975 RTF album No Mystery. Return To Forever then expanded into a big band that also featured Corea’s wife, vocalist/keyboardist Gayle Moran, by the late 1970s. It was during that time that Corea started a series of recorded duets with the pianist he replaced in Davis’ band, Herbie Hancock.

Celebrated duet partners since have included vibraphonist Gary Burton, vocalist Bobby McFerrin, banjoist Bela Fleck, and pianist Hiromi Uehara. All of whom have informed Corea’s current excursions with Rubalcaba, a pianist whose dazzling technique delves from even deeper classical and jazz studies than Corea’s. Yet for the two pianists, purposely not having a plan going into their show together seems better for both artists and audience. “We probably won’t decide what to play until shortly before the performance,” Corea says, “or maybe not until we actually sit down at the pianos to play. We already share enough common themes to work from, and we both love to improvise spontaneously. So spontaneous improvisation will be on the menu at Knight Concert Hall.” The two artists have played together occasionally since the 1990s. Rubalcaba recorded a duet medley of Joaquin Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez

and Corea’s “Spain” with his jazz elder at one of his most frequent performance venues, the Blue Note in New York City. It appeared on Corea’s 2003 live CD Rendezvous in New York. “I don’t remember the exact time line,” says Corea, “but my first meeting with Gonzalo was very joyful, and we became friends for eternity. When we began to play duet concerts, it became evident that this was something we would want to do more and more of.” The format for this two-piano show features solo sets by both Corea and Rubalcaba, and then a series of duets between the pianists, which are sure to feature more spontaneity. Corea is known as one of the

great improvisers in jazz history, and that’s one of many facets of the elder statesman that have influenced Rubalcaba. “Gonzalo is a true improviser,” Corea says. “And along with this comes his deep understanding of music and his unique and amazing technique as a pianist. It’s hard to describe, actually. There’s no one else who does what he does. Not even close.” “Gonzalo is brilliant,” Keller agrees, “and seems to come from a similar sensibility as Chick. His improvisations are remarkable for their inventiveness and beauty.” Corea, who turned 75 last June 12, celebrated at the Blue Note with a series of concerts featuring notable musicians that lasted mid-October to midDecember. “The two months at the Blue Note were a complete joy,” Corea recalls. “A bash beyond all bashes!” One gets the impression that, for this ageless and limitless jazz giant and his audiences, that’s the sincere reaction after every performance.

FREE museum admission is

for all visitors Exhibition Highlights Second Chances First Impressions

RAW — Recognition of Art by Women — with Svenja Deininger

f e b r ua ry 4 – a p r i l 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 Pen to Paper Artists’ Handwritten Letters from the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Arts

a p r i l 1 8 – j u ly 2 , 2 0 1 7

Open Late for Art After Dark Visit www. norton.org/artafterdark for weekly schedules.

t h u r s days / 5 – 9 pm

o p e n t h ro u g h co n st r u ct i o n

www.norton.org

1451 S. Olive Avenue West Palm Beach


AT12 ArtsPaper/Theater

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Composer-lyricist Jerry Herman has written some of Broadway's most successful musicals, including Mame. Photo provided

Theater

Revuemeister Day to celebrate the songs of Jerry Herman By Hap Erstein ArtsPaper Theater Writer For the past eight seasons, mutton-chopped British native Barry Day has been devising and presenting cabaret-withnarration shows at the Kravis Center’s Rinker Playhouse. They began with tributes to the multi-talented Noel Coward, about whom Day has written eight books of biography. Over the years, he has branched out to shows about such Broadway notables as Johnny Mercer, Frank Loesser and the songwriting team of John Kander and Fred Ebb. When Day met with Kravis senior programmer Lee Bell to discuss this year’s show, he did not hesitate to pitch the person he wanted to celebrate next — Jerry Herman. Why the longtime Broadway composer-lyricist? “Jerry is one of the most successful Broadway composers, with three shows that ran over 1,500 performances — Hello, Dolly!, which is being revived again this season, Mame and La Cage aux Folles,” explains Day. “His music is so melodic, you leave the theater humming. It’s so simple and direct, that could be why he doesn’t get the respect he deserves. Everyone reveres the complexity of Sondheim, but Jerry Herman is far more popular. “And his work is so upbeat, which is exactly what I think we all need at this point,” adds Day. “I think it’s a reflection of his own personal attitude toward life. He has been living with AIDS for many years now, but it does not seem to have affected his outlook. He chooses material for his shows that match his positive viewpoint.” The Kravis show, dubbed Hello, Jerry!, will feature four stellar fixtures of the New York cabaret scene — Klea Blackhurst, Carole J. Bufford, Marissa Mulder and Billy Stritch, all veterans of Day’s past shows. It will be at the Rinker Playhouse for three performances in late February, then head up the coast to Stuart’s Lyric Theatre for two more.

If You Go Hello, Jerry! The Songs of Jerry Herman, plays at the Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach.  Dates: 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Feb. 25; 7:30 p.m. Feb. 26. Tickets: $40 Info: 832-7469 “We could tour it elsewhere if everyone would clear the time, but then it would feel too much like work,” says Day. By now the group has the show’s assembly process down to a routine. “They just ring up and ask, ‘Who are we doing this time and when is it?’” notes Day. “They rehearse the songs up in New York, they come down here a few days ahead of the first show and we match up their musical numbers with my notes. It’s really about them. I just fill in a few biographical facts and a few words on introduction for each song.” Songs will be grouped thematically. They will include, for instance, upbeat tunes (“The Best of Times Is Now,” “Open a New Window,” “Put on Your Sunday Clothes”) and love songs (“It Only Takes a Moment,” “The Song on the Sand”). Day plans to err on the side of Herman’s most memorable songs. “We’ll do the ones that most people probably know, but may not know that Jerry wrote, or that came originally from Mame, say. And we’ll do a few of the less familiar songs as well, but that’s the exception.” All the better to get you humming along and appreciating the effortless artistry of Herman. “I picture the audience for this being any fan of musical theater, anyone who has ever seen a Jerry Herman show, anyone who enjoys show tunes and good old-fashioned melody,” Day says. And yes, he has already met with Bell about next year’s show. While they have chosen the subject, at the moment Day is not telling.


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Roderick Randle, Shein Mompremier, Karen Stephens and Troy Davidson star in Allison Gregory's Motherland, which is playing at the FAU Theatre Lab this month. Photo by Niki Fridh

Theater

A Brechtian take on the War on Poverty By Hap Erstein ArtsPaper Theater Writer Allison Gregory set out to write a play inspired by Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage and Her Children, generally considered one of the great stage works of the 20th century. The only thing is she knew almost nothing about it. “I had never read it or seen it. I knew zero about Brecht, really,” concedes Gregory. “I’ve never even seen a Brecht play. I’ve never studied Brecht. And in a way that helps. I didn’t know what was sacred and what wasn’t. I Gregory just took it all in and then ran it through my own experience and point of view.” The result is Motherland, now running through Feb. 12 at Florida Atlantic University’s Theatre Lab, which gave the play its first public reading in 2015. So what drew Gregory to the play, a timeless anti-war statement about an amoral war profiteer who loses her children, one by one, to the 17th century Thirty Years War? “When a friend of mine, a phenomenal actress, said that someday she’d love to do the role, I was immediately interested in it,” she explains. “And she being a woman of color, I wondered why she would want to do it. What would give it resonance for an African-American woman to do it?” Stumped for a satisfying answer, Gregory decided to write her own contemporary version of the play, specifically with her actress friend in mind. “Once I kind of blatantly, brashly stole the play from Brecht — and I really did, I took his exact setup — as I started to write it, it definitely took on a life of its own, which had to do with my putting an African-American family in

If You Go Motherland plays at the FAU Theatre Lab, Parliament Hall on FAU campus, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, through Feb. 12. $35. 297-6124. today’s world. What are they up against? What does that feel like? What does that sound like?” With several ongoing wars to choose among, Gregory chose to set her play within the War on Poverty. “And then I couldn’t help but be absolutely influenced by the headlines,” she says. “With what was going on in this country with young AfricanAmerican men being assaulted and many of them killed and silenced by authority figures, by the police.” In that sense, the play speaks very personally to Gregory, for she and her husband, playwright Steven Dietz (This Random World), have a 16-year-old African-American son. Soon after he got his driver’s license, Gregory recalls the two of them sitting the lad down for The Talk, “saying, ‘Now, you need to really be careful, because you’re going to be treated differently.’ And he is. So he needs to be careful what neighborhoods he drives in, he has to be careful about how he responds if he’s pulled over for any reason.” In that sense, Mother Courage’s reflex protectiveness is something Gregory well understands. “Absolutely. Her maternal instinct to gather her children and keep them close, and teach them as much as she possibly can. (To) impart as much of her maternal knowledge as she can before the world gets to them.” Gregory’s character, known simply as Mother, was built on “the idea of a woman who will fight tooth and nail for her kids on the one hand, but on the other hand is trying to

make a living. And just like any mother, she doesn’t always make what would be perceived of as the right decision.” The play is set firmly in America today with the use of such familiar icons as McDonald’s. “I think they land the play in the experience of a large part of the population, regardless of your social or economic status,” Gregory notes. “People understand what McDonald’s is, what it stands for and what it means. I personally have a very fond place in my heart for McDonald’s from when I was a kid. But I haven’t been to McDonald’s in 30 years.” Several regional theaters where Gregory has had her plays produced expressed interest in Motherland, but she decided to develop it at FAU Theatre Lab because of its artistic director, Louis Tyrrell. “Lou was the bravest. His was the first reading, back in December of 2015, the first time it was read out loud to the public. So when he said, early on, ‘I want to do this play,’ I absolutely said, ‘Yeah, you took first chance on it.’ My fingers are crossed that someone will take the bait and run with it after Lou’s brave steps forward.” Playing the role of Mother will be South Florida actress Karen Stephens, who has been associated with the character since last year’s reading. “She’s just terrific as Mother, even though she is a tiny woman. But she is fierce,” says Gregory. “She commands that stage and she is funny.” Funny? In a play set in wartime, where one by one Mother’s children become casualties of war? “It’s ultimately a comedy,” insists Gregory. “It may not read that way, but it plays that way. It’s a funny play and the actors are quite, quite funny. “It’s about real people, real situations, real concerns. But the bottom line is, it’s full of humor and humanity. And I think that’s something we need a lot more of now," she said.

ArtsPaper/Theater AT13


AT14 ArtsPaper/Calendar

The COASTAL STAR

ArtsPaper Calendar (Note: Events are listed through March 3 and were current as of Jan. 27. Please check with the presenting agency for any changes. Ticket prices are single sales. Most of the presenting organizations offer subscription plans.)

ART EXHIBITS

Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens: Through June 28: The Lost Bird Project, Todd McGrain’s tribute to extinct birds, including sculptures on the lawn; Rising: The Mystical World of Sophie Ryder, works by the British artist. Main gardens are open Wednesday to Sunday 10 am to 4 pm. Admission: $10, $8 for students. Call 561-8325328 or visit www.ansg.org. Armory Art Center: Through Feb. 11: Champions: Caribbean Artists of South Florida, works by more than a dozen artists from the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba and Trinidad. Opens Feb. 10: Artists in Residence Exhibition, works by Jenny Day, Spence Townsend, Alicia Boswell, Chad Steve and Andy Denton. Through March 10. Open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Free admission. Call 561-832-1776 or visit www.armoryart.org. Boca Raton Museum of Art: Through July 2: Glasstress, 25 to 30 glass installations by global artists. Admission: $12. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. first Wednesday of the month; 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Closed Mondays and holidays. Call 561-392-2500, or visit www. bocamuseum.org. Cornell Museum of Art and American Culture: Opens Feb. 3: Fabricated, an exhibition of fiber art, from large-scale to tiny works, by 15 different artists. Through April 23. Open Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 am to 4:30 pm; 1-4:30 pm Sundays; closed Mondays. Suggested donation: $5. Call 561-243-7922 or visit www. oldschoolsquare.org for more information. Cultural Council of Palm Beach County: Opens Feb. 3: 10x10, works for 10-by-10 surfaces by Palm Beach County artists. Through March 10 in the main gallery. In the side galleries, solo exhibitions by Dora Frost and Ron Burkhardt, through Feb. 18. Galleries at the council offices in Lake Worth are open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; free admission. Call 471-2901 or visit palmbeachculture.com. Flagler Museum: Through April 16: Harem: Unveiling the Mystery of Orientalist Art, paintings, drawings and other artworks exploring the Gilded Age’s fascination with the seraglio. Museum prices: Adults: $18; $10 for youth ages 13-17; $3 for children ages 6-12; and children under 6 admitted free. Hours: 10 am to 5 pm. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 561-6552833 or visit www.flaglermuseum.us. Lighthouse ArtCenter. Through March 4: Illuminating the Deep, photos by Edie Widder, Steven Bernstein and Elsa Bostlemann; also get a chance to take a virtual reality experience with Google Tilt Brush (separate $15 fee). Admission: $10 for adults, $5 for students over 12. 10 am to 4 pm. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Call 561746-3101 or visit www.lighthousearts.org. Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens: Opens Feb. 24: Deco Japan: Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945, an exhibit of more than 200 works from this little-known but highly creative period of Japanese art. Through May 21. Museum tickets: $15, $13 for seniors, $9 for children and college students. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays. Call 4950233 or visit www.morikami.org. Norton Museum of Art: Opens Feb. 4: Svenja Deininger: Second Chances, First Impressions, works by the contemporary Austrian abstract painter, through April 16; Recent Acquisitions, works by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Willie Cole

and Mickalene Thomas, through March 5. Admission to the Norton is free through 2018 as the museum undergoes extensive renovation and expansion. For more information, call 561832-5196 or visit www.norton.org. Society of the Four Arts: Opens Feb. 11: A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America, 60 works by some of the most admired folk artists working in the South between 1800 and 1920, including Edward Hicks, whose A Peacable Kingdom is part of this exhibit. Through March 26. Through July: Illustrating Words, poems by Robert Forbes illustrated by Ronald Searle, at the Mary Alice Fortin Children’s Art Gallery. $5. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday; 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Call 655-7226 or visit www. fourarts.org for more information.

BOOKS

Tuesday, Feb. 7 Tim Dorsey: The former Tampa Tribune reporter speaks and signs his latest Serge Storms novel, Clownfish Blues. 7 p.m. Murder on the Beach, Delray Beach. Call 561-279-7790 or visit www. murderonthebeach.com.

CABARET

Through Saturday, Feb. 4 Tommy Tune: The legendary dancer and Broadway eminence returns to the Colony. 8:30 pm: $110 Friday and Saturday; $60 for food and beverage. Royal Room Cabaret, Colony Hotel, Palm Beach. Call 561-659-8100 or visit www. theroyalroom.com. Tuesday, Feb. 7-Saturday, Feb. 11 Clint Holmes: The popular cabaret singer draws on jazz and classical. 8:30 pm: $70 weekdays, $8 weekdays, $90 weekends; $50 for food and beverage. Royal Room Cabaret, Colony Hotel, Palm Beach. Call 561-659-8100 or visit www. theroyalroom.com. Tuesday, Feb. 14-Saturday, Feb. 18 Tuesday, Feb. 21-Saturday, Jan. 25 John Pizzarelli and Jessica Molaskey: The great jazz guitarist and his wife, a veteran of more than a dozen Broadway shows. 8:30 pm: $100 weekdays, $110 weekends; $50 for food and beverage. Royal Room Cabaret, Colony Hotel, Palm Beach. Call 561-659-8100 or visit www.theroyalroom.com. Tuesday, Feb. 28-Saturday, March 4 Christine Andreas: The singer has a notable career on the Broadway stage and television. 8:30 pm: $90 weekdays, $100 weekends; $50 for food and beverage. Royal Room Cabaret, Colony Hotel, Palm Beach. Call 561-659-8100 or visit www.theroyalroom.com.

CLASSICAL MUSIC

Sunday, Feb. 5 Elias String Quartet: The British foursome performs music by Beethoven (Quartetto Serioso), Bartok (Quartet No. 4) and Brahms (Quartet No. 2). 3 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $20. Call 655-7226 or visit www.fourarts.org. Monday, Feb. 6 Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra: Keith Lockhart presents a program of British music including his own arrangements of songs by The Beatles. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Tickets start at $35. Call 561-832-7469 or visit www.kravis.org. Tuesday, Feb. 7 Jolente De Maeyer and Nikolaas Kende: The young Belgian violin-and-piano duo offers sonatas by Beethoven, Mendelssohn and Schubert, and a miniature (Mélancholie) by their countryman Cesar Franck. 7:30 pm, Flagler Museum, Palm Beach. Tickets: $70 (includes champagne reception); call 655-2833 or visit flaglermuseum.us. Symphony of the Americas: Sopranos Elizabeth Caballero and Grethel Ortiz, along with tenor Ricardo Velasquez, join the orchestra for a program of music from opera. 7:45 pm, Broward

Center for the Performing Arts, Fort Lauderdale. Tickets $20-$60. Call 954-462-0222 or visit www.browardcenter.org. Philadelphia Orchestra: Pianist Denis Kozukhin is the soloist in the Piano Concerto No. 3 of Rachmaninov, and conductor Stéphane Denève leads the Philadelphians in the Fifth Symphony of Shostakovich. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Call 832-7469 or visit www.kravis.org. Wednesday, Feb. 8 Philadelphia Orchestra: Conductor Stéphane Denève offers music by Ravel (Le Tombeau de Couperin), Debussy (La Mer) and the Seventh Symphony of Beethoven. 2 pm, Kravis Center. Call 832-7469 or visit www.kravis.org Palm Beach Symphony: This special concert spotlights the orchestra’s percussion section, and includes music by Ravel, Bartok, John Cage, Owen Condon and David Maslanka. Ramon Tebar conducts. 7:30 pm, Flagler Museum Palm Beach. $25-$100; call 281-0415 or visit palmbeachsymphony.org. Thursday, Feb. 9 Stephen Schilling: A pianist-composer offers a concert of his own works. 8 pm, Lake Worth Playhouse, Lake Worth. Tickets: $20. Call 5866410 or visit lakeworthplayhouse.org. Sunday, Feb. 12 Bamberg Symphony: The German orchestra, led by Christoph Eschenbach, welcomes Australian violinist Ray Chen for the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto. Mozart’s Don Giovanni overture and Mahler’s epic Fifth Symphony round out the program. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Call 832-7469 or visit www.kravis.org Wednesday, Feb. 15 Atlantic Classical Orchestra: The Fort Piercebased ensemble teams with the Young Artists Program at Palm Beach Opera for a night of overtures, arias and ensembles from operas by Bellini, Donizetti and Rossini. 7:30 pm, Eissey Campus Theatre, Palm Beach State College, Palm Beach Gardens. Tickets: $50-$60. Visit www. atlanticclassicalorchestra.com to buy tickets, or call 772-460-0850. Panther String Trio: Three members of Miami’s Amernet String Quartet — Misha Vitenson, Michael Klotz and Jason Calloway — appear in the Classical Café concerts at the Duncan Theatre’s Stage West. 2 pm, Palm Beach State College, Lake Worth. Tickets: $35. Call 868-3309 or visit www.palmbeachstate.edu. Saturday, Feb. 18 Seraphic Fire: Patrick Dupré Quigley’s Miami concert choir, now celebrating its 15th anniversary, revisits the six motets of J.S. Bach. All Saints Episcopal in Fort Lauderdale, 7:30 pm. Call 305-285-9060 or visit www.seraphicfire.org. Sunday, Feb. 19 Symphonia Boca Raton: Pianist Lindsay Garritson joins guest conductor Alastair Willis and the orchestra for the Ravel Piano Concerto on an all-French program that includes music by Ibert, Fauré, Debussy, Bizet and Honegger. 3 pm, Roberts Theater, St. Andrew’s School, Boca Raton. Tickets: $50-$84. Call 376-3848 or visit thesymphonia.org. Trio Solisti: The much-lauded American piano trio performs works by Haydn, Brahms and Ernest Chausson. 3 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $20. Call 655-7226 or visit www.fourarts.org Sunday, Feb. 19; Tuesday, Feb. 21; Thursday, Feb. 23 South Florida Symphony: Russian pianist Svetlana Smolina joins Sebrina Maria Alfonso and the orchestra for the Piano Concerto No. 2 of Rachmaninov; Rimsky-Korsakov’s Snow Maiden Suite and Carl Nielsen’s Fifth Symphony round out the program. 5 pm Feb. 19, Kaye Auditorium, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; 7:30 pm Feb. 21, Broward Center, Fort Lauderdale; 7:30 pm Jan. 24, Arsht Center, Miami. See southfloridasymphony.org to buy tickets online, or call 954-522-8445. Monday, Feb. 20 New World Symphony: The Miami Beachbased orchestral academy journeys north for

February 2017 an all-concerto program featuring four prizewinners of the New World academy’s concerto competition. Music by Sibelius, Haydn, Bloch and the Norwegian composer Arild Plau are featured. 2 pm, Kravis Center. Call 832-7469 or visit www. kravis.org Tuesday, Feb. 21 Trio Céleste: The California-based piano trio presents two Romantic favorites: the A minor Trio by Tchaikovsky and Dvořák’s Dumky Trio. 7:30 pm, Flagler Museum, Palm Beach. Tickets: $70 (includes champagne reception); call 655-2833 or visit flaglermuseum.us Lang Lang: The flamboyant Chinese pianist presents music from Spain, including pieces by Granados, Albeniz and Falla, plus the Debussy Ballade and the heroic Sonata in B minor of Liszt. Tickets start at $39. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Call 832-7469 or visit www.kravis.org Saturday, Feb. 25-Sunday, Feb. 26 Lynn Philharmonia: Joined by the Master Chorale of South Florida and soloists Rebecca Robinson and Adrian Smith, the Philharmonia and conductor Guillermo Figueroa tackle Berlioz’s huge Romeo and Juliet. 7:30 Saturday, 4 pm Sunday, Wold Performing Arts Center, Lynn University, Boca Raton. Tickets: $35-$50. Call 237-9000 or visit events.lynn.edu. Sunday, Feb. 26 Charlie Albright: The brilliant young pianist programs music by Schubert, Janacek, SchulzEvler’s and the complete Op. 25 etudes of Chopin. 3 pm, Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. Tickets: $20. Call 655-7226 or visit www. fourarts.org Orchestre National de Lyon: Leonard Slatkin directs the French orchestra and violinist Gil Shaham in the Violin Concerto of Samuel Barber, Guillaume Connesson’s Celephaïs and the Symphonie Fantastique of Berlioz. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Call 832-7469 or visit www.kravis.org Tuesday, Feb. 28 Pablo Villegas: The Spanish classical guitarist performs a solo recital featuring selections from his album Americano. Rinker Playhouse, Kravis Center, 7:30 pm. Call 832-7469 or visit www. kravis.org

DANCE

Friday, Feb. 3-Saturday, Feb. 4 Malpaso Dance Company: Osnel Delgado founded this contemporary dance troupe in Cuba in 2012. Both performances at 8 pm, Palm Beach State College, Lake Worth. Tickets: $39. Call 8683309 or visit www.palmbeachstate.edu. Friday, Feb. 17 Twyla Tharp: The celebrated American choreographer marks her 50th anniversary with her troupe’s performance of two works: Preludes and Fugues (Bach) and Nine Sinatra Songs. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Call 832-7469 or visit www. kravis.org. Friday, Feb. 17-Saturday, Feb. 18 Body Traffic: Lillian Barbeito and Tina Finkelman Berkett’s modern dance company, based in Los Angeles, is celebrating its 10th year. Both performances at 8 pm, Palm Beach State College, Lake Worth. Tickets: $39. Call 868-3309 or visit www.palmbeachstate.edu. Saturday, Feb. 18-Sunday, Feb.19 Ballet Palm Beach: Colleen Smith’s company revisits Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet for three performances at the Eissey Campus Theatre in Palm Beach Gardens. 2 pm and 7:30 pm Saturday, 4 pm Sunday. Call 814-5598 or visit www.balletpalmbeach.org. Friday, Feb. 24-Sunday, Feb. 26 Miami City Ballet: For its third program of the season, the company presents Balanchine’s Walpurgisnacht Ballet (Gounod), Christopher Wheeldon’s Polyphonia (Ligeti), and Alexei Ratmansky’s new Fairy’s Kiss (Stravinsky). 8 pm Friday, 2 pm and 8 pm Saturday, 1 pm Sunday. Tickets start at $20. Call 832-7469 (Kravis), 305-929-7010 (MCB) or visit www.kravis.org or www.miamicityballet.org.

FILM Friday, Feb. 10 The Salesman: Asghar Farhadi’s 2016 thriller about a young wife who is attacked in her Tehran apartment, and her husband’s quest for revenge. With Shahab Hosseini and Taraneh Alidoosti. In Farsi with English subtitles. At Living Room Theaters, Boca Raton. Call 561-549-2600 or visit fau.livingroomtheaters.com. Friday, Jan. 27 Sophie and the Rising Sun: In 1941 South Carolina, a woman artist falls in love with an injured Japanese-American man With Julianne Nicholson and Takashi Yamaguchi. At Living Room Theaters, Boca Raton. Call 561-549-2600 or visit fau.livingroomtheaters.com.

JAZZ Saturday, Feb. 4 Maria Rivas Quartet: The Venezuelan jazz singer has had an international career of more than 30 years. 8 pm. Tickets: $30 and up. Arts Garage, Delray Beach. Call 561-450-6357 or visit www.artsgarage.org Saturday, Feb. 18 Dr. Michael White: The jazz clarinetist is joined

by the New Orleans Jazz Quartet. 8 pm. Tickets: $30 and up. Arts Garage, Delray Beach. Call 561450-6357 or visit www.artsgarage.org Wednesday, Feb. 22 Manhattan Transfer and Take Six: The two celebrated jazz vocal groups share a concert they’re calling The Summit. Tickets start at $15. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Call 832-7469 or visit www. kravis.org. Thursday, Feb. 23 Maqueque: The all-female Cuban jazz sextet has won five of Canada’s Juno Awards and been nominated for two Grammys. 7 pm. Tickets: $30 and up. Arts Garage, Delray Beach. Call 561-4506357 or visit www.artsgarage.org

OPERA

Through Sunday, Feb. 11 Eugene Onegin: Florida Grand Opera continues its season with Piotr Tchaikovsky’s 1878 opera based on the Pushkin tale of a haughty young man who spurns a young woman’s love and returns years later. With Dina Kuznetsova and Lyuba Petrova sharing the role of Tatyana in this double-cast production, Franco Pomponi and John Brancy as Onegin, and Chad Johnson and Martin Nusspaumer as Lensky. Through Feb. 11. Call 800-741-1010 or visit fgo.org.

POPULAR MUSIC

Thursday, Feb. 9 Yonder Mountain String Band: The progressive bluegrass quintet from Colorado, on its winter tour. 8 pm, Culture Room, Fort Lauderdale. Visit www.cultureroom.net for tickets. Friday, Feb. 10 Avery Sommers: The celebrated local singer and actress presents I Love Being Here With You, a concert of songs from the Great American Songbook and Broadway. Tickets: $30 and up. Arts Garage, Delray Beach. Call 561-450-6357 or visit www.artsgarage.org Tuesday, Feb. 14 Steve Lawrence: The celebrated crooner, who turns 82 this year, presents a program of songs associated with his close friend Frank Sinatra. Tickets start at $25. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Call 832-7469 or visit www.kravis.org. Wednesday, Feb. 15 Kristin Chenoweth: The pint-sized Broadway legend and popular TV star sings songs from the Great White Way. Tickets start at $30. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Call 832-7469 or visit www. kravis.org. Dashboard Confessional: Boca Raton’s own emo standouts, back on tour. 6:30 pm, Revolution Live, Fort Lauderdale. $27-30. Call 954-449-1025 or visit www.jointherevolution. net. Saturday, Feb. 18 Chaka Khan: The Chicago-born pop singer (I’m Every Woman, I Feel for You) has been making hits since the late 1970s. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Tickets start at $25. Call 832-7469 or visit www. kravis.org Sunday, Feb. 19 Michael Feinstein: The singer and pianist leads the Kravis Center Pops Orchestra in a night of Big Band Swing. With Jarrod Spector and Marilyn Maye. 8 pm, Kravis Center. Call 832-7469 or visit www.kravis.org Saturday, Feb. 25 Sting: The founder of The Police is out touring to support his 12th solo record, 57th and 9th. Opening for him is his son Joe Sumner, and Tex-Mex band The Last Bandoleros. Tickets range from $255-$500. 8 pm, The Fillmore Miami Beach. See livenation.com to get tickets. Opens Thursday, March 2 Okeechobee Music and Arts Festival: The altmusic fest returns for its second year at Sunshine Grove in Okeechobee with a four-day bash that includes hundreds of bands including Kings of Leon, Usher and The Roots, The Lumineers and Wiz Khalifa. Through Sunday, March 5. Three-day and four-day passes run from $249-$269. See okeechobeefest.com for more information.

THEATER Opens Friday, Feb. 3 Collected Stories: Donald Margulies's play about the protegee of a noted author who writes a novel about her mentor's affair with a poet. Through March 5. Tickets: $81 opening night, 66 afterward. Visit www.palmbeachdramaworks. org or call 514-4042, ext. 2. Opens Saturday, Feb. 4 The Odd Couple: Neil Simon’s now-classic 1965 comedy about two mismatched men sharing an apartment. Through Feb. 19 at the Delray Beach Playhouse. Tickets: $30. Call 272-1281, ext. 4, or visit delraybeachplayhouse.com. Through Sunday, Feb. 5 Evita: Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s blockbuster musical about the first lady of Argentina in the 1950s. Through Feb. 5 at the Lake Worth Playhouse. Tickets start at $23. Call 586-6410 or visit lakeworthplayhouse.org. Beautiful: The 2014 Tony Award-winning musical about the rise to fame of songwriter

More calendar on the next page


February 2017

The COASTAL STAR

Books

Author celebrates wonders of reading a puddle of tears” quicker than the illness and death of Copperfield’s beloved Dora. Schwalbe’s enthusiasm might spur more people to cut back on gadgets and visit a library or a bookstore and maybe even join a book club. “Books,” Schwalbe concludes, “remain one of the strongest bulwarks we have against tyranny — but only as long as people are free to read all different kinds of books, and only as long as they actually do so.”

Books for Living, by Will Schwalbe; Knopf, 272 pp, $25.95 By Bill Williams At a time of growing reliance on smartphones and electronic devices, we need a strong reminder of the importance of reading books. In Books for Living, Will Schwalbe celebrates multiple genres, including cookbooks, memoirs, novels, poetry, children’s stories and ancient texts. Previously, he wrote the well-received The End of Your Life Book Club, about his decision with his dying mother to read books together. Books for Living asserts that everything we need to know can be found in a book. We can learn from the worst books, “even if it is just how crass and base, or boring and petty, or cruel and intolerant, the human race can be.” A friend of Schwalbe’s collected thousands of books and decided at age 70 to give them away, saving only his 100 favorite volumes. Among his saved titles was Toni Morrison’s novel Song of Solomon. Schwalbe regards it as one of the 10 best books he has read, which begs the question, “What are the other nine?” Among his favorites is Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran, the spellbinding

Carole King. Tickets start at $32. Kravis Center; call 832-7469 or visit www.kravis.org. Wednesday, Feb. 8 Love Letters: This familiar A.R. Gurney play from 1988, a two-hander that chronicles a relationship over 50 years, is presented here for one night starring Tony Dow (aka Wally on TV’s Leave It to Beaver) and figure skater Tai Babilonia. Tickets start at $35. Kravis Center; call 832-7469 or visit www.kravis.org Through Sunday, Feb. 12 Motherland: Allison Gregory’s play, inspired by Brecht’s Mother Courage, about a food truck owner trying to keep business and family together. At the Theatre Lab at Florida Altantic University. Call 561-297-6124 or visit www. fauevents.com. Opens Sunday, Feb. 12 Disgraced: Ayad Akhtar’s 2012 play, which won the Pulitzer for drama in 2013, about Islamaphobia in the progressive classes. Through Feb. 26 at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. Call 561575-2223 or visit www.jupitertheatre.org. Through Sunday, Feb. 26 West Side Story: Leonard Bernstein’s classic 1957 take on Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Through Feb. 26. Wick Theatre, Boca Raton. $75$80. Call 995-2333 or visit thewick.org. Opens Thursday, March 2 The Sugar Bean Sisters: Nathan Sanders’s 2006 Southern Gothic comedy about two sisters who are trying to avoid becoming spinsters. Through March 19. Tickets start at $23. Call 586-6410 or visit lakeworthplayhouse.org.

story of a group of women in Iran who secretly and at great personal risk started a book club to discuss classics. Books for Living begins with a vivid nightmare. In the dream, Schwalbe is rushing through an airport to catch a plane when he realizes he does not have a book to read during the flight. He cannot find a bookstore and misses the flight. In a chapter titled “1984: Disconnecting,” Schwalbe asks us to imagine a law that would require every citizen to carry a tracking device and check it five times an hour, but then adds there is no need for such a device because smartphones already dominate our lives. Books for Living offers tender moments. Regarding the classic David Copperfield, Schwalbe says that almost nothing reduces him “to

Bill Williams is a former editorial writer for The Hartford Courant. He is a member of the National Book Critics Circle and can be reached at billwaw@ comcast.net.

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AT16 Along the Row

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

A LONG TH E ROW Be dazzled by vintage jewelry. Diamonds may be a girl’s best friend, but some of the vintage costume jewelry at D. Brett Benson, Inc. (3616 S. Dixie Highway, Suite 120, www.dbrettbensoninc.com) made us giddy. And it’s a whole lot easier on the pocketbook. This Miriam Haskell necklace is $2,650. The bracelet is $1,395 and the earrings are only $185. That’s a lot of brilliance for the buck.

Chow down: Shopping makes us hungry. Not to worry: The antiques stores, specialty shops and art galleries on Antique Row are complemented by several restaurants. Among them are Belle & Maxwell’s (3700 S. Dixie Highway, www.belleandmaxwells. com) and Cholo Soy Cocina (3715 S. Dixie Highway, www. cholosoycocina.com).

Belle & Maxwell’s serves scrumptious salads, soups and desserts, and the décor is delightful with stained glass art, fresh flowers, antique furniture and a small patio. Cholo Soy Cocina (above) is a tiny, Andean-American eatery that serves tortillas and fresh ceviche. The backyard patio has picnic tables and colorful Andean murals. Cozy up to the first prez. George Washington’s birthday is Feb. 22. Our nation’s first president was born 285 years ago. Wouldn’t it be great to have him over for a birthday dinner? Oh, the stories the founding father could tell! Since that’s not possible, perhaps an almost life-size statue would be a good compromise. We found this one at Authentic Provence (3735 S. Dixie Highway, www. authenticprovence.com). You could take it home for $28,000. It’s in pretty good shape, but imagine the price if George’s left hand weren’t missing!

Find antique furniture in subtle and soothing palettes of whites, beiges and grays. In Faustina Pace’s shop (3635 South Dixie Highway, www. faustinapace.com), you’ll find neutral-colored antiques that Pace collects in France, Sweden and Belgium. The whites, beiges and grays are easy to live with, she says. They are certainly easy to admire. We found ourselves lured in as we admired the window furnishings, with antique chairs, baskets and a desk in the neutral colors Pace’s shop promotes. This is the first of three shopping areas The Coastal Star will check out this year. Next month, we’ll visit East Ocean Avenue in Lantana.


Community Calendar Note: Events are current as of 1/27. Please check with organizers for any changes.

FEBRUARY 4

Saturday - 2/4 - LOOP for Literacy at John Prince Park, Lake Worth. Proceeds benefit Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County. Cycle, run, walk, fun ride. 7 am 40-mile roadside ride; 8 am 5k run; 8:15 am 5k walk; 9 am fun ride inside the park. $10-$50. 279-9103; literacypbc. org 2/4 - Briny Bazaar at 5000 N Ocean Blvd, Briny Breezes. Gently used items and collectibles. 8 am-2 pm. Free. 276-7405; brinybreezes.us 2/4 - Digital Design & Photoshop Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Introduction/basic steps to editing digital images using Adobe Photoshop. Beginners/ basic computer skills required. Students encouraged to bring a laptop to class to follow along. Every Sat through 2/25 10-11:30 am. $79/resident; $99/non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 2/4 - Exhibition: Lake Worth Street Painting Festival Photographs at Cultural Council Sanders Foundation Artist Resource Center, 601 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Runs through 3/4. T-Sat 10 am-5 pm. Free. 471-2901; palmbeachculture.com 2/4 - Lake Worth Municipal Gym Grand ReOpening at 1515 Wingfield St. Ribbon-cutting ceremony, music, bounce houses, more. 10 am-noon. Free. 533-7363; lakeworth.org 2/4 - Boca Raton Fire Rescue Expo at Town Center Mall Parking Lot, Glades Road & St Andrews Boulevard. Meet firefighters & paramedics, live action demonstrations, health & safety education, interactive activities, informational displays, free blood pressure/ cholesterol checks. 10 am-2 pm. Free. 3937700; myboca.us 2/4 - 4th Annual Forgotten Soldiers Outreach Poker Run meets at Moose Lodge 994, 4844 Bowman St, Greenacres. Food/ beverages available for purchase. 10:30 am-5 pm. $15/1 hand; $25/3 hands. 369-2933; forgottensoldiers.org/category/events 2/4 - Coral Reef Shark, Alligator & Stingray Feedings at Sandoway House Nature Center, 142 S Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach. Shark T-Sat 10:30 am, Sun 1:30 pm; Alligator W/Sat 1 pm; Stingray T-Sat 2:45 pm, Sun 12:30 pm. Free w/$5 admission. 274-7263; sandowayhouse.org 2/4 - Murder Mystery: Who Dun It? & Luncheon at Benvenuto, 1730 N Federal Hwy, Boynton Beach. Benefits The Women’s Circle. Presented by The Zonta Club of Boca Raton Foundation. 11 am-3 pm. $75. RSVP: zontabocaraton.org 2/4 - Pickleball at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Adult. M-F 8:30-11:30 am, F 6-8:30 pm, Sat 1-4 pm. Monthly pass $15/ resident; $25/non-resident; $2/day. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com 2/4 - Bale Folclorico da Bahia: Bahia of All Colors at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Part of PEAK (Provocative Entertainment at Kravis) series. 1:30 & 7:30 pm. $35. 832-7469; kravis.org 2/4 - 5th Annual Tropical Rum Fest at Meyer Amphitheatre, 104 Datura St, West Palm Beach. 3-10 pm. $50-$100. 889-6312; tropicalrumfest. com 2/4 - Alligator, Snake & Owl Feedings at Daggerwing Nature Center, 11435 Park Access Rd, Boca Raton. Alligator W/Sat 3:15 pm; Snake Th 3:15 pm; Owl F 3:15 pm. Free. 629-8760; pbcgov.com/parks/nature

2/4 - Hercules at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. Every Sat through 2/28 4 pm. $14.50/ adult; $10.50/child under 12. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com

2/4 - Shallow Howl The Improvised Musical by Sick Puppies Comedy at Center Stage Performing Arts, 7200 W Camino Real #330, Boca Raton. 9-10:30 pm. $15/online; $20/at the door. 954-667-7735; sickpuppiescomedy.com 2/4 - Polo Presents Saturday Late Night with Dawn Marie Duo at The Colony Palm Beach, 155 Hammon Ave. Music from Temptations, Supremes, Gladys Knight & the Pips, Smokey Robinson, Marvin Gaye. Every Sat 9:30 pm-midnight. $20 cover includes free drink coupon. 659-8100; thecolonypalmbeach. com 2/4-5 - International Kinetic Art Exhibit & Symposium at Boynton Beach City Library, Civic Center, City Hall, & exhibition tent. Sat 9 am-6 pm; Sun 10 am-6 pm. Free. intlkineticartevent.org 2/4-5 - Driving Miss Daisy presented by Chicken Coop Theatre at Levis Jewish Community Center Sandler Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Runs through 2/19. Th/ Sat 7:30 pm; Th/Sun 2pm. $25-$40. 852-3200; levisjcc.org 2/4-5 - Elmar Oliveira International Violin Competition at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca

Community Calendar AT17

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017

Raton. Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 4 pm. $35-$50. 2379000; lynn.edu/tickets 2/4-5 - A Jew Grows in Brooklyn at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center Studio Theatre 2nd Floor, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Runs through 2/26. W/Th 7:30 pm; W/Sat 3 pm; F/Sat 8 pm; Sun 2 & 5 pm. $45-$95. 866-811-4111; ajewgrowsinbrooklyn.com 2/4-5 - Vegas! A Night on the Strip at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Runs through 2/12. F/Sat 8 pm; Sat/Sun 2 pm. $35. 347-3948; willowtheatre. org 2/4-5 - Pump Boys and Dinettes at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Sat 8 pm; Sat/Sun 2 pm. $52-$62. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 2/4-5 - New Country: An Unfiltered Comedy by Mark Roberts at Lake Worth Playhouse Stonzek Theatre, 713 Lake Ave. Held again 2/9-12. Th/F/Sat 8 pm; Sun 2 pm. $23. 296-9382; lakeworthplayhouse.org

FEBRUARY 5-11

Sunday - 2/5  - Elie Wiesel Memorial Symposium: A Celebration of Wiesel’s Life and Work at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 8 scholars talk about their collaboration with Wiesel. 9:30 am-3 pm. Free. 297-2979; fau.edu 2/5 - Sado Tea Ceremony Class at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens Seishin-an Teahouse, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Study Sado, The Way of Tea. Attending a Tea Ceremony Workshop is required for those who have never taken a Tea Ceremony Class but

Municipal Meetings 2/6 - Ocean Ridge - First Monday at Ocean Ridge Town Hall, 6450 N Ocean Blvd. 6 pm. Agenda: oceanridgeflorida.com 2/7 - Highland Beach - First Tuesday at Highland Beach Town Hall, 3614 S Ocean Blvd. 1:30 pm. Agenda: highlandbeach.us 2/7 & 21 - Boynton Beach - First and third Tuesdays at Boynton Beach City Hall, 100 E Boynton Beach Blvd. 6:30 pm. Agenda: boynton-beach.org 2/7 & 21 - Delray Beach - First and third Tuesdays at Delray Beach City Hall, 100 NW 1st Ave. 6 pm. Agenda: mydelraybeach.com 2/10 - Gulf Stream - Second Friday at Gulf Stream Town Hall, 100 Sea Rd. 9 am. Agenda: gulf-stream.org 2/13 & 27 - Lantana - Second and fourth Mondays at Lantana Town Hall, 500 Greynolds Cir. 7 pm. Agenda: lantana.org 2/14 & 28 - Boca Raton - Second and fourth Tuesdays at Boca Raton City Hall, 201 W Palmetto Park Rd. 6 pm. Agenda: myboca.us 2/23 - Briny Breezes - Fourth Thursday at Briny Breezes Town Hall, 4802 N Ocean Blvd. 4 pm. Agenda: townofbrinybreezes-fl.com 2/28 - Manalapan - Fourth Tuesday at Manalapan Town Hall, 600 S Ocean Blvd. 9:30 am. Agenda: manalapan.org 2/28 - South Palm Beach - Fourth Tuesday at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7 pm. Agenda: southpalmbeach.com wish to start studying Sado. Two lessons/month (2/5 & 19). Individual appointments begin at 10:15 am. $50/member, $55/non-member. Registration: 495-0233 x210; morikami.org 2/5  - 44th Annual Susan B. Anthony Feminist Awards Luncheon at Boca Country Club, 17751 Boca Club Blvd. Hosted by PBC National Organization for Women. Honoree Dr. Linda Geller-Schwartz. Noon-3 pm. $50/ member; $65/non-member. 888-394-0004; nowpbc.org 2/5 - Free Museum Admission at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Every 1st Sun noon-5 pm. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org

2/5 - Bridge Duplicate at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Sanctioned A.C.B.L. duplicate bridge game for experienced players. Light lunch. Partners available for singles. Sundays through 2/26 12:30-4 pm. $10/at the door. Reservations or partners: 338-2995; myboca.us 2/5 - Live! At the Norton: Andrew Sords: Music of Vienna at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. 2 pm doors open; 3 pm show. $3/member; $8/nonmember. 832-5196; norton.org 2/5 - The Original Florida Follies: 2017... On With The Show at Olympic Heights

Theater, 20101 Lyons Rd, Boca Raton. Benefits children’s charities. 2 pm. $30. 954-445-4232; theoriginalfloridafollies.com 2/5 - Lecture: Mystic America: Occult, Metaphysics and Spirituality in the Gilded Age with Mitch Horowitz at Flagler Museum, 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. 3 pm. $125/complete series; $28/non-member; $10/ individual, family & life member. Includes museum admission. 655-2833; flaglermuseum. us 2/5 - Concert: Gareth Johnson, Violin and Tao Lin, Piano part of Music At St. Paul’s series at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 188 S Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 3 pm. $20/preferred seating; $15/regular seating; $5/student. 276-4541; music.stpaulsdelray.org 2/5 - Delray String Quartet: Arensky, Faure and Diamond at The Colony Hotel, 525 E Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. 5 pm. $35. 213-4138; delraystringquartet.com Monday - 2/6 - Pickleball at Ezell Hester, Jr. Community Center, 1901 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Combines badminton and tennis. No play 2/20. Adults. M/W/F 9 am-1 pm. $5/person; annual pass: $130/resident, $165/ non-resident. 742-6550; boynton-beach.org 2/6 - Exhibit: Miracle on Meadows Road: Boca Raton Regional Hospital at 50 at Boca Raton Historical Society & Museum, 71 N Federal Hwy. Runs through 9/30. M-F 10 am-4 pm. $5/adult; $3/child 6+. 395-6766; bocahistory.org 2/6 - Socrates Cafe at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Every M 10-11:30 am. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/6 - Adult Watercolor Painting Workshop at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Instructor provides class lesson and lecture,


AT18 Community Calendar emphasis on composition and drawing, then a painting demo. Remainder of class time is one-on-one instruction, finishing with class critique. Age 18 & up. Every M or W 10 am-1 pm. Monthly: $35/resident; $40/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 2/6 - Friends of the Museum Auxiliary General Meeting at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 590 Plaza Real. Membership meeting. Learn about upcoming events. Meeting, coffee, pastries, film and/or speaker. 10:30 am-1 pm. Free. RSVP: 392-2500 x208; bocamuseum.org 2/6 - Senior Bingo at Pompey Park, 1101 NW 2nd St, Delray Beach. Adults age 50 & up. M&W 10:30 am-noon. Free. 243-7356; mydelraybeach.com 2/6 - Conversations on the World of the Etruscans at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Every M through 3/6 (no class 2/20) 11 am. $75/full series; $25/lecture. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/6 - No. 1 Choir in Nation in 2010: Dimensional Harmony Chorus presented by Friends of the Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of Brown Bag Series. Noon-1 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/6 - Duplicate Bridge Games at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. M/W/F noon-3 pm. $3/person. 742-6640; boynton-beach.org 2/6 - Bridge at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Intermediate & advanced. Every M 1-4 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/6 - Art Talks: The Art of Block and Linocut Printing with Bill Farran at Levis Jewish Community Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 2 pm. $12-$60. 558-2520; levisjcc. org 2/6 - British Plays with Richard Digby Day at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Held again 2/13. 2-3:30 pm. $25. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/6 - Life Story Writing Workshops fat Sugar Sand Park Community Center, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Tips on preserving family history, methods for getting started, prompts for writing, support and feedback, suggestions for binding/printing. Age 19+. Held again 2/13 & 27. 3:30 pm. $45/resident; $56.25 non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 2/6 - Culture & Cocktails: Houses, Homes & Hemingway with Bob Vila at The Colony Palm Beach, 155 Hammon Ave. Presented by the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. 5-7 pm. $65/advance; $75/at the door. 472-3330; palmbeachculture.com 2/6 - Bourbon 101: Rediscovering America’s Native Spirit at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Part of Wine & Spirits Appreciation class with Athena Yannitsas. 5:307 pm. $45/class. 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/6 - 31st Annual Citizen’s Justice Academy at West Palm Beach Police Department Community Room, 600 Banyan St. Classroom style lectures, interactive presentations, Q&A. Every M through 4/17 6-9 pm. Free. Limited

The COASTAL STAR enrollment/register: 355-4934; pbcgov.org/ criminaljustice 2/6 - Buy & Sell on Craigslist at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary.org 2/6 - Happy Squares Dance Club at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. All skill levels welcome. Age 18 & up. Every M 6:45-9:15 pm. $6/person. 865-2611; boynton-beach.org 2/6 - Bike Nite at Tilted Kilt Pub & Brewery, 3320 Airport Rd #1, Boca Raton. Held by Fury Road Riders, benefits Natural High, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to inspire youth to discover their natural high so they have a reason to say no to drugs and alcohol. Tilted Kilt donates 10% of food bill to Natural High. Every M 7 pm. 504-3310; furyroadrc.com 2/6 - Adult Beginner Dance: Tango at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Essentially walking with a partner and the music. Every M 7:50-10:50 pm. Per class $9/resident; $10/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 2/6-7 - Hair Cuttery Share-a-Haircut at multiple locations. For every paid haircut a haircut certificate is donated locally to homeless. Check website for locations/store hours. Haircuttery.com 2/6-12 - Allianz Championship at The Old Course at Broken Sound Club, 1401 NW 51st St, Boca Raton. Benefits Boca Raton Regional Hospital. Check website for times/daily activities. $20-$400/grounds & special passes; $25/VIP parking; free/under 17 & over 65. 2414653; Allianzchampionship.com Tuesday - 2/7 – Pickleball: Advanced Play at Delray Beach Community Center, 50 NW 1st Ave. Adults. T/Th/F 9 am-1 pm. Monthly pass $15/resident, $20/non-resident; 3-month pass $40/resident, $50/non-resident; 6-month pass $60/resident, $70/non-resident. 243-7250; mydelraybeach.com 2/7 - Wine Bottle Gift Bag Craft at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 10:30 am-noon. Free. Reservations: 742-6380; boyntonlibrary.org 2/7 - Exhibit: Contemporary African American Academic Surgeons at Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NW 5th Ave, Delray Beach. Runs through 5/6 during regular hours. $10/admission. 279-8883; spadymuseum.com 2/7 - Chess Club at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Knowledge of the game necessary. Age 18 & up. T/F Noon-4 pm. Annual fee $20/resident; $30/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 2/7 - Boca Raton Noon Toastmasters at Train Depot, 747 S Dixie Hwy. Improve public speaking, leadership abilities. Every T 12:15-1:15 pm. Free. 251-4164; toastmastersclub.org 2/7 - Couples Round Dance at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Learn figures/ routines to waltz, swing, foxtrot. Age 18 & up. Every T 1-3 pm (high intermediate level), 3-4:30 pm (beginner level). $12/couple. 352-455-5759; boynton-beach.org 2/7 – Socrates Café at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Philosophical

discussions. Every T 1:30-3 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 2/7 - Modern Line Dance Class at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Enhance quality of life through modern music/dance. Age 50 & up. Every T 1:30-2:30 pm. Per class: $5/resident; $6/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 2/7 - Art Insights: Images of Power and the Power of Images at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Part of Art Insights Lecture Series. Every T through 2/28. 2-3 pm. Full series $20-$40; Per event $6-$12. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/7 - Fran Weissler Talk and Q&A part of Dramalogue Talking Theatre series at Palm Beach Dramaworks, 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Series explores working in the theatre, in conversations with/about the artists who create the magic. 2 & 7 pm. $25/iperson. 514-4042; palmbeachdramaworks.org 2/7 - Literary Afternoon: Ellen Feldman, Terrible Virtue at Levis Jewish Community Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 2:30 pm. $20-$25. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 2/7 - Gallery Talk: Permanent Collection at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 3 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/7 - First Ladies, from Jackie Kennedy to Michelle Obama with Kate Andersen Brower part of the O’Keeffe Lecture Series at Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 3-4 pm. $35/non-members. 655-7227; fourarts.org 2/7 - So What’s Nu? The Wonderful World of Yiddish with Riva Ginsburg at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every T through 2/28. 3:30-5 pm. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 2/7 - Art & Antique Auction at Bill Hood & Sons, 2925 S. Federal Hwy, Delray Beach. Classic cars, paintings, antiques. 5 pm. 278-8996; hoodauction.com 2/7 – Ukulele Workshop at Delray Beach Library, 100 NW 2nd Ave. All levels. Held again 2/21. 5 pm. Free. 266-0798; delraylibrary.org 2/7 - Music & Interactive Art at Veterans Park Recreation Center, 50 NW 1st Ave, Delray Beach. Bring an instrument, join the open jam. Easels & art supplies set up for anyone wanting to explore their inner creativity. Join in or sit and listen! All ages. 2nd T 6-9 pm. Free. 2437350; mydelraybeach.com 2/7 - Astronomer Kevin Manning part of Friends Speaker Series at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 2/7 - Art Salon with Jane Hart, Curator: A Life in Art at Armory Art Center Library, 811 Park Place, West Palm Beach. 6:30-8:30 pm. $10. 832-1776; armoryart.org 2/7 - Soul Line Dancing at Ezell Hester, Jr. Community Center, 1901 N Seacrest Blvd, Boynton Beach. Age 18+. Every T 7-8:30 pm. $6/person. 742-6550; Boynton-beach.org

February 2017 2/7 - Beginnings: A Chicago Tribute at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 7:30 pm. $35-$45. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org Wednesday - 2/8 - Lawn Bowling at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Takes skill and practice. Age 18 & up. Every W/F 9 am-noon. Annual fee $40/resident; $45/nonresident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 2/8 - Trade and Politics part of Great Decisions group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 10 am-noon. Free. 7426390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/8 - Celebrating 20 Years of Alzheimer’s Community Care at The Beach Club, 755 N County Rd, Palm Beach. Keynote speaker Dr. James Goldberg. Luncheon, program, silent auction. 10:45 am-1:30 pm. $200. 683-2700;alzcare.org/palmBeachLuncheon 2/8 - Historical Walking Tour of Worth Avenue at 256 Worth Ave, Via Amore across from Chanel and Tiffany. Wednesdays through 4/26. Benefits TriCounty Humane Society. 11 am. Free. 659-6909;worth-avenue.com 2/8 - Gold Coast Tiger Bay Club: Ron Klein (D) vs. Sid Dinerstein (R): An Unusual President…What to Expect? at City Fish Market, 7940 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 11:30 am-1:30 pm. $45/member or firsttime guest; $50/non-member. 852-0000; goldcoasttigerbayclub.com 2/8 - Scrabble at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. Every W 1-4 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/8 - Getting to Know Your iPad at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1-2:30 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary.org 2/8 - Circling the Sun by Paula McLain part of Page Turners Book Discussion Group at The Four Arts King Library, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 1:30 pm. Free. 655-2766; fourarts.org 2/8 - Thomas Jefferson: America’s First Wine & Food Connoisseur with James Gabler at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of What’s on Wednesdays series. 1:30-2:30 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/8 - Silver Science Days at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Special afternoon for adults & retirees. Age 62 & up. 2nd W 2-5 pm. $10. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org 2/8 - English Verse: 1600-2000 with Richard Digby Day at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Every W through 2/22. 2-3:30 pm. $25/class. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/8 - Gallery Talk: Pre-Columbian Collection at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 3 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/8 - Zonta Club of Boca Raton at Pavilion Grille, 301 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 2nd W 5:30 pm. $30. 482-1013; zontabocaraton.org 2/8 - Writers’ Corner at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Manuscript critiquing by published authors. 6:30-8 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org

2/8 - Distinguished Lecture Series: Tommy Hutton at Palm Beach County History Museum, 300 N Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. 7 pm. Free/ member; $20/non-member. 832-4164 x 100; hspbc.org 2/8 - An Evening with Vivian Reed: Standards and More at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $40. 237-9000; lynn.edu/events 2/8 - The Doo Wop Project at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $34-$44. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 2/8-9 - Sibling Harmony: The Everly Brothers’ Story and Song at The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St. Lyrics to songs projected for audience sing-along. Part of Feelin’ Groovy: Musical Backstories series. 2 pm. $25. 272-1281 x4; delraybeachplayhouse. com 2/8-9 - Musical Films as Political History: 1776 presented by Dr. Burton Atkins at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7:30 pm. $25. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 2/8-9 - Tommy Dorsey and Glenn Miller Orchestras:  Battle of the Big Bands at Kings Point Theatre, 7000 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Held again 2 pm 2/11. 8 pm. $54. 800-716-6975; spanishriverconcerts.com 2/8-10 - Cafe de Cave at Lynn University Schmidt Family Studio, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. W/Th/F 7:30 pm; Th 12:30 pm. $5/ person; free w/Lynn ID. 237-9000; lynn.edu/ tickets Thursday - 2/9 - Rippers Knitting Club at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Registration form must be completed on 1st visit. All skill levels. Every Th 9 am-noon. $10/ per season. 742-6240; boynton-beach.org 2/9 - Quilters meet at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest. Share quilting information, perpetuate quilting as a cultural and artistic form. Sale of quilted items supports the Library. Every Th 9-11:30 am. Free. 7426886; boyntonlibrary.org 2/9 - Adult Acrylics Art Class at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Local instructor teaches basic acrylic painting techniques to beginners; also available for instruction to advanced painters. Call for list of supplies needed. Age 18 & up. Every Th noon-3 pm. Per class: $10/resident; $12/non-resident. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 2/9 – What’s Cookin’ Cookbook Club at Delray Beach Library, 100 NW 2nd Ave. Cookbook, food lit, potlick. This month’s cookbook: Lunch in Paris by Elizabeth Bard. Noon. Free. 266-0798; delraylibray.org 2/9 - Adults Tech Help Lab at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Every Th 1:303:30 pm. Free. 393-7906; bocalibrary.org 2/9 - A State Railroad Museum Documentary at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of Movies on Thursdays series. 2 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/9 - Art Insights: Perception and Deception in Art at Boca Raton Museum of


The COASTAL STAR

February 2017 Art, 501 Plaza Real. 2-3 pm. Held again 2/16 & 23. $6/member; $12/non-member. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/9 - Senior Bridge at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Experienced players welcome. Partners not needed. Every Th 2:30-4 pm. Annual fee: $15/resident + $1/ game; $25/non-resident + $2/game. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 2/9 - Gallery Talk: Sculpture Garden at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 3 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/9 - The Observational Humor of Jerry Seinfeld with Dr. Ira Epstein at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter OneTime Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 2/9 - Exhibition Lecture: A Conversation with Svenja Deihinger at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. 3 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton.org 2/9 - Torah, Tradition and Change: The Ancient Synagogue at Horvat Kur at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 4 pm. $25. 800-564-9539; fauevents. com 2/9 - What Happens when we Die? at Gramercy Bagles & Deli, 15200 Jog Rd, Delray Beach. Hosted by Congregation Beit Kulam. Held again 2/16. 4-5 pm. $15 per class/includes early bird dinner. RSVP:585-2618; cbkulam.org 2/9 - Sweetheart Concert by Les Dames at Highland Beach Library Community Room, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. 5 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/9 - Addressing Climate Change with Space Age Food Production with Dr. Lisa Dyson at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Part of Conservation Leadership Lecture Series. Cocktails, passed hors d’oeuvres, animal encounters, lecture. 6-8 pm. $25/lecture; member discount available. Register in advance: palmbeachzoo.org 2/9 - Special Lecture: American Jennie: The Remarkable Life of Lady Randolph Churchill at Flagler Museum, 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. 6 pm. $20/non-member; $10/individual, family & life member. Includes museum admission. 655-2833; flaglermuseum. us 2/9 - The Next Generation Road Rascals Car Show at Lake Worth Casino Building & Beach Complex, 10 S Ocean Blvd. 2nd Th 6-9 pm. rstarr2010@gmail.com 2/9 - One Plus One Fundraiser to Benefit The Volen Center at The Volen Center, 1515 W Palmetto Park Rd, Boca Raton. Doors open 6:30 pm; Showtime 7-8:30 pm. $10/advance; $15/at the door. 395-8920 x0; volencenter.com 2/9 - Palm Beach Watercolor Society Meeting at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. 2nd Th 6:30 pm Oct-May. palmbeachwatercolorsociety.org 2/9 - Open Reading Night at School of Creative Arts/Crest Studios at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Listen or sign up to read from an original work (published or unpublished). All levels welcome. Read for 10-15 minutes then open discussion (not critique). 2nd Th 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. 212677-4278; oldschoolsquare.org 2/9 - Jazz in the Gallery at Boca Raton Museum of Art Outdoor Sculpture Garden, 501 Plaza Real, Mizner Park. The Marshall Turkin Classic Jazz Ensemble. 7-8:30 pm. Free w/ museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum. org 2/9 - Distinguished Lecture Series: Tommy Hutton at Palm Beach County History Museum, 300 N Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. Reception/ book signing follow. 7 pm. Free/member; $20/ non-member. Reservations: 832-4164 x100; historicalsocietypbc.org 2/9-11 - Step Above Rummage Sale at First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach, 33 Gleason St.  9 am-3 pm. Free. 276-6338; firstdelray.com Friday - 2/10 - Fabulous Flowers! with Reed Stewart: Valentine’s Day at the Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 10 am-noon. $95/materials included. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/10 - Supervised Bridge Play at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd, Boca Raton. John Black: 2 hours supervised Bridge play. Partners not needed. Adults. Every F 10 am-noon. $10/person. 393-7807; myboca.us 2/10 - In the Shadow of Revolution: Causes of the Revolutionary War with Dr. Marc Newman at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every F through 3/3. 10-11:30 am. $60/annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 2/10 - Current Events Discussion Group at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean

Blvd. Every F 10:30 am-noon. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/10 - Balkan by the Beach: International Folk Dance at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. Benefit of exercise, pleasure of dancing to beautiful music. No experience or partner needed. Age 50 & up. Every F 10:45 am1:15 pm. $5/resident; $6/non resident per class. 243-7350; mydelraybeach.com 2/10 - Bill Gove Golden Gavel Toastmasters Club at Duffy’s Sports Grill, 4746 N Congress Ave, Boynton Beach. Every F noon-1 pm. $12/ lunch or $5/soft drink; cash only. 742-2121; billgovetoastmastersclub.com 2/10 - iPad 2: Using Apps at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1-2:30 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary.org 2/10 - Bob Roberts Society Orchestra at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Full 16-piece big band; variety of tunes for lovers of music and dance. Every F 1:30-3:30 pm. $4. 742-6240; boynton-beach.org 2/10 - Once Upon a Posturepedic at The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St, Delray Beach. Part of Studio Theatre series. 2 pm. $25. 272-1281; delraybeachplayhouse.com 2/10 - Teresa Kirk & Allan Pierce part of the BOCA Talks series at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 3 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/10 - Opening Reception: Artists-inResidence Exhibition at Armory Art Center, 811 Park Place, West Palm Beach. Runs through 3/10. 6-8 pm. Free. 832-1776; armoryart.org 2/10 - Evening on the Avenue at Cultural Plaza, 414 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Live music, food vendors, crafts, artists selling their artwork. Every F 6-10 pm. Free. 588-8344; lakeworth.org 2/10 - Bonfire on the Beach at Lake Worth Casino and Beach Complex, 10 S Ocean Blvd. Bring beach chairs. 2nd & 4th F through 2/24. 6-9 pm. Free; metered parking. 533-7395; lakeworth.org 2/10 - Friday Oldies Night with Joey Dale at The Pavilion Grille, 301 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Every F 6 pm dinner; 8 pm showtime/ dancing. $10/includes house drink. 912-0000; paviliongrille.com 2/10 - Violin Master Class with Elmar Oliveira at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets 2/10 - Movies at the Beach at Lantana Municipal Beach, 131 Florida A1A, Manalapan. 7 pm. Free. 540-5000; lantana.org 2/10 - 2nd Annual Georgina Dieter Dennis Tribute Vocal Recital at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $10. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 2/10 - Castoffs Square Dance Club at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. Basic modern western square dancing. Every F 7-7:45 pm dance & rounds; 7:45-9:30 pm dance club. $12/couple at the door. 731-3119; boynton-beach.org 2/10 - Community Foundation Gala 2017: Keeping it Local at The Breakers, 1 S County Rd, Palm Beach. 7 pm. $650/person; $350/ junior (age 40 & under). 340-4508; cfpbmc.org 2/10 - Blue Tuesdays at Boston’s on the Beach, 40 S Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach. Hosted by Famous Frank Ward. Every T 8:30-11:30 pm. Free. 278-3364; bostonsonthebeach.com 2/10-12 - 11th Annual Boca Raton Concours d’Elegance at Boca Raton Resort & Club, 501 E Camino Real. Comedian/entertainer Jeff Foxworthy at the Gala Dinner 2/11. Benefits Boys & Girls Clubs of Broward County. F 6-9 pm duPont Registry Live Hangar Party $120; Sat Gala Dinner Show & Auction $500 & up; S 10 am-4 pm Concours Automobile & Motorcycle Exhibition and Concours d’Gourmet Pavilion $75-$125. Full event schedule online. 888-3025439; bocaratonconcours.com 2/10-12 - 18th Annual Garlic Fest 2017 at John Prince Park, 4759 S. Congress Ave, Lake Worth.  Benefits local nonprofits. Food court, entertainment, children’s amusement area, cooking competitions, artist & craft vendors, more. Free & $5 parking throughout the park; trolley available to festival site. No pets, coolers, chairs, outside food/beverage. F 5-11 pm; Sat 11 am-11 pm; Sun 11 am-6 pm. $10/ advance; $20/at the gate; free/child 10 & under. dbgarlicfest.com 2/10-14 - 3rd Annual Eau Spa Love Fest at Eau Spa, 100 S Ocean Blvd, Manalapan. 6 featured treatments available. Starts at $99/ couple. 540-4950; eauspa.com Saturday - 2/11 - 6th Annual Barrier Free 5K Run, Walk and Roll at Barrier Free Park, 3111 S Congress Ave, Boynton Beach. Benefits Congress Avenue Barrier Free Park, designed with the needs of children and adults with disabilities in mind; the only park of its kind in the county. 7:30 am. 742-6255; boyntonfoundation.org 2/11 - Dolphins Cancer Challenge at Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 5 different cycling rides, 14-100 miles, ends at Hard Rock Stadium, 347 Don Shula Dr, Miami Gardens. Finish Line Celebration with The

Counting Crows concert. Boca ride is 52 miles. 8:30 am. $750 fundraising minimum. 305-9436799; dolphinscancerchallenge.com 2/11 - Ride & Remember Trolley Tour departs from Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NW 5th Ave, Delray Beach. 2-hour tour focuses on 5 historic districts. 2nd Sat 10 am-noon. $25. Reservations: 279-8883; spadymuseum.com 2/11 - Family Saturdays at the Cultural Council at Cultural Council of Palm Beach County Main Gallery, 601 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. 10-11:30 am. $5/family. 471-2901; palmbeachculture.com 2/11 - Taste History Special Holiday Culinary Tours of Historic Lake Worth and Lantana conducted by Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History departs at 11 am from Macy’s (outside East Entrance) Boynton Beach Mall, 801 N Congress Ave. 4-hour tour includes bus/ walking tour, food sampling, visits to historical/ cultural sites. Narrated by live guide. 2nd Sat year-round, rain or shine. Reservations required: check website for available dates. $50-$60/adult & senior citizen; free/child under 18 (max 5 children per family.) 243-2662; tastehistoryculinarytours.org 2/11 - All About Apple Devices presented by Palm Beach Phoenix Apple User Group at Fire Station No. 2, 4301 S Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. Discuss anything related to Apple products. 1st meeting free; yearly membership ($48/year) required to attend other meetings. 2nd Sat noon-2 pm. 336-0119; pbphoenix.org 2/11 - Bolshoi Ballet: The Sleeping Beauty at Society of The Four Arts Gubelmann Auditorium, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. All performances previously recorded. 2 pm. $20/ adult; $15/student w/ID 655-7226; fourarts.org 2/11 - Peter and Will Anderson Trio: The Magic of Benny Goodman presented by Swing and Jazz Preservation Society at Olympic Heights Community High School, 20101 Lyons Rd, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $25. 470-0095; swingjazzfl.com

FEBRUARY 12-18

Sunday - 2/12 - Israeli Film Series: Einstein in the Holy Land at Levis Jewish Community Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 9:30 am. $6-$16. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 2/12 - Neil Berg’s 108 Years of Broadway at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach.  Part of Adults at Leisure Series. 11 am & 2 pm. Tickets $29. 8327469; kravis.org 2/12 - 22nd Annual Hanley Center Foundation Family Picnic at National

Community Calendar AT19 Croquet Center, 700 Florida Mango Rd, West Palm Beach. Lunch, games, activities for children; magic show, creative crafts, silent auctions for kids & adults. Noon-4 pm. $195/adult (18 & over); $50/child (age 4-17); free/children under 3. 841-1212; hanleycenterfoundation.org 2/12 - Il Circolo’s Carnivale! at Intracoastal Park Clubhouse, 2240 N Federal Hwy, Boynton Beach. Italian party buffet, music, prizes surprises. Casual dress or costumes. 1-4 pm. $35/person; free/member’s child. 596-6730; ilcircoloflorida.com 2/12 - Keyboard Conversations with Jeffrey Siegel: A French Musical Feast at Society of The Four Arts Gubelmann Auditorium, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 3 pm. $40-$45. 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/12 - Author Talk & Book Signing by Sy Montgomery part of One Book Boca Series at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 3-4 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 2/12 - Was Elvis Jewish? Plus Secrets Your Rabbi Never Told You with Paulette Cooper Nobel at Florida Atlantic University Wimberly Library 5th Floor, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 3 pm. $20-$30. 297-2891; fauf.fau. edu/17JCSCalendar 2/12 - Exhibition Lecture: Willie Cole on His Art at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. 3 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton.org 2/12 - Lecture: The Allure of Immortality: An American Cult, a Florida Swamp, and a Renegade Prophet with Lyn Millner at Flagler Museum, 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. 3 pm. $28/non-member; $10/individual, family & life member. Includes museum admission. 655-2833; flaglermuseum.us 2/12 - Rattette at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 3 pm. $20. 800-564-9539; fauevents.co 2/12 - Tropical Flutes at First United Methodist Church Boynton Beach, 101 N Seacrest Blvd. 3 pm. Free. 954-947-1951; fumcbb.com 2/12 - Florida Youth Orchestra at Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. The Principal Orchestra and Flute Choir. Bring blankets, chairs. Chairs, available to rent ($5). 4 pm. Free. 393-7827; myboca.us 2/12 - Violin Mini-recital and Master Class with Gilad Karni at Lynn University AmarnickGoldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 4 pm. Free. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets 2/12 - The Music and Times of Nat King Cole and Natalie at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr,

Boca Raton. 4 pm. $30-$50. 237-9000; lynn. edu/tickets 2/12 - Wycliffe Gordon at St Gregory’s Episcopal Church, 100 NE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. 4 pm. $30-$99. 395-8285; stgregorysepiscopal.org Monday - 2/13 - 1984 by George Orwell part of Great Books group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 9:30-11 am. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/13 - Jewish Cultural Resistance to Nazi Genocide with Dr. Samuel Edelman at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter Lecture Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. Every M through 3/6 10-11:30 am. $60/ annual membership; $50/advance member; $65/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau. edu/lls 2/13 - Monday Morning Muffins & Mysteries: Red Lights by Georges Simenon at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30-11:30 am. Free. 393-7906; bocalibrary.org 2/13 - St. Louis Blues at Kravis Center Cohen Pavilion, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Part of 12th Annual African-American Film Festival. 11:30 am. $10/each; $25/all three films. 832-7469; kravis.org 2/13 - Opera Luncheon: This is My Beloved at Benvenuto Restaurant, 1730 N Federal Hwy, Boynton Beach. Includes 3-course gourmet meal. Noon. $39. Reservations: 364-0600; benvenutorestaurant.com 2/13 - All About Love in Music with Nikki Rattinger presented by Friends of the Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of Brown Bag Series. Noon-1 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/13 - Jeffrey Toobin at Adolph & Rose Levis Jewish Community Center, 9901 Donna Klein Blvd, Boca Raton. Author and legal analyst discusses Supreme Court, immigration and politics. 4:30 pm. VIP: $75, Lecture: $25. 5582520; levisjcc.org 2/13 - Dionne Warwick at Florida Atlantic University Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 5 pm. $30-$60. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 2/13 - Workshop: On Relationships presented by Mark and Makayla Logue at Delray Beach Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. 6 pm. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 2/13 - New Play Reading: Love and Other Unnatural Acts by Don Webster at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $10. 237-9000; lynn.edu/events

C H R I S T I A N A NG L E R E A L E S TAT E

TRUST | DEDICATION | PERSONAL COMMITMENT

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AT20 Community Calendar 2/13-14 - Defying Gravity at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $52-$67. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 2/13-16 - Broadway’s Superstar! The Music of Andrew Lloyd Webber at The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 NW 9th St. Held again 2/20-23. Part of Musical Memories series. 2 & 8 pm. $30. 272-1281; delraybeachplayhouse.com Tuesday - 2/14 - Valentine’s Day 2/14 - Wii Bowling for Adults at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/14 - National League of American Pen Women Luncheon at Delray Beach Golf Club, 2200 Highland Ave. Speaker Carol Garrett, singer/songwriter, lyricist, musician. 11:30 am. $27-$30/member; $32-$35/non-member. 7323577; bocapenwomen.org 2/14 - Valentine’s Day Group Wedding at National Croquet Center, 700 Florida Mango Rd, West Palm Beach. Palm Beach County Clerk Sharon Bock presides. Bring up to 10 guests; no pets, please. 11:30 am. Free. Registration & marriage license required before 2/10: 3552468; mypalmbeachclerk.com/valentinesday 2/14 - Valentine’s Day Tea for Two at Flagler Museum, 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Tea, classical harp, token Valentine’s keepsake. 11:30 am-3:30 pm. Per couple: $80/museum member includes tax/gratuity; $120/non-member includes tax/gratuity/museum admission. 6552833; flaglermuseum.us 2/14 - Valentine’s Day Party at Boynton Beach Senior Center, 1021 S Federal Hwy. 1-3 pm. $3/advance; $5/at the door. 742-6570; boynton-beach.org 2/14 - Fathers and Sons in Literature and History with Frank Bruni part of O’Keeffe Lecture Series at Society of the Four Arts Gubelmann Auditorium, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 3-4 pm. $35/non-member; free/ member. 655-7227; fourarts.org 2/14 - Winnifred Rule’s Born to Destroy at Delray Beach Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. 4 pm. Free. 266-0194; delraylibrary.org 2/14 – How to Spot a Psychopath at Delray Beach Library, 100 NW 2nd Ave. Winifred Rule, member Society for the Scientific Study of Psycopathy, recounts her experiences and lessons from living with two psychopaths. 4 pm. Free. 266-0798; delraylibrary.org 2/14 - Lucky Lovers Delight at Caffe Luna Rosa, 34 S Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach. 274-9404; caffelunarosa.com 2/14 - Valentine’s Day Dinner Dance at The Pavilion Grille, 301 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 6

The COASTAL STAR pm dinner; 8 pm music & show. Four-course dinner starting from $39.95. 912-0000; paviliongrille.com 2/14 - Foreign Film Series: Conformist (R) at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6:30-9 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary. org 2/14 - Valentine's Day Concert: Florida Wind Symphony From the Swing Era With Love at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $20. 800-5649539; fauevents.com 2/14 - Shed Sessions at The Spady: Spady House Band at The Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NW 5th Ave, Delray Beach. 2nd T 8-11 pm. $10/at the door; free/musicians. 2788883; spadymuseum.com 2/14-15 - Daughter of Empire: My Life as a Mountbatten by Pamela Hicks part of The Talk of Kings Book Discussion Group at The Four Arts King Library, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. T 5:30-6:30 pm; W 11 am-noon. Free. 655-2766; fourarts.org Wednesday - 2/15 - Conflict in the South China Sea part of Great Decisions group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 10 am-noon. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary. org 2/15 - Noel Coward and His Leading Ladies with Barry Day at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 11 am. $10/nonmember; free/member. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/15 - Matinee Movies with Myrna Loman at Levis Jewish Community Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 1st & 3rd W through May 1 pm. $8-$10. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 2/15 - Secrets of Consignment, Thrift & Vintage Store Shopping with Paulette Cooper Noble at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of What’s on Wednesdays series. 1:30-2:30 pm. Free. 7426390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/15 - Rubbing Shoulders: My Life with Popes, Princes, Moguls, and Movie Stars with Marc Rosen at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 1:30 pm. $25. 832-7469; kravis.org 2/15 - Behind the Scenes: A Life Lived Dramatically with Julia Hansen at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30 pm. $10/nonmember; free/member. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/15 - Highland Beach Coastal Democratic Club at Highland Beach Library, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. 3rd W 5 pm. Free. 272-6280

2/15 - Evening of Songs for Valentine’s Day part of Cy Schonberg Concert Series at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7 pm doors open, 7:30 pm performance. $25/singleevent ticket. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 2/15 - Rocket Man: The Elton John Tribute Show at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $57-$77. 243-7922; oldschoolsquare.org 2/15-16 - A Closer Look: Super Blue Omo (2016) at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Talks begin in a gallery, focus on an individual artwork, then move to the Museum Theater to explore the work’s cultural contest. W 1pm; Th 6 pm. Free. 8325196; norton.org 2/15-21 - Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show at Palm Beach County Convention Center, 650 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. W 7-10 pm VIP preview party; Th-M 11 am-7 pm; Tu 11 am-6 pm. $150/VIP; $20/general admission. 822-5440; palmbeachshow.com Thursday - 2/16 - Field Trip: Yesteryear Village leaves from Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Includes museum tour, lunch, cabaret show, round-trip motorcoach transportation to/ from Patch Reef Park. Light refreshments prior to boarding. 8:30 am check-in. 9 am-2 pm trip. $40/person. 3677035; myboca.us 2/16 - Discover Boca Raton Public Library’s Digital Library at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 11 am-12:30 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary.org 2/16 - Encore Palm Beach County Premier Event at The Phoenix at Delray, 5624 Linton Blvd. Connecting Boomers to encore careers. Speaker Chris Farrell, 1:30-4 pm. $20. Encorepbc.org 2/16 - Robert D. Chapin Lecture Series: Hilaree O’Neill at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 2 pm. $32-$67. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 2/16 - Documentary about a Great Boxer at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of Movies on Thursdays series. 2 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/16 - The Walk to Elsie’s: An Extravagant Collection of Escapades at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30 pm. $25/non-member. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/16 - Harry Truman and the White House Restoration, 1948-1952 with Clifton Daniel at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of

February 2017

Arts/Crafts Shows & Sales Saturday-Sunday - 2/4-5 - Artists in the Park presented by Delray Beach Art League at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St. Fine art exhibition and sales. Every Sat/Sun except 2/26-27. 10 am-4:30 pm. Free. 843-2311; delrayartleague.com Saturday-Sunday - 2/4-5 - Boca Raton Museum of Art 31st Annual Outdoor Juried Art Festival in Mizner Park, 501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 10 am-5 pm. Free. 392-2500 bocamuseum. org Monday - 2/6 - Delray Art League Exhibit at Greater Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce, 140 NE 1st St. Artwork by different artists every 3 months. M-F 8 am-5 pm. Free. 843-2311; delrayartleague.com Sunday - 2/12 - Art Show at South Palm Beach A group project made by Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 2-4 pm. Free. 588- The Briny Quilters. 8889; southpalmbeach.com Saturday - 2/18 - Briny Breezes Hobby Club Show & Sale at 5000 N Ocean Blvd. Meet the hobbyist. All items handmade locally; raffle and silent auction. 9 am-noon. Free. 716-8028 Winter One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 2/16 - Third Thursdays @ 3 presents George Poncy at Palm Beach County History Museum, 300 N Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. 3 pm. Free/member; $10/ non-member. Reservations: 832-4164, x101; historicalsocietypbc.org 2/16 - Intermediate/Advanced Bridge II with Sterling Odom at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Every Th through 3/16. 4:156 pm. $200/session. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/16 - Creative Art for Adults at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 18+. 5-7 pm. $28/resident; $35/non-resident. 3473900; sugarsandpark.org 2/16 - Grand Opening & Customer Appreciation Evening at Brown Harris Stevens, 619 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Light refreshments. 5-7 pm. Free. RSVP: 582-2200. 2/16 - Ballet Brika at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Hands-on West African drumming program. 6-7 pm. Free. 7426390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/16 - Opening Reception at Artists’ Guild Gallery, 512 E Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Wine, dessert. 6-8 pm. Free. 278-7877; bocaguild.com 2/16 - FAU Guest Artist Recital: Project Fusion Saxophone Quartet at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $20. 800-564-9539; fauevents. com 2/16 - Commonwealth by Ann Patchett at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. New contemporary fiction book club for adults. 7-8 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary.org 2/16 - From the Studio of Roberta Rust at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $10. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets 2/16 - Pippin at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 8 pm. Tickets start at $30. 832-7469; kravis.org 2/16 - The Sounds of Soul at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $35-$45. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 2/16-17 - Julie Feldman Trunk Show & Purse Signing at Boca Raton Museum of Art, Museum Store, 501 Plaza Real. Th 5-8 pm; F 10 am-5 pm. Free w/museum admission. 3922500; bocamuseum.org 2/16-19 - Gitta Sereny’s Into that Darkness at Showtime Performing Arts Theatre, 503 SE Mizner Blvd, Boca Raton. Runs through 3/5. ThSat 8 pm; Sun 2pm. $40/adult; $30/senior; $20/ student. 394-2626; showtimeboca.com Friday - 2/17 - Field Trip: Art Wynwood with Bruce Helander meet at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 9:30 am-6 pm. $185/includes transportation, ticket, lunch. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/17 - The Symphonia Fundraiser:  Paris Impressions  at Via Mizner Country Club, 6200 Boca Del Mar Dr, Boca Raton. Learn about the inner workings of an orchestra, reception follows. 10:30 am silent auction; 11:45 am program & lunch. $75-$90. 376-3848; thesymphonia.org 2/17 - Secrets of War (2014 NR) part of Friday Films Series at Society of The Four Arts Gubelmann Auditorium, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30, 5:15 & 8 pm. $5/adult; free/ member. 655-7227; fourarts.org 2/17 - Roxene Sloate & Miles Laventhall part of BOCA Talks series at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 3 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/17 - Evenings at the Council at Cultural Council of Palm Beach County Main Gallery, 601 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Held again 3/3. 6-8:30 pm. Free. 471-2901; palmbeachculture.com

2/17 - Happy Hour Friday/Music on the Rocks at Ocean Avenue Amphitheatre, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Food, snacks, beverages available for purchase. 3rd F through Jun 6-9 pm. Free. 600-9097; catchboynton.com 2/17 - Opening Reception: Mad Pie Girl (Cynthia Zmetronak) at Artisans on the Ave, 630 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Utilitarian and whimsical pottery. 6-9 pm. Refreshments. Free. 762-8162; artisansontheave.com 2/17 - Night of Dance at Carolyn Sims Center, 225 NW 12th Ave, Boynton Beach. Leave your worries behind, dance the night away. Dress code casual, vibe Rhythm & Blues. Light refreshments. 6-8:30 pm. $10/person. 7426640; Boynton-beach.org 2/17 - FAU Wind Ensemble Featuring Project Fusion Saxophone Quartet at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $10. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 2/17-18 - Date Night featuring Mary Grace and Michael Cartwright at Lake Worth Playhouse Stonzek Theatre, 713 Lake Ave. 8 pm. $20. 296-9382; lakeworthplayhouse.org 2/17-18 - Modern Dance Series: BODYTRAFFIC at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 8 pm. $45. 868-3309; duncantheatre.org 2/17-19 - Xanadu at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. F/Sat: 8 pm; Sat/Sun: 2 pm. $42-$52. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 2/17-19 - The Spitfire Grill at Florida Atlantic University Studio One Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Held again 2/24-26. F/Sat 7 pm; Sat/Sun & 2/24 2 pm. $20. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 2/17-19 - Mr. 80%: A Comedy by James Sherman at Boynton Beach Playhouse, 145 SE 2nd Ave. Held again 2/24-26, 3/3-4. F/Sat 8 pm; Sun 2:30 pm. $20. 301-5404; stagelefttheatre. net 2/17-19 - Love Letters by A.R. Gurney at Bhetty Waldron Theatre, 1009 N Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. F/Sat 8 pm; Sun 2 pm. $27.50/ adult; $15/student w/ID. 833-7529; eventbrite. com 2/17-25 - Art Exhibit: The Art of Imagination by Dana Donaty at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Library hours. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 2/17-26 - Delray Beach Open at Delray Beach Stadium & Tennis Center, 201 W Atlantic Ave. Tennis legends and top-ranked ATP players. Senior day, Kidz day, food drive. Check website for matches/times. Tickets start at $29.25. 3306000; yellowtennisball.com Saturday - 2/18 - 5th Annual Ride4Orphans meets at Spanish River Church, 2400 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Benefits Place of Hope and 4KIDS of South Florida. 32- or 65-mile cycling ride; rest stops; 4-mile kid’s fun ride. 6 am registration; 7:30 am pedals up. $40/adult; $15/ child. Register:  994-5000; ride4orphans.com 2/18 - Garden Club Rummage Sale at Ocean Ridge Town Hall, 6450 N Ocean Blvd. Proceeds benefit sending kids to horticulture camp and beautification projects in Ocean Ridge. Donations accepted at Town Hall 8:30 am-3 pm Feb. 16-17. 752-1630 2/18 -King Library Book Sale at Society of the Four Arts King Library, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Refreshments, gift drawings, fiction and nonfiction books, DVDs, more. 8:30 am-1 pm. Free. 655-2766; fourarts.org 2/18 - City of Lake Worth Annual Festival of Trees at Cultural Plaza, 414 Lake Ave. Get advice, buy native trees and plants from local nurseries. 9am-3pm. Free. 586-1677;lakeworth. org 2/18 - Neither Common nor Everyday: The Barbara Gordon Folk Art at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 11 am. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.or 2/18 - Taste History Culinary Tours of Historic Delray Beach & Boynton Beach


The COASTAL STAR

February 2017 conducted by Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History departs at 11 am from Macy’s Boynton Beach Mall, 801 N Congress Ave. 4-hour tour includes bus/walking tour, food sampling, visits to historical/cultural sites. Year-round, rain or shine. Reservations required: $50-$60/adult & senior citizen; free/child under 18. 243-2662; tastehistoryculinarytours.org 2/18 - The Science of Chocolate at South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Tr N, West Palm Beach. Learn how chocolate is made, its chemical properties and potential health benefits. Liquid nitrogen chocolate ice cream, frozen chocolate molds, samples, chocolate fountain, chocolate related crafts, activities. 11 am-4 pm. $16.95/adult; $14.95/senior; $12.95/child (3-12); free/child under 3. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org 2/18 - 30th Anniversary Celebration/Open House at Hospice Resale Boca, 141 NW 20th St. Discounts, free gifts, refreshments. Noon-4 pm. 338-4030; hpbcf.org 2/18 - Downtown BBQ Throwdown with Bobby Flay & Anne Burrell at Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Noon-5 pm. $35-$75/adults; $10/child 9-12; free w/food donation and child 8 & under. (844)672-2849; mizneramphitheater.com 2/18 - Art School Workshop: Fun Casting at Boca Raton Museum of Art School, 801 W Palmetto Park Rd. Cast metal to make one-ofa-kind jewelry.  1-5 pm. $110. Pre-registration required: 392-2503; bocamuseum.org 2/18 - Watercolor Workshop at Green Cay Nature Center, 12800 Hagen Ranch Rd, Boynton Beach. Learn to paint wildlife in watercolors: introduction to watercolor painting, materials needed, how to use them. Every Sat through 3/9 1 pm. Full course $40/member; $50/nonmember. RSVP: 966-7000; pbcgov.com/parks 2/18 - Spady Living Heritage Festival at Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NW 5th Ave, Delray Beach. Music, food, games, more. 1-5 pm. Free. 279-8883; spadymuseum.com 2/18 - Book+Art Discussion: Siddhartha + Buddhist Sculpture at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. 2 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton.org 2/18 - Hangmen part of National Theatre Live Series at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. All performances previously recorded. 2 pm. $25/adult; $15/student. 6557226; fourarts.org 2/18 - Artist at Work Series: Eydi Lampasona: Handmade Paper Collage at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Demonstration, discussion with the artist about the process, materials, concepts of creating art. 3-4 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/18 - Palm Beach County Firefighter Chili Cook-Off at Bryant Park, 6 S Golfview Rd, Lake Worth. 3-7 pm. Free/admission; $10/armbands for unlimited chili tastings. 722-3224; pbcfrretiree.org 2/18 - Tenth Annual Concerto & Aria Competition Winners’ Concert at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $10. 800-564-9539; fauevents. com 2/18 - Live Jazz Jam Session & Showcase at Flamingo Clay Glass Metal Stone Studio & Gallery, 15 S J St, Lake Worth. 3rd Sat 7-10 pm. $5/cover. 588-8344; flamingoclaystudio.org 2/18 - First Nighters at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hobnob with performers, have your photo taken with the stars. Follows performance by The New Shanghai Circus and Traditional Chinese Acts. 9 pm. $20. 237-7750; lynn.edu/tickets 2/18-19 - The New Shanghai Circus and Traditional Chinese Acts at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Sat 7:30 pm, Sun 4 pm. $50-$70. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets

FEBRUARY 19-25

Sunday - 2/19 - West Palm Beach Antique Auction at Marriott, 1001 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Featuring collection of Montelatici family. 11 am. kaminskiauctions. com 2/19 - Ice Cream Social at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 2-4 pm. Free. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 2/19 - Gold Coast Band Concert: Love American Style at Boynton Beach High School, 4975 Park Ridge Blvd. 2:30 pm. $8. 7426240; boynton-beach.org 2/19 - Music in the Museum: Palm Beach Opera Apprentice Artists at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 3-4 pm. Free w/ museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum. org 2/19 - Lecture: The Religion of Biologic Living: Dr. John Harvey Kellogg with Brian C. Wilson at Flagler Museum, 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. 3 pm. $28/non-member; $10/individual, family & life member; includes museum admission. 655-2833; flaglermuseum. us

2/19 - Exhibition Lecture: The Forbidden City: What the Guidebooks Don’t Tell You About Chinese Architecture at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. 3 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton.org 2/19 - Two Vibrant Harpsichords at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 3 pm. $10. 800-564-9539; fauevents. com 2/19 - Jefferson Campbell, Bassoon at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. 4 pm. $20. 2379000; lynn.edu/tickets 2/19 - South Florida Symphony Orchestra: Order By Disorder at Florida Atlantic University Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 5 pm. $30-$60. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 2/19 - A Night of Passion at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 7 pm. $55. 832-7469; kravis.org 2/19-20 - Art School Workshop: Stand Up to Paint Abstracts at Boca Raton Museum of Art School, 801 W Palmetto Park Rd. Paint in vertical format; explore composition, mark making, personal symbols, layering.  45-min lunch break. 10 am-5 pm. $185 + $20 material fee. Registration: 392-2503; bocamuseum.org Monday - 2/20 - Presidents Day 2/20 - Art School Workshop: Mandala in Colored Pencils at Boca Raton Museum of Art School, 801 W Palmetto Park Rd. Guided meditation, storytelling, drawing exercises. 45-min lunch break. 10 am-3 pm. $65 + $15 material fee. Pre-registration required: 3922503; bocamuseum.org 2/20 - Carmen Jones at Kravis Center Cohen Pavilion, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Part of 12th Annual African-American Film Festival. 11:30 am. $10. 832-7469; kravis. org 2/20 - President's Day & 85th Birthday at Palm Beach Kennel Club, Belvedere Rd one mile west of I-95, West Palm Beach. Family fun festival w/greyhounds. 2-4 pm. 683-2222, ex 241; pbkennelclub.com 2/20 - The Palm Beach Symphony 15th Annual Gala at The Breakers, 1 S County Rd, Palm Beach. World-renowned cellist Amit Peled. Cocktails, dinner, dancing, live music. Black tie. 7-11 pm. $650. 655-2657; palmbeachsymphony.org 2/20-21 - Better than the Beatles: Featuring the Liverpool Legends at Spanish River Church, 2400 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Held again 2/27-28, 3/6-7. 8 pm. $54. 800-7166975; spanishriverconcerts.com 2/20-23 - Wayside House Spring Boutique & Trunk Show at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Benefits programs at Wayside House, a Delray Beach women’s addiction treatment center. Preview party M 6-8 pm $100/person; trunk show T-Th 10 am-5 pm. 666-9162; waysidehouse.net Tuesday - 2/21 - Oil Painting on Canvas for the Experienced Beginner at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Every T through 4/11 10 am-noon. $180/resident; $225/ non-resident. 393-7807; myboca.us 2/21 - Coloring for Adults at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Special coloring pages, colored pencils, gels, markers provided or bring your own. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/21 - Gallery Talk: Tracy Kamerer, Harem: Unveiling the Mystery of Orientalist Art at Flagler Museum, One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Exhibit runs through 4/16. 12:15 pm. Free w/museum admission. Reservations recommended: 655-2833; flaglermuseum.us 2/21 - Gallery Talk: Modern and Contemporary Collection at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Held again 2/28. 2 pm. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/21 - Tales from Downton Abbey with Jim Carter part of O’Keeffe Lecture Series at Society of the Four Arts Gubelmann Auditorium, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 3-4 pm. $35/non-member; free/member. 655-7227; fourarts.org 2/21 - Ukulele Music Interactive at Veterans Park, 802 NE 1st St, Delray Beach. All ages. 1st & 3rd T 6-9 pm. Free. 243-7350; mydelraybeach. com 2/21 - FAU Astronomical Observatory public viewing day at Florida Atlantic University Science & Engineering Building 4th floor, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 1st F & 3rd T 8 pm. Free. 297-STAR; physics.fau.edu/observatory Wednesday - 2/22 - Saudi Arabia in Transition part of the Great Decisions group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 10 am-noon. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary. org 2/22 - Field Trip: Palm Beach Artists’ Studio Tour with Bruce Helander meet at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 10 am-4 pm. $185/includes transportation, ticket, lunch. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org

Community Calendar AT21

2/22 - Senses of Cinema Presents Film for Thought Class at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 18+. Every W through 3/29. 10 am-12:45 pm. Per class $12/ resident, $15/non-resident; 5-week session $50/resident, $62.50/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 2/22 - Cancer Alliance of Help & Hope’s Shop the Day Away Spring Luncheon at The Breakers, 1 S County Rd, Palm Beach. Financially supports those with cancer. 10:30 am-2 pm. $400. 748-7227; cahh.org 2/22 - The Unassuming Brilliance of Audrey Hepburn: A Presentation by Pamela Fiori at Kravis Center Cohen Pavilion, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 11:30 am. Tickets $89. 832-7469; kravis.org 2/22 - Painting: Watercolour for All Levels at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Learn traditional watercolour techniques, procedures. Every W through 3/29 12:30-3:30 pm. $180/resident; $225/non-resident. 3937807; myboca.us 2/22 - Save on Magazine Subscriptions at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1-2:30 pm. Free. 393-7906; bocalibrary. org 2/22 - Boynton Shipwrecks Over the Years with Steve Anton at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of What’s on Wednesdays series. 1:30-2:30 pm. Free. 7426390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/22 - Einstein Relatively Simple by Ira Mark Egdall at Society of the Four Arts King Library, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 1:30 pm. Free. 655-2766; fourarts.org 2/22 - Critical Moments of the American Presidency: Past, Present, & Future with Michael Beschloss at Florida Atlantic Kaye Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 3:30 pm. $35. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 2/22 - For The Love of Business: Speed Networking Event presented by Greater Boynton Beach Chamber of Commerce at Copperpoint Brewing Company, 151 Commerce Rd, Boynton Beach. 5:30-7:30 pm. $10/member; $15/non-member. 927-7331; boyntonbeach.org 2/22 - Arte Cubano at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. Experts talk about opportunities/challenges for American collectors and Cuban artists. 5:30-7:30 pm. $40 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/22 - Intermediate 3D Fundamentals at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary. org 2/22 - Adult Pottery at Boynton Beach

Art Center, 125 SE 2nd Ave. Learn to use a slab roller, coil maker, electric wheel. Every W through 4/5 (no class 3/22) 6:30-9 pm. $60/resident; $75/non-resident. 742-6650; boynton-beach.org 2/22 - Charles Todd speaks and signs his book Racing The Devil at Murder on the Beach Bookstore, 273 NE 2nd Ave, Delray Beach. 7 pm. Free. 279-7790; murderonthebeach.com 2/22 - Delray Speaks: A Community Conversation at Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NW 5th Ave, Delray Beach. 7-8 pm. Donations accepted. 279-8883; spadymuseum.com 2/22 - Beau Jest at B’nai Torah Congregation, 6261 SW 18th St, Boca Raton. Part of B’nai Torah Theatre series. 7:30 pm. $25/congregation member; $36/non-member. 392-8566; bnaitorah.org 2/22 - Concert: Walnut Street Theatre: Last of the Red Hot Lovers at Society of The Four Arts Gubelmann Auditorium, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 8 pm. $40-$45. 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/22 - Mix Tape Music Series: Stayin’ Alive at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 8 pm. $35. 868-3309; duncantheatre.org 2/22-23 - Changing American Foreign Policy in the Middle East: Iran, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and Israel presented by Dr. Andrew Kahn at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7:30 pm. $25. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 2/22-24 - iPhone Workshop with John J. Lopinot at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 1-4 pm. $425/series. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org Thursday - 2/23 - Recorrido De Las Galerías En Español at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 11 am. Free w/museum admission. 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/23 - Women of Distinction at The Breakers, 1 S County Rd, Palm Beach. Palm Beach Atlantic University honors Emilia May Fanjul and Darlene Luccio Jordan. 11:15 am-2 pm. $200. 803-2971; pbau.ed 2/23 - Expressive Figure Drawing Class at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Explore the human figure with exciting drawing exercises. Observe, simplify, ultimately feel confident dealing with the figure. Students encouraged to use a variety of materials. All experience levels welcome. Every Th through 4/6 (no class 3/23) 12:30-3:30 pm. $240. 3937807; myboca.us

BOCA VILLAS/MIZNER PARK

464 NE 8th Street – Best valued, newly built home in Boca Villas! Timeless and updated casual style of this just completed home located in most sought after East Boca Raton neighborhood. Home boasts 4/5 bedrooms and 5 1/2 baths, with large open upstairs loft for additional space. $1,650,000

BOCA VILLAS/MIZNER PARK

951 NE 4th Avenue – Unbelievable value! Beautiful custom, 2 story, meticulously maintained home boasting 5 bedrooms and 4.5 baths! Stately curb appeal with circular drive featuring Chicago brick pavers and split 3 car garage! $1,599,000

2/23 - Documentary About China at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of Movies on Thursdays series. 2 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/23 - Words…Alive! Remembering Joan Rivers at Levis Jewish Community Center Beifield Auditorium, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. 2 pm. $15-$20. 558-2520; levisjcc.org 2/23 - Healthy Aging: Mind, Body, and Spirit with Dr. Michael DeDonno at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter OneTime Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & nonmember. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 2/23 - Globalization In Antiquity: Augustus, Herod and the Second Temple at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 4 pm. $25. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 2/23 - Atwater Duo Opera & Broadway at Highland Beach Library Community Room, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. 5 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 2/23 - Ghaleb: A World Class Pop Tenor and Flamenco Guitarist at The Pavilion Grille, 301 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. 6:30 pm dinner; 7:30 pm showtime/dancing. Dinner $39+tax/ service charge; $20/bar area cover. 912-0000; paviliongrille.com 2/23 - Curator’s Conversations: Second Chances First Impressions at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Curators lead insightful discussions about special exhibitions, installations, the Museum Collection. All ages. 6:30 pm. Free. 832-5196: norton.org 2/23 - Town Hall Talks:  From Tragedy to Triumph: Boca Raton Regional Hospital at 50 with Jerry Fedele at Boca Raton History Museum, 71 N Federal Hwy. 7 pm. $5/ adult; free/member. RSVP: 395-6766 x301; bocahistory.org 2/23 - American Political Activist, Academic Scholar and Author Angela Y. Davis at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $10. 800564-9539; fauevents.com 2/23 - Canvas & Cocktails at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Create art; enjoy wine, craft beer, signature cocktail. 7-9 pm. $35/includes materials & one drink ticket. 243-7922; oldschoolsquare.org 2/23 - The Playwright’s Forum: An Evening with Carter W. Lewis at Florida Atlantic University Theatre Lab at Parliament Hall, 777

LAKE ROGERS/BOCA RATON

3750 NE 6th Drive – Idyllic seaside living. Stunning British West Indies style. Elegance meets relaxed livability in this gorgeous deepwater home. Located in one of East Boca’s most coveted waterfront neighborhoods of Lake Rogers. Wide water views and quick access to Boca Inlet! $4,295,000

DELRAY/BOYNTON BORDER

5 Lake Eden – Small gated community of 56 homes w/nature preserve for privacy. Inexpensive HOA. 5 minutes to Atlantic Ave! 3 Beds /2.5 Baths. Second floor has large loft area easily converted to 4th bedroom. Spacious master w/2 walk in closets & large en-suite bath. 1st floor office. Ocean beaches nearby! $529,000

THERESA M. LARSEN, PA

561-289-4462 TERRYLARSEN3@GMAIL.COM

889 E PALMETTO PARK ROAD, BOCA RATON, FL 33432


AT22 Community Calendar  Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $20. 800-5649539; fauevents.com 2/23-24 - Boca Cōl-Lėct Trunk Show at Boca Raton Museum of Art, Museum Store, 501 Plaza Real. Th Noon-8 pm; F 10 am-4 pm. Free/ open to the public (does not include museum admission). 392-2500; bocamuseum.org 2/23-24 - Blackbird, Fly: A Concert for Voice, Body and Strings at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 7:30 pm. Tickets $32. 832-7469; kravis.org Friday - 2/24 - Across the Seas with Elizabeth Sharland and Robert Spencer at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 11 am. $10/non-memberr. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/24 - 2017 Diamond Award Luncheon at Boca Raton Resort & Club, 501 E Camino Real. Honors Diamond award recipient Susan J. Saturday and Pearl Award Recipient Rebecca Zerbo. 11:30 am-1:30 pm. $75. Tickets available through noon 2/23 online: bocaratonchamber. com/events 2/24 - Speaker Series : Delirious Japan Art Deco in the Imperial Era with Kendall Brown at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens Theater, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. 1 pm. Free w/paid museum admission. 495-0233 x237; morikami.org 2/24 - The First Monday in May (2016/PG-13) part of Friday Films Series at Society of The Four Arts Gubelmann Auditorium, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30, 5:15 & 8 pm. $5/adult. 6557227; fourarts.org 2/24 - Boca Ballet Theatre presents Raise The Kilt at Barrel of Monks Brewing, 1141 S Rogers Circle #5, Boca Raton. 6-8 pm. $50/ person. RSVP: 995-0709; bocaballet.org 2/24 - Philip Fortenberry: The Hands of Liberace at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $27-$37. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 2/24 - The Habana Boys at Palm Beach State College Duncan Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 8 pm. $29. 868-3309; duncantheatre.org 2/24-26 - 51st Annual St. Vincent Ferrer Parish Festival at 840 George Bush Blvd, Delray Beach. Rides, raffles, games, food, more. Check website for times/details. stvincentferrer. com Saturday - 2/25 - South Florida Political & Historical Collectibles Show at Palm Beach Atlantic University Greene Complex, 1100 S

The COASTAL STAR Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach. Buy/sell/trade political campaign artifacts. Free appraisals w/ admission. 9 am-3 pm. $5/person; free/child 12 & under. 707-3090; pba.edu 2/25 - Exhibition: Patricia Levey and Kris Davis at Cultural Council Artist Resource Center, 601 Lake Ave, Lake Worth. Runs through 3/25 T-Sat 10 am-5 pm. Free. 471-2901; palmbeachculture.com 2/25 - Tea Day at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens Theater, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Celebrate the culture of tea: tea tasting, storytelling for the family, Tea Talks. 10 am-5 pm. Free w/museum admission (except tea talks & tea ceremony demo) 4950233 x237; morikami.org 2/25 - The Way of Tea: Sado Demonstration at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens Seishin-an Teahouse, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Observe Japanese sado by the Omote Senke tea group, an ever-changing tea ceremony demonstration rich in sensational subtleties. Noon, 1 pm, 2 pm & 3 pm. $5 w/paid museum admission. 4950233 x210; morikami.org 2/25 - Speaker Series: Tea Day Lectures: Candice Kumai & Rona Tison at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens Theater, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. 1 pm. $7/member; $10/non-member + museum admission. 495-0233 x237; morikami.org 2/25 - Divorak’s Rusalka part of Met Opera Live in HD Series at Society of The Four Arts Gubelmann Auditorium, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 1 pm. $27/adult; $15/student w/ID. 6557226; fourarts.org 2/25 - Author Talk & Book Signing by Arielle Ford part of One Book Boca Series at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1:30 am-12:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 2/25 - Tamara Green: My African-American Dream at Boca Raton Public LIbrary, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Part of Story Central: One World, Many Cultures series. Adults. 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. Register: 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 2/25 - 2017 Chinese New Year and Lantern Festival presented by the Chinese Cultural Association of South Florida at Olympic Heights Performing Arts Theater, 20101 Lyons Rd, Boca Raton. Celebrate the Year of the Rooster with Dragon and Lion dance, Chinese Acrobats, Martial Arts, Chinese Yo-yo, folk dance, songs. Chinese dinner, cultural activities for children, raffle draw follow. Wear your Chinese costume,

join the costume contest. 4-8 pm. $25/adult; $15/child 12 & under (includes show & dinner). 445-0608; choralspringschinese.org 2/25 - 2nd Annual Boca Italian Fest at Sanborn Square, 72 N Federal Hwy. Authentic Italian food, vendors, children’s activities, live entertainment. 4-10 pm. Free. 393-7807; myboca.us 2/25 - 2017 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards Exhibition EG2 at Armory Art Center, 811 Park Place, West Palm Beach. Exhibit runs through 3/8. 6-8 pm. Free. 832-1776; armoryart.org 2/25 - 2017 HEArt (Healing Through Expressive Arts) Show at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Benefits The Milagro Center Arts Education programs. Gallery, demonstrations, interactive displays, light food/beverage. 6-9 pm. $30-$40. 8192555; heartshow.org 2/25 - D4TS Derby Scholarship Fundraiser: A Night at the Races presented by Dollars 4 Tic Scholars at South County Civic Center, 16700 Jog Rd, Delray Beach. Benefits college scholarship fund for students with Tourette Syndrome. 6:30 pm. $45. 487-9526; dollars4ticscholars.org/d4ts-derby 2/25 - Catch A Rising Star Comedy Club: Julia Scotti and Sal “The Voice” Valentinetti at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $47-$67. 243-7922 x1; delraycenterforthearts. org 2/25-26 - 23rd Annual Lake Worth Street Painting Festival at Lake & Lucerne Avenues. Check website for entertainment details. 10 am-6 pm. Free. streetpaintingfestivalinc.org 2/25-26- Uncle Philip’s Coat presented by Chair-O-Plane Music Inc. at Levis Jewish Community Center Sandler Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 2 pm. $25$40. 852-3200; levisjcc.org 2/25-26 - Hello, Jerry! The Songs of Jerry Herman at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Sat/Sun 7:30 pm, Sat 1:30 pm. $40. 832-7469; kravis.org 2/25-26 - National Society of Arts & Letters’ Florida East Coast Chapter’s High School Photography Project at Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Interpret work of 60 schools from 4 schools participating in the 201 project; includes a master class and lighting seminar w/former NY Times photojournalist Fred Conrad.  9 am-4 pm. Free. 391-6380; nsalfloridaeast.org

February 2017

Green Markets Artisan Market, every Sunday and Wednesday, Plaza del Mar, 230 S. Ocean Blvd, Manalapan. Unique food finds, local artists, handicraft vendors. 10 am-3 pm. Free. 762-5340; plazadelmarshopping.com Boca Raton GreenMarket, every Saturday, Royal Palm Place Southwest Parking Lot, intersection of S Federal Highway and SE Mizner Blvd. 8 am-1 pm. Free. 368-6875; myboca.us Boynton Beach Mall Green Market, every Sunday at 801 N. Congress Ave, between Cinemark 14 Theater and TooJay’s. Every Sun noon-5 pm. Free. 736-7900; boyntonbeachmall.com Delray Beach GreenMarket, every Saturday, Old School Square Park, 50 NE 2nd Ave, one block north of Atlantic Ave. Fresh local produce, baked goods, gourmet food items, plants, live music, children’s activities. 9am-2pm. 276-7511; delraycra.org Lake Worth Farmer’s Market, every Saturday, Old Bridge Park, 10 S Ocean Blvd, Lake Worth. 9 am-1 pm. Free. 547-3100; lakeworthfarmersmarket.com Lake Worth Night Market Waterside, every 1st Wednesday, Old Bridge Park, 10 S Ocean Blvd, Lake Worth. 6-9 pm. Free. 533-7395; lakeworth.org

FEB. 26-MARCH 4

Sunday - 2/26 – Sunday Musical Matinee Series: Joshua Breakstone Trio at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. 2 pm. $20/show. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 2/26 - Benise in Concert: Spanish Nights at Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. 1 pm gates open; 2 pm show. $12.50$95. 393-7807; myboca.us 2/26 - The Playwright’s Forum Master Class: An Afternoon with Carter W. Lewis at Florida Atlantic University Theatre Lab at Parliament Hall, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 3 pm. $30. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 2/26 - Lecture: The First World’s Parliament of Religions at Chicago’s 1893 Columbian Exposition with Eric Ziolkowski at Flagler Museum, 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. 3 pm. $28/non-member; $10/individual, family & life member; includes museum admission. 655-2833; flaglermuseum.us 2/26 - Florida Intergenerational Orchestra: Music for Humanity Celebrating the Human Spirit at Our Lady of Lourdes Church O’Shea Hall, 22094 Lyons Rd, Boca Raton. 2:15 pm doors open/pre-concert talk, meet & greet performers; 3-5 pm concert. Free. 482-8206; flioa.org 2/26 - Special: Irving Labovitz part of Friends Speaker Series at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 3-4:30 pm. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 2/26 - Exhibition Lecture: Alfred Maurer A Panel Discussion at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. 3 pm. Free. 832-5196; norton.org 2/26 - Student Piano Gala at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 3 pm. $10. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com 2/26 - Love Knows No Season presented by Masterworks Chorus of the Palm Beaches at Palm Beach Atlantic University DeSantis Family Chapel, 300 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 4 pm. $20/advance; $25/at the door; $10/student. 845-9696; masterworkspb.org 2/26-27 - The Songs of Andrew Lloyd Webber at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 11 am & 2 pm. Tickets $29. 832-7469; kravis.org Monday - 2/27 - Bus Tour: Florida’s Agricultural Legacy departs from Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NW 5th Ave, Delray Beach. Conducted in sponsorship with the Sugar Cane League.  9 am-5 pm. $20/person includes lunch. 279-8883; spadymuseum.com 2/27 - Time part of Great Books group at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 9:30-11 am. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/27 - A Great Day in Harlem (1994) at Kravis Center Cohen Pavilion, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Part of 12th Annual AfricanAmerican Film Festival. 11:30 am. Tickets start at $10. 832-7469; kravis.org 2/27 - Maintain Balance and Poise using the Alexander Technique with Gaynelle Gosselin presented by Friends of the Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. Part of Brown Bag Series. Noon-1 pm. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/27 - Egg Tempera Painting and Gilding: Session I at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Every M through 4/3 1-4 pm. $325/ session materials included. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org 2/27 - Google Trilogy Part I: Google Mail at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary. org Tuesday - 2/28 - Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler part of Book Club discussion by Friends of the Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 10:30 am-noon. Free. 393-7968; bocalibrary.org 2/28 - Greeting Card Craft at Boynton Beach City Library, 208 S Seacrest Blvd. 10:30 amnoon. Free. 742-6390; boyntonlibrary.org 2/28 - Mandel JCC 22nd Annual Boynton Beach Book Luncheon at Indian Spring Country Club, 11501 El Clair Ranch Rd, Boynton

Beach. Martha Hall Kelly speaks & signs her book Lilac Girls. 11 am. $50/Literary Society member; $60/ non-member guest. 712-5252; jcconine.com/bookfestival 2/28 - Adult Multi Media Art Class at Intracoastal Park Clubhouse, 2240 N Federal Hwy, Boynton Beach. Water colors, pastel, acrylic; learning design and composition. Age 18+. Every T through 4/18 11:30 am-2 pm. $60/ resident; $75/non-resident. 742-6221; boyntonbeach.org 2/28 - Art 101: Abstract Painting at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Specific topics in art represented in the Museum Collection and special exhibitions. Held again 3/7 & 14. 1-3 pm. $100/member. Registration required: 832-5196 x 113; norton. org 2/28 - Isabella Stewart Gardner: Her Collection and Museum with Marlene Strauss part of O’Keeffe Lecture Series at Society of the Four Arts Gubelmann Auditorium, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 3-4 pm. $35/non-member; free/member. 655-7227; fourarts.org 2/28 - Photo Apps for Beginners at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 6-7:30 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary.org 2/28 - Humor Me Class at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. Age 19+. Every T through 4/4 (no class 3/21) 7-9 pm. 1 class $25/ resident, $30/non-resident; full session $115/ resident, $143.75/non-resident. 347-3900; sugarsandpark.org 2/28 - Just Add Piano: Amernet String Quartet & Heather Coltman at Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7 pm. $20. 800-564-9539; fauevents. com 2/28 - Cantor Stephanie Shore in Concert at Congregation B’nai Israel Zimmerman Family North Social Hall, 2200 Yamato Rd. 7:30-8:30 pm. Free/member; $5/non-member. 241-8118; cbiboca.org 2/28 - Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 8 pm. Tickets start at $29. 832-7469; kravis.org 2/28-3/1 - The Killer Angels: The Classic Novel of the Civil War by Michael Shaara part of The Talk of Kings Book Discussion Group at Society of the Four Arts King Library, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. T 5:30-6:30 pm; W 11 am-noon. Free. 655-2766; fourarts.org 2/28 - Jewish Inspired 20th Century Music at FAU Wimberly Library, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 8 pm. $20. 297-6124; fauevents.com 2/28-3/8 - Kultur 2017 festival at Florida Atlantic University Wimberly Library 5th Floor, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 3 pm. $20-$30. 297-2891; fauf.fau.edu/17JCSCalendar 2/28-4/18 - Writers’ Launch II part of The Writers’ Academy at Kravis Center Cohen Pavilion, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach.  Designed to alchemize the unexpressed bounty into a discipline of form, content, technique, style which results in a story. Focus/ goal is toward the fictional short story. Every T 1:30-3 pm through 3/8. $300. 832-7469; kravis. org Wednesday - 3/1 - Bridge: Play of the Hand at Boca Raton Community Center, 150 Crawford Blvd. Adults. Every W through 4/12 10-11:30 am. $120/resident; $150/non-resident. 3937807; myboca.us 3/1 - Literary Lectures: Jane Gardam: Award Winning British Novelist at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 1-2:30 pm. Free. 393-7852; bocalibrary.org 3/1 - Classical Cafe Series: Vienna Piano Trio at Palm Beach State College Stage West Theatre, 4200 Congress Ave, Lake Worth. 2 pm. $35. 868-3309; duncantheatre.org 3/1 - Contemporary Global Crises: Col Alfred Biegel, US Army (Ret) at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Community Institute. Every W through 3/2. 2 pm. $50/4 sessions. 266-9490; delraylibrary.org 3/1 - East Meets West: Five Insights from Five World Religions with Jeffrey Small


The COASTAL STAR

February 2017 at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 6 pm. $10. Reservations: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/1 - 2nd Annual Adult Wine Carnival & Silent Auction presented by American FineWine at Boca Raton Children’s Museum, 498 Crawford Blvd. Benefits the Children’s Museum. 6:30-9 pm. $55/person. 391-7274 x 133; turkun@ffcdc.org 3/1 - The Robert Sharon Chorale: The Beauty of Chorale Singing part of the Cy Schonberg Concert Series at South Palm Beach Town Hall, 3577 S Ocean Blvd. 7 pm doors open, 7:30 pm performance. $25/single-event ticket. 588-8889; southpalmbeach.com 3/1 - Second Avenue Jewish Chorale: Jewish Legacy in Song at Florida Atlantic University Wimberly Library, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 8 pm. $20. 297-6124; fauevents. com 3/1 - Taj Express: The Bollywood Musical Revue at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Part of PEAK (Provocative Entertainment at Kravis) series. 8 pm. Tickets start at $15. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/1  - In Mo Yang, Violin at Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Part of Young Artists Series. 7:30 pm. Tickets start at $30. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/1 - The Weight Band performing music of The Band at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8-9:30 pm. $57-$77. 243-7922; oldschoolsquare.org 3/1-2 - Better than the Beatles: Featuring the Liverpool Legends at Kings Point Theatre, 7000 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach. Held again 2 pm 3/4. 8 pm. $54. 800-716-6975; spanishriverconcerts.com Thursday - 3/2 - Advanced Beginners Bridge with Bill Greenspan at Society of The Four Arts Dixon Education Building, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Every Th through 4/6 (no class 3/9). 10 am-noon. $200/session. Reservations required: 805-8562; fourarts.org 3/2 - Sumi-e Ink Painting Class at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Every Th through 3/23. Floral 10:30 am-12:30 pm; Landscape 1:303:30 pm. $55-$60 + materials fee. Advance registration required: 495-0233; morikami.org 3/2 - Android Tablet Basics at Boca Raton Public Library, 400 NW 2nd Ave. Adults. 11 am12:30 pm. Free. 544-8578; bocalibrary.org 3/2 - First Thursday Site Tours at Cornell Museum at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave. History of Delray Beach slide show, tour of the historic site. 11 am & 1 pm. $5/at door. 243-7922; oldschoolsquare.org 3/2 - Lunch & Learn: Rigoletto - The Power of a Curse presented by Palm Beach Opera at The National Croquet Center, 700 Florida Mango Rd, West Palm Beach. Noon. $84. 833-7888; pbopera.org 3/2 - Art of Asia: Marion Dolan at Delray Beach Public Library, 100 W Atlantic Ave. Part of Lifelong Learning Community Institute. Every Th through 3/30 2 pm. $50/four sessions. 2669490; delraylibrary.org 3/2 - Exhibit Opening Reception: Works by Ralph Papa & Mimi Franklin at Highland Beach Library Community Room, 3618 S Ocean Blvd. 5-7 pm. Free. 278-5455; highlandbeach.us 3/2 - International Film Lecture Series: The Lunchbox (India 2014) at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 6:30-8:45 pm. $155/5-film series; $35/single film. Tickets not sold at the door. RSVP: 392-2500 x213; friends@ bocamuseum.org 3/2 - Jewtopia presented by Chicken Coop Theatre at Levis Jewish Community Center Sandler Center, 21050 95th Ave S, Boca Raton. Held again 3/4-5. Th/Sat 7:30 pm; Th/Sun 2 pm. $23-$36. 852-3200; levisjcc.org 3/2 - Robert D. Chapin Lecture Series: Kobie Boykins at Crest Theatre at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 2 pm $32-$67; 7 pm $25/adult; $5/student. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/2 - The Golden Age of Jewish Humor: Part IV You Don’t Have To Be Jewish To Love This Humor! With Dr. Stephen Cohen at Florida Atlantic University Friedberg Auditorium, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. Part of Winter One-Time Event Series at FAU Lifelong Learning Society. 3-4:30 pm. $60/annual membership; $30/advance member; $35/at the door & non-member. 297-3171; fau.edu/lls 3/2 - Science in Support of Everglades Restoration with Dr. Nicholas G. Aumen at Palm Beach Zoo, 1301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Part of Conservation Leadership Lecture Series. Cocktails, passed hors d’oeuvres, animal encounters, lecture. 6-8 pm. $25/ lecture; member discount available. Register in advance: palmbeachzoo.org 3/2 - International Film Lecture Series: The Lunchbox (India, 2014) at Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real. 6:30-8:45 pm. $35. RSVP: 392-2500 x213; bocamuseum.org 3/2 - Mostly Schumann at Lynn University Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, 3601 N

Military Tr, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $20. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets 3/2 - The Playwright’s Forum: An Evening with Israel Horovitz at Florida Atlantic University Theatre Lab at Parliament Hall, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton. 7:30 pm. $20. 800-5649539; fauevents.com 3/2 - Annie at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 8 pm. Tickets start at $30. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/2 - Silent Disco at The Fieldhouse at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. DJ dance music experienced through highquality, wireless headphones. 9-11 pm. $15. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/2-12 - 11th Annual Festival of the Arts BOCA at Mizner Park Amphitheater, 590 Plaza Real & Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real. World-class performers, authors, speakers. Check website for schedule/ times. $9.99-$125/person. 368-8445; festivaloftheartsboca.org Friday - 3/3 - Canasta Class at Rutherford Community Center, 2000 Yamato Rd, Boca Raton. Basic techniques: how to count points, keep score, play of the hand. Couples and singles welcome. Each player required to purchase four decks of cards (2 red, 2 blue) + canasta tray, bring to first class. Every F through 3/24. 10 am-noon. $50/resident; $63/nonresident. 367-7035; myboca.us 3/3 - Adult Multi Media Art Class at Intracoastal Park Clubhouse, 2240 N Federal Hwy, Boynton Beach. Water colors, pastel, acrylic; learning design, composition. Age 18+. Every F through 4/21. 11:30 am-2 pm. $60/ resident; $75/non-resident. 742-6221; boyntonbeach.org 3/3 - Words and Pictures (2013 PG-13) part of Friday Films Series at Society of The Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. 2:30, 5:15 & 8 pm. $5/adult. 655-7227; fourarts.org 3/3 - Historical Walking Tour meets at Palm Beach County History Museum, 300 N Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. 1-hour guided tour showcases the evolution of downtown West Palm Beach buildings and landmarks; includes an historical urban design overview through recent area development. Held again 2/3. 4 pm. $5/recommended donation. Advance registration required: 832-4164 x100; hspbc.org 3/3 - Opening Reception: NAWAFL: Down the Rabbit Hole at Armory Art Center, 811 Park Place, West Palm Beach. Exhibit runs through 3/26. 6-8 pm. Free. 832-1776; armoryart.org 3/3 - First Friday Art Walk at Cornell Art Museum at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. Current exhibits, wine/ cheese, then make your way to other participating galleries on Atlantic Avenue, in Pineapple Grove, Artists Alley. 6-9 pm. Free. 243-7922; oldschoolsquare.org 3/3 - Movies in the Park at Ocean Avenue Amphitheatre, 129 E Ocean Ave, Boynton Beach. Food/beverages available for purchase. 1st F Oct -Jun 7 pm. Free. 600-9093; catchboynton. com 3/3 - Rhythmic Circus: Feet Don’t Fail Me Now! at The Pavilion at Old School Square, 51 N Swinton Ave, Delray Beach. 8 pm. $25/adult; $15/student. 243-7922 x1; oldschoolsquare.org 3/3 - Tony Bennett: One Night Only at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 8 pm. Tickets start at $36. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/3-5 - Midnight Sun Festival 2017 at Bryant Park, 6 S Golfview Rd, Lake Worth. Have fun, celebrate the rich Finnish heritage of Lake Worth. F 3-9 pm; Sat 10 am-6 pm; Sun 10 am-5 pm. $5/adult; free/kids under 4 ft tall. 6293194; midnightsunfest.org 3/3-5 - Capitol Steps at Kravis Center Rinker Playhouse, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. Runs through 3/19. T-Sat 7:30 pm, W/ Sat/Sun 1:30 pm. Tickets $40. 832-7469; kravis. org 3/3-5 - Good Mourning (PG-13) at Willow Theatre at Sugar Sand Park, 300 S Military Tr, Boca Raton. F/Sat 8 pm, Sun 2 pm. $25. 3473948; willowtheatre.org

The next edition of The Coastal Star will be delivered the weekend of March 4

Saturday - 3/4 - Neighborhood Rummage Sale at Boynton Beach Civic Center, 128 E Ocean Ave. $20/vendor spot; free/admission. 8 am-1 pm. 742-6243; boynton-beach.org 3/4 - Tea Ceremony workshop at Morikami Japanese Museum and Gardens Seishin-an Teahouse, 4000 Morikami Park Rd, Delray Beach. Learn basics of sado, necessary to know in order to learn more about the aesthetics of sado or better understand and fully enjoy the tea ceremony itself. Workshop is a prerequisite to study sado at Morikami sado. $40. 1-3 pm. Advance registration required: 495-0233 x237; morikami.org 3/4 - A View from the Bridge part of National Theatre Live Series at Society of The Four Arts Gubelmann Auditorium, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. All performances previously recorded. 2

Community Calendar AT23 pm. $25/adult; $15/student. 655-7226; fourarts. org 3/4 - Celtic Woman 2017 Tour at Kravis Center Dreyfoos Hall, 701 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach. 3 & 8 pm. Tickets start at $29. 832-7469; kravis.org 3/4  - Evening on Antique Row, 33003900 Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach. Benefits Historical Society of Palm Beach County. Food trucks, musicians, entertainment, antique shop showcases. 6-9 pm. General admission $40/advance, $65/at entrance; VIP $100/advance, $125/at entrance. 832-4164; historicalsocietypbcl.org 3/4 - The Great Gatsby Feather Ball at 241 Seaview Ave. Benefits Palm Beach Day Academy. Dinner, auction. 6 pm. $225. 6551188 x125; pbday.org

3/4 - Valerie Tyson: Aretha & Gladys at The Wick Theatre and Costume Museum, 7901 N Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. 8 pm. $75-$85/ person; $48/optional themed dinner. 995-2333; thewick.org 3/4 - First Nighters at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Hobnob with performers, have your photo taken with the stars. Follows performance by Lucie Arnaz starring in Latin Roots. 9 pm. $20. 237-7750; lynn.edu/tickets 3/4-5 - Live at Lynn Series: Lucie Arnaz starring in Latin Roots at Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, 3601 N Military Tr, Boca Raton. Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 4 pm. $50-$70. 237-9000; lynn.edu/tickets


AT24 

The COASTAL STAR

February 2017


The Coastal Star February 2017