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KIDS WHO TA KE A PPROPRI AT E RISK S BECOME MORE CONFIDEN T, LE A RN HOW TO WEIGH OU TCOME S A ND A RE OV ER A LL H A PPIER .

Today, amid a growing culture of fear, our children are losing the privilege of taking risks. Patagonia was founded by climbers—risk-taking is in our blood. Lately, we’ve been contemplating the concept of risk. How does risk fit into childhood? Does risk have rewards? Many kids today live only in the safety zone and no longer take risks—even small ones like climbing rocks and rolling down hills. Instead, they’re indoors, in front of screens, with devastating effects for children and the planet. Simply put: We protect what we love. If we want the next generation to preserve the natural beauty we’ve enjoyed, then our children need to fall in love with the wild outdoors and all wild creatures. But first, kids need to get outside. Thankfully, there are those working to get children into the wild. Lia Grippo, Director of the Wild Roots Forest School, is one. She spoke to

lef t: Getting bolder with each boulder, fouryear-old Raivo Sao-Burwick tests his wings. Última Esperanza, Chile. somira sao nex t: Fifteen hundred feet up, Roan Harvey, age 10, is happily marooned on the Island in the Sky. Canyonlands National Park, Utah. kennan harvey

us about standing up for the right of children to take initiative, and the power of doing so in wild spaces. Learn more about her ideas and her school on page 16. In this presidential election year, what’s at risk for our country and our planet? Rick Ridgeway, Patagonia’s Vice President of Public Engagement, reminds us what we risk losing if we elect leaders who turn a blind eye to the environmental crisis. Rick’s daughter Carissa examines why she wants to defend wildness for her children and future generations. Their essays begin on page 26. Finally, as we mused about the concept of risk, we looked for photos that showed kids taking appropriate risks. We admit some images gave us parents sweaty palms. However, for each image of a child on the edge of a precipice or a youngster climbing something far too high, there’s a parent letting their kid take a chance, take a risk and learn important lessons all the while.

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The small stuff. Kids’ clothes are the definition of small stuff, and we sweat all the details from head to toe. Well-fitting hoods stay on to keep kids warm. Soft chin guards protect from zipper pulls and teeth. Low-profile tapered collars help avoid chafing. Lapped shoulders make it easier to put garments on and take them off. Fold-over covers for hands and feet keep fingers and toes toasty. The elasticized ankles of our booties ensure tiny feet stay covered. Reflective zipper pulls provide extra visibility. Tiny animal ears on hats and hoods keep it fun.

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OUTERWEAR AND FLEECE 1 Baby Snow Pile Jacket 61101 • $129.00 • 2T-5T • Regular fit 2 Baby Reversible Tribbles Hoody 61160 • $99.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit 3 Infant Micro D® Bunting 60175 • $65.00 • NB-24M • Regular fit 4 Baby Snow Pile Bibs 61107 • $129.00 • 2T-5T • Regular fit 5 Baby Reversible Honey Puff Hoody 61165 • $99.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit 6 Baby Micro D® Snap-T® Jacket 60155 • $49.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit 7 Baby Micro D® Bottoms 60167 • $35.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit

all styles imported

CAPILENE ® BASELAYER 8 Baby Capilene® Crew 60060 • $25.00 • 6M-5T • Slim fit 9 Baby Capilene® Bottoms 60065 • $25.00 • 6M-5T • Slim fit 10 Infant Capilene® Set 60054 • $45.00 • NB-24M • Slim fit

ACCESSORIES 11 Baby Reversible Shell Hat 60577 • $35.00 • 3M-5T • Regular fit 12 Baby Puff Mitts 60551 • $39.00 • 3M-5T • Regular fit 13 Baby Synchilla® Booties 60531 • $29.00 • 3M-5T • Regular fit 14 Baby Pita Pocket Mittens 60548 • $29.00 • 3M-5T • Regular fit

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1 Baby Synchilla® Cardigan

2 Baby Micro D® Snap-T® Jacket

60091 • $59.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit

60155 • $49.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit

3 Baby Furry Friends Hoody

4 Baby Retro-X® Vest

61155 • $55.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit

61035 • $69.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit

Baby Furry Friends Hat available online all styles imported

nex t: A young fencing master in Livigno, Italy. gary bigham


The fleece jacket parents swear by.

Baby Synchilla® Cardigan 60091 • $59.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit

Here’s why this jacket is a cult favorite: Kids love to wear it because it’s lightweight, breathable and warm but not too hot; it’s easy on/off, which means less fussing; dirt and gunk wash right out, and it dries in a snap. Everybody’s happy.

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Head-to-toe warmth for the littlest ones.

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Some parents consider buntings one-piece wonders, protecting wee ones from cold weather in a way jackets and pants can’t. The Hi-Loft Down Sweater Bunting is our warmest and has 600-fill-power down insulation and a plush, high-pile fleece-lined hood. The most versatile is the Reversible Puff-Ball Bunting, which has warm-even-when-wet synthetic insulation. Both have deep zippers for easy on/off and fold-over covers to warm hands and feet.

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REVERSIBLE

WA R M E S T

1 Baby Reversible Puff-Ball Bunting

2 Baby Hi-Loft Down Sweater Bunting

60131 • $99.00 • NB-24M • Regular fit

60101 • $149.00 • NB-24M • Regular fit

all styles imported

right: By the shores of the Strait of Magellan, siblings hang out on the rusty remains of an erstwhile boat dock. Punta Arenas, Chile. somira sao


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Hand it down. If you have a circle of friends or relatives who believe in hand-me-downs, consider yourself very fortunate. Sharing clothes saves money and resources, plus durable, well-made clothes beg to be handed down. Our customers tell us stories of Patagonia garments being passed from one generation to the next, so all our kids’ jackets, vests and pants have a hand-me-down label sewn in, which has room to list the history of a garment’s owners.

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1 Baby Reversible Puff-Ball Jacket

2 Baby Down Sweater Vest

3 Baby Reversible Down Sweater Hoody

60188 • $89.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit

60507 • $79.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit

61370 • $119.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit

4 Baby Down Sweater

5 Baby Hi-Loft Down Sweater Hoody

60519 • $99.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit

60492 • $129.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit

more colors available online

more colors available online

more colors available online

all styles imported

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A SCHOOL T HAT GOE S IN TO T HE WILD. BY N I C O L E M A R I E

It’s spring so there are many fledging birds about. I’m wandering with a group of children when I hear baby dark-eyed juncos begging nearby. I put my hand to my ear and listen. The children do the same. Now we all hear the birds. “Let’s go find them!” they clamor. But before we set off, one little boy cries, “Lia, stop. We have to see if there are any crows around.” He knows that crows could follow us to the nest and eat the baby juncos. We make sure there aren’t any nearby and off we go. Soon, we’re watching the babies being fed by their parents. The little boy tugs on my sleeve, “Lia, we have to go, the crows are here.” For me that was a gratifying moment because it showed me that our children’s connection with nature is authentic. They understand there are many complicated relationships between creatures besides their own. They know that they can help and harm. They’ve learned to pay attention and notice patterns, which are skills that will serve them all their lives. Most importantly, they have enough compassion that they want to help other creatures. Before anyone ever asks our students to help the Earth, they have an opportunity to fall in love with her first. The world really needs young people to fall passionately in love with it. The heart of what we’re doing is serving children and serving the Earth.

This story comes to us from Lia Grippo, founder and director of Wild Roots preschool in Santa Barbara. Wild Roots is what’s called a Forest School—an education movement that has proliferated in Scandinavia and Britain, and is gaining popularity in the United States, Australia and Canada. Forest Schools take place entirely outside; as Wild Roots’ website describes it, “The sky is our ceiling, the trees are our walls, and our floor is the living Earth.” Forest Schools combine the ideas and practices put forth by learner-centered, play-based educational philosophers (think Piaget, Steiner and Vygotsky) with environmentalism. It’s supported by a growing body of research about the effects of nature on children’s well-being. The basic idea is that nature is good for kids, and kids who are connected to nature are good for the world. This has certainly been demonstrated in Lia’s experience. She was born in Latvia when food was scarce and spent her first six years foraging in the forest with her family. She attributes her love of wild plants to those experiences, “So much of what happens in early childhood is pre-memory, therefore, those things live deep in the body. Children don’t lose their relationship to the natural world even if they are taken out of it.”

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FORE S T SCHOOL S TA KE PL ACE EN T IRELY OU T SIDE ... T HE SK Y IS OUR CEILING, T HE T REE S A RE OUR WA LL S, A ND OUR FLOOR IS T HE LI V ING E A R T H. Grippo’s first preschool, founded in 1996, had a facility surrounded by wild landscapes. The longer she had the building, the more time she and her students spent outside of it. She found that children who had difficulty in the classroom didn’t outside. All around there was less conflict and more magic. Two years later, she decided to move outdoors full-time. She couldn’t get insurance because they didn’t know what to do with an outdoor school, and she had no idea that she was part of a larger movement. Not being someone who shies away from challenge, it didn’t dawn on her to be afraid. Today, that daring ethos infuses Wild Roots. Children climb trees, learn to avoid poison oak, come across dead animals and even enjoy campfires on rainy days. Grippo believes that children possess an inherent wisdom. They don’t want to hurt themselves. Therefore, incrementally allowing kids to take risks, and get little bumps and scrapes, helps them learn to make informed choices. Wild Roots children are never told to “be careful,” because it only puts their nervous system on alert without giving any information about how to keep safe. Instead, they use language that teaches children how to assess the situation: “Is the branch you’re about to climb on dead or alive?” More than ever Grippo is committed to children’s right to appropriate risk,

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“I’ve seen a cultural shift growing that demands parents be afraid so that children aren’t able to take risks that we all took as kids. Unsupervised play, swimming in ponds and all manner of things are now deemed too dangerous.” Being outside, the school is quite public and sometimes that comes up against the fear of risk by folks in the community. People see a child climbing a tree and get frightened. Teachers learn to form good, calm relations with the community, all the while affecting the public’s perceptions. The good news is that, despite their fears, parents are recognizing the need for quality outdoor education, and they are spearheading the movement. Lia gets emails every day from parents wanting to know if there are Forest Schools in their area. As a result, more and more are springing up. Parents seem to benefit from Forest Schools as much as children. Their kids teach them how to identify poison oak and which plants they can eat. Inevitably, Lia says, as parents see their kids thrive amidst the rocks, birds and trees, they begin to grieve their own loss of connection to nature, and they strengthen their resolve to recapture what they’ve lost. Nicole Marie has been an early childhood teacher, expert and consultant for over a decade. She took a break from working on her first novel to visit and write about the Wild Roots Forest School.

previous: Wild Roots has four “classrooms” including a forest creek, a farm, an outcropping of sandstone and a large “oakcalyptus” tree surrounded by grasslands. The school moves monthly, giving kids time to get to know each place in every season. lef t: Students play “Jaguars Get a Deer.” The boy in blue chose to be the “deer,” and the “jaguars” gave chase. With theatrical gusto all around, the deer was taken down and devoured. When the deer said “stop,” the game ended immediately. right: Depending on their skills, children use either vegetable peelers or knives to whittle sticks. Before using sharp tools, kids create a “blood ring” around themselves using fallen branches and sticks. Other children know to stay outside the ring for safety. photos by kyle sparks


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Built with room to grow. It’s a fact that kids grow like weeds. We think clothes should grow with them to add a season or more of wear. All our kids’ styles are durable and built to be handed down, but some also have our “grow-fit” feature. Inside the legs and sleeves of our ski/snow styles (plus others), we’ve tucked in extra fabric. Remove the grow-fit stitches, and the sleeves or pant legs become 1½ to 2 inches longer. Problem solved—until, that is, the next really big growth spurt.

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B OY S ’ WAT E R P R O O F J AC K E T S A N D PA N T S

G I R L S ’ WAT E R P R O O F J AC K E T S A N D PA N T S

1 Insulated Snowshot Jacket 68520 • $199.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

10 3-in-1 Jacket 68366 • $229.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

2 3-in-1 Jacket 68361 • $229.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

11 Insulated Snowbelle Pants 68535 • $149.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

3 Insulated Snowshot Pants 68530 • $149.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

12 Insulated Snowbelle Jacket 68525 • $199.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

B OY S ’ C A P I L E N E ® B A S E L AY E R S

G I R L S ’ C A P I L E N E ® B A S E L AY E R S

4 Capilene® Heavyweight Zip-Neck 64730 • $45.00 • XS-XXL • Slim fit 5 Capilene® Bottoms 64710 • $35.00 • XS-XXL • Slim fit

K I D S ’ AC C E S S O R I E S 6 Powder Town Beanie 66061 • $35.00 • One size • Regular fit

13 Capilene® Heavyweight Zip-Neck 64735 • $45.00 • XS-XXL • Slim fit 14 Capilene® Crew 64695 • $35.00 • XS-XXL • Slim fit 15 Capilene® Bottoms 64715 • $35.00 • XS-XXL • Slim fit

K I D S ’ AC C E S S O R I E S

7 Beanie Hat 66055 • $29.00 • S/M, L/XL • Regular fit

16 Powder Town Beanie 66061 • $35.00 • One size • Regular fit

8 Bonsai Pack 14L 48070 • $59.00

17 Beanie Hat 66055 • $29.00 • S/M, L/XL • Regular fit 18 Woolly Hat 65983 • $39.00 • S/M, L/XL • Regular fit

9 Synchilla™ Gloves 66102 • $25.00 • S-L • Regular fit

all styles imported

19 Hestra® Czone Gauntlet Junior Gloves O2050 • $65.00 • 3-7 • Formfitting

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Fleece that’s softer on the planet. To make our solid-color, recycled polyester fleece styles, plastic bottles are collected, melted down and spun into fiber. This reduces our reliance on petroleum products and keeps discarded bottles out of landfills—there are 18 bottles in each Boys’ Retro-X® Jacket and 13 in a single Girls’ Re-Tool Snap-T® Pullover. Although not recycled, our Better Sweater® fleece is dyed with a low-impact process that significantly reduces the use of dyestuffs, energy and water compared to conventional dyeing methods.

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B OY S ’ F L E E C E

1 Lightweight Synchilla® Snap-T® Pullover 65545 • $79.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

5 Retro-X® Jacket 65625 • $129.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

2 Re-Tool Snap-T® Pullover 65585 • $99.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit 3 Los Gatos Hoody 65485 • $79.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit vest available online

4 Better Sweater® Coat 65686 • $119.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit hoody available online

girls’ jacket available online

6 Micro D® Hoody 65755 • $65.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit 7 Lightweight Synchilla® Snap-T® Pullover 65571 • $79.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit 8 Better Sweater® 1/4-Zip 65705 • $79.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit jacket available online

all styles imported

previous: In a low-snow year, good jumps are hard to find but Karsten, age 10, leaves no stone unturned. Squaw Valley Ski Resort, California. jay beyer

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WHAT DOE S I T ME AN TO VOT E OUR PL ANE T ? BY R I C K R I D G E WAY

As we enter the final stretch of this election year, Patagonia is kicking off its Vote Our Planet campaign. But what does it mean to “vote our planet”? And why talk about elections in our kids’ catalog? Especially when the majority of the people in the United States have not been sufficiently alarmed to respond to the looming existential threats of the environmental crisis? Today, however, as threats become palpable—we can see clearly the teeth of the beast as it steps out of the woods to confront us—there is emerging consensus not just to react, but to act. A significant part of this consensus is coming from young women and men with children. As my daughter Carissa says in her essay in this catalog, who doesn’t want clean air and water for their loved ones? Who doesn’t want to safeguard wild places as our most foundational source of relevance, solace and beauty? As a grandfather I look out on the horizon line of future generations’ lives. Let’s be frank: It is frightening. Cities with only polluted water and air. Barren deserts where once there were forests. Coastal areas underwater. Wars over disappearing resources. Wars not just between nations, but within nations.

Again, what does it mean to “vote our planet”? It means to vote for those who want coral reefs and glaciers to exist in more than photographs, for bluefin tuna in more than aquariums, and elephants, tigers and rhinos in more than zoos. It means to vote for peace instead of war, to support our leaders who recognize climate change and environmental degradation are the greatest threats to our national security. It means to vote for a living planet instead of a dying planet. There is no time left for equivocation. There can only be action. If you are not outraged, you are not paying attention. Look at the faces of your children, your grandchildren, the kids in this catalog, and then do whatever is in your personal capacity to ensure we have leaders in our government who will make certain those kids have a vibrant planet for themselves, for their kids, for generations yet to come.

Rick Ridgeway is Patagonia’s Vice President of Public Engagement and as a climber and surfer he has been hanging out at the company since it started in 1973.

V O T E


WH Y I’M VOT ING FOR OUR PL A NE T. BY C A R I S S A R I D G E WAY T U D O R

It takes so little time to transform a wild place into man-developed terrain. When I travel with my father he tells stories of places that were once wild that are now cities or suburbs, golf courses or trash heaps. And I’ve already seen that kind of development myself, in my own lifetime. By the time my kids are grownups, there won’t be any places that are wild because they’ve simply been undeveloped or undiscovered. Wild places will be wild because humans chose to protect them, so we better think about why we want to defend wildness if there’s going to be any left for upcoming generations. I want to defend wildness because I care about my children’s health. They will need clean water, air and food. I don’t want them to live in a toxic world where the basic resources have all been used up or contaminated. I want them to know beauty, and not just the beauty that comes from the imagination of humans. Humans will produce art no mat-

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ter the state of the planet, but it would be sad to never experience the intrinsic beauty that exists in wildness. Most importantly I want them to know humility. Wildness puts us in our place, makes us feel small in the midst of this great complex planet, and we humans need that to counterbalance our rapacity. In wildness you can see and smell and touch that greatness beyond ourselves, you can exist within it. The alternative way to know humility and something beyond ourselves is religion; religion creates that same sense of scale. But I don’t like relying on religion for humility; to me it feels too abstract. Yet, without wildness, I’m not sure we’d have a choice. I want my kids to live in a world where wildness exists as a path to grace. Carissa Ridgeway Tudor is a second-generation environmentalist who has been making films for over a decade.

previous: Mont Blanc looks on approvingly as a young mountain-bike rider gathers speed and leans into the turn. Chamonix, France. andrew burr lef t: My daughter and I look for birds in the Big Rock Preserve. Ventura, California. kyle sparks right: Flamingoes fly over Patagonia Park. When I first visited this area in 1999 much of it was overgrazed. Now it has been restored as wildlands because people chose to protect it. Chacabuco Valley, Chile. linde waidhofer


This jacket has down insulation.

Down Sweater Girls’ 68232 • $119.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit Boys’ 68244 • $119.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

Down is warmer, lighter and more compressible for its weight than any other insulating fiber. It remains the choice for deep warmth in cold, dry environments. For warmth in good conscience, we trace the source of our down from parent farm to apparel factory to help ensure the birds that supply it are not force-fed or live-plucked. Down Sweater styles are insulated with 600-fill-power Traceable Down.

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all styles imported


This jacket has synthetic insulation.

Nano Puff® Jacket Boys’ 68000 • $99.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit Girls’ 68005 • $99.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

Synthetic insulation is soft, lightweight, compressible and toasty warm. The PrimaLoft® Gold Insulation Eco in our Nano Puff Jacket has the added benefit of being 55% recycled, plus it maintains 98% of its warmth when wet, so it’s supremely versatile. See more synthetic- and down-insulated outerwear on the next page.

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Stands up to childhood. Guaranteed.

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We insist on function, durability and comfort for our kids’ gear—all the qualities we demand from our adult clothing—then we back it all up with our guarantee. We use durable, easy-care fabrics, and the garments are versatile enough for many seasons and activities. They can be passed along to siblings, cousins or friends, still in good shape and still suitable because they aren’t keyed to temporary fashion. When kids know that their clothes can look great and still wear hard under vigorous everyday play, they learn something about investing in function, durability and comfort.


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GIRLS’ SYNTHETIC OUTERWEAR

BOYS’ DOWN OUTERWEAR

1 Reversible Fuzzy Puff Hoody 68475 • $119.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

5 Bivy Down Hoody 68310 • $139.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

2 Nano Puff® Jacket 68005 • $99.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

6 Hi-Loft Down Sweater Hoody 68206 • $179.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

GIRLS’ DOWN OUTERWEAR 3 Down for Fun Coat 68255 • $189.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

7 Down Hybrid Jacket 68325 • $109.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit 8 Down Sweater 68244 • $119.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

4 Hi-Loft Down Sweater Hoody 68211 • $179.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

all styles imported

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WH Y SHOULD BUSINE SS C A RE A BOU T FA MILIE S? FA M I LY B U S I N E S S B Y PATAG O N I A C O - F O U N D E R M A L I N DA C H O U I N A R D A N D J E N N I F E R R I D G E WAY 400-page, full-color hardcover book with photos throughout BK760 • $45.00 • Printed in Canada

Thirty-three years ago, Malinda Chouinard took a risk and started on-site child care at Patagonia. “It was evident,” she explained, “that the few other working parents were having as hard a time as I was. When several of my divorced colleagues lost custody of their young children due to lack of child care, my personal struggle became a ‘workers’ struggle.’ Emboldened, I began to make unilateral decisions for which I had no budget, no authority, and zero preparation.” Three decades later, over 1,500 children have graduated from Patagonia’s child-care program and some, who are now adults, work for the company. Malinda’s risk paid dividends in the form of loyal, engaged employees and a thriving business overall. The Family Business book illustrates why Patagonia’s child development center is a key component of the company’s mission—and demonstrates to the business community the benefits of providing high quality, on-site child care to working families. Order Family Business and watch a series of videos that address issues important to working families at patagonia.com/familybusiness right: At our child-care center, when kids want to scale a tree, we stand nearby and assist only if necessary. Children who make relatively small decisions— Should I jump from this rock?—practice weighing consequences before they get older and must make higher-stakes choices. Ventura, California. photos by kyle sparks

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Prsrt. Std. U.S. Postage PAID Patagonia, Inc.

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Ironclad Guarantee we guarantee everything we make

Nano Puff® Jackets This jacket is for kids who spend time outdoors climbing boulders, exploring the river’s edge and building tree forts. The windproof, water-resistant and warm Nano Puff Jacket is an every-season stalwart, performing yeoman service as an outer layer in cool weather and as an insulating midlayer when things get really cold. Its polyester mini-ripstop shell has a DWR (durable water repellent) finish to shed rain; PrimaLoft® Gold Insulation Eco (55% recycled synthetic fibers) stays warm even when wet.

all styles imported

Girls’ Nano Puff ® Jacket 68005 • $99.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit Baby Nano Puff® Jacket 61362 • $79.00 • 6M-5T • Regular fit Boys’ Nano Puff® Jacket 68000 • $99.00 • XS-XXL • Regular fit

Unwanted Mailings If you are moving, send us your old and new addresses. If you’ve received this catalog in error, received a duplicate or want to remove your name from our mailing list, please call us at 800-638-6464.

cover: Big fins and a small Finn in the Torre Valley. Patagonia, Argentina. bernd zeugswetter

100% Recycled Paper This catalog is made with FSC®certified 100% post-consumer recycled paper. Not a single tree was cut to produce it. If you can’t hug a tree right now, you could just hug this catalog.

This catalog refers to some or all of the following trademarks as used, applied for or registered in the U.S.: FSC® and the FSC Logo®, registered trademarks of the Forest Stewardship Council, A.C.; and PrimaLoft ® Gold, a registered trademark of PrimaLoft, Inc. Patagonia® and the Patagonia and Fitz Roy Skyline® are registered trademarks of Patagonia, Inc. Other Patagonia trademarks include, but are not limited to, the following: Better Sweater ®, Capilene®, Micro D®, Nano Puff ®, Retro-X®, Snap-T® and Synchilla®. Catalog prices are valid through December 31, 2016.

100% PCW

OCTOBER 2016 © 2016 Patagonia, Inc.

Patagonia Kids’ 2016 Catalog (U.S.)  

Risk. Kids who take appropriate risks become more confident, learn how to weigh outcomes and are overall happier.

Patagonia Kids’ 2016 Catalog (U.S.)  

Risk. Kids who take appropriate risks become more confident, learn how to weigh outcomes and are overall happier.