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168 babies died in Kilrush Mother & Baby Home

PÁRAIC MCMAHON paraic@clareecho.ie

168 BABIES died at a West Clare mother and baby home from the period 1922 to 1932. A chapter devoted to the County Clare

Nursery located in Kilrush was included as part of the long-awaited final report from the Mother and Baby Homes Commission of Investigation. “Appalling” living conditions are detailed in the report including children sleeping two to a bed “with every habitable corner occupied”. The Kilrush nursery came into being

following the closure of the workhouses in 1921. It was run by the Congregation of the Sisters of Mercy nuns up to 1928 and afterwards by lay staff. Between 300 to 400 mothers were in the nursery during its lifetime with a greater amount of children. The first birth recorded there was in February 1922 and the last in February 1932. 168 infants died at the

Mother & Baby Home. At the time of its closure, children were either fostered out or sent to Sean Ross Abbey in Roscrea. Prior to this, one councillor at the time suggested taking all the unwanted babies to the pier in Kilrush to “drown them”.

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l STUNNING: Sunset on the Shannon Estuary Photo by Richard Quinn

‘Trump will still be welcome in Doonbeg’

R

ECENT events in Capitol Hill will not dilute the reception for US President Donald Trump for his next visit to Doonbeg, writes PĂĄraic McMahon. Shocking scenes from Washington DC last week saw Trump supporters storm Capitol Hill. Despite this episode and many Republicans voicing out against Donald, a proportion of the Doonbeg and West Clare population remain grateful for his contribution to the area Actions in America have little relevance on life in Doonbeg said PRO of the local coastal protection group, Liam Ryan. “We’ve always backed the company, we’re not in America, we stay away from the decisionâ€?. Their respect is based on the amount of persons employed and the individuals depending on it for their livelihood. Liam warned that the potential impeachment of Trump will lead to a further escalation of tempers. “We all know how dangerous social media is, even in Clare.â€?. Encouraging protesting of any form is not right, Liam stated. “He didn’t do

damage but said things to get people riled up.â€? Ryan felt Capitol Hill incident will not negatively impact Doonbeg and flagged plans for further investment in the area by the Trump family which will be particularly important post COVID-19. Chairperson of Clare Beef Plan, Joseph Woulfe insisted Mr Trump would get the cĂŠad mĂ­le fĂĄilte. “He has helped to feed a lot of families and gave income to allow them and their children to have a better lifeâ€?. Woulfe described the US President as “an anomalyâ€? and “a very unusual public speakerâ€?. He outlined, “I think he should come and go as he chooses. He is welcome to his own property. The time he came before, people wondered if there would be protesting, I wouldn’t expect anything negative to happenâ€?. He admitted that he wouldn’t be one for shaking hands of any US President but said of the New York businessman’s legacy, “In fairness to the man, he hasn’t started a warâ€?. He confirmed he would have voted for Trump over Biden and believed Twitter has a lot to thank him for.

30 social housing units completed across Clare STUART HOLLY

editor@clareecho.ie

                  Â Â? 

    

CLARE County Council has announced the completion of 30 residential units under social housing developments, as well as details of 163 additional units that are currently under construction. The completed units are located in Quilty, Kilmihil, Sixmilebridge and Roslevan. Construction on a new development of 18 units at An Cladach, Quilty West, Quilty, commenced on 25th April, 2019, and was handed over to Clare County Council on 18th December, 2020. This development was constructed by Martins Construction Ltd and comprises a mix of two, three and four-bedroom single and two-storey semi-detached houses. These residential units were constructed to a high standard and achieved Building Energy Ratings (BERs) of A2 and A3. A further two units were recently completed at a new development at St Michael’s Place, Kilmihil. The development was constructed by Custy Construction Ltd. This development saw the construction of two three-bed two-storey semi-detached residential units with a BER of A2. Cappagh Lodge, Sixmilebridge, saw the completion of a further two units. This development was aldo constructed by Custy Construction Ltd, The scheme comprises two three-bed two-storey semi-detached residential units constructed to a high standard and achieving a BER of A2.

The remaining eight units were completed in Roslevan, Ennis, earlier this year. There are 163 units currently under construction by Clare County Council in the county. Fifty-one of these units are under construction in Shannon, under the Shannon Public Private Partnership Scheme. A further 40 units are under construction in Ashline, Ennis. The remaining 72 units are under constructionin Newmarket-on-Fergus , Miltown Malbay, Tulla and Doonbeg. The Mayor of Clare, Cllr Mary Howard, said: “I welcome the development of these new houses, that will provide badly needed homes for people in Clare. It is essential that Clare County Council continues to build homes as part of our plans to address our social housing requirements, and to continue to do this in a planned and strategic way.� The units at Quilty, Kilmihil, Sixmilebridge and Roslevan were funded by the Irish Government under the Rebuilding Ireland Action Plan for Housing and Homelessness.

lNEW HOMES: An Cladach, Quilty


THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

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THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

168 children died

l APPALING: Kilrush workhouse (left) pictured in the 1900s, which became the County Clare Nursery in 1922

PÁRAIC MCMAHON

C

paraic@clareecho.ie

ONDITIONS in the County Clare Nursery have been described as "even worse than Tuam" with "appalling" rates of infant mortality. Published on Tuesday, the long-awaited final report from the Mother and Baby Homes Commission of Investigation recommended a state apology, redress and access to their birth information should be given to survivors. Experiences of women and children who lived in the 14 mother and baby homes and four county homes are included in the 2,865 page document. Approximately 9,000 children died in the 18 homes under investigation, it is roughly 15 percent of all children that were in the institutions. Co Clare's only registered Mother and Baby Home was located in Kilrush. It was owned and financed by Clare County Council and was run by the Congregation of the Sisters of Mercy between 1922 and

1928 and by directly employed lay staff from 1928 to 1932. It closed in March 1932. The average cost of keeping a mother and child was 24 schillings at Kilrush. No extant admission registers existed for the Home which limit the ability to determine how many women and children were in the Kilrush nursery. It is likely that there were between 300 and 400 mothers there and considerably more children. The first birth recorded for the Co Clare nursery was a baby boy, born on the 9th February 1922. The last baby born in the nursery was also a boy, born on 21st February 1932. Baptismal records suggest 330 children were born in the nursery during this period. Figures from the Central Statistics Office detail that 168 'illegitimate infants' died in Co Clare from 1923 to 1932. The Commission noted that Clare's death rate is "very high when compared with the numbers in the baptismal record. As the nursery was the only institution for 'illegitimate' children in Co Clare, it is probable that at least the majority died there". Concerns on the death rate were

voiced at a meeting of the Clare Health Board in February 1927 prompting the need for special precautions, during that month 27 children were suffering from measles. At one point the death rate was so high that two extra nurses were hired to watch the children day and night, the report states.. Another indicator of the high mortality rate was the continuous requisitions for coffins. In a report from March 1922, the nursery committee commented that the mothers were neglected with no proper clothing or comfort of any kind. "We don't consider it is humane to allow expectant and nursing mothers to wring out heavy twill sheets and blankets as they do at present. We feel strongly that the lot of these poor women should be improved. Some are under 20 years and we feel confident we could get good results both to the women and the Home if we could, with discretion and common sense, give them comfort in their work, food and clothing". At the nursery committee meeting that month it was agreed that children could be retained in the nursery when the mothers were

discharged and the committee could use its discretion about admitting children without mothers. There are also references to mothers being discharged for 'insubordination' and the children being retained. Agreement was reached by the nursery committee in May 1922 that mothers would not be allowed leave the institution until the child was at least two years old. In March 1923, the Board of Health informed the nursery committee that it had no power to detain mothers who were willing to bring their children with them. In general, it would appear that many of the women stayed for two years unless taken out by their family and then only with the permission of the board. In May 1924, the matron reported that three women had 'scaled the wall' but had been arrested and brought back by the Gardaí. In October of that year, she reported that two women escaped over the wall leaving behind their two children, one aged three weeks and the other five months. The matter was reported to the Gardaí. Physical condition of the Nursery was described as "always very

‘Proper recognition is needed’ PÁRAIC MCMAHON

paraic@clareecho.ie

RECOGNITION for the mothers and babies from the County Clare Nursery in the form of a fitting memorial is needed in the town of Kilrush. Records indicate that between 300 to 400 women lived at the Nursery from 1922 to 1932 with considerably more children. Baptismal records suggest 330 children were born there during this period while 168 infants died in this time. Rita McCarthy (inset) has been researching this particular Mother & Baby Home since 2009. "Dreadful" conditions and lack of proper food led to the high death rate, she stated. "The water was running down the walls. There was no sanitary conditions, there was no hot

water, there was no cold water, there was nothing, these people were living in the most unbelievably primitive conditions, it is not enough to say this was because of its time, even in its time councillors were going along and paying lip service saying it was a disgrace". An example of the conditions cited by Rita include women doing laundry while water was up to their ankles in winter. In a memo written to the Minister for Local Government and Health in 1924 by Dr Counihan, it was flagged that women were not able to nurse their bodies as extra rations were sought. "At some point, they did increase the rations and someone from the Board of Health wrote back in 1927 and questioned the amount of

food they were giving, it was above what the Board of Health and Government agreed," Rita recalled. As one of the main contributors to the chapter on Kilrush in the Mother and Baby Homes Commission of Investigation, the historian admitted that the topic has become an obsession. She told The Clare Echo that a fitting memorial is needed in the West Clare town for the mothers and babies. "I feel very strongly that these women and all their children deserve some recognition. There must be some memorial for them, we can at least look and say this happened in our town behind the gates of the Workhouse and these were the conditions the people were in". "We need the women and children to be re-

membered, a lot of woman and children went through hardship in Clare in those times. Fathers were pretty much allowed to walk away scotfree, there was notes when the father made contact and changed the name to take responsibility but they were only one or two. There were also children who had no name because they were abandoned, they were given names, one was called 'Hill' because they were found on a hill, those children are even more forgotten and we have to remember it was a difficult time. “It is no use saying it was historical and that's how it was, they knew back then that this was wrong, there are several reports where they acknowledged the conditions certainly some doctors and matrons were looking to improve food and conditions. There are people who knew it was happening and did nothing".

poor". The building was in a bad state of repair with leaking roofs, no baths, and no inside sanitary accommodation. It was so bad that its closure was considered less than a year after it opened. In December 1922, the Local Government Inspector, James McLysaght, who inspected all the county institutions at the request of a committee of inquiry set up by Clare County Council, said that it was a 'perfect scandal to have anyone in the place'. He pointed out that there was no sanitary accommodation and no water supply and that it would cost a lot of money to make it habitable; he was concerned that the prevailing conditions, 'would give rise some time or other to an outbreak of fever for which the County Board of Health would be responsible. Poor conditions in the nursery were a matter of ongoing correspondence between the matron, the Board of Health and the DLGPH. In April 1924, the matron complained that the institution was overcrowded as there were 164 residents in the nursery and children were sleeping two in a bed with 'every habitable corner occupied.'

Bishop Monahan issues apology AN APOLOGY has been issued from the Bishop of Killaloe, Fintan Monahan following the Commission of the Mother and Baby Homes report. Two Mother and Baby Homes were in the Diocese of Killaloe, Sean Ross Abbey in Roscrea (1931-1969) and The County Clare Nursery in Kilrush (1922-1932). In a statement, Bishop Monahan said his response to the report was one "of sorrow, sadness, shame and deep regret". Painful memories were invoked upon reading how "unfairly, unjustly and harshly" the single mothers and their children were treated. "As bishop of Killaloe, I humbly say sorry to all who suffered as outlined in the Report. For the degradation caused, I am sorry; for the suffering inflicted, I am sorry; for the failure of the Church to demonstrate its commitment to the sacredness of human life, I am truly sorry. Sorry is a small word that may seem inadequate in the light of all that is attempting to address. I can only say that it comes from my heart," he added. Professions that the Church was to show a love to all people was not evident for the single mothers of the time, Bishop Monahan felt. "We now clearly see that single mothers should not have been treated in such a manner. I accept that the Church which judged them so harshly is shamed by its actions. That shame is a legacy handed down to our Church today".


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Roche granted conditional permission to decommission PÁRAIC MCMAHON

C

paraic@clareecho.ie

ONDITIONAL planning has been granted for the decommissioning of Roche's Clarecastle site. Further information was sought by the local authority when the initial application was lodged in June of this year. In a decision announced last Monday, the green light was given to the development subject to it meeting a set of conditions. An application fee of €38,000 which is the maximum amount, was paid by the developers who say that up to 160 persons will be employed during the course of the decommissioning work. Contributions which total over €1m have to be paid to the local authority by Roche for use of public infrastructure. A timeline from June 2021 until May 2028 has been listed for the works on the 88 acre site. Daily water usage is expected to be 35m3 per day with a peak of 9m3 per hour. All existing buildings will be demolished as part of the works

which also include the phased remediation of three Areas of Environmental Concern (AECs) within the site boundary such as the main processing and landfill areas. Bulk excavation of the decontamination units and backfilling of excavated areas also form part of the works. Air emission levels are to be recorded and monitored by the developers. "As far as practicable, waste will be removed to licensed receiving facilities located in close proximity to the site and within Ireland. As the bulk of waste from AECs require thermal treatment followed by beneficial reuse, these will be shipped to receiving facilities in continental Europe," the application states. An estimated 39,418 tonnes of waste have been identified at the site, "as a worst case scenario this would need to be disposed of offsite and outside of Ireland at a hazardous waste landfill". Documents included with the planning file flag that the proposed backfilling works exceed 90,000 tonnes. Disposing of the waste will involve a peak of 18 heavy goods vehicles (HGV) an hour travelling from junction 11 of the M18 onto the R458, through Patrick St and

Clarehill. All works on the site are to take place between 7am and 7pm from Monday to Friday inclusive and between 8am and 2pm on Saturday. Roche estimate that there will be a total of 63,000 HGV movements in Clarecastle throughout the lifetime of the project. No observations were made by Transport Infrastructure Ireland (TII) or the Health and Safety Authority (HSA) in relation to the project. The Irish Aviation Authority felt the applicant should be conditioned to engage with Shannon Airport to ensure that appropriate wildlife hazard reduction techniques and management is employed. Pharmaceutical operations ceased at the facility on 27th March 2020. It has built up a strong connection with the locality which resulted in a joint submission of support for the project from Clarecastle Tidy Towns, Clarecastle Community Development CLG and Clarecastle Ballyea Heritage & Wildlife. They stated that the "environmentally sound brownfield development site is of immeasurable value to our future" which poses the possibility of new opportunities that could be "a real socio-econom-

Alive and wool after close shave

‘Just get this to East Clare’ cianobroin@clareecho.ie

l THANK EWE: Johnny Casey with the ewe after his successful rescue effort

The poor thing couldn't stand and her legs were going out from under her." He added: "The tide was coming in and it would probably have drowned if she was left there. We threw her on the shoulders and carried her back across the reef. I ended up drenched and absolutely soaked." The two reached the prom and placed the sheep on a rope and Johnny escorted her up the village to wait for a tractor to transport the sheep back to her home farm. Johnny admitted that he did receive some funny looks from friends and passers-by as he escorted the sheep up the village on the rope. He stated: "I was thinking to myself 'how did I get involved in this?'" The insurance professional stated that he "didn't bat an eyelid" over his rescue effort. He stated: "I grew up with sheep, goats, bullocks, horses so it was nothing out of my day." Mr Casey said that the sheep wouldn't have been spotted from the land as it was hiding in the cave.

darkened living conditions were also referenced regarding the frequency of HGV movements. In a planning report compiled by the Ennis Municipal District, it was detailed by senior engineer Eamon O'Dea that there would be peak HGV movements per day of 220 over a 12 hour period in 2022. He noted that the quantity of traffic movements would not increase significantly in Clarecastle. A spokesperson for Roche described the decision as "a very positive outcome" that can facilitate future use of the site. "Roche Ireland looks forward to receiving a formal grant of planning permission so that work can get underway on this strategic project and the benefits it will deliver to Clarecastle and Co. Clare".

l WORKS: The Roche facility in Clarecastle Photo by Martin Connolly

CIAN O’BROIN

GORDON DEEGAN A LAHINCH surfer has saved an 'exhausted' sheep from drowning after the sheep had fallen off a cliff edge at the Clare seaside resort. Johnny Casey was out surfing waves at Lahinch at the southern end of the beach when he spotted the 'marooned' sheep in a little cave on a ledge at the cliffs. Mr Casey said today that with the tide coming in, there was a real fear that the sheep would drown and he went about rescuing the female sheep. Recalling the recent rescue effort for the ewe, Mr Casey – who celebrates his 30th birthday this weekend – stated that he saw the sheep was "standing there motionless on the ledge. She ended up there after falling down the cliff ". He stated: "I paddled in when I saw the sheep. I got one more wave and off I went. I went over to her and she was quite shaken." Mr Casey then went to the family home of the Leahys who farm the lands along the Cliff edge "and I told Mrs Leahy that one of their sheep had gone off the Cliffs". He stated: "The tide was on its way in and there was a lot of swell with the waves. I grew on a farm in Barefield outside Ennis so I have a bit of experience dealing with livestock and I said that I would go down and get it back." He then proceeded with one of the Leahy sons to rescue the sheep. With the tide coming in, Johnny stated: "We had to wade through rock pools and the water coming in. When we got to her, the sheep was so tired that she couldn't walk. She was absolutely exhausted.

ic game changer for Clarecastle and its environs". Chairperson of Clarecastle GAA, Niall Tuohy in a submission expressed the view that the transformation of the facility opens the possibility to "bring prosperity and vibrancy back to our village". HGV movements prompted concerns in some objections to the works. One Limerick based objector felt there was an intention to move a "colossal quantity of contaminated soil" through Clarecastle with a truck passing "every three to four minutes". Two residents of the village described the scale of HGV movements as a "nuisance" as they cautioned the industrial development could "straddle the Fergus estuary for considerable time". Health concerns, air pollution and

TWO Clare natives have been running an unofficial Christmas challenge for five years against An Post and are hoping that this will finally be the year that they get the better of the national postal service. The pair, Gearoid Kelly of Feakle and Anthony McTigue of Kilnamona, have been challenging each other in attempting to successfully send their Christmas postcards to one another by adding a vague description instead of a full postal address on the front of their letters. Gearoid and Anthony met in college in Galway, where they hung out and played music together and have been friends for the past 10 years. "Each year we send a letter addressed to our parent's homes in Clare. Each time, we put less info on it, increasing the challenge," Gearoid explains. This year, Anthony, writing from Sydney, Australia, addressed his letter to Gearoid as follows: That lad who studied commerce in NUIG who used to be in TradSoc, played in the Crane on Tuesdays, lives in Dublin now for the past few years, see him on Facebook a lot with dinosaur costume. Tulla.... or perhaps Feakle? Anyhow, just get this to East Clare and they will know who I am on about, Ireland. The letter made its way to the postal office in Tulla, who

subsequently passed it onto a local lady, living in Feakle, who is familiar with the family. After reading the description, a connection was made, and the letter was then dropped off to Gearoid's parents' house. The year before, Gearoid says that the local postman rang his home address to see if the letter was for him. "By now there is probably a red flag being highlighted for us in An Post. Each year is getting more difficult to beat the system. We are running out of ideas to make it as vague as possible," he adds. Gearoid credits the hard work of An Post, saying that they "Go above and beyond in getting anything delivered." In spite of this resounding success over the past five years, Gearoid concedes that his letter, addressed to Anthony's home house in Clare, has yet to be delivered. Sending it from Dublin, Gearoid decided to add an extra element of creativity. Writing his in Irish, the address contains a description of his friend's son and mentions that he is living in Australia. It reads: “A mhac an fir a shnoigh dealbh Michael Cusack atá in Inis. Tá an mac Engineer san Astral ach tá an áit bhaile í gContae an Chláir.” "I am holding out my hopes, hoping it will arrive. It has been several weeks now. Having written it in Irish, maybe I have pushed the boundaries out too much. I am hoping in speaking to The Clare Echo that maybe the search for it will continue and it can be found," he adds.


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‘School is where Jack learns life skills’ CIAN O’BROIN

P

cian@clareecho.ie

ARENTS of special needs students in Clare have said their children have retreated and regressed due to the disruptions to their school routines with one teenager refusing to leave his room for 11 weeks. Last week it was decided that schools would remain closed until January 31st. Certain special needs schools and classes are permitted to remain open. However, for many special needs students like Julia Pennekamp (9) and Jack Faulkes (17) attending mainstream education, the onus lies on the parents, who state that they have received very little support from the government since school closures began last March. "Leaving the house for Jack has always been a challenge because of the way he perceives people, they

are abstract to him. Over the years, we have helped him with his regular routine in getting to school. Everything about getting out of the house is about getting ready and going to school. “At school is where he learns his life skills and that's where he gets his socialising from. He has always had an issue with germs and once the virus came it was off the charts. So much so that he wouldn't leave his room for 11 weeks, only to fill up his water bottle and go to the bathroom," Fiona Faulkes, mother to Jack Faulkes, who has Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) told The Clare Echo. Jack, who attends St. Joseph's Secondary School, Spanish Point is part of an autism unit operated by the school. Each day, a teacher within the school emails Fiona and Jack with work to complete. “I am very anxious about Jack though. I know how long and how stubborn he will be about staying in his room. It's that regression that I see. He has one friend,

Dylan, from the autism unit in the school and they ring each quite often. Besides chats I have with him that is the only contact he has". Nicole Pennekamp, mother to Julia Pennekamp (9), who attends Doolin National School, exclaims that there is nothing for her daughter in mainstream education despite the excellent efforts of the school. She explains that since October, her daughter's anxiety has gone through the roof. Julia, who like Jack, has ASD spends 20 minutes each day with her SNA online. "With her routine completely disrupted, there has been a massive impact in the house here. There is no respite for both of us. Due to the time of year and our inability to get out for walks, it is more difficult for her to focus on her work. “She needs activity breaks during her work, to run it off. The school is extremely helpful; however, I am waiting for someone to give me some respite hours per week, which isn't possible at the moment due to the number of cas-

THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

l VITAL: Jack Faulkes (right) pictured with his friend, Dylan es," Nicole commented. Fiona believes that services are underfunded for parents of special needs students and feels that there could have been more recognition and guidance from government. "There was loads of time and information. They failed to anticipate this and have no Plan B. “What we are looking for is ad-

vice and access to different ways of learning. Some students can handle it, some can't. There needs to be support there for those that can't," Fiona highlighted. She also says that there is very little access to local services and that Jack hasn't been able to avail of therapy for the last four years, due to a large backlog.

Clare students lead call for Leaving Cert grading options CLARE students are leading the call for predictive grades to be made optional for the Leaving Certificate class of 2021, writes Páraic McMahon. Contingency planning for the 2021 Leaving Certificate is to be discussed by the State Examinations Commission later this month but pleas have been issued for this process to be accelerated to give greater clarity. Cian Mac Coisteala was among one of the first voices to speak out against the planned reopening of schools last week, a decision which was reversed in just under two days. He was critical of the Department of Education for failing to have a back-up plan given the way in which last year’s State Exams unfolded. “I believe a decision should be made

l FRUSTRATED: Cian Mac Coisteala

Photo by Gary Collins

quickly and a realistic solution must be presented because we can’t rush this thing like we did last year because it caused a lot of issues. We have to be conscious of the time because we lost a lot of time last year”. A student at Gaelcholáiste an Chláir, Cian admitted that frustration got the better of him when listening to the Minister for Education, Norma Foley (FF) on national airwaves last week and accused the Kerry TD of showing “utter disregard” for the wellbeing of students. “Students are very anxious. The stress we are under now with all the uncertainty is a lot to be dealing with, you’re sitting down to the study you’re behind in your coursework but you don’t even now what is going on with the Mocks”. “By pushing for a traditional exam I don’t think they are listening to the views of students when we’ve had such an unusual year. I’ve struggled myself with mental health in the past and I thought it was just unjust,” he told The Clare Echo. He confirmed he would prefer to sit an exam rather than avail of calculated grades. He is of the view that students are being listened to now and is against the notion of cancelling the Leaving Cert but highlighted how far behind they are with the curriculum. “Last year was a time when we were supposed to build up a lot of ground for the Leaving Cert, even now we’re still playing catch-up. We’ve missed out on too much now to even catch up on the work, it is not realistic to have a traditional Leaving Cert exam at this stage unless they acknowledge the amount of time we have lost”. Lara Costello is a recently appointed regional officer with the ISSU (Irish Second-Level Students’ Union). A Leaving Certificate student at St Patrick’s Com-

prehensive in Shannon, she has appealed for a choice to be given to students to choose between predictive grades and sitting the traditional exams. Announcing the planned reopening of schools in the midst of a third wave of the pandemic left Lara “incredibly confused”. She commented, “Students are struggling, it was the prospect of having to choose between our education and the health of ourselves and our loved ones, although schools were opening some people were deciding themselves not to go in because they felt so insecure and so unsafe.”. She felt the amount of time missed strengthened the argument to move towards calculated grades. “I would really plead with the Department of Education to give us the choice between calculated grades and the

exams, the amount of time we’ve missed is insane. The class of 2021 missed three months worth of school last year and now we’re back online learning. There is a massive negative impact from a socio-economic perspective, particularly people with disabilities and neurodivergent students focusing online can be so difficult and it’s not accessible for everyone. It would be totally unfair to make all students sit the traditional Leaving Cert,” she added Mac Coisteala outlined that they will take note of the actions of politicians today when it comes to polling day. “It is important for them to remember that they are dealing with students who are 17 or 18 and are coming up to the voting age, we will remember how they treat this situation when it comes to the next election”.


NEWS 9

THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

Clare's 14 day incidence rate of COVID-19 hits all-time high OVER 1,000 new cases of COVID-19 have been diagnosed in Co Clare over the space of seven days, writes Páraic McMahon. In what is the quickest growth of the virus in the county since the beginning of the pandemic, a total of 1,129 new confirmed cases for the county were notified to health officials from the period of January 4th to January 11th. As of Tuesday evening, the National Public Health Emergency Team (NPHET) confirmed that Clare's 14 day incidence rate per 100k of the population has hit an all-time high of 1498.1 and remains above the national rate of 1410.3. Up to 574 members of staff at UL Hospitals Group were unavailable for work due to COVID-19, 201 nurses and attendants at University Hospital Limerick (UHL) are affected. Multi-layered socialising by a proportion of the population during, before and after Christmas has led to the rapid spread of infection. Outbreaks were recorded in various social settings, including private households, among extended families, large house gatherings, the hospitality sector, and in workplaces. Preliminary evidence from cases identified in social settings and in the community in December have been contributing factors in a number of outbreaks in longterm care facilities and healthcare settings. New outbreaks in workplaces are also being managed. While the vast majority of workplaces are adhering to strict guidelines, particularly in relation to engagement with the public, some workplaces are dropping

the guard when it comes to staff contact, the Department of Public Health have said. Instances where staff are not wearing masks or are in close contact in break rooms. These practices should no longer happen, as they can and will lead to workplace outbreaks. Dr Mai Mannix, Director of Public Health Mid-West, said: "We are now seeing the impact of this third wave in our community, as

we focus our efforts on managing complex cases and outbreaks in nursing homes and residential care facilities across the region. “Our focus right now is to break the chain of transmission so we can limit the spread among our most vulnerable population, and to prevent further loss of life in the coming weeks". She expected the next few weeks would be the Mid-West's "greatest test since

the start of the pandemic". Cathaoirleach of the Killaloe Municipal District, Cllr Pat Hayes (FF) said the onus is on the public to alleviate the pressure on the healthcare system by following all guidelines and staying home. "There is a need for us all to keep up the good fight and try support communities and individuals and promote that it is in our hands to keep safe".

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‘We need to do more than call them heroes’ CLARE councillors are leading the call for frontline workers during the current pandemic to receive "tangible recognition", writes Páraic McMahon. Plaudits greater than lighting a candle or a collective clapping of hands are needed to adequately pay tribute to frontline staff, local elected representatives in the county have stated. In a motion discussed at Monday's meeting of Clare County Council, Cllr Joe Garrihy (FG) urged the Irish Government to explore means of thanking the country's frontline workers by means of a tax free bonus payment, paid leave or a tax credit. He believed the Department of Health should lead a cross-Departmental grouping to determine the measure that could be introduced and who would be entitled to it. Although Cllr Killeen acknowledged the timing wasn't right considering the significant rise in COVID-19 cases after Christmas but he believed it was important to begin the conversation, "It is not about money but it is about doing more than calling people heroes". Garrihy added, "The commitment and all sacrifices being made cannot just be treated as a thank you". "One of the things we can do to help our frontline workers is to look after our own health and minimise the impact on the health service until we reach the peak and get onto the vaccination. They are stretched to the limit," Cllr Joe Killeen (FF) commented. He added, "There has to be some reward for those who put their lives on the line and continue to do so". Agreement on the sentiments of Killeen were expressed by Cllr Garrihy, "The most important thing we can do to protect our health services is to stay home and bring down the numbers".

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10 NEWS

THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

Safer entrance to graveyard needed PĂ RAIC MCMAHON

A

paraic@clareecho.ie

SAFER design at the entrance of one of Clare's biggest graveyards and crematoriums has been sought. An 'urgent' plea was tabled by Cllr Gerry Flynn (IND) at a recent meeting of the Shannon Municipal District for "a safer design" at the exit and entrance of Illaunamanagh graveyard and crematorium plus the sports and recreation facilities at Tullyvarraga. Flynn maintained, "There is very little sight lines available to road users at this location and the area has experienced a lot more activity over the last number of years". Senior executive engineer, Aidan O'Rourke committed to having an examination at the location in question "to determine the measures required to improve sightlines at this junction". Funding would

have to be found if works were necessary, he said. Speaking at the meeting, Cllr Flynn pointed out that he also flagged the matter in the first half of 2020. "The volume of use at that junction has increased considerably and I believe a design needs to be put in place to address sight issues". He believed it was demonstrative of the Shannon MD being "the poor relation" when it comes to funding from Clare County Council. "I am not happy with the response because we are putting lives at risk". Any potential works should dovetail with plans for Hasting's Cottage, Cllr Pat O'Gorman (FF) suggested. It is a popular spot for walkers in Shannon, Cllr Donna McGettigan (SF) outlined. "A lot of walkers use it, people also use it to park their cars to start walking around the Shannon Loop. Increasing traffic levels in the vicinity formed another argument to carry out works, Cllr PJ Ryan (IND) maintained. "With the volume of traffic there at the moment, it has increased immensely. There needs to be something done with it in near future".

Lack of cycling lane on approach to airport flagged ABSENCE of infrastructure to facilitate cyclists within the vicinity of Shannon Airport has been brought into focus, writes PĂĄraic McMahon. Clare County Council have been requested by Cllr Gerry Flynn (IND) to include cycling lanes in the design of the Airport Rd on the N19 and in the interval to put in place temporary measures "as currently no cycle lane exists". Senior engineer, SeĂĄn Lenihan voiced his agreement that the scheme design is in need of cycle lanes and improved pedestrian access. He confirmed that a detailed design had yet to be conducted for the scheme but that a number of options would be put before the public including the option of "shared use two-way cycle and

pedestrian pathways". Encouragement of cycling needs to form the thinking into new schemes, Cllr Flynn stated. "There are no mechanisms in place and cyclists by law are not allowed cycle to the airport,� he added. The proposal was seconded by Cllr Donna McGettigan (SF). Earlier at the meeting of the Shannon Municipal District, acting senior executive officer Jason Murphy commented that the work associated with the scheme was expected to be ongoing for the next two to three years. Detail had been sought by the County Council on whether the road would be a dual or single carriageway and also what pedestrian and cycling facilities

would exist, senior executive engineer Aidan O'Rourke outlined. "There is no way we should consider a single carriageway, we should definitely be pushing for a dual carriageway. If there is an accident on a single carriageway, the access to the airport is closed down," Cllr PJ Ryan (IND) argued. "That would be common sense," Cllr Pat McMahon (FF) remarked as Cllr Flynn told the meeting he has put in "a number of submissions" over the years highlighting the need for an international airport to have adequate access. "I'd agree fully with PJ, you are coming off a motorway to an international airport. If there is an accident the airport would have to close," Cllr McGettigan added.

lURGENT PLEA: Illaunamanagh Graveyard

Photo by Joe Buckley

Flood damage residents worthy of insurance cover FLOOD damage for South Clare residents needs to be included as part of insurance cover, a Clare councillor has stated, writes PĂĄraic McMahon. Insurance companies were requested to consider the inclusion of flood damage for the residents of the Shannon Municipal District by Cllr John Crowe (FG). Houses within the MD have been "hindered by getting flood relief on their insurance" for many years, the Sixmilebridge councillor stated. "There is a review going on at the moment, I would be hoping that we could send our views to that review and it would be included. It is very wrong at this stage, I can't understand that the insurance companies can't do this with the profits they are making". Support for the motion was voiced by Cllr Donna McGetti-

gan (SF). "I'm in Shannon 40 years and I don't remember it ever flooding. I can't see why it isn't on insurance," she stated. "There is more to this than meets the eye," Cllr Gerry Flynn (IND) cautioned. He pointed to the Shannon CFRAM study which highlighted areas at risk and lands reclaimed. Having insurance was the message he believed the public needed to consume. "Get insurance is the message to people, you can lose your house because a fire, you can repatriate it after flooding". Cllr PJ Ryan (IND) added, "Whoever wrote the CFRAMS report thought Shannon was in danger of being flooded and I don't think that was ever going to happen. The people of Shannon suffered because of the CFRAMS report, the risk was a lot less than the insurance companies made out".

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Arts & Entertainment 11

THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

Marty recounts getting temporary amnesia while shooting for RTÉ TADHG HOLLAND

P

news@clareecho.ie

OPULAR Clare broadcaster, Marty Morrissey has spoken about his fear of swimming and an incident which left him with temporary amnesia. Speaking on 'The Laughs Of Your Life' podcast, Morrissey revealed to host Doireann Garrihy that shooting an episode of 'Marty and Bernard's Big Adventure' in 2018 ended with him being "rushed to the hospital". Marty recalled, "The second part of ['Marty and Bernard's Big Adventure'] was to test ourselves out against the elements. Could we survive in the wild west? We were in

training, we did all sorts of things, we were taught how to survive, how to light a fire with timber etc but they knew the one fear I have despite being from West Clare is a fear of water, I can't swim." Morrissey described how he was taken to Wicklow to shoot an episode of 'Marty and Bernard's Big Adventure', "We arrived in some part of Wicklow and when we arrived in Wicklow they put masks on over our eyes and next thing I remember standing somewhere in a field beside Bernard and some guy from the army recruitment roaring. He'd come right up to your ear [and say] 'Are you ready to do this'. "Next thing they threw a bucket of water at us and next thing we were in the lake. So, after a while they took me out and we were in a timber kind of hut and they provided us meals but apparently Bernard said, 'there is

WILD ATLANTIC FLEADH CANCELLED AN ONLINE Irish festival scheduled to take place over St Patrick's Week has been cancelled, writes Páraic McMahon. Festival producers of the Wild Atlantic Fleadh cited the spike in confirmed cases of COVID-19 throughout Europe and the US for their decision. A spokesperson told The Clare Echo, "While we are very disappointed to have to push the Wild Atlantic Fleadh to next year, the health and safety of our performers and crew has to come first. “Our confidence that we could safely produce the online fleadh was based on the numbers when we announced back in November, however the current trajectory of the virus is a

different playing field to anything prior. We know that postponing the Wild Atlantic Fleadh is the responsible and right thing to do. One positive outcome of moving the Fleadh to 2022 is that we can combine the planned online event with a live and in person event, which was always the long term goal of the producers". Patrons who had already purchased tickets will be refunded in full, organisers have confirmed. A new date for the Wild Atlantic Fleadh in 2022 will be announced in due course. Acts that had been confirmed to play festival included Cherish the Ladies, Nathan Carter, Riverdance tenor Michael Londra and folk duo Byrne and Kelly.

something wrong with him'. “So, they looked at me and said what do you think of that and what do you think of that and I said did we do that, did we do that," RTÉ's GAA correspondent added. "They brought me to the doctor in Ashford and from there I was rushed to the hospital, out to the Beacon and they tested me out and they told me that I had temporary global amnesia". The Mullagh man said the condition was caused by the sudden shock of the water although he didn't say that it had any long-term effects. Last year, Marty became one of the first RTÉ broadcasters to present a programme from a shed in West Clare. 'Marty In The Shed' was a virtual chat-show for the RTÉ Player which was shot by Ennis cameraman Paschal Brooks in the garden shed' in the West Clare home of Morrissey's mother

Peggy. Also on the podcast Marty discussed his love for the GAA, growing up in the Bronx and his teenage years in West Clare.

lSHOCK: Broadcaster Marty Morrissey

Photo by Paschal Brooks

Scariff Library hold online book club addressing mental health CIAN O’BROIN

cianobroin@clareecho.ie

SCARIFF Library are running a monthly online book club through Zoom, in conjunction with First Fortnight, a charity that challenges mental health prejudice through arts and cultural action. The first meeting, which took place on Tuesday January 12 at 11am, looked at Matt Haig's 'The Midnight Library'. The novel, released in 2020, tells the story of a woman who steps into the possibilities of her life, inspecting both the best and worst possible outcomes. Linking with the national First Fortnight festival, 'The Midnight Library' was selected from the Mind Reading recommended reading list. Clare County Library has been linked with First Fortnight Festivals for years, tells Senior Executive Librarian Cora Gunter. It's all about creating awareness and letting

members know that these books have these themes in them, she explains. The Scariff Branch joins a number of other Clare branches who have been operating book clubs before and during the lockdowns. "We find that it is a bit of challenge for our members with regards to technology. Overall, that link and connection back into the group is beneficial. In sharing a reading experience, members of our book clubs and communities will have the opportunity to give their views and opinions after reading it. We wanted to keep this going through the third lockdown. The other two previous times we had them up and running. This lockdown has been more challenging than the others and this offers members of the community the chance to engage with their peers," Cora states. Zoom allows for an air of inclusivity, she stresses. Each book club contains between 8 and 10 members. Cora references several workshops delivered to book clubs throughout

the County Library services. One particular workshop in Scariff brought in the author, allowing participants to discuss their views and opinions with the author throughout the session. She states: "We would prefer our book clubs to be coming into the library. The Ennis Library runs three separate book club groups. Our preference would certainly be to have them in person. Obviously, we are following guidelines, and this is an adaptation in the same way everyone else is having to adapt." Anyone interested can contact their local branch. Bigger branches that are staffed are operating book clubs. The book will be delivered out to individuals that are cocooning or older and can also be accessed online. Clare County Library have a lot of resources through Borrow Box, where individuals can download the audio book or the full version also. Scariff book club are keen to add new members and can be contacted on 061 922893 or email scarriff_ library@clarecoco.ie.


12 COLUMNIST

THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

Eoin Neylon

An inside look at Clare’s political spectrum With



With With

  Healthy food leads to healthy people says The Clare Echo’s farming columnist Joe Melody who admits daily messaging from health officials surrounding the virus are missing a trick.

S

ADLY it’s become part of most people’s daily routine. We wait with bated breath for the daily count of the latest Coronavirus cases. Interspersed through these bulletins is the public health advice we receive; wear a mask, wash your hands, socially distance and we’re reminded of the roll out of the much needed vaccine. What I cannot understand though is there’s no daily reminder to eat well, exercise and build a resilient immune system, all things that are under our own control. In Ireland we’re lucky to have an abundance of locally produced nutrient dense food that along with regular exercise can build an active and robust immune system to take on viruses and pathogens. We know that nature is full of pathogens and viruses. Anyone who grew up on a farm will have had their immune systems well tested

and trained to be more robust in the process from being exposed to the soil and various microorganisms. How does Irish agriculture contribute to a healthy immune system though for non farming folk, I hear you ask. Well it all centres around the proliferation of pasture based farming. In Co. Clare, the majority of its land area is unsuitable for tillage but grows grass vigorously. I feel we often loose sight of how wonderful the food produced off this pasture is especially in a world where our beef has been commoditised rather than been put on a pedestal as an example of what all beef should aspire to be. It is rich in Vitamin A and E which are essential for a strong immune system. These cattle get these vitamins themselves from eating rich pastures and being out in the open expressing themselves as cattle rather than as a unit of production.

ď ŹCLUCKING AROUND: Melody’s free range hens

Milk produced from cows that graze pasture is rich in Vitamin D, which is a hugely important vitamin for a resilient immune system. These cows have lots of this vitamin because they are out grazing in the open soaking up the sunshine, these cows in turn produce a milk that is not only life giving but is health enhancing. These are only two examples of bovine produced foods but the same can be said for lamb produced off grass as is done all across pockets of Clare especially in the north of the county. Lamb produced off these pastures have on average 14% less fat and 8% more protein. Why is this? Movement! These sheep are out in the elements constantly walking and grazing just like the cattle do. This leads to strong muscles and healthy animals which in turn leads to lean quality meat. This is healthy food that leads to healthy people. On our farm, we have seen the difference pasture raised animals can make to food quality and animal health not just in beef we raise or milk we produce but in the past year with the arrival of my brother Frank’s 400 clucking hens who really enjoy their pasture. These hens are moved regularly just like a herd of pasture fed dairy cows or rotationally grazed cattle. The egg yolks are an almost orangey colour with a firm egg white. What is the first thing you see when someone is sick? Their colour. So food should be no different, a healthy egg yolk colour is a sign of a healthy hen thriving on their natural omnivorous diet foraging for insects on fresh pasture expressing themselves rather than scratching a dust yard or being locked in a cage as some sort of a robotic egg producing machine.

Trump worship must end

J

UST a few hours after filing my column for last week’s paper, a friend contacted me via WhatsApp to ask was I watching the US Congress certification of the Presidential election. My incurious response was that, as much a political anorak as I am, I could not bring myself to watch such a dull affair as a role call vote to a foregone conclusion. Fast forward another hour, and I along with many others here was glued to the TV as we watched incredulous scenes unfold in Washington DC. For the first time in our lifetime, my generation were watching a full scale assault on the very institutions of a Western democracy. My thoughts immediately went back to 2018 and my sole visit to the US Capitol where Congressman Brendan Boyle’s office graciously gave my fiancĂŠe and I a private tour of the building, meeting newly elected members of Congress like Rashida Tlaib along the way in the wake of midterm elections. Luckily, word came through quickly that all members their staff were safe. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case for everyone on duty on the day. A week later and we are still trying to digest what we witnessed and the alarm with which this raises for other countries too. Earlier in the day, Donald Trump and his inner circle addressed an assembled crowd, whipping them up, before instructing them to march on the Capitol. If that is not incitement to riot, I do not know what is. Their language was deliberate, and hate filled. Instructions of ‘going to battle’ and “march down Pennsylvania Avenue [to the Capitol Building]â€? and to “take back our countryâ€? were given to the assembled mass of Trump supporters by the President and his various spokespeople, which included Kimberly Guilfoyle, daughter of Ennis man Tony Guilfoyle. What followed was an utter disgrace. An election campaign that tried to pit Trump on the side of law and order, descended into outright treasonous behaviour as the crowd breached the Capi-

tol building to try stop the final part of the free and fair election that happened two months ago. In doing so, the crowd who, up to then, pithed themselves as the key proponents of ‘Blue Lives matter’, directly antagonising the Black Lives Matter movement, beat one police officer to death and left many more in hospital. In all, five people lost their lives in the Capitol. The insurrection proved a failure and Congress re-convened to certify the election anyway. The aftermath is only beginning to bite for the disgraced US President as some of his most loyal supporters have fled his cause. His Northern Ireland envoy has resigned, Irish owned Stripe have stopped processing payments for his website and the PGA have pulled out of hosting the 2022 PGA Championship on one of his golf courses. Make no mistake, the Trump brand is going to take an enormous hit, and this is worrisome for Doonbeg. So long as his name adorns the property, expect footfall to plummet, regardless of Covid. As I have stated in this column before, Trump is no saviour for West Clare. He didn’t buy the resort out of any act of altruism. Nor was he the only person interested in the asset when it came up for sale. There were many others lined up with Trump’s bid coming out on top in the end. However, were he not in the bidding, it would have tak-

en on my someone else who would have undoubtedly done a similar job for the West Clare village. The local hero worship of a wannabe dictator must end. There are many other great, local hotel owners in the West of the county, like the Burkes and the Vaughans, who do stellar work for the county who must be sickened at the scenes they witness whenever a member of the Trump clan comes to town. In the interim, the scale of the legal ramifications for Trump and his dwindling number of supporters is yet to be fully realised. Many arrests have already taken place and Trump is set to be impeached again for his role in the first attack on the US Capitol since 1814 when the British burned it to the ground. The cult he has built around him, founded on delusional thoughts of grandeur and a violent attitude to the media that has valiantly attempted to hold him to account, will persist beyond his leaving office though. It serves as a warning for the rest of us: beware the politicians that sow mistrust in the media, for they’re likely the ones with the most to hide. For over a century and a half, the US has put their democracy on a pedestal for the rest of world to admire. If that solid democracy can be so shaken to its core, then there’s no reason to believe the same cannot happen here. Beware the populists.

ď ŹRIOT: Trump supporters stormed the Capitol building in Washington DC last week


FEATURES 13

THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021



GREEN CLARE

Seed Savers celebrate 30 years

CIAN O’BROIN

S

cianobroin@clareecho.ie

CARIFF based Irish Seed Savers Association celebrates its 30th anniversary this year, perpetuating a passion for preserving Ireland’s seed heritage. Founded by Anita and Tommy Hayes in County Wicklow, with the venture moving to Clare 25 years ago, Irish Seed Savers now boasts a 20-acre site, comprising an internationally renowned apple tree collection and the nations only public seed bank. Promoting national biodiversity is at the core of their foundation, encouraging the community to come together collaboratively in sharing and planting seeds. Marketing and Development Co-ordinator Peter Couchman says that Irish Seed Savers has become a significant employer in the area and are proud of the work being done for the local economy. Despite facing many challenges in 2020, the association noted a 225 per cent increase in seed selling. Peter asserts that the Irish population realised the value of growing their own food, amid empty shelves caused by the pandemic. Each seed tells its own unique story, he explains. “Even though there are dark times, the positive side is that people are reconnecting with growing. Our seed bank contains 600 varieties. We have some very native Irish seeds that have been developed here that are often lost. One of the ones that we often cite is the Buan Onion. “That was developed by an Irish grower in Tipperary in the 1950s. He took all the best varieties he could of Irish onions, that led to this onion that was perfect for the growing conditions in Ireland. “It was so successful that it went around the world to other seed banks but was then lost to Ireland. We managed to bring a sample of that back from a Russian institute and reintroduced it into this country. Now it’s one of the best sellers.� Irish Seed Savers slowly developed from just volunteers into a blend of volunteers and 20 permanent staff members. The majority of staff operate as part of the seed team, tasked with growing crops, packaging seeds and

sending them to customers and supporters. The orchard team look after Ireland’s largest apple tree collection, sporting over 180 unique varieties. An education team delivers training and workshops on site, teaching people to save and grow their own seeds. This educational element has several strands, Peter tells. Schools are brought on site and taught how to grow themselves and teachers receive a specialised training pack. A school forest was also introduced last year, where children outside of school can be brought in for training. An adult education programme teaches a new skill around growing. The Community Seed Guardians, operated through Rethink Ireland, is a programme that looks at how communities are currently growing and how they can learn to save seeds. “We are really proud of what we do and are always encouraging others to learn the same skills,� Peter states. Over 2,000 supporters help fund Irish Seed Savers. By signing up, they receive a collection of free seeds. Peter affirms that this is an integral part of how the association operates. Half of the association’s annual income is earned from sales and workshops, with the other half being financed through grants and funds provided by the Department of Agriculture. These are offered in line with the preservation of native seed varieties, Peter explains. “This is the perfect time of year to become a supporter and start growing your own seeds. Despite the enormous challenges we faced in 2020 due to restrictions and limited amount of people on site, we are delighted to be celebrating our 30th anniversary. This is our chance to be looking ahead. We are proud of the work that we have been doing with seeds. We want to make sure our apple tree collection is spread around Ireland so that if anything were to happen to it, it exists elsewhere. For our supporters, we are excited for them to be a part of this renewed interest in people growing. There is a huge amount to do this year,� Peter concludes. Visit irishseedsavers.ie to shop an eclectic seed collection, pledge your support or simply find out more information on how the Scariff based association works. lBIODIVERSITY: (left) Seed Savers curator Joanne Newton with Luka Bloom

lTRAINING: An education team deliver workshops on site

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14 COLUMNIST

THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

BREAK THE DIET WITH VENISON Kearney Cooks

B

ETWEEN Brexit, Covid and lockdown I had been feeling a little down lately, so I decided to feck the diet out the window (just for one day) and treat myself to a very tasty Sunday dinner, but with a twist. I have noticed the variety of produce on shopping centre shelves has reduced somewhat lately, probably because of Brexit, so I have been doing more local shopping. I got a beautiful loin of venison from the Ennis farmers market on Friday last, and I decided to pair it with a wonderful blackberry and balsamic glaze. I usually do the sauce well before I cook the meat as it’s easy heat up the sauce just as you’re about to serve. INGREDIENTS For the sauce: • 200g blackberries • 1 diced shallot • 1 clove of garlic • 30 ml balsamic vinegar • 750 ml beef stock

R

ebecca O’Neill

S

• •

1 sprig of thyme Half a glass of red wine

For the venison: • 1 venison loin or fillet • 3 cloves of garlic • Rapeseed oil • 4 Sprigs of thyme • Plenty of salt and pepper Step 1 Season your meat generously with salt and pepper, cover with oil, thyme and some crushed garlic and let it marinate. Step 2 Into a hot pan or pot add a drop of oil and fry your onions, garlic and blackberries for a couple of minutes. As your onions begin to colour horse in your red wine and balsamic vinegar. Let the alcohol burn off on that by boiling hard for a couple of minutes. As your wine and balsamic starts to thicken and go syrupy feck in your beefstock and boil it hard until its reduced into a thicker sauce. It should reduce to about

two thirds. Step 3 Blend your now thickened sauce with a stick blender and pass it through a sieve. Stir in a small cube of butter, this should give it a nice sheen, and keep it warm on a very low heat. Step 4 Place your marinated fillet onto a roasting hot pan and leave it for about four minutes. Then flip it and reduce the heat by half after two minutes. Feck about 100g butter, some thyme and two cloves of garlic into the pan with your venison. As the butter melts, use it to baste your fillet for a further two minutes (these timings are for a rare cook, but if you want it more well done just cook it for longer). Step 5 Leave your cooked venison on a board to rest for five minutes, and then cut into slices. I served mine on top of creamy mashed potatoes, with butter boiled carrots

and some asparagus. However celeriac, wild mushrooms and veggies like squash go amazingly well with venison too. Finally, pour over some of your amazing blackerry and balsamic reduction and tear into your wonderful venison dish. All of the ingredients I used on this dish were Irish and most were produced locally. My venison fillet cost me €12 from Ennis farmers market in Roslevan and fed four adults. We are blessed with quality produce in Clare and I do hope to feature more local produce in this column going forward. If you are a producer and would like me to feature some fantastic Clare products you can message me on Instagram by searching KearneyCooks or @stevekearney37.

Enjoy

Steve K

Setting goals for 2021 Columnist Rebecca O’Neill offers some advice on achieving your goals and setting a positive mindset for the new year

ETTING out unique goals for yourself is crucial to get what you want. This can be hard for some people that have a lack of motivation and drive for life. It can often cause some people to feel down because they can’t think of any goals for themselves. In this week’s column, I’m going to talk about ways to create goals for yourself. These will be easy ways to get what you want in life. This would all start with day to day life, including small every day goals that are very achievable and realistic for you at that moment in time. I’m going to make a list of small goals for you to stimulate your motivation. These are also some of my personal goals.  Getting dressed before 9.00am every morning. (This helps you feel ready for the day ahead and organised).  Going for a 20 minute walk

within your 5km distance. (This refreshes the mind and body).  30 minute Yoga session followed by 3 minute meditation.  Reading your favourite book for at least 10-20 minutes a day. (This is entirely dependent on you).  Journaling your day. (This can be hard to do everyday. If you struggle with this, once a week is perfect too. Writing down your thoughts from that day or week can really help you highlight your positives).  Eating three meals a day. (Some people do struggle with eating. Everyone has a different re-

lationship with food. If you manage to eat your three meals a day that you may struggle to do, that is an amazing accomplishment).  Drink at least two litres of water daily. (The benefits that drinking enough water has would shock some people. When you start getting into this habit you’ll notice a positive change to your skin and body).  Take a break from your phone for at least 30-60 minutes a day. (This is one goal a lot of people would struggle to do but also need to do it. This ultimately helps clear your mind). These goals are more achievable

NEW START: 2021 is full of possibilities

for me when I want to have a positive mindset. I also want to ensure you, your goals are entirely catered to your needs. If you achieve only one goal that day, that is a big positive step. Maybe the next day you will achieve two goals. I would encourage you to ease yourself into this journey. Another way to set out your goals can be by creating a vision board. This is very beneficial for people that like to see everything visually. All you have to do is create a list of goals that you want to achieve in 2021, collect some pictures from old magazines that inspire you and write down some of your favourite inspiring quotes to stick all onto your vision board. This board can be your main inspiration for the year ahead and may encourage you to achieve more than you even planned. The main idea behind this whole column is to create a positive and successful mindset for your 2021. This is also a gentle reminder to be kind to yourself.


THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

Forever friendship

RONAN SCULLY

options and make choices about who we want to be.

Thought for the week

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FTER a very productive deep and meaningful conversation on a long walk up Diamond Hill in Connemara with one of my best friends recently, I started to reflect on the nature of friendship, and a few thoughts emerged regarding what constitutes a healthy friendship. One reason that I think friendship is so enjoyable is that it allows us to appreciate qualities in others that we do not ourselves possess. God has made each person unique and unrepeatable and friendship gives us a chance to recognize the gifts of others. It can liberate us from some of the narrowness of our own pointof-view. While we possess certain qualities in common with our friends, I think that much of the pleasure we receive from friendship arises from the uniqueness we discover in others. I often say that it is blessed are they, who have the gift of making friends, for it is one of God's best gifts. It involves many things, but above all, the power of getting out of one's self, and appreciating whatever is noble and loving in another. Sometimes in life, you find a special friend. Someone who changes your life just by being a part of it. Someone who makes you laugh until you can't stop. Someone who makes you believe that there really is good in the world. Someone who convinces you that there really is an unlocked door just waiting for you to open it. This is Forever Friendship. When you're down and the world seems dark and empty, your forever friend lifts you up in spirit and makes that dark and empty world suddenly seem bright and full. Your forever friend gets you through the hard times, the sad times and the confused times. If you turn and walk away, your forever friend follows. If you lose your way, your forever friend guides you and cheers you on.

Friendship Blessings

I often wonder why we are drawn to some people more than others? What makes us want to maintain a friendship? For me friendship is a life-line. Connecting with like-minded people who genuinely care about one another is a gift we take for granted all too often. Friends are people we feel good with. Some make us laugh, some hear us out and really listen to our hearts, others support us when

the going is tough, and still others just hang with us when we need down time. A true friend holds up a mirror in which we see ourselves. For many people, friends are a rare commodity and true friends ever more rare. I have said many times before that if you have true friends that amount to the fingers on one hand you are truly blessed. A true friend unbosoms freely, advises justly, assists readily, adventures boldly, takes all patiently, defends courageously and continues a friend unchangeably. To have a good friend is one of the highest delights of life; to be a good friend is one of the noblest and most difficult undertakings. Friendship improves happiness and abates misery, by doubling our joy and dividing our grief. Anyone with a heart full of friendship has a hard time finding enemies. Since there is nothing so well worth having as friends, never lose a chance to make them. Recently, I received the most beautiful note from a close friend of mine who was thanking me for praying for them in their time of need with the following quotation enclosed: “Friendship isn’t about whom you have known the longest. It’s about who came and never left your side.” Among the basic ingredients of true friendship are: loyalty, trust, compassion, love, care, honesty, mutual commitment and shared ideals. Friends are very special to us because we know that they are there for us, just as we are there for them. When we have the safe haven of a true friend and genuine friendship, we have something precious beyond words. Friends make life worthwhile because they embody the powers of goodness, trustworthiness, honesty and love. True friends enrich our lives in so many ways and shower us with many blessing's. Through a magical combination of similarities and differences, friends offer us the opportunity to know ourselves as we are and help us grow into who we want to be. Our similarities attract us to each other, comforting us with familiarity when we see ourselves in them. When we are drawn to those we admire, the same recognition is at work, unconsciously acknowledging that these people possess qualities that we ourselves possess. By acting as mirrors, friends help us define who we are by reflecting ourselves back to us. True friends also help us know ourselves through our differences. Differences allow us to see other

Thought for the Week

As your thought for the week, look around you and truly cherish those special people and friends that are part of your life and always remember that friendship can be a true place of refuge and is one of life's most wonderful blessings. Let me finish this thought with a prayer I say for my friends, "I will pray for you, my friend. I will name you in my heart before God and ask all His blessing be upon you. I will be concerned for your rising and your daily mood. I will be sympathetic to your personal needs and desires in each day of your life. I will wish you well in your learning, or your work, in your domestic round and your leisure. I will think of you at the close of each day and pray that God’s peace be with you. If you have been especially kind or helpful to me then I will make my gratitude known to you. I will ache for you in your sorrows and disasters and rejoice with you in your joys and triumphs. I will love and care for you as I love and care for myself. Amen." So always remember that a friend is someone who walks in when the whole world has walked away. Be thankful and cherish those true friends that are part of your life and understand that we all need help and support now and then. Please remember that Friendship is one of the most beautiful, most powerful, and most valuable treasures in life and a true gift from God. Jesus said: “Greater love has no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends. You are my friends if you do what I command you. I have called you friends, for all that I have heard from my Father I have made known to you.” John 15: 12-15. Imagine that! Jesus has brought us in on the conversation He has with His Father. And just as talking with your friend is as important as it is pleasant, so having a conversation with Jesus and His Father is crucial in maintaining our friendship with God. And this is simply called “prayer.” Furthermore, we know that when we love God, we love everyone He loves. And there is actually no one outside of His love. In fact, charity which is this friendship with God, this love of God for His own sake, is the only way we can love all our neighbors, even our enemies! Now, the reason it was good for me and my friend as we climbed Diamond Hill to consider what human friendship is like is that it helps us to understand something of what friendship with God is like. It also helps us prepare for that experience we will have with Him and all those He loves in heaven. And it’s beginning here on earth. Right now.

FEATURES 15

Get in touch on Brew Monday STUART HOLLY

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editor@clareecho.ie

N A bid to beat the winter blues, Samaritans Clare is encouraging the community to reach out to someone they care about and connect over a virtual cuppa this winter for Brew Monday. Samaritans new research with over 1,400 of the charity’s volunteers, found that the start of the cold days and long nights have heightened feelings of isolation and loneliness for those already experiencing loneliness due to the pandemic restrictions. To ensure that nobody struggles alone, Samaritans is asking people to check in with those they care about for a cuppa and chat . Samaritans Clare will be kicking off Brew Monday on Monday 18 January, sometimes known as ‘Blue Monday’

for being the most difficult day of the year. The branch will be encouraging people to get together over a warming virtual cuppa and a chat. Margaret MacMahon Director Samaritans Clare said: “It has been a winter like no other. The challenges that many people face during this season have been felt more acutely this year with the pandemic. There couldn’t be a better time to reach out for a chat with someone you care about. It doesn’t have to be a Monday or a cup of tea, it’s just about taking time to really listen to another person which can in turn help them work through what’s on their mind.” Join the conversation on social media using #BrewMonday and why not make a donation while you’re there, you could help save a life. The Samaritans are available 24/7 for emotional support and a listening ear at freefone 116123 or email jo@samaritans.ie.

lCUPPA: Samaritans are there for you during hard times

Shannon Lions Club distribute food parcels SHANNON Lions Club have distributed the goods raised from their Christmas Food Appeal. 25 hampers were put together following donations from the public at Shannon Town Centre. Two houses were supplied with coal and briquettes while a total of 50 Dunnes Stores food vouchers worth €50 each were also distributed. Food hampers, food vouchers and the coal were all given to households within Shannon, Sixmilebridge and Newmarket-on-Fergus. President of Shannon Lions Club, Tony Walsh extended his appreciation to all individ-

uals who contributed to the Christmas food appeal. “Through your generosity we were in a position to help many families either by food hampers or food vouchers”. Walsh also voiced his gratitude to the management of Dunnes Stores for their ongoing support. He outlined that this was the first year in which Iceland Store in Shannon Town Centre came on board to back their efforts. He acknowledged that none of the items would have been collected had it not been for the voluntary efforts of personnel within the Lions Club.


My Health Clare Echo THE

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Lock down didn’t stop the slim down for front line worker Emma Harvey, now almost 6 Stone lighter!

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LMOST 6 stone lighter, Clare nurse, Emma Harvey is loving life. This time last year Nurse Emma Harvey had been feeling fed up with herself, she hated clothes shopping and was lacking in confidence. At 29 years old, knowing the big birthday was coming in 2020, she knew something had to change. After completing her nursing degree in 2017, Emma felt she had neglected herself, but now it was time to change. In January 2020 Emma joined her local Slimming World group in Kilrush and hasn’t looked back since. “I love the food and hand on heart I am never hungry. I love Slimming World Lasagne and of course my steak dinners!”. Lockdown meant the groups had to run virtually as many venues closed and restrictions meant groups couldn’t run physically. As a frontline worker, Emma was busier than ever with a lot of added stress. However, she never lost focus, “I was determined to lose weight from Day 1 of joining and with the Slimming World plan and support

from my consultant and group, that made it so much easier for me”. Emma continued to attend her virtual groups and weigh in each week. Using the app and on-line resources helped to keep her motivated and on track. After losing almost 6 stone, Emma is looking and feeling absolutely fantastic. “I now love clothes shopping and am wearing a size 10 – 12. I have also taken up jogging, which I would never have been able to do before. My confidence is back and I feel like my old self again. If I can do it anyone can” If you would like to make 2021 your year, then your local Slimming World group can help. See www.slimmingworld. ie for your nearest group.

lEmma Before and After (right)


My Health Clare Echo

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Sitting Right 5 ways to wellbeing Damien McMahon of Physio Recovery Room shares some tips on having the right sitting posture and staying active

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ITH many of you continuing to adapt and work from home you may notice yourself spending more time sitting, but what is the best sitting posture? There is a perception and miseducation that sitting with a straight back is the best posture, but this is not the case. Sitting posture by itself is not a large predictor of pain and sitting time by itself is not predictive of pain. Staying in the one position for a moderately long period is an important factor, this leads to reduced movement. So, what is the best sitting posture? A position that is comfortable for you and that you change it from time to time so do not stay fixed in one position. Sit comfortably and vary several sitting positions. Get up, Get out and Get moving: This is particularly important now as you may find yourself confined to home with reduced exercise tolerance. Updated guidelines from the World Health Organisation (WHO) for adults aged 18-64 strongly recommend 150 to 300 minutes of moderate and 75 to 150 minutes of vigorous intensity aerobic exercise per week. Children and adolescents should do at least an average of 60min/day of moderate-to-vigorous intensity, mostly aerobic, physical activity, across the week; Strength exercises should be done 3 days per week. This would mean walking, cycling, jogging and if you are lucky enough to live by the sea, swimming. Muscle strengthening exercises for adults will give an additional health benefit, two days per week which focus on your larger muscle groups. The benefits of exercise cannot be underestimated, reducing cardiovascular disease mortality, blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, mental health (reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression), increased cognitive health, increased bone health and increased sleep. Get up, Get out and Get moving for these health benefits your body does not enjoy a sedentary lifestyle.

Adapted from HSE.ie

CONNECT Connect and chat with your friends, work colleagues or family. During the Covid restrictions this can be difficult enough. You might feel shy about starting a WhatsApp chat, or a zoom link up. It is worth the effort though. Evidence show that good relationships with family, friends, colleagues and the wider community are important for mental wellbeing. Connect with support groups like Samaritans (Freephone 116 123), Clare Suicide Bereavement Support (086 0565373, 087 369 8315), Aware, Text HELLO to 50808, anytime day or night, Pieta House offer Text HELP to 51444. More of these are on https:// www2.hse.ie/services/mental-health-supports-and-services-during-coronavirus/ Making the first call or text is the hardest. It gets easier after that.

TAKE NOTICE Have a look around as you walk and take notice! Paying attention to the present moment – to our own thoughts, feelings and to the world around you can improve your mental wellbeing. And always remember, your thoughts are not facts! They are just thoughts. Sometimes they are right, sometimes they are wrong. Stick to the facts!

BE ACTIVE You are already doing this! Being active is great for your physical and mental wellbeing. Evidence proves there is a link between being physically active and good mental wellbeing. There are people these days who are taking on the challenge of 100 days of walking. You choose how long the walk is. Just getting out there is good for you.

GIVE Give encouragement and support to your friends, family and colleagues and how well they are doing during the these tough times. Most agree that giving to others is a good idea however giving to others has a knock on effect on ourselves by improving the givers mental wellbeing.

HELLO

KEEP LEARNING Ask someone about some interesting fact they have come across this week. Use your smartphone. There is a truly amazing amount of material out there for us to learn. Be curious and wonder about things. Evidence shows that continuing to learn throughout life can help improve and maintain our mental wellbeing.

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My Health Clare Echo THE

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New Year - Bereaved by Suicide? This January you might choose to seek support

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F you have been bereaved by suicide, whether recently or in the past, you may find the New Year a challenging time. It may seem to offer new beginnings, but you are mourning your loved one. Yet New Year offers us the opportunity to choose to look for support. Mourning, which can be very painful, is the path through grief. When travelling this path gathering support is really important. You might prefer to talk to someone you know, a family member or close friend. Sharing our feelings with another family member or friend helps to ease the pain and confusion. This is not always easy, as the other person is also in pain, needs to talk and share their feelings too. There may be a fear of creating more pain for each other by talking. Sometimes it is easier to talk with someone who is not connected to you by family or friendship. Clare Suicide Bereavement Support volunteers are available to offer help and support. Help is only a phone call or text away. When you ring or text, you will speak to a coordinator, who will support you, and arrange for you to meet one of our volunteer befrienders, should you wish, at a time and place that suits you. The person you meet is trained for this work, and is aware that coping with feelings, following the death of a loved one, can be difficult. Here in Clare Suicide Bereavement Support, we believe and

Please do not grieve alone We listen and support You are welcome to contact us by call or text

Call or text

086 0565373 087 369 8315 www.claresuicidebereavementsupport.com

know that talking about these feelings can help. At present during Level 5 Covid restrictions, we are providing support by phone and by text. When restrictions are lifted, we look forward to running our group programme. This is an 8-week structured series of group meetings available for people bereaved by suicide. People who have lost a loved one to suicide find it supportive and helpful to meet and work through grief and mourning with other people who have also been bereaved by suicide. They find it helps them understand, and to feel less isolated in their loss. We will advertise this on The Clare Echo, other local papers, Clare FM, parish newsletters. If you would like to ring and talk to someone about the group programme, and register your interest in the next one, ring or text one of our numbers. At Clare Suicide Bereavement Support, we support children and young people who have been bereaved by suicide by providing a safe, caring and confidential opportunity to talk through your grief. We at Clare Suicide Bereavement Support always welcome people who have been with us before, we understand that grief revisits us, sometimes unexpectedly. Clare Suicide Bereavement Support can be contacted at 087 3698315 or 0860565373. Further information and support is available on www. claresuicidebereavementsupport.com


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My Health Clare Echo THE

Walks For All Spectrum’s top tips

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ORDIC Fitness Ireland is a family owned; family run business, based in Dysert O’Dea, Corofin. Established in 2017 it is run by husband-and-wife team, Tony & Joanne Burke. They have trained well over 200 people in fitness walking, many of whom have achieved goals they never thought possible. Their customers travel regularly from Galway and Limerick as well as Clare for their weekly classes and walks. Groups from Roscommon, Dublin, Cork and the UK have enjoyed residential weekend courses. Initially providing tuition in Nordic Walking they have now extended their programme for 2021 created Walks for All. This is a comprehensive walking programme which is suitable for all levels of fitness and you do not need to use poles. Walking is one of the best ways to stay fit and maintain mental wellbeing and is suitable for everyone. Joanne & Tony have many years of experience of walking. Tony has completed numerous ultra-marathon events as well as climbing Everest in 1993 as part of the first Irish team to do this. He worked as an IT programme manager for many years and has now developed their Walk for Work programme. Joanne came to exercise later in life but has since completed several marathons, a triathlon and numerous other running and walking events, so knows that anything is possible at any age. She was a nurse for nearly 40 years and fully aware of the importance of looking after both physical and mental wellbeing. Both are qualified fitness walking and Nordic Walking instructors gaining their qualifications through the YMCA, Nordic Walking UK and British Nordic Walking. 2020 was a challenging year which they have successfully navigated and have built up a loyal group of locals who participate in the walking programmes, which include both outdoor walking events and online classes. During this latest lockdown period they are offering FREE online classes in walking fitness to help motivate individuals to kickstart 2021. These are proving to be very popular with people joining from UK, Canada, Denmark as well as all around Ireland. Saturdays is Nordic Natter day where everyone enjoys their own walk followed by a virtual coffee and catchup together. Guest speakers are invited to tell us about their walking experiences or useful information about walking. To date there have been talks about walking in Italy, The Lake District, The Camino, using poles for longer events and Walking Apps. This Saturday (January 16th) come and find out more about the Walks for All Programme. Check our website for details and to book. www.nordicfitnessireland.com

for staying healthy

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T’S that time of year again. Feeling lethargic and drained after the Christmas holidays, most people resign themselves to extreme New Year’s resolutions. Usually unrealistic, research shows that over 80% of people fail to sustain their new habits past the 30day mark. Our team of experts have put together some seemingly small changes that can have a bigger impact in the longer term. Aim to incorporate a new one each week, keep them up and see how it benefits your overall wellbeing. Hydration Tired, drowsy or fatigued? One important element to consider is your water intake. Aiming for 2-3 litres of water per day is the general rule of thumb or, even better, aim for your urine to be a pale straw colour. Don’t go overboard, as this is potentially dangerous. Use a bottle to refill so you can see exactly how much you drink, or set a timer on your phone/use an App to remind you to have a sip. Sparkling water and caffeine-free herbal teas also count, and sliced fruit adds a flavoured twist!

Eating your 5-a-day How many of us manage to get our 5-a-day on a consistent basis? According to The Bord Bia Thinking House study, on average in Ireland we eat 3.9 portions daily. Energy will never be at an all time high without your recommended dose of micronutrients and the best way to boost yourself is eat plenty of fruit and vegetables in a variety of colours. For suggestions of how to up your intake, visit www.spectrumnutrition.ie/blog Get moving! When we talk about increasing activity levels, remember that everything counts. Getting up to take a few steps every hour, walks during lunchbreaks, cleaning the house, walking whilst on the phone, gardening, playing with the kids; it all adds up. Movement is individual for everyone so it’s often worth consulting a professional to get the right advice. Chartered physiotherapists are expertly placed to create tailored programmes and get you off on the right foot. Finding something you enjoy means you’re more likely to keep it up, plus scheduling it into your calendar as 30 minutes, 5 times a week will

help make it a priority for you. How are your ZZZs? If you wake up tired or spend the day longing for a nap or rest, it’s likely that you’re not getting enough sleep. Try creating a new bedtime (count backwards 8-9 hours from the time you have to wake up), use sleeping aids (such as eye masks, earplugs, or scented pillow sprays), rest your mind before bed with some mindfulness, and limit caffeine and alcohol both of which disrupt sleep quality. If you can’t sustain drastic changes to your diet and lifestyle – which, let’s be honest, few of us can – then it is a lot of pain for no long-term gains. We hope that you can see the positive effects that small consistent changes can make to your wellbeing. Our team of experts in Spectrum Health comprises of Chartered Physiotherapists, Podiatrists & Chiropodists, Nutritionists & Dietitians, and Speech & Language Therapists. They are available for clinic appointments in selected clinic locations nationwide, as well as for video consultations online. Our Clare clinic is located within Francis Street Medical, Ennis. For more information, visit

www.spectrumhealth.ie.

Your Health Is Our Priority. Physiotherapy Treatments Sports Injury Assessments Podiatry Treatments General Chiropody Services Clinic & Video Appointments Available

Book with our expert team now by calling 1890 333 777 or emailing info@spectrumhealth.ie. Find Us: Ennis Medical, Francis St, Ennis, Co. Clare V95 KC3H

Tony & Joanne Burke


My Health Addiction to devices Clare Echo THE

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E’VE all seen kids hypnotically staring at glowing screens in restaurants, in playgrounds and in friends’ house. Like a virtual scourge, the illuminated glowing faces are multiplying. But at what cost. Is this just a harmless indulgence or fad like some sort of digital hula-hoop? Some say that glowing screens might even be good for kids, a form of interactive educational tool. Don’t believe it. We now know that iPads, smartphones and Xboxes etc are a form of digital drug. Recent brain imaging research is showing that they affect the brain’s frontal cortex which controls executive functioning, including impulse control in exactly the same way that cocaine does. Technology is so hyper-arousing that it raises dopamine levels, the feel-good neurotransmitter most involved in the addiction dynamic. This addictive effect is why Dr. Peter Whybrow, director of neuroscience at UCLA, calls screens “electronic cocaine” and Chinese researchers call them “digital heroin.” In fact, Dr. Andrew Doan, the head of addiction research for the Pentagon and the US Navy who has been researching addiction calls video games and screen technologies “digital pharmakeia” (Greek for drug). That’s right, both you and your child’s brain on these platforms looks like a brain on drugs. Is it any wonder then that we have a hard time getting kids and ourselves off the screens. Children in particular are vulnerable and developmental psychologists outline that children’s healthy development involves social interaction, creative imaginative play and an engagement with the real, natural world. Unfortunately, the

addictive world of screens is having a detrimental effect on children’s developmental processes. But this is not just happening to children it is also happening to adults and apart from the social disconnect the health implications are enormous.

According to a 2013 Policy Statement by the American Academy of Pediatrics, 8- to 10 year-olds spend 8 hours a day with various digital media while teenagers spend 11 hours in front of screens. One in three kids are using tablets or smartphones before they can talk. Meanwhile, the handbook of “Internet Addiction” by Dr. Kimberly Young states that 18 percent of college-age internet users in the US suffer from

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tech addiction. Once a person crosses over the line into full-blown addiction be that drug, digital or otherwise they need to detox before any other kind of therapy can have any chance of being effective. With tech, that means a full digital detox, no computers, no smartphones, no tablets. The extreme digital detox even eliminates television. The prescribed amount of time is four to six weeks; that’s the amount of time that is usually required for a hyper-aroused nervous system to reset itself. But that’s not an easy task in our current tech-filled society where screens are ubiquitous. A person can live without drugs or alcohol; with tech addiction, digital temptations are everywhere. In Glow Kids, a new book by Dr. Nicholas Kardaras he points out how technology, more specifically, age-inappropriate screen tech, with all of its glowing ubiquity has profoundly affected the brains of an entire generation. Brain imaging research is showing that stimulating glowing screens are dopaminergic (dopamine activating) to the brain’s pleasure center. He also outlines the growing mountain of clinical research that correlates screen tech with disorders like ADHD, addiction, anxiety, depression, increased aggression, insomnia and even psychosis. Most shocking of all, recent brain imaging studies conclusively show that excessive screen exposure can neurologically damage a young person’s developing brain in the same way that cocaine addiction can. The real question now is can we reset the human being back to its human settings. What I mean is can we and our children be reconnected to the natural frequency of life and living or are we forever trapped in this growing addictive cy-

POSITIONS AVAILABLE APPLY WITHIN

www.fitfork.ie (065) 6891319


My Health - Michael O Doherty Clare Echo

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ber world, becoming physically sick, emotionally disconnected, and challenged mentally. There is no doubt that the world as we know it is changing fast, and I believe we shouldn’t fear this change, but we must not lose sight of the fact that we are spiritual beings also and if we neglect this it throws us into chaos. The chaos and turbulence in the world presently is creating huge fear because of the uncertainty and insecurity however, I truly feel we can be in control and emerge a more in tune human being. This is what I deal with every day in my clinic. So how do we keep our children from crossing this line? It’s not easy. • The key is to prevent your 4-, 5- or 8-year-old from getting hooked on screens to begin with. • Try board games, jigsaws, something that all the family can be involved in. • Read books instead. • Get out in nature and play sports instead of watching TV. • If you have to, demand that your child’s school not give them electronic devices until they are at least 12 years old. • Have honest discussions as a about why you are limiting their screen access. • Eat dinner with your children without any electronic devices at the table — just as the late Steve Jobs used to have tech-free dinners with his kids. • Don’t fall victim to “Distracted Parent Syndrome” — as we know from Social Learning Theory, “Monkey see, monkey do.” • Have honest conversations about why as a family you don’t need to be on devices or playing video games all the time. • Explain, that many people and kids have a hard time stopping or controlling how much they play games or the excessive time they spend on social media. • Parents need to understand that if their kids get caught up with screens and games like some of their friends have, other parts of their lives may suffer. • Visit Medium.com if you wish to find out more about this research. I deal with this problem each week in my clinic as parents have no place to turn to for solutions. Parents are struggling to win back their children from the claws of the digital world. While we all acknowledge that this is our future and it can be positive there is need for regulation in particular where children are involved. Parents and all of us need to be mindful

Mind your wellbeing Starting with a plan to do one small thing that will keep you well is a great way to look after your mental health and wellbeing. The ‘Keep Well’ campaign is aimed at showing people of all ages how we can mind our own physical and mental health and wellbeing by adding healthy and helpful habits to our daily and weekly routines. It will provide guidelines, information and tips on activities and resources that will help us keep well through the coming months. The Keep Well campaign is focused on five main themes. Keeping active Keeping active and being outdoors, even during the winter, is important to help physical and mental health and wellbeing.

Staying connected Staying connected with people, addressing isolation, supporting volunteerism and initiatives that support person-to-person connection are important to our wellbeing. Switching off and being creative Switching off and being creative or learning something new, getting back to nature and finding ways to relax can help our general wellbeing.

of the information being delivered through these platforms because it does have an impact. The time has come to reset and reconnect to the real meaning of family and life and we must never lose the wisdom of the elders in our families and society. We can evolve as humans alongside this tech world but we must not allow it to control us or replace our spirituality. Michael O Doherty. www.michaelodoherty.com Info@michaelodoherty.com

Find ideas on what you can do and what’s available in your local community at

clarecoco.ie/together the food we eat and how we feel and positively impact our physical and mental wellbeing. Minding your mood It’s normal to be worried or to feel stressed during this difficult time, but there are many things we can do to help us mind our mental health and wellbeing and to keep ourselves well.

Community Response Helpline A helpline is available to respond to the needs of vulnerable members of our community. If you need practical supports, like your shopping delivered, or you just need someone to talk to you, the Clare Covid-19 Community Response Helpline is here for you. Call Freephone 1800 203600 or email clarecommunityresponse@clarecoco.ie

Eating well By nourishing our bodies and minds, we can develop a better connection between

Follow Clare County Council on social media


My Health Clare Echo

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What to know about CBD-Wild Atlantic Hemp WHO IS BEHIND WILD ATLANTIC HEMP FULL SPECTRUM CBD OIL: Wild Atlantic Hemp is a CBD company based in County Clare and run by husband-and-wife team, Daniel Lyons, and Laura Jayne Foley. The couple graduated with their Masters in Agricultural Innovation from the National University of Ireland, Galway and won a start-up award from Enterprise Ireland to help develop their hemp processing facility in Kilkee, County Clare. The couple launched their product this year after 3 years in development. We wanted to make a CBD oil which was 100% Irish, which was approved by the appropriate regulatory bodies. We wanted to make an oil which our customers knew to be both beneficial and food safe. WHAT IS CBD: CBD stands for Cannabidiol which is one of the many phyto-cannabinoids found in the hemp plant. Cannabinoids are the natural therapeutic com-

pounds found on the hemp flower and the holistic benefits derived from cannabinoids are the basis for the growth in its sales as a Health Food Supplement.

WHAT IS FULL SPECTRUM CBD OIL: Full Spectrum CBD oil is an oil that includes the full array of naturally occurring compounds present in the hemp plant. No cannabinoids have been removed but more importantly no isolated or synthetically developed cannabinoids are added. There are 5 cannabinoids present in Wild Atlantic Hemp CBD oil. CBD is the most prominent cannabinoid present but minor cannabinoids such as CBG, CBC, THC and CBDV are also present in smaller amounts. These compounds interact with our body through our endocannabinoid system. The synergistic way these cannabinoids work together even in minute amounts is called the Entourage Effect. WHO REGULATES CBD IN IRELAND:

In Ireland, CBD is considered a health food supplement and is regulated by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland. Licences to cultivate hemp are issued by the Department of Health. All CBD products must be notified to the Food Safety Authority of Ireland before being placed on the market to ensure food safety and accurate labelling. WHY CHOOSE WILD ATLANTIC HEMP FULL SPECTRUM CBD OIL: • Wild Atlantic Hemp is a Notified Health Food Supplement with the Food Safety Authority of Ireland. • Our facility is based in Kilkee, County Clare and is approved by the HSE for the processing of CBD oil as a Food Supplement. • Our product is 100% Irish and is traceable back to Department of Health licenced farms. • Our Hemp is hand harvested and processed in small batches. • We process our oil without the use of solvents such as hexane, ethanol, or CO2.


RECRUITMENT 23

THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

Recruitment

A LAHINCH company is to create 50 new jobs and in the process double its workforce. Technology firm, HRLocker has announced its need to fill 50 additional posts in light of a major shift towards remote working during the current pandemic. Positions in sales, software development and customer support will be filled as part of the expansion. It follows a year in which the company experienced "a huge rise" from its platform users, a trend which management expect to continue. The company offers cloud-based software to automate administrative elements of human resources. It is in stark contrast to the recession when HRLocker was reduced to two employees. Adam Coleman, chief executive of HRLocker outlined that remote and dual working was now commonplace for the vast majority of organisations which has led to business personnel looking for technologies that enhance employee experience and minimise disruption". The new roles will enable the provision of software

Jobs in Clare

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editor@clareecho.ie

HE Limerick branch of Network Ireland, an organisation supporting the professional and personal development of women, has elected Caragh O'Shea as President for 2021. From Cratloe, Caragh is the founder of COSEvents.ie and currently project manager for Rugby Travel Ireland. She was presented with the chain of office by outgoing president Petrina Hayes. Emma Wilson, Azpiral, has been confirmed as Vice President of Network Ireland Limerick. Speaking about her appointment, Ms O'Shea said, "It is a great honour for me to have been elected as President. I'm looking forward to continuing our efforts in supporting our members and providing opportunities for everyone to connect, learn and share ideas. After such a challenging year it's important, now more than ever, to stay connected or to reconnect. "During 2020 we brought all our events online and managed to reach a wider audience than we normally would. "We still have a journey ahead before things return to the new norm, so we will continue to support our members virtually until such time as we can meet face to face again."

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solutions connecting businesses and their employees. "We are expanding our sales and marketing team to bring more support to new and existing customers, while our investment in product development and customer support will allow us to continue innovating and configuring our platform to meet the unique HR needs of the market going forward," Coleman added. Born in Galway, Adam moved to Lahinch after leaving a role in London where he worked as Head of HR with 02. He took the Irish operation of O2 from 20 to 800 people before having a reverse role in Britain, reducing staff from 3,500 to 1,500. He co-founded HRLocker with John Dennehy and bought out his partner in 2013. Over the past seven years, the cloudbased company has gone from 60 customers to more than 500, with 60 per cent in Ireland, 30 per cent in Britain, and the rest spread around the world. A Coleman has previously expressed the view that HRLocker will reach a valuation of â‚Ź64m. He has set himself a deadline of 21st September 2025 to begin the process of exiting his role by 21st September 2027, before hitting that juncture he is eager to make a push into the United States which is a priority for the end of 2021.

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As President of the Network Ireland Limerick, Caragh will be responsible for fostering the aims and objectives of Network Ireland, representing the Limerick branch at National Executive meetings and overseeing the smooth running of events locally. "For 2021 I'm looking forward to lining up some great speakers and putting extra virtual events in the calendar. "I would like to invite new members who have recently moved to the area or returned home to work remotely to connect with us and realise the benefits of extending their network of contacts," she continued. Ms O'Shea has chosen Cliona's Foundation as the networks charity partner for 2021. Certain events throughout the year will have a fundraising element and all monies raised will be sent directly to the charity. Membership of Network Ireland Limerick is made up of a very diverse group of women from across the Mid-West, from budding entrepreneurs, SME owners, professionals and leaders in large organisations to non profits, charities, arts and the public sector. If you are interested in joining Network Ireland Limerick, you can reach out to Caragh on limerick@networkireland.ie.

l BOSS: (left) 2021 Women in Business Network President Caragh O'Shea


24

MOTORING

THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

MOTORING

MOTORING EXPERT NEIL BRISCOE GIVES HIS VIEWS

K IA’S N E W P LUGI N S OR ENTO HI T S 3 8 G/ KM O F C O 2

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IA Motors have revealed the all-electric range and CO2 emissions data for the new Kia Sorento Plug-in Hybrid as the model enters production in Korea. The full-size, seven-seat SUV will deliver an equivalent all-electric range (EAER) of up to 57 kilometres (on the WLTP test) from a single charge of its 13.8 kWh battery pack. Furthermore, in urban environments it is capable of travelling up to 70 kilometres on a single charge (EAER city) before its turbocharged gasoline engine starts up. Drivers are therefore able to complete many journeys, such as their daily commute, on zero-emissions electric power alone. Its plug-in hybrid powertrain also promises the lowest CO2 emissions ever offered by the Kia Sorento. With emissions of just 38 g/ km (WLTP, weighted combined**), the new model is one of the most efficient vehicles in its class. Furthermore, Kia Sorento PHEV customers will be eligible to access the brand’s new KiaCharge service. This provides access to a pan-European integrated public charging network of around 160,000 charge points via a single card and app. KiaCharge offers attractive charging tariffs to EV and PHEV

owners based on their individual charging needs, with a single monthly invoice and no need for multiple vehicle charging accounts or subscriptions. The Kia Sorento Plug-in Hybrid features a powerful 1.6-litre T-GDi (turbocharged gasoline direct injection) engine, which on its own produces 180 ps and 265 Nm of torque. Combined with an electric motor producing 67 kW and 304 Nm of torque, the Sorento Plug-in Hybrid delivers a combined 265 ps and 350 Nm of torque, making it the most powerful Sorento ever sold in Europe. The engine and motor are paired with a high-capacity 13.8 kWh lithium-ion polymer battery, enabling the Sorento Plug-in Hybrid’s substantial all-electric range. For longer journeys, the powertrain combines electric and combustion engine power. Drive is sent to the front wheels or all four wheels, depending on road conditions, via a quick-shifting six-speed automatic transmission. Drivers can keep track of the powertrain’s status via the 12.3-inch fully-digital instrument cluster. This enables them to check the battery’s state of charge and monitor the flow of electric and gasoline power through the powertrain. Drivers can also easily lo-

cate nearby charging points on-the-go via the 10.25-inch touchscreen infotainment system, powered by Kia’s innovative UVO Connect ‘connected car’ system. The Kia Sorento Plug-in Hybrid’s powertrain has been intelligently packaged to ensure it offers the maximum possible cargo capacity and cabin space for up to seven occupants. The electric motor is mounted between the engine and transmission, enabled by the neat packaging of the downsized turbocharged engine beneath the bonnet. The Sorento’s battery pack is been positioned beneath the driver and front passenger seats. In the Sorento’s all-wheel drive configuration, the ‘saddle-shaped’ battery pack lays over the top of the propshaft. The Sorento PHEV’s 67-litre fuel tank is located beneath the floor underneath the second row of seats, while the 3.3 kW onboard charger is situated beneath the cargo floor. The location of these components means all passengers – including those in the third row of seats – still enjoy plenty of legroom and a comfortable seating position. This layout also means the battery pack doesn’t intrude on the Sorento’s cabin or cargo space in the same way that it might in many other

plug-in hybrid models, where the battery often takes up valuable boot space. The new Kia Sorento Plug-in Hybrid has started production this week at Kia’s Hwasung manufacturing facility in Korea. It will go on-sale across Europe in early 2021, with all models covered by Kia’s 7-year, 150,000-kilometre warranty. The warranty also covers the car’s electric motor and battery pack. Irish sales will start in the spring of 2021.

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Sport Clare Echo THE

Change in policy needed regarding hosting of clubs camps before Cúl Camps

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change in policy will be required from Croke Park if clubs are allowed to hold their own equivalent summer camp prior to the Kelloggs Cúl Camps. Lissycasey GAA Club had submitted a motion before the annual County Convention of Clare GAA as a follow up to a topic they raised at the June meeting of the County Board. They sought approval for clubs “to host their own club summer camp on a date before or after their Cúl Camp”. The motion received support from Clarecastle. Despite flagging the matter six months ago, Lissycasey’s James Meere said they have yet to receive any correspondence from Croke Park. “It is something we want clarification on for the year ahead. Can we hold our camp on or before the Cúl Camp,” he stated. “It is going to have to be a change in policy in Croke Park to see if it can go ahead before it,” outgoing Chairperson Joe Cooney responded. “We can look to see if policy can be changed. We don’t know what the outcome will be,” he added.

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O’Donnell to remain as Mills manager PÁRAIC MCMAHON

paraic@clareecho.ie

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’Callaghans Mills manager Donach O’Donnell has committed to the East Clare side for 2021. Beaten finalists in last year’s championship, O’Callaghans Mills fell short against neighbours Sixmilebridge after recording wins over Broadford, Clonlara, Inagh/Kilnamona and Clonlara. O’Donnell’s decision to stay on which he announced to the panel prior to Christmas will be seen as a big boost to the Fireballs. Coach of the Munster SHC winning Limerick side of 2013, the MA applied coaching masters student in UL previously guided Nenagh CBS to Harty Cup glory.

For his first season in charge, Donach was joined on his management team by Donal Cooney, Marty Baker and Tom Crehan.The trio are expected to return for the campaign ahead. This year will mark the first in the history of O’Callaghans Mills that they compete at both senior and intermediate. It follows their historic Junior A championship win of 2020 when they defeated Kilmaley after extra time. Members of the O’Callaghans Mills/Bodyke outfit that won the 2020 Minor B championship eligible for the senior grade will be hoping to make the step-up to O’Donnell’s side.

Weekend wins for Moroney and Meehan at Limerick Greyhound Stadium

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EEKEND wins at Limerick Greyhound Stadium were recorded for dogs owned by Ennis’ Marion Moroney and John Meehan of Newmarket-on-Fergus. Action at the Galway Track fell foul to the weather on Friday Night and with Connacht Ruby in action at the venue on Saturday night the focus switched to Limerick where Sweepstakes dominated the card’ with both the ‘Epic Hero Leger Winner 2020 525’ Sweepstake and the ‘Johnny Waters Memorial 525 Sweepstake’ getting underway. In heat two of the Epic Hero Ledger Winner 2020 Stake, Allegra Blue got back to winning ways for owner Marion Moroney of Ennis. Edging inwards from trap four early on, Allegra Blue had to make do with third place rounding the opening corner but once the field had straightened itself out, there was only one greyhound that looked a winner and that was Allegra Blue. Showing excellent speed down the back, the John Browne trained bitch breezed up the inside at the penultimate turn and flew up the Limerick straight to record a four length win in a time of 29.21 over Hawkeye Supreme in second. Bling Bling Paul was the winner of heat five for owner John Meehan of Newmarket-on-Fergus who made light work of a talented field to score in style. Quickly into stride wearing the white jacket, Bling Bling Paul outpaced Burren Ripple to the opening bend to take a three length lead into the back straight. Pressing home his advantage

from halfway, the son of SH Avatar stayed on strongly in the final fifty yards and ran out a most convincing, five and a half length winner in a time of 28.88. All eyes were on the Buttsy Syndicate of Shannon owned Buttsy Best in heat three after his 18.70 sprint effort last time out. However, after a poor start from trap six, Buttsys Best found Tullovin Sky a worthy adversary in trap three. Breaking in front, Tullovin Sky rounded the opening turn clear with Buttsys Best showing phenomenal early speed to recover from a sluggish start and follow the leader around in second. The latter quickly joined the leader down the back straight and it was nip and tuck between the bottom two bends. Tullovin Sky was a tough nut to crack however, and Michael Ryan’s charge pulled out more in the closing stages to account for a length victory over Buttsys Best, who ran a big race in second. The opening heat went to Honourable Mate in trap-to-line fashion. Breaking in front from trap three, Honourable Mate showed plenty of courage and determination at the first turn to narrowly avoid traffic and from here, the son of Droopys Buick - Droopys Piece went about his business in good style. Despite the best efforts of Paradise Mozart owned by Sean Meade of Miltown Malbay who showed eye-catching pace down the back, Honourable Mate held firm to record a three parts of a length victory. Ballymac Express a further short head back in third as the clock returned 29.21

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pg 26

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Clare Echo THE

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O’Loughlin returns to Clooney/Quin as coach SEAMUS HAYES

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HILE doubts remain as to when the 2021 GAA domestic season will get under way and what format competitions will take, clubs are working towards putting management teams in place for what is likely to be a condensed season from heretofore. It has already been announced that the inter county competitions will take place in the first part of the season with the club championships not expected to commence before July or early August. Because of Covid 19 restrictions, there were no league competitions last season and it remains to be seen if the leagues will return in 2021 Clarecastle native Fergie O’Loughlin will coach Clooney-Quin in 2021. He was previously coach to the Clooney-Quin senior side in 2017 when they reached the Clare senior final where they

lost out to Sixmilebridge after a replay. O’Loughlin was coach to his native Clarecastle last season when Rodger McMahon was the magpies’ manager. Their 2020 season concluded with defeat to Newmarket-on-Fergus in the Senior B semi-final. He previously had terms as coach with Ballyea and with Kilmoyley in Kerry In Clooney-Quin, he will work with a management team that includes Noel Harrisson, and Michael Duggan while Quin native Victor O’Riordan will be the club’s strength and conditioning coach. Former Clare senior camogie coach Liam Clancy who had been coach to Clooney/Quin last year is no longer involved. The loss of Peter Duggan was a big blow to club and county last year and it remains to be seen if he will return in 2021. He is currently based in Perth, Australia. “Nobody knows when the season will commence or what the competition formats will be. Players are currently working on their own individual fitness programmes and I am sure this is the situation with most clubs”, selector Mike Duggan told The Clare Echo.

Former Clare footballer, new coach of the Ennistymon senior footballers SEAMUS HAYES

F

ORMER Clare footballler, Odran O’Dwyer is the new coach of the Ennistymon senior footballers. Kilmurry-Ibrickane native and former Clare and Munster player, Odran O’Dwyer will coach Ennistymon footballers in 2021. The team will be managed by Noel Crowe. The North Clare club has been knocking on the door at senior level in recent years. Winners of the Minor A championship in 2019, they had qualified for the 2020 final in this grade before the Covid 19 lockdown came in late November. It remains to be seen if this competition will conclude when club action is allowed again. Corofin and Doora-Barefield have to play in the

Odran O’Dwyer & Joe Brolly Photograph: Gerard O’Neill

semi-final for the right to face Ennistymon in the decider. O’Dwyer who represented Ireland in the Compromise Rules series against Australia. was coach to Kilmihil last year and steered them to victory over a fancied Clondegad side in the opening round of the senior championship on their way to a quarter final date where they bowed out to neighbours Lissycasey. A native of Mullagh, Odran represented his county for 22 years lining out at every level. He also served as a selector to Clare U21 footballers as well as forming part of management teams for the Kilmurry Ibrickane senior footballers and O’Callaghans Mills senior hurlers. Crowe’s management team succeed Kieran Kelleher who first took charge of the North Clare Magpies for the 2020 season.

Fergie O’Loughlin during a previous stint involved with Clarecastle. Photograph: Chris Copley

Ennis’ Irene steps down as Treaty Utd U17 manager PÁRAIC MCMAHON

paraic@clareecho.ie

E

NNIS’ Irene Hehir has stepped down from her role as U17 manager of Treaty Utd. Appointed manager of the Limerick club’s first season in the Women’s National League, Irene announced her decision to leave the role at the beginning of the month. She was previously manager of Limerick FC’s U17 side. Irene will continue in her role as Assistant Manager to the Irish women’s U17 team and told The Clare Echo she is looking “to purse other interests in the football environment”. She admitted that the post with the national side requires a lot of work, the Ei Electronics shift supervisor will be scouting games every weekend as part of the tasks associated with being the Asst Manager. “I thoroughly enjoyed my time with the club and I wish Treaty Utd’s players, staff and Board the very best of luck for the upcoming season”. Treaty Utd in a statement paid tribute to the work of the Clare women as they announced her decision to step away from the club. “Irene has led the development of the club’s underage players and we are incredibly grateful for her leadership in this area”. Capped four times for her country, Irene’s playing days also saw her line out with the Lifford Ladies side that tasted national success at underage and senior level.

Irene Hehir.

Photograph: Sky View Photography


14-01-21

Clare Echo THE

pg 27

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David Dillon & Elaine Keane honoured with special awards by Clare Camogie PÁRAIC MCMAHON

paraic@clareecho.ie

C

LARE Camogie have honoured David Dillon and Elaine Keane with individual accolades. Kilmaley’s Dillon has been chosen as the recipient of the 2020 lifetime achievement award in light of his continued contribution to the game from behind the lens. A retired school teacher, David has been active in recording and chronicling of the sport. Dillon was a central cog in the

production of the annual parish magazine in Kilmaley and also through his teaching role encouraged several players to take up the sport. In more recent years, he has been spotted as a regular figure on the sidelines taking photographs which have appeared in local media and online across Clare Camogie’s social media platforms. PRO of the Camogie Board, Brid MacNamara described David as “the gentleman on the sidelines with the camera”. Corofin woman Elaine Keane was selected as the volunteer of the year winner. A child protection officer with her club, she is credit-

ed as a regular figure at all events associated with camogie in Corofin and is viewed as one of the first volunteers to step forward. Over the past year, she served as the COVID officer for Corofin attending every training session and match, sometimes including two games in the one evening to guarantee the safety of all players from the youngest to the oldest panellists. Elaine also acts as a County Board delegate for her club, her fellow officers in Corofin have applauded the manner in which she reports back on all developments from these meetings.

Volunteer award for Ruan’s Brid Mac PÁRAIC MCMAHON

paraic@clareecho.ie

C

ounty camogie PRO Brid MacNamara has been named as the Clare winner at the 2020 Federation of Irish Sport Volunteers in Sport Awards. Nominated by Clare camogie, Brid has been recognised as a result of her ongoing efforts in promoting the sport in the county along with a special fundraiser she helped to initiate in the year gone by. Created to champion the contribution, commitment and dedication of the army of 450,000 volunteers across the country, the Volunteers in Sport Awards acknowledge the exploits of personnel who dedicate some 37.2 million hours of volunteering across the country’s 13,000 plus sports clubs and associations every year. Now in her second term as public relations officer of Clare Camogie, Brid was county secretary in 2004 and is one of the longest serving officials on the board. On a weekly basis, she compiles all match reports from U12 to Junior and submits to local media outlets to keep supporters informed on what is going on. Brid has been spotted presenting medals to club championship winners, organising blitzes, making sandwiches for county teams, distributing tea to supporters, putting together match programmes, live tweeting from games, taking photographs, painting benches, digging flowers and reportedly assisting to lay a footpath at the county grounds.

With a little nudge from Clooney/ Quin’s Mike Duggan, Brid came up with the idea of doing a walk which was the equivalent of the 430km journey from Fr McNamara Park in Ennis to Croke Park and back. Along the way, she visited each of the 26 clubs in the county and eventually ended up walking over 500km, this effort brought in over €16,000. A native of Ruan, Brid has previously been named as PRO of the Year by the Camogie Association in 2011 and 2012. Anne McHale, of Ballina Braves Boys BC in Mayo, received the overall Outstanding Achievement Award for the many years of tireless service she has given to the sport and the club in Co. Mayo. Olympian Pat Hooper (RIP) was also honoured with a Special Recognition award for his dedication to the sport of athletics. He was a decorated athlete before becoming a dedicated and exceptional coach. His untimely passing in 2020 was felt by the entire athletics community. Daingean GAA (Offaly) also received a Special Recognition award for their commitment to their community during COVID-19. The group went above and beyond to assist their community and came together to support the most vulnerable members through these challenging times.

Winner of the All Age Bitch Trial Stake at the Miltown Malbay Coursing Meeting are from the left Dermot O’Sullivan from Labasheeda Co. Clare,Mark Nolan with Gooleen Wonder Maria O’Sullivan and Tom Nolan. Killeen Photography

In the centre is Eoin Garrihy from Clonlara ,Co.Clare with Aristo Shadow and Manon Maurel from Mairseille France after winning the Oaks Trial Stake at the Miltown Malbay Coursing Meeting. Also included are Mervin and Micheal Hehir who presented the Nancy and Brendan Hehir and Rith Gan Gaisce Memorial Cup. Killeen Photography


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THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

PLANNING NOTICES Clare County Council Brickhill East, Cratloe, Co. Clare. Take notice that John Boland is applying to Clare County Council for retention permission for alterations to the private garage and planning permission to extend and carry out alterations to an existing dwelling house along with all associated works at the above address. The planning application may be inspected or purchased at a fee not exceeding the reasonable cost of making a copy at the offices of Clare County Council during its public opening hours and a submission or observation in relation to the application may be made to the authority in writing on payment of the prescribed fee within the period of 5 weeks beginning on the date of receipt by the authority of the application. Clare County Council Ballyhannan North, Co. Clare Take note that GCTS, Goodison Construction Technical Services, Gort na Rí, Gort, Galway, 086 0314468, intend to apply to the planning authority on behalf of W & B Keane, for permission to construct a new single storey dwelling together with all ancillary

site development works and services at the above location. The planning application may be inspected or purchased at the offices of the planning authority and a submission or observation in relation to the application may be made to the authority in writing on payment of the prescribed fee within the period of 5 weeks during it’s public opening hours, beginning on the date of receipt by the authority of the application. Note that these provisions may change due to Covid-19. Clare County Council 39 Willsgrove, Cahercalla, Ennis, Co. Clare Take notice that Brian Foudy & Associates Ltd – Architects & Chartered Engineers of Osprey House, Carmody Street, Ennis, Co. Clare 065 6893565 www. foudyconsulting.ie. intend to apply to the planning authority on behalf of Barry & Linda O’Keeffe for permission to (a) construct an extension and carry out alterations to existing dwelling house (b) retain attic conversion together with all associated site development works and services at the above address.

The planning application may be inspected or purchased at a fee not exceeding the reasonable cost of making a copy at the offices of the planning authority during its public opening hours. A submission or observation in relation to the application may be made in writing to the planning authority on payment of the prescribed fee within the period of 5 weeks beginning on the date of receipt by the authority of the application. Clare County Council Ballaghboy, Doora, Co. Clare Take notice that Brian Foudy & Associates Ltd – Architects & Chartered Engineers of Osprey House, Carmody Street, Ennis, Co. Clare 065 6893565 www. foudyconsulting.ie. Intend to apply to the planning authority on behalf of Oliver Flanagan to construct a vintage truck / storage shed together with all ancillary site development works and services at the above address. The planning application may be inspected or purchased at a fee not exceeding the reasonable cost of making a copy at the offices of the planning authority during its public opening hours. A submission

CLASSIFIEDS STORAGE

PLANNING ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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ANNIVERSARIES

or observation in relation to the application may be made in writing to the planning authority on payment of the prescribed fee within the period of 5 weeks beginning on the date of receipt by the authority of the application Clare County Council Carrowmeer, Newmarket on Fergus, Co Clare Morgan McCarthy intends to apply to the above planning authority for permission to extend existing house at Carrowmeer, Newmarket on Fergus, Co Clare. The application consists of a single storey extension to the rear of the existing house and all associated site works. The planning application may be inspected, or purchased at a fee not exceeding the reasonable cost of making a copy, at the offices of the planning authority during its public opening hours and that a submission or observation in relation to the application may be made to the authority in writing on payment of the prescribed fee within the period of 5 weeks beginning on the date of receipt by the authority of the application

Nuala & Henry Murphy (3rd and 12th Anniversaries.)

Treasured memories of our dear parents, Nuala who died on 5th January 2018 and Henry who died 25th January 2009 late of Newline, Tulla. The years we were all together will not return but the love and memories will remain. We know you are happy back together and this puts a smile on all our faces. Sadly missed by your Daughters Geraldine & Sínead, Sons Matthew, Henry, Gerard and David, your Sister Maura, your grandchildren and extended family and friends. Anniversary Mass on Sunday 17th January 2020 at 11am in Tulla Church. Mass can be viewed on Tulla Parish Facebook Page.

THANKSGIVING THANKSGIVING. ST. JUDE. Most Holy Apostle St. Jude faithful servant & friend of Jesus. The Church honours & invokes you universally as the patron of hopeless cases, of matters almost despaired of. Pray for me I am so helpless & alone. Make use I implore you of that particular privilege given to you, to bring speedy help where help is almost despaired of. Come to my assistance in this great need that I may receive the consolation & help of Heaven in all my necessities, tribulations & sufferings & that I may praise God with you & all the Elect forever. I promise O Blessed St. Jude to be ever mindful of this great favour to always honour you as my special & powerful patron & to gratefully encourage devotion to you. Amen. This prayer must be said for 9 consecutive days & published immediately & in 3 days the favour will be granted.

THANKSGIVING. ST. JUDE. Most Holy Apostle St. Jude faithful servant & friend of Jesus. The Church honours & invokes you universally as the patron of hopeless cases, of matters almost despaired of. Pray for me I am so helpless & alone. Make use I implore you of that particular privilege given to you, to bring speedy help where help is almost despaired of. Come to my assistance in this great need that I may receive the consolation & help of Heaven in all my necessities, tribulations & sufferings & that I may praise God with you & all the Elect forever. I promise O Blessed St. Jude to be ever mindful of this great favour to always honour you as my special & powerful patron & to gratefully encourage devotion to you. Amen. This prayer must be said for 9 consecutive days & published immediately & in 3 days the favour will be granted. AP


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HOW TO PLAY

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I W B O W D U E G O G L C

S E V R B D

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Twins

Sudoku is a logic puzzle where you have to populate the grid with numbers. A number can appear only once in each row, column and house. Each puzzle can be solved using logic from the given information and requires no guesswork.

8

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Smile

1

How to play

2

W G C H U B B Y E T K U D

Sleep

5

4

9

B V U B L U E F Y E N M M L

Pink

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9

5

N O O D D O Y G S S D B A S O

Nurse

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S T F P N D T H R E M U E L C

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5

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L L L E G W N E M Y L T B M C

Midwife

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Love

8

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7

A P E R S B L A O A

7

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4

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How to play

Y P Y F C P O E D H M Y E P V

L S E D

SUDOKU

1/11/2021

Sudoku is a logic puzzle where you have to populate the grid with numbers. A number can appear only once in each row, column and house. Each puzzle can be solved using logic from the given information and requires no guesswork.

WORD SEARCH

1/1

Babies

1/1

021

Renault KOLEOS

Solution

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The Clare Echo Crossword ACROSS 1 The majority (4) 3 Disadvantage (8)             9 Foremost (7) 10 Brute (5)                         Relative by marriage Best Daily Word Search players also11 enjoy:               (2-3) 12 Concurred (6)                       14 Puzzle (6) 16 Existing in fact (6)           19 Conundrum (6) 21 Loafer (5)                         24 Classical language https://puzzles.bestforpuzzles.com/games/best-daily-word-search           (5) 25 Trading ban (7)                       26 Surround (8) 27 Optical glass (4)               1

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DOWN 1 Hat-maker (8) 2 Shoulder-wrap (5) 4 Sea between Greece and Turkey (6) 5 Exclude (5) 6 French castle (7) 7 Compassion (4) 8 Indian tent (6) 13 Splendid (8) 15 Foolish (7) 17 Ascends (6) 18 Make known (6) 20 Giver (5) 22 Big (5) 23 Otherwise (4)

CROSSWORD ANSWERS S

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QUIZ 31

THURSDAY, JAN 14 2021

The Clare Echo Quiz CLARE GAA QUIZ year did Clare hurlers 1 Infirstwhat win an All-Ireland title? 1914, 1924, 1934

2

What year did Ger Loughnane take over the senior hurling team? 1994, 1995, 1996

3

How many years did Davy Fitzgerald manage Clare for? 2years ,3years ,4years

Tipperary, Offaly, Kilkenny

many lions feature on the 9 How Clare GAA crest? Who scored the 4th goal in 10 Clareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s win vs Cork in the All-Ireland replay? 2, 3, 4

Darach Honan, Tony Kelly, Shane Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell

is the capaci4 What ty of Cusack Park? 18,000 , 25,000 , 28,000

what year did the Clare football 5 Inteam win their first Munster title?

lQUESTION 1: (above) In what year did Clare hurlers first win an All-Ire-

1905, 1912, 1917

land title?

How many All-Ireland junior titles 6 have the Clare Camogie team won?

lQUESTION 3: (left) How many years did Davy Fitzgerald manage Clare

2, 3, 4

for?

ANSWERS

what year did the Clare G.A.A 7 Inemblem come into being? 10.Darach Honan

4. 28,000

9. 3

3. 4 years

8. Offaly

did Clare beat in 1995 to 8 Who win the All-Ireland hurling final?

5. 1917

about 1926, 1936, 1946

7. about 1926

2. 1995

6. 4 Can you spot the difference? Spot the 7 differences. The answers will be revealed in next weeks edition.

1. 1914

Spot the Difference

Last weeks Answers . Colour different on waistcoat . Red button missing on waistcoat . Black button missing on collar of waistcoat . Shadow missing of woman (left)

. Arm missing of man in background . Flowers missing on womans dress (left) . Hair different colour of woman

Photo by Richard Quinn


Profile for The Clare Echo

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