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Newspaper of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis Coming soon: Stewardship tool kit

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The Catholic Spirit

May 12, 2011

News with a Catholic heart

Secrets for a happy marriage

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TheCatholicSpirit.com

Saluting the graduates

■ Cristo Rey to graduate first class — Page 1B

■ Senior student profiles — Pages 3B-12B From left, seniors Marrissa McLemore, Ismael Ibarra and Grissel Briones discuss classwork at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School in Minneapolis.

Dave Hrbacek / The Catholic Spirit

State bishops testify in support of marriage amendment The Catholic Spirit Two Minnesota Catholic bishops were among those who testified in state House and Senate committee hearings in favor of bills that would put a constitutional amendment on the ballot in 2012 to define marriage as a union between one man and one woman. “Based on God’s Word given in divine revelation, we believe that marriage creates a sacred bond between spouses,” said Bishop Paul Sirba of Duluth, testifying May 2 before the House Civil Law Committee in support of HF 1613. “We hold this to be true not only for ourselves, but for all humanity.” The church’s convictions about marriage “find ample PLEASE TURN TO TRADITIONAL ON PAGE 7A

Bishop Paul Sirba of Duluth testifies May 2 before a Minnesota House Committee in support of a constitutional amendment that would define marriage as a union between one man and one woman. Dianne Towalski / The Catholic Spirit


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MAY 12, 2011 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

Preparing for the new Roman Missal

That They May All Be One Archbishop John C. Nienstedt

This new translation has been guided by a new standard of rules that sets out to provide a more exact rendering of the original Latin text

Part of the rich legacy that we have inherited from the now Blessed John Paul II is a new Roman Missal, a text he issued in the Jubilee Year of 2000, but not released until 2002. The Roman Missal is the red book that the priest or bishop uses at his chair and at the altar in which he finds the prayers for that particular liturgy. More often, we hear it called the “sacramentary.” Of course, the official language of the 2002 Missal was Latin and so an English language translation was needed for the celebration of the Mass in the vernacular. That process took eight years of intense work, but received final approval in April 2010. We will begin to use this historic text on the first Sunday of Advent of this year.

Words will change While the Mass itself is not changing — that is, the structure of the Mass as we have known it since the Second Vatican Council is not being modified — the words of the Mass will be changing, and in significant ways. This new translation has been guided by a new standard of rules that sets out to provide a more exact rendering of the original Latin text. The text that we currently use was translated in 1974, and while the translation has served us well for many years, the church in her wisdom has determined that a revised

The Catholic Spirit The Catholic Spirit’s mission is to proclaim the Good News of Jesus Christ in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. It seeks to inform, educate, evangelize and foster a spirit of community within the Catholic Church by disseminating news in a professional manner and serving as a forum for discussion of contemporary issues.

Appointments

“I see the new missal as a great opportunity to stop and re-examine our understanding of the Mass so as to renew and deepen our appreciation for the mysteries that it contains.

ARCHBISHOP JOHN NIENSTEDT

Read the next installment in the series on the new missal — page 17A translation is necessary, correcting and clarifying those points of the 1974 translation that perhaps were not as clear as they need to be, or that did not do adequate justice to the beauty or power of the original Latin texts. We will also notice in the new translation a different “register,” a term used to describe the kind of speech in a particular setting. The new translation is written in a more formal register, highlighting the dignity and importance of the sacred liturgy and the One to whom we speak. For example, contrast this prayer of the 1974 translation, “Father, your love never fails.

Hear our call. Keep us from danger, and provide for all our needs.” with the 2010 version, “O God, whose providence never fails in its design, Keep from us, we humbly beseech you, all that might harm us and grant all that works for our good.” This is but one example of many in which a more elevated style of speech will be found in the newly translated text. To be sure, the difference in the style of the language will, at first, be PLEASE TURN TO RESOURCES ON PAGE 10A

The New Generation of Appliance Specialists

Vol. 16 — No. 10 MOST REVEREND JOHN C. NIENSTEDT Publisher BOB ZYSKOWSKI Associate publisher

JOE TOWALSKI Editor

Materials credited to CNS copyrighted by Catholic News Service. All other materials copyrighted by Catholic Spirit Publishing Company. Subscriptions: $29.95 per year Senior 1-year: $24.95 To subscribe: (651) 291-4444 Display Advertising: (651) 291-4444 Classified advertising: (651) 290-1631 Published bi-weekly by the Catholic Spirit Publishing Company, a non-profit Minnesota Corporation, 244 Dayton Ave., St. Paul, MN 55102 (651) 291-4444, FAX (651) 291-4460. Periodicals postage paid at St. Paul, MN, and additional post offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Catholic Spirit, 244 Dayton Ave., St. Paul, MN 55102. www.TheCatholicSpirit.com e-mail: catholicspirit@archspm.org USPS #093-580

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Third-Generation Appliance Specialists St. Paul s Edina s Woodbury Maple Grove s Apple Valley Rochester s Mpls. Outlet

Archbishop OKs 18 priest assignments for archdiocese Eighteen priests have been given new assignments in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. Father Jules Omba Omalanga was named as part-time chaplain for French-speaking African Catholics and part-time chaplain for North Memorial Hospital in Golden Valley, effective June 1. He has been serving as pastor of St. Philip in Minneapolis. (See page 5A for additional information on St. Philip.) The additional 17 assignments will begin Friday, July 1. Father Rodger Bauman was named pastor of Guardian Angels in Oakdale. He has served as pastor of St. Mary of the Lake in White Bear Lake since 2002 and previously served at St. Peter in Richfield, Holy Spirit in St. Paul, and St. Edward in Bloomington. Father Douglas Ebert will serve as pastor at Guardian Angels in Chaska. He has been assistant pastor at All Saints in Lakeville since 2009. Father Joseph Fink will be pastor of Immaculate Conception in Watertown. He has served at St. Joseph in West St. Paul since 2009. He prePLEASE SEE APPOINTMENTS ON PAGE 9A

Corrections ■ In the “Journey through the Easter Triduum” photos on page 4 of the April 28 issue, under Holy Thursday, Father James Perkl is washing, not anointing, the feet of Dylan Heiman at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton in Hastings. ■ In the story on page 7 about pastor assignments, Father Stan Mader served on the Clergy Personnel Board, not as clergy personnel director.

It’s The Catholic Spirit News with a Catholic heart. 651-291-4444 thecatholicspirit.com

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“Every charitable act is a stepping stone toward heaven.” Henry Ward Beecher

Local The Catholic Spirit

News from around the archdiocese

MAY 12, 2011

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St. Thomas Academy hockey player is a champ on and off the ice also to talk to them about the value of a good education is our mission.”

By Julie Pfitzinger For The Catholic Spirit

AJ Reid has proven himself to be a star on the ice as part of this year’s St. Thomas Academy championship hockey team, on the ball field as a left-fielder and power hitter for the STA baseball team, and as the Mendota Heights school’s Cadet lieutenant colonel and member of its crack drill squad. In the middle of these high-profile responsibilities — not to mention the academic pressures of senior year — this 18-year-old from Lakeville also has been working out of the spotlight, with the help of friends and family, to launch Teens for Change, a non-profit organization dedicated to encouraging teens to become positive influences in their communities and do what they can to make a difference in the lives of other kids. Through a connection with a family friend in the Minneapolis public school district, Reid learned about Elizabeth Hall International Elementary School in north Minneapolis; almost 90 percent of the children in this pre-K-fifth-grade school live at or below the poverty line, and nearly a quarter have experienced homelessness at some point in their lives. “My parents and I visited the school and met with the principal, who provided us with statistics about the kids,” said Reid. “I thought this would be a good place for Teens for Change to get involved.”

A successful team effort Earlier this year, Reid and Jesse Wyatt, a senior at Convent of the Visitation School in Mendota Heights, and several members of the STA hockey team visited Elizabeth Hall and worked with fifthgrade students there to make 80 care

A broader vision St. Thomas Academy senior AJ Reid receives congratulations from Dan Brooks after Reid’s hockey team won the state Class A championship March 12 at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul. Brooks presented the Herb Brooks Award to Reid after the game, which is named after Dan’s father, the legendary U.S. Olympic and University of Minnesota hockey coach. Dan Brooks played hockey at St. Thomas Academy and graduated from the school in 1986. Dave Hrbacek / The Catholic Spirit

packages for soldiers serving in Iraq. It provided the opportunity for Reid and the others to spend some quality time with the kids, who were a little awestruck by the older students. “It was really something to see them working side by side, talking and having a good time,” said Jackie Reid, AJ’s mother, who, along with his father, Alan, are co-founders of Teens for Change. “AJ has a very big heart and he just really loves people.” Teens for Change is currently in the process of raising $20,000 for its first major project, called “Back Packs for a Promising Future”; the organization hopes to purchase 400 new back packs filled with age-appropriate school sup-

plies to be given to every Elizabeth Hall student for the 2011-12 school year. The organization, which received its 501(c) 3 status in January, has a board of directors, which includes Reid and Wyatt as well as several local business leaders, and Greg and Tom Vannelli, both STA hockey coaches. Reid has taken on the role of primary fundraiser, approaching companies such as Ameriprise and Medtronic, and soliciting donations for Teens for Change. “I was a little nervous when I first started having those meetings, but it’s easier now. I want them to know I’m sincere and it is important to help kids who don’t have a lot,” he said. “To be able to give these kids some opportunities and

“AJ is truly a committed young man,” said Bennice Young, principal at Elizabeth Hall. “The initiative he has taken for our school is very impressive.” Next week, Reid and eight other STA seniors will be spending several days at Elizabeth Hall working with the students there on a service project. Young said all the students in the school, particularly the fifth-graders, really look up to Reid and his classmates. “I’ve used AJ as an example of a role model for a leader and how he’s shown what you can do if you put your mind to it,” Young said. “Everything from winning the state championship in hockey in their division to the work he’s doing for our school. There are a lot of great things to say about him.” Reid plans to remain active on the Teens for Change board, even though he will be playing junior hockey for the Omaha Lancers next year and then start college in fall 2012. In fact, Arianna Reid, his younger sister, who is a sophomore at Lakeville South High School, will be the one to create the next big project for the organization. “Once I get established, I’d like to turn Teens for Change into a scholarship foundation to help send kids to STA or to college,” said Reid. “People have really been willing to help us out, and when times are hard, I think that’s what the world needs — people who want to make things better.” For more information or to make a donation to Teens for Change, visit the website WWW.TEENS4CHANGE.ORG.


2010 WINNERS

Celebrating 100 years of publishing, The Catholic Spirit proudly announces the 10th annual Leading with Faith Awards

Nomination time! We are looking for folks like these, business owners, supervisors, anyone with management responsibilities who lives their faith in the work-a-day world. The Catholic Spirit kindly requests nominations for the 10th annual “Leading With Faith" Awards. Now is the time to nominate a Catholic manager, owner or business person for this prestigious award.

Presented by — PRESENTING SPONSOR — Available — PATRON SPONSOR — Available — SPONSOR — Available

AWARD CRITERIA REQUIREMENTS • Nominee must be employed currently in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. • Nominee must be an active member of his/her parish.

SUBMITTAL PROCESS:

Do it now: deadline is July 15 The 2011 awards will be presented to individuals who have influenced the workplace through business practices that reflect the teachings of Jesus Christ and his Church and who share of themselves in their parish and/or community. Business people will be honored in both large and small companies as well as leaders of nonprofit organizations.

Forms are also available online at TheCatholicSpirit.com. You will find a "Leading With Faith" nomination form with requirements and criteria the nominees must meet. Please duplicate blank forms and nominate individuals in any or all of the three categories: businesses with fewer than 50 employees; businesses with 50 or more employees; and nonprofit organizations. The more thorough the nomination, the better the chance of selection. If you have questions or to make reservations for the awards luncheon, contact Mary Gibbs at (651) 251-7709 or gibbsm@archspm.org.

WORKPLACE PRACTICES — USE ADDITIONAL PAPER (Note: This is the most important part of the nomination. If you do not work with the nominee, it may be helpful to talk with him/her or someone who works with him/her .) 1. List and describe examples that demonstrate the nominee's faith-based leadership. Examples might include treatment of employees and/or shareholders, value-based wages and benefits, role modeling, mentoring and others. 2. Describe an ethical dilemma the nominee has faced in his/her work environment and how he/she resolved the dilemma. 3. List major parish, archdiocesan and/or spiritually based non-church community organizations to which the nominee belongs. Identify leadership roles with each organization.

NOMINEE INFORMATION:

NOMINATOR INFORMATION:

Name: ________________________________________________

Name: ________________________________________________

Mail or e-mail nominations to: Mary Gibbs The Catholic Spirit 244 Dayton Ave. St. Paul, MN 55102 or gibbsm@archspm.org

Parish: ________________________________________________

Title: __________________________________________________

Phone: ________________________________________________

Relationship to nominee: ________________________________

E-mail:_________________________________________________

Phone: ________________________________________________

Company name (note whether for-profit or nonprofit):

E-mail: ________________________________________________

Archbishop John Nienstedt will present the “Leading With Faith” Awards at a noon luncheon banquet on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2011, in the Rauenhorst Hall Ballroom in the Coeur de Catherine building at St. Catherine University, 2004 Randolph Ave., St. Paul.

_______________________________________________________

Company contact information, if available:

Nominations must be submitted and postmarked by Friday, July 15, 2011.

_______________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

Number of employees: _____

_______________________________________________________

Job title: _______________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

How long has nominee held that position?_________________

_____________________________________


Local

MAY 12, 2011 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

Oblates to commemorate founder’s death with Mass, open house By Julie Carroll The Catholic Spirit

The Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate, an international order of missionary priests and brothers with members serving in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis, will commemorate the 150th anniversary of the death of its founder with a Mass and open house at Christ the King Retreat Center in Buffalo Sunday, May 22. “It’s an opportunity to take a look at the gift that St. Eugene [de Mazenod] was to the church, who he was, and what kind of legacy he leaves us,” said Oblate Father James Deegan, a staff member at the retreat center. Oblate Father Louis Studer, director of Christ the King, will concelebrate the 2 p.m. Mass with Father Deegan. An open house will follow from 3 to 5 p.m. Christ the King Retreat Center is at 621 First Ave. S in Buffalo. Oblates founder St. Eugene de Mazenod was born into a wealthy family on Aug. 1, 1782. He was ordained a priest at age 29. “His conclusion was, ‘If Jesus gave everything for me, then I, in turn, had better give everything for Jesus,’” Father Deegan said. St. Eugene started the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate in France in 1816. The order received formal approval from Pope Leo XII in 1826. In 1837, St. Eugene was named bishop of Marseille, France. When he died on May 21, 1861, six Oblate bishops and more than 400 Oblate missionaries were working in 10 countries. Pope John Paul II canonized him on Dec. 3, 1995. Today, more than 4,000 Oblate priests and brothers serve in 68 countries. Members have been instrumental in founding 44 other religious communities and secular institutes, Father Deegan said. In the archdiocese, the Oblates served

Minneapolis parish’s financial challenges prompted decision St. Philip parish in Minneapolis will merge with nearby Ascension parish on June 1, archdiocesan officials announced April 30.

FATHER GALLAGHER

Strategic Planning

Two priests with local ties to lead Oblates Father Louis Studer, director of Christ the King Retreat Center in Buffalo, has been appointed vicar provincial of the U.S. Province of the Oblates, the order’s No. 2 leadership position. His replacement at Christ the King has not yet been announced. Father Gregory Gallagher, a native of St. Casimir in St. Paul, has been appointed the province’s administrative assistant. Currently he serves as director of the National Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows in Belleville, Ill. Both men will begin their three-year terms in Washington, D.C., in June.

— The Catholic Spirit

UPDATE

The decision came after leaders at St. Philip informed the archdiocese that financial challenges at the 250-household parish had become insurmountable, according to a statement on the archdiocesan website.

St. Philip was not one of the 21 parishes slated to merge as a result of the archdiocesan Strategic Plan, announced last October. “When the archdiocese launched its strategic planning process a little more than two years ago, it was our hope that St. Philip could stabilize financially and would be able to remain open,” Archbishop John Nienstedt said in the online statement. “Unfortunately, over the past several months it has become clear that

this is simply not possible. I offer my condolences and prayerful support to all those who are impacted by this decision.” Father Michael O’Connell, pastor at Ascension, said his parish, which is about half a mile from St. Philip, is ready to welcome the St. Philip parishioners.

Chaplaincy to serve immigrants A community of French-speaking African immigrants at St. Philip will move to St. William in Fridley, where a chaplaincy will be established. Father Jules Omba Omalanga, St. Philip’s current pastor, will serve as chaplain. “The St. William family is very happy to open our arms to these French-speaking African Catholics,” said Father Joseph Whalen, pastor at St. William. “We are excited about the opportunity to learn from and share with one another.” After the merger, St. Philip’s church building will be closed. Parish leaders have not yet determined if St. Philip’s community outreach programs will continue. According to church law, St. Philip parishioners have until May 11 to request that Archbishop Nienstedt reconsider the merger if they wish to do so.

for 75 years at St. Albert in Albertville. The also have served at Assumption in Richfield and St. Mary in St. Paul. Currently, there are about 12 active and eight retired Oblates serving at St. Casimir in St. Paul and other area parishes, Regions Hospital in St. Paul, and Christ the King Retreat Center. One Oblate originally from St. Paul, Archbishop Roger Schwietz, currently serves as archbishop of Anchorage, Alaska. For more information, go to Christ the King Retreat Center’s website, WWW.KINGS HOUSE.COM.

Hearing Tests Set for Senior Citizens Announcement — Free electronic hearing tests will be given all next week Monday thru Friday from 9 am to 4 pm. The tests have been arranged for anyone who suspects they are not hearing clearly. People who generally feel they can hear, but cannot understand words clearly are encouraged to come in for the test, which uses the latest electronic equipment. Everyone, especially those over age 55 should have an electronic hearing test once

St. Philip slated to merge The Catholic Spirit

FATHER STUDER

a year. Demonstrations of the latest devices to improve clarity of speech will be programmed using a computer to your particular needs — on the spot — after the tests. See (and HEAR) for yourself if newlydeveloped methods of correction will help you understand words better. Tests will be performed at one of 20 convenient Greater Twin Cities Avada Hearing Care locations.

Call 1-800-435-5189

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THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • MAY 12, 2011

Stewardship tool kit, training coming for parishes The Catholic Spirit New tools to develop stewardship as a way of life will soon be available in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis, and a series of workshops have been scheduled in early June to help clergy, parish staff, parish volunteers and others interested in growing stewardship in homes and parishes to make the best use of those tools. A stewardship planner, posters, prayers, sample general intercessions, letters to parishioners, bulletin announcements, commitment cards and much more — all customizable — will soon be available online. So that those involved in growing stewardship at parishes learn how to access and implement the new resource, the archdiocesan Office of Development and Stewardship has slated workshops at five locations on the following dates and times: ■ Monday, June 6, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Lumen Christi, 2055 Bohland Ave., St. Paul. ■ Tuesday, June 7, 6 to 7:30 p.m., Pax Christi, 12100 Pioneer Trail, Eden Prairie. ■ Wednesday, June 8, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Holy Name of Jesus, 155 County Road 24, Medina. ■ Thursday, June 9, 6 to 7:30 p.m., St. Odilia, 3495 Victoria St. N., Shoreview. ■ Monday, June 13, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., St. Patrick, 3535 72nd St. E., Inver Grove Heights. A light meal will be included at all of the workshops.

Resources for parishes Michael Halloran, director of the archdiocesan Office of Development and Stewardship, encouraged parish leaders to attend the most convenient workshop. “Our hope is to grow stewardship as a way of living within our homes, our parishes and throughout our archdiocese,” Halloran said. “Essential to our success in accomplishing this vision will be to provide resources, support and encouragement to our parish leaders.

As the 10th Anniversary of that fateful day approaches, we will never forget

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“To be sure, stewardship is not a program,” he added. “However, we believe these resources can help in the education and formation around Christian stewardship and the sense of who we are as disciples of the Lord Jesus — recognizing all blessings come from the Lord and these blessings are to be used to serve all of God’s children.” Committee members who help plan the Archdiocesan Stewardship Conference have previewed the tool kit and served as consultants to Halloran on its contents and implementation. Terri Ashmore, managing director of the Basilica of St. Mary in Minneapolis, called the tool kit “a one-stop shop to go for new ideas and useable samples for actual work happening in the parish.” “I think the ‘Best Practices’ list is a great reference just to ground yourself about the big picture,” Ashmore said. “Practically, for me it’s the sample letters and forms that are so valuable — they are easy to take and adapt to fit your own parish situation. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel.” School Sister of Notre Dame Marion Welter, who served as director of stewardship at Epiphany in Coon Rapids and has been a consultant to parishes on stewardship, said the timing couldn’t be better for this resource package. “Many parishes are seeking help with their beginning or ongoing stewardship efforts,” Sister Marion said. “The tool kit is the perfect instrument, packed with ideas to assist any parish with creating the awareness and implementation of stewardship as a way of living.” And, she added, “all will be available at the click of the mouse.”

How does — and how will — our church communicate best? Help discern the answers to those vital questions by taking part in a national study of Catholic media usage. The Catholic Press Association of the United States and Canada has commissioned the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA) at Georgetown University to conduct a survey of readers of Catholic media, and The Catholic Spirit is inviting you to take part. The survey is being conducted online only. The aim is for our church to be dealing with facts as it moves forward in this time of transition and searching for the best ways to communicate.

How to participate Here’s the URL that will take you directly to the survey: HTTP://CARA.GEORGETOWN.EDU. Click on “Online Research” at the top of the page. This will take you to a page that lists CARA’s currently active “Online Surveys.” The survey you are invited to take is entitled “Catholic Media Use.” Click on the link for this survey, then click on the line “Complete the Catholic Media Use survey here.” CARA is a national, non-profit, Georgetown University-affiliated research center that conducts social scientific studies about the Catholic Church. Founded in 1964, CARA has three major dimensions to its mission: ■ to increase the church’s self understanding; ■ to serve the applied research needs of church decision-makers; ■ to advance scholarly research on religion, particularly Catholicism.

In Memory of Minnesota Native Thomas E. Burnett, Jr., Martyr, Faith-filled Catholic, Devoted Husband and Father, Citizen Soldier Tom answered the call without reservation and led the violent, fateful and successful charge by our citizen heroes on the cockpit of United Flight 93 on September 11, 2001, saving a targeted attack on the White House by Islamic Terrorists. Tom Burnett freely opened his heart and united his will, being prepared by Our Eucharistic Lord and the Blessed Mother, in inspired anticipation for what would be asked of him in service to the Faith and the Nation he loved so much.

$5,000 scholarships to be awarded Announcing the granting of two (2) $5,000 one-time college scholarships, in Thomas Burnett’s memory, to be gifted to young, patriotic, Faith-filled Minnesota men scheduled to graduate from High School in the spring of 2012. Homeschooled candidates most welcome. Applications should include a character summary of the young man’s life, including exemplary leadership and service to community, Church and a brief testimony on his heartfelt devotion to the Blessed Mother,

Patroness of our Land as The Immaculate Conception. Non-familial personal references should be included. Application deadline is September 11, 2011, and can be sent on behalf of the candidate, or by the young man himself. Awardees will be announced on the Feast of Our Lady of Victory (Our Lady of the Rosary), October 7, 2011 and the names will be published in The Catholic Spirit. Send to: Faith and Freedom Scholarship, PO Box 237, Hamel, MN 55340.

Read more about this courageous man and the amazing story about how the Holy Spirit supernaturally prepared he and his wife Deena in a powerful way for what would be asked of them. www.spiritdaily.net/burnett.htm Visit Thomas’ gravesite at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, easily located along the drive at Section 7, Site 23. Read a concise history of the world changing Battle of Lepanto, the 440th anniversary of which will be celebrated this October 7th, entitled Our Lady and Islam, Heaven’s Peace Plan: www.ewtn.com/library/mary/olislam.htm Request a free copy of the remarkable testimony Fighting Back, Living Life Beyond Ourselves, by Deena Burnett, by writing to the Scholarship address provided, or purchase through Amazon.com. Ask for Tom’s intercession for our beloved Nation and people in this hour of our need. This scholarship award is offered independently of the efforts of the Tom Burnett Family Foundation.


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MAY 12, 2011 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

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Redefining marriage redefines parenthood, expert says The Catholic Spirit Love is a wonderful thing, says Jennifer Roback Morse. But there’s no compelling reason for the government to register the simple fact that people love each other. It serves no essential public purpose. Marriage, on the other hand, does serve an essential public purpose: attaching mothers and fathers to their children and one another, said the founder and president of the Ruth Institute, a project of the National Organization for Marriage. “It’s obvious that same-sex couples and opposite-sex couples are different with respect to that core purpose,” Roback Morse said. “If you’re different with respect to that purpose, it’s not discrimination to treat people differently. “The courts know that because when they go to redefine marriage, they have to get rid of that core purpose,” she said. “They will tell you the purpose of marriage is something else. They’re wrong.” Roback Morse recently visited St. Paul to testify in favor of House and Senate bills that would allow Minnesotans to vote in 2012 on a constitutional amendment defining marriage as a union between one man and one woman. Supporters of the amendment approach cite recent court rulings and legislative actions in other states that have changed — or sought to change — the legal definition of marriage. Five states plus the District of Columbia currently allow “same-sex marriage.” Illinois recently passed a law legalizing civil unions and giving them the same status as marriages in the state. If written into the Minnesota Constitution, the state’s definition of marriage as the union between a man and a woman could not be changed by the Legislature or court system.

Separating child, parent In her testimony, Roback Morse, who holds a doctorate in economics and has written two books on the social purpose and significance of marriage, said “samesex marriage redefines parenthood as a side effect of redefining marriage.” “Up until now, marriage has made legal parenthood track biological parenthood, with adoptions for exceptional sit-

Dianne Towalski / The Catholic Spirit

Jennifer Roback Morse, founder and president of the Ruth Institute, testifies May 2 in St. Paul before the House Civil Law Committee.

uations,” she said. “The legal presumption of paternity means that children born to a married woman are presumed to be the children of her husband. With this legal rule, and the social practice of sexual exclusivity, marriage attaches children to their biological parents. “Same-sex couples, of course, do not procreate together,” she continued. “Socalled ‘marriage equality’ requires a dubious move from ‘presumption of paternity’ to the gender neutral ‘presumption of parenthood.’ The same-sex partner of a biological parent is never the other biological parent. Rather than attaching children to their biological parents, samesex marriage is the vehicle that separates children from parent.” Some courts have demonstrated their agreement with this change. Roback Morse cited the Iowa Supreme Court, which in 2009 stated as part of a samesex union case that “the traditional notion that children need a mother and a father to be raised into healthy, welladjusted adults is based more on stereotype than anything else.” She called that a false notion in light of the “mountains of data” that show children need both mothers and fathers and

care deeply about biological connections. It is one way same-sex marriage would alter the social structure. “The biological principle of determining parentage will have to be suppressed and eventually replaced with another principle,” she said. “That principle will be that the state will decide who counts as a parent.”

Wrong side of history? Roback Morse, who is a Catholic, wife and mother of two children, addressed critics who say that supporters of traditional marriage are on the “wrong side of history” because today’s younger generations favor it. She said opponents of abortion also heard they were on the “wrong side of history” in the aftermath of the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision legalizing the practice. But, she said, young people today increasingly express pro-life views and don’t buy into the abortion culture. There is a similarity between the issues of abortion and same-sex unions, Roback Morse said during an interview with The Catholic Spirit. “The parallel is that it was the interests of the children that were set aside for the

abortion regime,” she said. “The interests of children are set aside for the pleasure and convenience of adults. That’s exactly what’s happening with same-sex marriage. “Marriage is turning into something that has to do with adult desires, adult affirmation, adult convenience,” she added. “The idea that marriage attaches mothers and fathers to their children and to one another, the idea that the bond between a child and his biological parents is important — that’s being completely set aside. It’s the interests of the child that are being downgraded in order to accommodate the desires of adults. Over time, that will become more obvious.” The opportunity to vote on a constitutional amendment regarding marriage will give ordinary citizens the kind of say they should have in the matter, Roback Morse said. “Doing this on the constitutional level is the highest guarantee that the people of Minnesota could give themselves that marriage is what it should be,” she said. For more information about the Ruth Institute, located in San Marcos, Calif., visit WWW.RUTHINSTITUTE.ORG.

Traditional marriage advances common good, bishop testifies CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A support in principles which can be discovered by human reason and which have been reflected throughout human history,” Bishop Sirba said. The House bill, introduced by Rep. Steve Gottwalt (R-St. Cloud), was approved by the Civil Law Committee by a 10-7 vote. A companion bill in the Senate (SF 1308), authored by Sen. Warren Limmer (R-Maple Grove), was passed April 29 in the Senate Judiciary Committee, where Bishop John Quinn of Winona testified in support of the measure. “Defining marriage as simply a union of consenting parties will change the core meaning of marriage for every Minnesotan,” Bishop Quinn told lawmakers. “At best it is an untested social experiment. And, at worst, it poses a dangerous risk with potentially far-reaching consequences.

Stay updated For the latest news about the marriage amendment bill, visit THECATHOLICSPIRIT.COM and the Minnesota Catholic Conference’s resource page at WWW.MNCC.ORG/ISSUES/MARRIAGE.

“This could open the door to an ongoing process that redefines marriage according to the social needs of groups advocating change that, in time, could result in no fixed definition of mar-riage.” If both houses pass the measure, a question would be placed on the ballot in November 2012 asking voters: “Shall the Minnesota Constitution be amended to provide that only a union of one man and one woman shall be valid or recognized as a marriage in Minnesota?” Both bills could receive a full floor vote

in the House and Senate as early as this week. At the May 2 House hearing, Bishop Sirba was the third of seven people to testify on behalf of the House bill. Hundreds of people were directed to a lower-level room to watch the proceedings via live broadcast, as only ticketed participants were allowed into the packed hearing room. Testimony in support of the bill was also given by representatives from four other faith groups, University of St. Thomas School of Law professor Teresa Collett and Jennifer Roback Morse, founder and president of the Ruth Institute, a project of the National Organization for Marriage. Amendment opponents also testified. Bishop Sirba said “the committed relationship between one man and one woman calls forth the best of the spouses, not only for their own sake, but also for

the well-being of their children and for the advancement of the common good.” In defending the institution of marriage, he emphasized that “persons with same-sex attractions are our sisters and brothers, and should not be deprived of their authentic human rights, including the most fundamental rights of all — the right to life and the right to love.” The Catholic Church opposes discrimination against any person based on a same-sex attraction, he said. “At the same time,” he added, “meeting authentic human needs does not require changing society’s definition of marriage.” Bishop Sirba said the bishops believe the amendment is needed because several legislative proposals in the past few years have sought to “transform marriage from an institution focused on the needs of children into a totally new legal entity centered on the happiness of adults.”


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THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • MAY 12, 2011

Immigration reform must protect families, human dignity The following is a legislative update provided by the Minnesota Catholic Conference, which advocates on behalf of the state’s bishops for public policies and programs that support the life and dignity of every human person. In the past decade, the federal government has spent $117 billion on immigration enforcement, yet the number of unauthorized immigrants in the United States continues to grow. Katie Conlin Legal means of entering the United States to work are extremely limited and do not correspond to the demand for labor. About 300,000 to 500,000 migrants cross the border every year looking for work, yet the number of available visas and green cards that offer realistic legal entry options is nowhere near that number. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops believes that increasing lawful means for immigrants to enter, live and work in the United States would help law enforcement focus on those immigrants who actually pose a threat to public safety. The bishops, of course, accept the legitimate role of the U.S. government in controlling its borders and enforcing the rule of law. But enforcement of immigration laws, while not inherently objectionable, is being carried out in ways that raise many concerns about the rights and dig-

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Minnesota Food Assistance program. This program helps legal noncitizens over the age of 50 who need food support but do not qualify for the federal food stamps program. The other proposal would eliminate Medical Assistance coverage for certain low-income legal noncitizens.

“The bishops believe that policies and laws that focus only on enforcement without comprehensive immigration reform do not resolve the dilemma posed by large numbers of undocumented immigrants in a just manner.

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KATIE CONLIN

nity of those being prosecuted and deported. There is little hope that either comprehensive immigration reform or the DREAM Act (which would create a conditional path to citizenship for qualifying undocumented youth) stand a chance of passing Congress this year. There are, however, a number of important immigration-related efforts taking place at both the federal level and in Minnesota.

Keeping families together At the federal level, the USCCB has been hard at work opposing enforcement-only legislation, as well as working to obtain administrative relief from processes that tear apart families and deport large numbers of otherwise non-

criminal undocumented persons. The bishops believe that policies and laws that focus only on enforcement without comprehensive immigration reform do not resolve the dilemma posed by large numbers of undocumented immigrants in a just manner. Advocates from the USCCB will be meeting with members of Congress in the next couple of weeks to discuss their concerns about immigration issues and are asking Catholics to follow up on these visits by contacting the local offices of our U.S. representatives and senators. Locally, there are two proposals in the Minnesota Senate version of the Health and Human Services budget bill that would have a negative impact on legal immigrants. One is the proposal to eliminate the

During this difficult budget year, it is likely that many programs will be trimmed and reformed. But the wholesale elimination of food support and affordable health care access for certain elderly and low-income legal immigrants could leave people in very vulnerable situations. You can speak up for our legal immigrant neighbors by contacting members of the Health and Human Services conference committee and asking them not to adopt the Senate’s position of eliminating food support and affordable health care access for low-income and elderly legal noncitizens. Contacting your legislators is easy: Visit WWW.MNCC.ORG and navigate to “Advocacy Tools” under the “Legislation” tab to take action on this and a number of other important issues pending at the State Legislature. Katie Conlin is the Minnesota Catholic Conference’s interim social concerns director.

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Appointments CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2A viously served at St. Mark, St. Bernard and St. John, all in St. Paul; St. Raphael in Crystal; St. Mary in Shakopee; St. Thomas the Apostle in Corcoran; St. Pius X in White Bear Lake; Most Holy Redeemer in Montgomery; and St. Peter in Mendota. Father Paul Jarvis was named pastor of St. Joseph in Rosemount. He has been pastor of Guardian Angels in Chaska since 2007 and previously served at the Basilica of St. Mary in Minneapolis and Our Lady of Grace in Edina. Father Paul Kammen will become pastor of St. Joseph and St. Peter (Delano Catholic Community) in Delano. He has served at St. Hubert in Chanhassen since 2009 and previously at Holy Name of Jesus in Medina. Father Abraham George Kochupurackal, CMI, will be pastor of Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Bloomington. He has served at Our Lady of the Lake in Mound since 2009 and previously at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton in Hastings, St. Anne in Le Sueur, Blessed Sacrament in St. Paul; and St. Dominic in Northfield. Father Thomas Krenik was named pastor of Risen Savior in Burnsville. He has been serving at St. Richard in Richfield since 1999 and as canonical administrator of Blessed Trinity Catholic School in Richfield since 2004. He previously served at St. Timothy in Blaine, Maternity of the Blessed Virgin in St. Paul and the St. Paul Seminary. Father William Martin will be pastor of St. Richard in Richfield. He has been serving as pastor of Guardian Angels in Oakdale since 1998. He previously served at St. Mary in Waverly, Christ the King in Minneapolis and St. Margaret Mary in Golden Valley. Father Kenneth O’Hotto will serve as pastor of St. Mary in Waverly. He has served as pastor of St. Michael in West St. Paul since 2003 and previously served at St. Anne in Le Sueur. Father Timothy Rudolphi was named pastor of St. Patrick in Edina. He has served as pastor of St. Henry in

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Obituaries Monticello since 2000. He previously served at Guardian Angels in Chaska, Risen Savior in Burnsville and Epiphany in Coon Rapids. Father Eugene Tiffany will be pastor of Immaculate Conception in Columbia Heights. He has served at St. Mark in St. Paul since 2009. He has served as pastor at Holy Spirit in St. Paul, St. Olaf in Minneapolis, All Saints in Lakeville, Holy Trinity in South St. Paul and St. Henry in Montecello. Father Rolf Tollefson was named pastor of St. Hubert in Chanhassen. He has been serving as chaplain of the Marriage, Family and Life Office since 2008 and previously served at St. Charles Borromeo in St. Anthony. Father Stephen Ulrick will be pastor of Holy Name of Jesus in Medina. He has served as pastor of Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Bloomington since 2005. He also has served at St. Hubert in Chanhassen, St. Thomas Aquinas in St. Paul Park, as chaplain at United/Children’s Hospitals in St. Paul, St. Joseph in Hopkins and St. Matthew in St. Paul. Father Anthony Vanderloop was named pastor of St. Henry in Monticello. He has served at St. Peter in Richfield since 2006 and as canonical administrator of Blessed Trinity Catholic School in Richfield since 2010. He previously served at St. Francis de Sales and St. Bernard, both in St. Paul. Father Frank Wampach will serve as pastor at St. Joseph and St. Francis Xavier in Taylors Falls. He has served as pastor at Immaculate Conception in Watertown since 1997. He previously served at St. Mary in Bellechester, St. Paul in Zumbrota, Guradian Angels in Oakdale and St. Vincent de Paul in Brooklyn Park. Father Timothy Wozniak was named pastor of St. Thomas Becket in Eagan. He has served as pastor of Risen Savior, Burnsville, since 1999. He has served at St. Thomas Aquinas in St. Paul Park, Assumption in Richfield, Basiclia of St. Mary in Minneapolis, St. John the Baptist in New Brighton and St. Edward in Bloomington.

Father Daniel Bodin will begin studies in canon law. He has served as pastor at St. Joseph in Taylors Falls since 2008. He also has served at St. Francis Xavier in Franconia and St. John Neumann in Eagan. OFFICIAL Archbishop John C. Nienstedt has made the following appointments in the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis: Effective June 1, 2011: Rev. Jules Omba Omalanga, part-time chaplain for French speaking African Catholics and part time chaplain, North Memorial Hospital, Robbinsdale. Effective July 1, 2011: Rev. Rodger R. Bauman, pastor, Guardian Angels, Oakdale. Rev. Douglas A. Ebert, pastor, Guardian Angels, Chaska. Rev. Joseph P. Fink, pastor, Immaculate Conception, Watertown Rev. Paul L. Jarvis, pastor, St. Joseph, Rosemount. Rev. Paul A. Kammen, pastor, St. Joseph and St. Peter (Delano Catholic), Delano. Rev. Abraham George Kochupurackal, CMI, pastor, Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Bloomington. Rev. Thomas W. Krenik, pastor, Risen Savior, Burnsville. Rev. William F. Martin, pastor, St. Richard, Richfield. Rev. Kenneth L. O’Hotto, pastor, St. Mary, Waverly. Rev. Timothy C. Rudolphi, pastor, St. Patrick, Edina. Rev. Eugene W. Tiffany, pastor, Immaculate Conception, Columbia Heights. Rev. Rolf R. Tollefson, pastor, St. Hubert, Chanhassen. Rev. Stephen D. Ulrick, pastor, Holy Name of Jesus, Medina. Rev. Anthony G. VanderLoop, pastor, St. Henry, Monticello. Rev. Frank J. Wampach, pastor, St Joseph and St. Francis Xavier, Taylors Falls. Rev. Timothy J. Wozniak, pastor, St. Thomas Becket. Rev. Daniel J. Bodin, studies in canon law.

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Deacon Carlson was among first ordained permanent deacons Deacon Paul Carlson, 94, was part of the first group of permanent deacons to be ordained for the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis in 1976. He died April 20. A catechist at the Paulist information center, Deacon Carlson taught Scripture for the diaconate formation program and in parishes and was a member of the archdiocesan Marriage Tribunal. A funeral Mass was celebrated at St. Lawrence Newman Center Parish April 26, with burial in Gethsemane Cemetery.

Father Bernard Klein served 62 years as archdiocesan priest Father Bernard Klein, 88, died May 4. He was ordained a priest June 4, 1949. He retired from active ministry in January 1995 but continued to serve parishes in sacramental ministry. The long-time coordinator of the annual family Rosary Procession, he received an apostolic blessing on the 50th annual procession from Pope John Paul II in 1998. In a 2004 story in The Catholic Spirit about the 1949 ordination group from the St. Paul Seminary, Father Klein said that he and his classmates back then were eager to reach the prestigious “pastor” status. “The great thing was to be the pastor, to kind of be the boss,” he said in the interview. “You just knew that after you were ordained you wouldn’t become a pastor for at least 15 years.” He served at St. Columba, St. Paul; St. Dominic, Northfield; St. Michael, West St. Paul; Blessed Sacrament, St. Paul; St. Martin, Rogers; and St. Vincent, St. Paul. A funeral Mass was celebrated May 10 at St. Peter in North St. Paul.

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Heavenly Mother’s Day

Resources available to prepare for use of new Roman Missal CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2A

Jim Bovin / For The Catholic Spirit

Participants in the 64th annual May Day Family Rosary Procession make their way in the rain toward the Cathedral of St. Paul from the Minnesota State Capitol building in St. Paul on Mother’s Day Sunday, May 8.

Archbishop Nienstedt’s schedule ■ Saturday, May 14: 10 a.m., Faribault, Church of Divine Mercy: Confirmation. ■ Sunday, May 15: 10 a.m., St. Paul, The St. Paul Seminary: Archbishop Harry J. Flynn Catechetical Institute - Class of St. John Vianney graduation Mass in St. Mary’s Chapel. ■ Monday, May 16: 11:30 a.m., St. Paul, Archbishop’s Residence: Mass and lunch with St. Thomas Academy downhill ski team champions and hockey team champions. 3 p.m., St. Paul, Chancery: Catholic Community Foundation quarterly board meeting. ■ Tuesday, May 17: 8:30 a.m., St. Paul, Archbishop’s Residence: Scheduling meeting with staff. 1:30 p.m., St. Paul, Chancery: Archbishop’s Council meeting. ■ Wednesday, May 18: 11:15 a.m., St. Paul, Archbishop’s Residence: Mass and lunch with DeLaSalle’s girls’ basketball team champions.

challenging for all of us. I believe that the changes will be most challenging for us priests, who have over the years memorized many of the prayers, especially the Eucharistic Prayer. I know this is the case with my own life. To meet this challenge, we must keep in mind that these changes are meant to help us better celebrate the sacred mysteries of the Eucharist and thus lead us to a deeper union with God. The purpose of the change in translation is not arbitrary, but has rather been undertaken so as to promote the devotion and prayer of the People of God. As we read in “Liturgiam Authenticam,” the Vatican’s most recent document on inculturation and the translation of liturgical texts: “By means of words of praise and adoration that foster reverence and gratitude in the face of God’s majesty, his power, his mercy and his transcendent nature, the translations will respond to the hunger and thirst for the living God that is experienced by the people of our own time” (no. 25). In preparing for the new texts, we should also keep in mind that the sacred liturgy is one of the primary sources of expressing, and maintaining, the unity of the church. We worship in the same way to communicate the fact that we are united in discipleship. Thus, rubrics and liturgical rules are not just about being fussy or nitpicky. Rather, obedience to the texts and rules of the liturgy help us stay unified as church, both on the local and universal level. So you see, there is much more involved in the reception of the new

“There is much more involved in the reception of the new translation than just a matter of which words we use. This reality touches on the core of our union as the Body of Christ.

ARCHBISHOP JOHN NIENSTEDT

translation than just a matter of which words we use. This reality touches on the core of our union as the Body of Christ. Personally, I see the new missal as a great opportunity to stop and re-examine our understanding of the Mass so as to renew and deepen our appreciation for the mysteries that it contains. To help us all in our efforts of catechesis and reception, I have asked the archdiocesan Office of Worship to begin a series of articles in The Catholic Spirit on the new Roman Missal, as well as to offer resources (many of which are online) to our parishes — resources that will help them prepare for the changes. I urge pastors, deacons, catechists, teachers, worship committees, musicians, cantors and parish staff members to enter into this time of preparation with enthusiasm and with a positive spirit. God love you!

2 p.m., St. Paul, Chancery: Meeting with Catholic Charities. 4:30 p.m., St. Paul, Archbishop’s Residence: Catholic Services Appeal volunteer appreciation Mass and dinner. ■ Thursday, May 19: 9 a.m., St. Paul, Chancery: Caleb group meeting. 2:30 p.m., St. Paul, Chancery: Archdiocesan Finance Council meeting. 6:30 p.m., St. Paul, Archbishop’s Residence: Archbishop Harry J. Flynn event committee recognition. ■ Friday, May 20: 12:30 p.m., St. Paul, University of St. Thomas: St. John Vianney College Seminary graduation banquet. ■ Saturday, May 21: 10 a.m., Anoka Church of St. Stephen: Confirmation. ■ Sunday-Wednesday, May 22-25: Trip with seminarians to the Boundary Waters. ■ Thursday, May 26: Noon, St. Paul, Archbishop’s Residence: Lunch for ordinandi. 6 p.m., Minneapolis, Church of St. Olaf: Welcome dinner for ordinandi ■ Friday, May 27: 10 a.m., St. Paul, Archbishop’s Residence: Mass and blessing of chalices and lunch with ordinandi and their parents. 8 p.m., Faribault, Bethlehem Academy: Graduation commencement.

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“The bishops recognized something needed to be done to help folks deal with the severe emotional and spiritual and moral consequences of unemployment.” Thomas Mulloy, policy adviser in the bishops’ Office of Domestic Social Development, on the bishops’ support of the Faith Advocates for Jobs campaign

Nation/World MAY 12, 2011

News from around the U.S. and the globe

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Church needs blogs, bloggers need church Briefly the Catholic blogs generally are real sources of “Catholic clarity.”

By Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

But bloggers can’t claim to be purveyors of clarity unless they do so with charity, she said.

The Catholic Church needs active members who blog. But Catholic bloggers also need the church, especially to remind them of the virtue of charity needed in their writing, said participants at a Vatican meeting.

“Charity is one of the biggest challenges we face,” she said, because “freedom is both a gift and a source of temptation for our egos.”

The meeting May 2 was sponsored by the pontifical councils for culture and for social communications.

Scalia said the Catholic blogosphere is host to too much “us and them” on both the conservative and liberal sides of the church.

The councils accepted requests to attend, then drew the names of the 150 participants once the requests were divided according to geography, language and whether the blog was personal or institutional.

As Catholics, she said, “we have no business fostering enemies.” “The church needs us,” Scalia said. “It needs us for evangelization. It needs us to disseminate information and often to correct information.”

Richard Rouse, an official at the culture council, said news of the Vatican meeting already has encouraged other church officials to begin a dialogue with local bloggers. The Vatican meeting, he said, was not designed as a how-to seminar, and it was not aimed at developing a code of conduct, but rather to acknowledge the role of blogs in modern communications and to start a dialogue between the bloggers and the Vatican.

Reaching out Father Roderick Vonhogen, a Dutch priest and author of “Katholiek Leven” (“Catholic Life”), told the meeting that blogging “allows me to be a shepherd for people who need one, not those who already have one” because they are active in a parish. “If you write a blog post and no one

Maintaining a proper focus CNS photo / Paul Haring

Rocco Palmo, author of “Whispers in the Loggia,” speaks at a meeting of Catholic bloggers at the Vatican May 2.

comments, you feel miserable . . . alone and isolated,” he said. The comments let the writer and readers experience being part of a community. But, it’s only when you have established interest and friendship that you can bring someone to faith, Father Vonhogen said. Elizabeth Scalia, who writes “The Anchoress,” said that while the mainstream media tend to view blogs as “little more than a means of self-promotion,”

Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, Vatican spokesman, said “Bloggers are important” for forming and informing church members. But anyone who influences what Catholics think must recognize the responsibility that comes with it. Father Lombardi said he had to thank bloggers for the times they acted to explain and spread church teaching and the thought of Pope Benedict XVI. But he also said that the whole question of bloggers’ self-centeredness and “ego” is “one of the problems which is worth reflecting on,” because while it is a danger for all communicators, a communicator who calls him- or herself Catholic must focus first on serving others.

Homes play major role in fostering vocations World Day of Prayer for Vocations is May 15 Catholic News Service The theme of Pope Benedict XVI’s message for the upcoming World Day of Prayer for Vocations points to the important role Catholic home life plays in the promotion of vocations to the priesthood and religious life, said Archbishop Robert Carlson of St. Louis. “The theme which the Holy Father chose places the burden on the local church to reflect on how it develops a culture of vocations,” said the archbishop, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Clergy, Consecrated Life and Vocations. “We know that the vocation comes out of the home.” The papal message for the day of prayer, which will be observed May 15, was released Feb. 10 at the Vatican. The 2011 theme is “Proposing Vocations in the Local Church.” “Every Christian community, every

member of the church needs consciously to feel responsibility for promoting vocations,” especially in an era when God’s voice “seems to be drowned out by ‘other voices’ and his invitation to follow him by the gift of one’s own life may seem too difficult,” the pope said.

Parish, family important In an interview with Catholic News Service while he was in Washington in March, Archbishop Carlson said the majority of newly ordained priests said they were influenced by their parish in their discernment for the priesthood. According to results of a survey of members of the 2011 ordination class, released April 25, 66 percent of the respondents said it was their parish priest who encouraged them. Forty-two percent identified their mothers as having a major influence on their decision. The annual national survey is conducted by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University for the USCCB’s Secretariat of Clergy, Consecrated Life and Vocations.

Archbishop Carlson said parishes need to find a way to encourage the wider community to be more supportive of young men who choose a vocation to the priesthood, since many of them begin the discernment process at age 16. “Most young people don’t understand what discernment is all about,” Archbishop Carlson told CNS. “They have not been taught from the pulpit or in the religion classes how to discern.”

Other influences The archbishop said he was interested in the influence Catholic education had on vocations this year. Results showed that 47 percent of the ordinands surveyed went to a Catholic elementary school and were somewhat more likely to attend Catholic high school. Thirty-nine percent of them attended a Catholic university or college, compared to 7 percent of all U.S. Catholic adults. “We are going to make sure our Newman chaplains and our campus ministers are talking to young people about vocations,” the archbishop added.

Bishops urge Senate to protect poor Acknowledging that Congress and the administration face “difficult challenges” in tackling the country’s massive budget deficit, the U.S. bishops reiterated their call that the needs of poor and vulnerable must be protected in budget decisions. The bishops urged lawmakers to protect human life and dignity as the budget debates unfold in a May 5 letter to each member of the Senate. The letter was signed by Bishop Stephen Blaire of Stockton, Calif., chairman of the Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, and Bishop Howard Hubbard of Albany, N.Y., chairman of the Committee on International Justice and Peace. “The moral measure of this budget debate is not which party wins or which powerful interests prevail, but rather how those who are jobless, hungry, homeless or poor are treated,” the bishops wrote.

House bill restricts funding for abortion The House has approved a bill that would make the Hyde Amendment permanent, limit tax deductions for the cost of an abortion and block other potential use of federal funds for any clinic or doctor who offers abortions. The Hyde Amendment prohibits federal funding of abortion. The legislation — H.R. 3, the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act — is unlikely to reach a Senate vote and would likely be vetoed by President Barack Obama if it should pass. But supporters of the bill called for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (DNev.) to bring the bill to the floor.

Advocacy network aids unemployed As Paul Kravitz struggled for months to find work in the computer field without success, it was his parish, St. James in suburban Stratford, Conn., that came to the rescue. Earlier this year the St. James ministry joined Faith Advocates for Jobs, a new campaign of the Washington-based Interfaith Worker Justice. The group has assembled a tool kit that explains the campaign’s goals, examines the role of churches in supporting the unemployed, offers tips on forming support groups, provides prayer resources and suggests ideas for action at meetings. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has joined the effort. Information about Faith Advocates for Jobs can be found online at WWW.IWJ.ORG/INDEX.CFM/EMPLOY MENT. — Catholic News Service


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The Catholic Spirit • May 12, 2011

Nation / World

Beatification highlights Blessed John Paul’s courage, faith “I felt something had changed in me, and I was healed,” she said. The crowd in the Circus Maximus erupted in applause.

By Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

Pope John Paul II was a true believer, a courageous voice of truth and a man whose witness to the faith grew more eloquent as his ability to speak declined, Pope Benedict XVI and others who worked closely with the late pope said at events for his beatification. “John Paul II is blessed because of his faith — a strong, generous and apostolic faith,” Pope Benedict said May 1 just minutes after formally beatifying his predecessor. In the beatification proclamation, Pope Benedict said that after a consultation with many bishops and faithful and a study by the Congregation for Saints’ Causes, he had decided that “the venerable servant of God, John Paul II, pope, henceforth will be called blessed” and his feast will be Oct. 22, the anniversary of the inauguration of his pontificate in 1978. Italian police said that for the beatification Mass more than 1 million people were gathered in and around the Vatican and in front of large video screens in several parts of Rome. The next morning 60,000 people gathered in St. Peter’s Square for a Mass in thanksgiving for the beatification.

Personal stories

CNS photo / Paul Haring

Nun’s healing

Polish pilgrims hold a picture of Blessed Pope John Paul II as they celebrate outside St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican May 2.

The official celebrations began with a nighttime prayer vigil April 30 at the Circus Maximus, the site of ancient Roman racetrack.

The crowd — estimated at about 200,000 people — cheered French Sister Marie Simon-Pierre, whose cure from

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Parkinson’s disease was accepted as the miracle that paved the way for Pope John Paul’s beatification. The nun beamed as she recounted her unexpected healing. She said when she was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2001 at the age of 40, she found it difficult to watch Pope John Paul, who suffered from the same disease. “I saw in him the image of my illness. But I admired his strength and courage,” she said. Two months after the pope died, her condition worsened. Then, after prayers to the late pope, she awoke early one morning feeling well rested.

Many others in the crowds for the events also had personal stories about Pope John Paul. Likewise, Pope Benedict ended his homily at the beatification Mass sharing his own personal story. “I would like to thank God for the gift of having worked for many years with Blessed Pope John Paul II,” he said. As prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith from 1982 until his election in 2005, Pope Benedict said he worked at the pope’s side “and came to revere him.” “His example of prayer continually impressed and edified me. He remained deeply united to God even amid the many demands of his ministry,” the pope said. Pope Benedict said that even at the moment of his death people “perceived the fragrance of his sanctity and in any number of ways God’s people showed their veneration for him. For this reason, with all due respect for the church’s canonical norms, I wanted his cause of beatification to move forward with reasonable haste.” After the Mass, Pope Benedict went into St. Peter’s Basilica and knelt in prayer for four minutes before Blessed John Paul’s casket, which was set in front of the main altar. After the pope left, the concelebrating cardinals filed up to the wooden casket, touching it lightly and kissing it. Later, the Vatican opened the basilica to the general public and kept it open until 3 a.m. Vatican police said 250,000 people filed past the casket or knelt in prayer near it in those first 13 hours. The basilica was opened again after the thanksgiving Mass May 2 so more people could pay their respects. Contributing to this story were John Thavis and Carol Glatz at the Vatican.

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Genna Lizakowski and Adam Kostanecki, members of the teen Polish folk dance group Chabry, perform May 1 at Pope John Paul II School in northeast Minneapolis to mark the beatification of the school’s namesake.


“In the face of a man’s death, a Christian never rejoices, but reflects on the serious responsibilities of each person before God and before men.” From a Vatican statement following Osama bin Laden’s death

This Catholic Life MAY 12, 2011

Opinion, feedback and points to ponder

The Catholic Spirit

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Bin Laden killing poses questions for moral debate s word got out that Osama bin Laden had been killed by a Navy SEAL strike team in Pakistan, television and the Internet quickly began to feature images of spontaneous celebrations outside the White House and at ground zero in New York. Just as quickly, blogs and social media pages such as Facebook began to rage with debates: about the morality of bin Laden’s killing and how it was accomplished and about the appropriateness of the celebratory atmosphere. Others questioned the meaning of the “justice” described by President Barack Obama in announcing bin Laden’s death. “We must be clear what we underPatricia Zapor stand when President Obama says ‘justice has been done,’” said Gerard Powers, director of Catholic Peacebuilding Studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame, in an exchange of emails with Catholic News Service. “Justice has been done in that the killing of bin Laden was necessary to defend the common good against terrorism,” Powers wrote. “Justice has not been done if we revel in his killing as an act of revenge for 9/11. It is unclear if justice has been done in the sense of holding bin Laden legally accountable for his past crimes against humanity, especially the 9/11 attacks.” Also unclear was whether bin Laden could have been captured and brought to trial, Powers said. “If it was possible to capture bin Laden and he was killed anyway, then justice was not done.”

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Analysis

Important distinction Bishop Paul Loverde of Arlington, Va., whose diocese includes the Pentagon, wrote that bin Laden’s death brings back painful memories for many in the community, which requires a note of caution. “It is important that we recognize the distinction between support for this act of justice defending our nation and a misguided sense of revenge,” he wrote. “Let us not turn toward resentment or bitterness, but rather toward a deeper trust in our Lord. With confidence in his mercy and guidance, let us pray for those serving our country, for a conversion of heart among those who support the evils of terrorism and for the growth of faith and a desire for peace within our own hearts.” The Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding and the Islamic Society of North America were among those applauding the elimination of the threat posed by bin Laden, but warning against misdirected hatred and stereotypes. “We hope his death will bring some relief to all the families, of every faith and walk of life, who lost loved ones on 9/11 and in every other terrorist attack orchestrated at the hands of Osama bin Laden,” said a statement from the Islamic society, which quoted Obama’s description of bin Laden as “not a Muslim leader” but “a mass murderer of Muslims.” The Islamic society said al-Qaida, the terrorist organization bin Laden headed, “has slaughtered scores of Muslims in many countries, including our own. So his demise should be welcomed by all who believe in peace and human dignity.” A statement from the Tanenbaum center voiced gratitude that bin Laden, “one of history’s most infamous voices of hate and terror . . . is silenced and can no longer promote a violent agenda.” But it cautioned against the “voice of hatred” emerging amid the scenes of national jubilation. “On Twitter today, we see racial epithets used to describe bin Laden. We see stereotyping of all people

CNS photo / Mike Segar, Reuters

The picture of a victim of the 9/11 terrorist attacks hangs with flowers and messages on a fence around the former World Trade Center site in New York May 3. The 2001 al-Qaida attack on the trade center’s towers killed 2,752 people.

“It is important that we recognize the distinction between support for this act of justice defending our nation and a misguided sense of revenge.

BISHOP PAUL LOVERDE OF ARLINGTON, VA.

who follow Islam. The venom expressed is not different in kind from the hatred that Osama bin Laden spewed,” said the Tanenbaum statement. “The question for those who tweet, write blogs, participate on Facebook and join in the media debate is: ‘Why do you think your blind hatred, unjust stereotypes of Muslims and promotion of violence is so different from bin Laden’s hate?’ And the answer, of course, is that it isn’t.” The Tanenbaum statement went on to say: “Failing to recognize our common humanity is the first step in dehumanizing others, and a dangerous progression toward creating a country based on hate rather than respect, justice and inclusion.”

Christian response? In one of the Catholic blog discussions, Jesuit Father James Martin, culture editor of the Jesuit magazine, America, captured some of the more charitable threads of the Internet debate: “Osama bin Laden was responsible for the murder of thousands of men and women in the United States, for the deaths and misery of many thousands across the world, and for the deaths of many servicemen and women, who made the supreme sacrifice of their lives. I am glad he has left the world. And I pray that his departure may lead to peace,” wrote Father Martin. “But as a Christian, I am asked to pray for him and, at

some point, forgive him. And that command comes to us from Jesus, a man who was beaten, tortured and killed. That command comes from a man who knows a great deal about suffering. It also comes from God.” The Vatican was among the religious organizations that were quick to weigh in with a statement acknowledging bin Laden’s faults, including: “spreading divisions and hatred among populations, causing the deaths of innumerable people, and manipulating religions to this end.” But the Vatican also admonished against the gleeful response: “In the face of a man’s death, a Christian never rejoices, but reflects on the serious responsibilities of each person before God and before men, and hopes and works so that every event may be the occasion for the further growth of peace and not of hatred.”

Other issues Powers said that there are other thorny moral issues raised by the case of bin Laden. They include the difference between attempts to assassinate heads of state, such as Libya’s Moammar Gadhafi, versus attempts to kill heads of terrorist organizations, such as bin Laden, which is less morally problematic, he said. Also subject to moral review might be whether the United States violated the sovereignty of Pakistan by waging the assault on bin Laden’s hiding place. “Yet in Catholic teaching sovereignty is not an absolute,” Powers said. “If it was clear that Pakistan was unwilling or unable to take appropriate action against bin Laden and other terrorists in its midst, then, at some point, Pakistan cannot complain when others fulfill the responsibilities it cannot fulfill itself.” Finally, Powers said, “even though we can justify the killing of bin Laden, we do so with a sense of deep regret and with a recommitment to develop nonmilitary ways to defend against terrorism and address its deeper roots, while cultivating the peaceable virtues without which no lasting peace is possible.” Patricia Zapor is a staff writer for Catholic News Service.


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Opinion/Letters

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • MAY 12, 2011

/ This Catholic Life

Marriage amendment not about ‘fringe’ politics, hate he Minnesota Independent noted in a recent article that newspapers throughout the state are coming out against a bill seeking to place a constitutional amendment on the ballot that would define marriage as a union between one man and one woman. No editorial boards, it said, are supportive of the amendment. That’s not true. This newspaper is supportive of the effort. Marriage and family life have been the bedrock of civil society for millennia. It is the place where a man and woman pledge to share a lifelong, committed love with each other. It is the place where new life is created, and where it should be nurtured and protected. This union is so sacred that the church elevates it to the level of a sacrament. But one doesn’t need to be a person of faith to recognize the value of traditional marriage to society. The state — meaning our secular government — recognizes marriage and gives it certain benefits because it contributes to the common good. Stable unions between a man and a woman who love each other are in the best interest of the children they bring into the world — children who will someday become important contributing members of society as workers, taxpayers, community volunteers, spouses and parents of children themselves. That’s not to say that married couples don’t fall short of the ideal sometimes for a variety of reasons, but that is not the fault of the institution itself. Nor is it to say that a child cannot be raised successfully by a single parent. But neither case

with respect, compassion and sensitivity.” Admittedly, at times, the church — we individuals, parishes and institution as a whole — could do a better job of acknowledging the gifts that these brothers and sisters of ours bring as well as the challenges they face in communities that aren’t always willing to acknowledge their God-given human dignity. But, none of that is a reason to change the definition of marriage. And that’s why supporters of traditional marriage are advocating for the amendment bill.

T Editorial Joe Towalski

Stable unions between mothers and fathers are in the best interest of the children they bring into the world

Why this approach?

warrants changing the definition of marriage.

What they’re saying Newspaper editorials opposing the marriage amendment effort have failed to recognize the essential purpose of marriage and the importance of the institution itself. Some, like the Fairmont Sentinel, question the fairness of not extending some of the benefits enjoyed by married couples — “rights associated with property, inheritance, tax law, work benefits, etc.” — to samesex couples. The Winona Daily News characterizes the amendment initiative as pandering to the interests of “fringe conservatives.” A few, including the Star Tribune and the Mille Lacs Messenger, call it bigotry. Two points are garnering much of the concern and complaint: benefits and equality. However, the propriety of extend-

ing certain benefits to same-sex couples can be addressed through private legal arrangements without resorting to changes in the definition of marriage or creating civil unions that are equivalent to marriage. Regarding the latter — equality — there is a sense among some that if the state does not allow same-sex couples to marry, it amounts to saying that persons with same-sex attraction are somehow “lesser individuals” who can be treated with less respect. Not true. They deserve the same respect as any other child of God. Our laws say so, and so does our church — a fact that seems to get lost when the church comes under criticism in some quarters for supporting the amendment effort. The Catechism of the Catholic Church is clear: People with samesex attraction must be “accepted

Even though same-sex marriage is currently prohibited by state law, that law could change. Recent court rulings and legislative actions in other states have changed the legal definition of marriage. Five states plus the District of Columbia currently allow “same-sex marriage.” Illinois recently passed a law legalizing civil unions and giving them the same status as marriages in the state. The only way to ensure that the definition of marriage does not change is to make it part of the state constitution. If the amendment bill passes both the House and Senate, which it could do as early as this week or next (the governor’s signature is not required), Minnesotans will have 18 months to debate the merits of an amendment before voting on it in November 2012. Ensuring the definition of marriage doesn’t change has nothing to do with hate. It is nothing “fringe” or radical. It is all about preserving an institution that best serves children and the common good.

Letters Religious grateful for contributions

1603 for information on how you can still contribute.

The National Religious Retirement Office sent a letter of appreciation to Archbishop John Nienstedt, thanking the archdiocese for its generous collection to the 2010 annual Retirement Fund for Religious, which amounted to $470,238.66. Sister Janice Bader, executive director, wrote, “Your generosity surely helps religious address the many challenges religious face as they retire.” Many religious work until the age of 75 and beyond. Just check the religious working in your parish and you will find they remain ever faithful to also helping support the care of their retired religious. “Even as [retired religious] age, their commitment to the ministry of their community, their prayer and spiritual life are vibrant testimony to the faithfulness they promised so many years ago. All religious, young and old, are grateful for your support. You can surely rely on the prayers of 34,000 religious over the age of 70 and the ever increasing number of religious who will be retiring very soon,” Bader said. If you missed the opportunity to address this need, call the Retirement Fund for Religious Office at (651) 290-

Coordinator of the archdiocesan Retirement Fund for Religious

SISTER MIDGE BREITER, SSND

Would Jesus have killed bin Laden? Would Jesus have pulled the trigger on Osama bin Laden, or at least supported the act? If Jesus is our ultimate model of what it means to be human, this is a vital question. I believe the answer would be “no.” Jesus taught followers to “love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.” If we as human beings were truly committed to loving our enemies over the long haul (and with great cost, no doubt, for look what happened to Jesus for doing so), then a new way of being in relationship would grow. Trust would replace mistrust. Understanding would replace accusation. Respect would replace demonization. We could have avoided the devastating wars against Iraq and Afghanistan had we opted to pursue the genuine question that we as a nation (including President Bush) asked ever so briefly: “Why do they hate us?” But instead of seriously grap-

pling with the question, which might have led to building bridges with the Muslim world and undermining the appeal of radical movements, we quickly resorted to what was most comfortable: war. Jesus taught followers to grow peace through acting peacefully. What a concept! On the other hand, most Christians believe that we grow peace through violence, which Jesus never taught. In the long term, growing peace through violence does not work. How could it? It is time to try something few have done: follow Jesus’ example. PAUL KRENZELOK Holy Name, Minneapolis

Tax-funded abortions are the wrong choice Thanks to Dave Hrbacek for his story about Abby Johnson, a former Planned Parenthood Employee of the Year who is now pro-life and the author of “unPLANNED.” The Government Accountability Office reported that from 2002-2009 pro-abortion groups spent over $1 billion from the federal government, including $657.1 million to Planned Parenthood over seven years. Our taxes should not support an organ-

ization that destroys thousands of vulnerable lives each day and harms women and couples. We don’t solve social problems by killing the children of the poor. Many women and couples regret their abortions. Spiritually, abortion is like a tsunami. Relationships are torn apart and lives are devastated. Pressured into “choosing” abortion, women live with deep emotional, psychological and spiritual wounds — anger, anxiety, unabated grief and depression. Some abortion survivors never have more children. Please contact your senator in Washington today to support the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act, a bipartisan bill that creates a government-wide statutory prohibition on abortion funding, including problematic provisions in the health care bill. The vote could come soon. SHARON SODERLUND Client advocate at Highland Life Care Center in St. Paul

To our readers Material printed on the Opinion and Letters page of This Catholic Life does not necessarily reflect the opinions of The Catholic Spirit or the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis.


This Catholic Life / Commentary

MAY 12, 2011 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

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Fishing for a faith-filled response to tribal netting housands of Minnesota anglers will hit their favorite lakes and rivers in search of walleye on this weekend’s fishing opener. For a select few, the fishing began more than a week ago. On Lake Mille Lacs, the crown jewel of walleye waters in Minnesota, members of the Mille Lacs band of Ojibwe have been harvesting walleyes with nets they have strung out in the shallows. They are joined by several other bands from Wisconsin, all of whom won netting rights via the 1999 landmark court decision on a treaty signed in 1837. The annual rite of walleye harvest by these bands always comes with more than a little tension, as local sport anglers and fish conservation activists in the area complain about the Native Americans rights. One local fishing guide, Steve Fellegy, went so far as to announce his intention to catch a walleye before last year’s opener. After he followed through, he was promptly given a citation by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, which he plans to fight in court. Listening to such public outcry saddens Crosier Father Dave Gallus, who works and lives at St. ThereseLittle Flower Mission on the Mille Lacs band reservation. He served as pastor from 2002 to 2009, and continues to minister to about 20 families, both Indian and non-Indian — who call this their parish.

emotional, psychological, physical, moral and spiritual issue,” he said.

T The Outdoors Dave Hrbacek

The annual rite of walleye harvest practiced by the Indian bands always comes with more than a little tension

A meaningful environment As he has gotten to know Native American and Ojibwe culture, he has tried to bring that into the small church that seats about 90. The Book of the Gospels used each Sunday is adorned with a cover made by band member Joni Boswell, who “put in 250 hours,” Father Gallus said. It features well-known

Challenged by the past

Dave Hrbacek / The Catholic Spirit

Crosier Father Dave Gallus believes a good and faith-filled response to the issue of tribal walleye netting on Lake Mille Lacs would be to respect those who have won the right to do so.

Indian symbols such as an eagle, a bear, the northern lights and, of course, Lake Mille Lacs. Perhaps, the most striking example of the culture can be found on the back wall of the church. High on the wall is a crucifix containing a corpus of Christ with Native American features, providing a meaningful environment, while also offering traditional Mass elements. “A Christian community is multicultural; it’s open to all,” the 72year-old priest said. “We should be a witness on the reservation of a respectful community.” Respect is a word Father Gallus used often in discussing netting. I have been a sport angler all my

life, and have fished Mille Lacs. Like others, I have gotten nervous about the tribal netting that takes thousands of pounds of walleye out of the lake before I can fish the opener. I also have thought of the abuses Indian tribes have endured at the hands of our government and, even at the hands of our church. Father Gallus noted the time Indian homes were torched for no reason by white authorities in the 1930s. Native Americans, also, were often forced off their lands and on to reservations that offered little sustanence. Father Gallus believes that it is important to consider the history when discussing tribal netting. “It’s a very complex historical,

I felt challenged by his words and description of some of the injustices the Native Americans have suffered. After hearing the stories, I was less inclined to complain about their annual walleye harvest, which is more than 142,000 pounds, this year. I asked Father Gallus if it would ever be possible to create unity between Native Americans and whites, and end the annual tension about Indian walleye netting. “I have to believe it’s possible,” he said. “That’s part of my faith.” It’s part of my faith, too. I have hope that everyone — Indian and non-Indian alike — can live in harmony, on the shores of Lake Mille Lacs and everywhere else. I also think that the Catholic Church — both leaders and people in the pews — can and should lead the way in making this happen. We should promote conversation and try to reduce confrontation. Father Gallus had some ideas about bringing about that healing. “If we can respect the differences and recognize that they are Godgiven differences, then we can begin to build harmony and unity and peace that we all strive for,” he said. “It’s all incarnational theology — the word made flesh. This is what Easter is all about.” So, the next time you’re up north, attend Mass at St. Therese Little Flower, introduce yourself to a Native American person and tell them you respect them as a brother or sister in Christ. Then, let the healing begin. Dave Hrbacek is a staff photographer at The Catholic Spirit. Visit his Faith Outdoors blog at HTTP:// C OMMUNITY.T HE C ATHOLIC S PIRIT. COM / BLOGS/FAITHOUTDOORS.

Pro-life is more than just a platform for this year’s Miss America eing Miss America is a lot of pressure for 18-year-old Teresa Scanlan. But then, when her mom was 18, she faced a lot of pressure, too: She was pregnant and unwed. Teresa learned this last September, when the Nebraska native was preparing for the 2011 Miss America pageant. Her half-brother, Jerod, had called unexpectedly. It was his 31st birthday, his wife was expecting their firstborn, and it seemed like a good time to reach out. Teresa was working in her basement office when her mom, Janie, came down to tell her the news. Janie had gone on to get married and have six children. She had never told them about Jerod, assuming she would never hear from him and that it would be easier on them that way. Teresa was stunned. “It was strange for me to even imagine that,” she told me. “I thought, ‘There’s no way. This has to be some kind of joke, some kind of misunderstanding.’ All you know of

B Twenty Something Christina Capecchi

Teresa Scanlon learned about mom’s pregnancy at 18, while preparing for pageant

your family for 17 years has suddenly changed.”

New perspective The news offered Teresa insight on her mother. It hadn’t been easy for Janie being Catholic, pregnant and 18 in Wichita, Kan., and the pregnancy was kept a secret, even to relatives. With her parents’ blessing, Janie decided to give the baby to the Catholic Adoption Agency. She wanted him to have a stable, loving family and every opportunity for success. When Jerod was born, Janie held his tiny hand, wrote him a letter and said goodbye. “It was so, so hard for her,” Teresa said. “I have all the more respect and love for her understanding that now.” Shortly after Jerod’s phone call, he and Janie decided to meet at an Olive Garden in Lincoln, Neb. (“When you’re here,” says the chain’s slogan, “you’re family.”) Janie brought three of her daughters, and when they spotted Jerod, they engulfed him in hugs.

Over breadsticks and pasta, they talked for hours, landing on tidbits from three decades, studying each other’s faces and lives. “When he smiles, there are my mom’s dimples,” Teresa said. Soon the big-hearted teen was viewing the situation for what it was: evidence of God’s providence that Jerod would be raised by such devoted Catholic parents and that he would be reunited with his birth mom and her vibrant, faith-filled family. “I’m just excited to be a part of his family and for him to be a part of ours,” Teresa said. “I always wanted a bigger family. I didn’t think six was enough.” In January, Teresa became Nebraska’s first Miss America, the youngest in decades to claim the title. “I finally realized that it is those times when we’re least prepared, when we’re least ready, when we have those doubts and fears — that’s when God uses us,” she said. “He takes our feeble little attempts and

turns them into amazing things.”

Hope for future One week after being crowned Miss America, Teresa became an aunt. Jerod’s wife delivered a healthy baby girl named Marilyn, who has an incredible tiara-toting role model. Teresa hopes to one day become a Supreme Court justice. Meeting Jerod changed her. She is a young woman raised in a pro-life family who has now lived it. Being pro-life is an intimate experience, one that rewires families, homes and hearts — a shuffling of bedrooms and priorities, a clutching of faith. And it’s founded on a beautiful thing: hope for the future. When you think of Teresa and her delicate niece, how can you feel anything but? Christina Capecchi is a freelance writer from Inver Grove Heights. Contact her at CHRISTINA@ READCHRISTINA.COM.


“Faith furnishes prayer with wings, without which it cannot soar to heaven.” St. John Climacus

The Lesson Plan 16A

The Catholic Spirit

Reflections on faith and spirituality

MAY 12, 2011

Good Shepherd gives us all we need through initiation sacraments “I am the gate. Whoever enters through me will be saved, and will come in and go out and find pasture” (John 10:9). he image of a shepherd and his flock is found throughout the texts of the Mass of the fourth Sunday of Easter. The Easter season, itself, gives us a rich context in which to meditate upon these texts. In Easter, we remember the salvation won by Christ, our own invitation to share in that salvation, and the promised completion of that salvation in heaven. The Easter season flows out of the Paschal Triduum, the days from Holy Thursday through Easter Sunday. These days are the church’s most solemn commemoration of Christ’s suffering, death and resurrection. Christ the Good Shepherd, through his sacrificial death, offered himself to God to make up for the offense caused by our sin and to Deacon merit for us the graces necessary for Jonathan salvation. These graces and merits Venner are especially applied to us through the sacraments of the church, most preeminently the sacraments of initiation (baptism, confirmation and the Eucharist). It is at the Easter Vigil, the climax of the Triduum, that the church most solemnly confers these sacraments of initiation.

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Sunday Scriptures

Readings

For reflection

Sunday, May 15 Fourth Sunday of Easter ■ Acts 2:14a, 36-41 ■ 1 Peter 2:20b-25 ■ John 10:1-10

Reflect on ways that you have “gone astray,” and how you returned to the flock of Christ.

These sacraments, especially baptism, give us a real (albeit created) participation in God’s own life, and, along with faith, bring us into his mystical body, the Catholic Church. This life of grace that we experience on earth, already a participation in God’s life, is meant to come to fruition in the life of glory in heaven.

From this sheepfold, Christ wills to lead us to the eternal pastures, the beatific vision. It is in the church that we find all the means that God has given us to be strengthened and nourished in this life of grace, a life that we live by our love of God and neighbor. In the second reading, we hear the words of the letter of St. Peter, “for you had gone astray like sheep, but now you have returned to the shepherd and guardian of your souls” (1 Peter 2:5). The life of grace is incompatible with mortal sin. We have returned to Christ, the shepherd and guardian of our souls in baptism, and if we should lose this grace through sin, we will find that our shepherd has already provided us a means, in his sheepfold, to be restored to his friendship in the sacrament of penance. How many gifts and graces has our shepherd left for our sanctification and salvation in his sheepfold! We cannot omit to mention, however, one other gift; Christ has even left us with living teachers, the pope and the bishops. Truly, in the church, our good shepherd is leading us toward salvation, he who says to us, “I came so that they might have life and have it more abundantly” (John 10:10).

The church is that sheepfold of Christ where we begin to find pasture, for we find satisfaction in the union with Christ that we experience through the life of grace.

Deacon Jonathan Venner is in formation for the priesthood at the St. Paul Seminary for the Diocese of Sioux Falls, S.D. His home parish is Ss. Peter and Paul in Pierre, S.D., and his teaching parish is St. Bridget of Sweden in Lindstrom.

Thursday, May 19 Acts 13:13-25 John 13:16-20 The people who challenge our viewpoints are the messengers we find most difficult to welcome.

Monday, May 23 Acts 14:5-18 John 14:21-26 In order to remain open to the guidance of the indwelling Spirit, we must be teachable.

Shepherd restores grace

Daily Scriptures Sunday, May 15 Fourth Sunday of Easter Acts 2:14a, 36-41 1 Peter 2:20b-25 John 10:1-10 “I came so they might have life and have it more abundantly.” John 10:10 Several recent studies have shown that after a family reaches a reasonable level of income (according to one source approximately $60,000 a year), a larger income does not produce more happiness. Contrary to what some televangelists would have us believe, the abundance God wants to give us has more to do with the condition of our heart than our pocketbook. Notice what gave you real joy and meaning these past few days. Chances are it came from creating something for the sheer joy of it, helping someone who was suffering, laughing with a friend or spending time in nature. Monday, May 16 Acts 11:1-18 John 10:11-18 If we are going to truly listen, we must have the humility to change our mind. Tuesday, May 17 Acts 11:19-26 John 10:22-30 Make space in your heart, mind and schedule to listen to the indwelling Spirit. Wednesday, May 18 John I, pope and martyr Acts 5:12:24 — 13:5a John 12:44-50 When have you experienced the truth that where lifegiving love is present God is present?

Friday, May 20 Bernardine of Siena, priest Acts 13:26-33 John 14:1-6 If we demand certainty before taking action, it can’t be called faith. Saturday, May 21 Christopher Magallanes, priest and martyr, and his companions, martyrs Acts 13:44-52 John 14:7-14 What have you discovered about the nature of divine love through the compassion of Jesus? Sunday, May 22 Fifth Sunday of Easter Acts 6:1-7 1 Peter 2:4-9 John 14:1-12 “If you know me, then you will also know my Father.” — John 14:7 After sharing ministry, meals, laughter and prayer together, Jesus’ closest followers still couldn’t comprehend that when they looked at Jesus they saw the face of God. Two thousand years later, many of us carry an image of God that differs greatly from the stories in the Gospel, which portray Jesus as a compassionate person willing to challenge the status quo when mercy and justice took a backseat to the letter of the law. Spend some time meditating on this line from Scripture today and notice any discrepancy in your own heart and mind.

Tuesday, May 24 Acts 14:19-28 John 14:27-31a Peace is the fruit of a faith that empowers us to surrender — out of love — to the unknown. Wednesday, May 25 Bede the Venerable, priest and doctor of the church; Gregory VII, pope; Mary Magdalene de Pazzi, virgin Acts 15:1-6 John 15:1-8 Compassion, forgiveness, patience and a desire for justice will grow in our hearts when we remain faithful to the indwelling Spirit. Thursday, May 26 Philip Neri, priest Acts 15:7-21 John 15:9-11 When we mistake pleasure for joy, we make poor choices. Friday, May 27 Augustine of Canterbury, bishop Acts 15:22-31 John 15:12-17 As our capacity to love unconditionally increases, our interest in conflict, competition and blaming will decrease. Saturday, May 28 Acts 16:1-10 John 15:18-21 Suffering opens places in our heart we didn’t know existed. The daily reflections are written by Terri Mifek, a member of St. Edward in Bloomington and a certified spiritual director at the Franciscan Retreat House in Prior Lake.


The Lesson Plan

Why a new missal? The following is the next in a series of articles regarding the new Roman Missal, which will be used in the United States beginning Nov. 27, the first Sunday of Advent. The Second Vatican Council was one of the singular gifts of God’s grace in the 20th century. In a century of unprecedented bloodshed, genocide, war and ethical upheavals, the Catholic Church boldly proclaimed in the texts of the council truths ever ancient, ever new: the singularity of Jesus Christ and his church; the universal call to holiness; the profound importance of Sacred Scripture in Christian discipleship; and the truth that the liturgy is the source and summit of the Christian life. Father Certainly one of the most obvious outJohn Paul comes of this great Erickson ecumenical council was the reform of the liturgy, that is, the public prayer of the church. As enunciated in the first published document of the council, “Sacrosanctum Concilium,” an explicit goal of these reforms was the “full, active, and conscious participation” of the people of God in this public prayer, especially in the holy Mass. To aid in this kind of participation, which is at its root a union of mind and heart with the mysteries being celebrated, the council paved the way for a greater use of the vernacular in the liturgy. Very quickly after the council’s conclusion, the revised rituals and liturgical texts of the Latin church were translated from the original Latin, which remains the official language of the Latin church, into the many vernacular languages of the world.

Lift Up Your Hearts

And so the “Novus Ordo” or, “New Order of Mass” was soon available the world over in the language of the country in which the Mass was being offered. In 1974, an official English translation was released in the United States. We have been praying with it ever since. After the Council, the process of translating these revised texts from the Latin source into the many vernacular languages of the world was guided by an important document entitled, “Comme Le Prevoit.” This document, composed and approved by the church in 1969, gave the translators of liturgical texts certain principles to follow when trying to communicate the ideas found within the original Latin texts. One such principle was “dynamic equivalence,” which encouraged translators to utilize their skills to best convey the basic meaning of the texts, even when it involved simplifying or modifying the words of the original.

A different approach We have had nearly 40 years to pray the Mass utilizing the 1974 translation. Many have been nourished and sustained by the words within it. Many Catholics in the United States have prayed the Mass in English using these words all of their life. It is all they have known. It is all I have known. But as Blessed John XXIII, the great pope who convened the Second Vatican Council reminded us, the church is both our mother and our teacher, and as a mother and a teacher she has the duty to constantly lead and form her children in the ways of prayer and worship, even when that duty leads her to change cherished texts. Desiring to continue to harvest the rich fields of the liturgical reforms of the Second Vatican Council, the church released in 2001 a pivotal document entiPLEASE TURN TO NEW ON PAGE 23A

Upcoming missal series articles ■ May 26: “The New Translation is a Plus for Catholics.” An article explaining what will be gained in the new translation and the opportunity it affords us as praying Christians. ■ June 9: “New Kids on the Block.” In addition to new words, the new missal brings with it the memorials of new saints. ■ June 23: “The Lord be with you — and with your spirit.” Perhaps no other change has received more attention than this brief exchange. Why is it changing and what does the change mean? ■ July 7: “The Act of Penitence.” Why is it important to acknowledge our sin as Mass begins? What is changing about the wording of this rite? ■ July 21: “The Gloria.” It’s appropriate that our first liturgical exposure to this retranslated text will not be Nov. 27, but rather at the Vigil Mass of Christmas, when we will gather to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ. Why? Because the new words sound an awful lot like the hymn of the angels at Bethlehem. ■ Aug. 4: “The Creed, part 1.” Why does the Creed matter, and why is it changing from “We believe” to “I

believe”? ■ Aug. 18: “The Creed, part 2.” ■ Sept. 1: “The Preface Dialogue.” It is right and just. ■ Sept. 15: “The Roman Canon, part 1.” As a way of examining the Mass itself, we’ll explore the first Eucharistic Prayer, often called the Roman Canon. Many rich symbols and references are found within this ancient prayer, and by paying attention to the scriptural and traditional imagery, we can learn much about just what it is we are doing through, with and in Christ at the Mass. ■ Sept. 29: “The Roman Canon, part 2.” ■ Oct. 13: “The Roman Canon, part 3.” ■ Oct. 27: “The Roman Canon, part 4.” ■ Nov. 10: “Q&A.” As the implementation of the new missal becomes imminent, we will try to answer any remaining questions about the new texts and their use. ■ Nov. 23: “Q&A, part 2.”

MAY 12, 2011 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

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Take the survey Be part of a national study about Catholic media use The Catholic Press Association of the United States and Canada has commissioned the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA) at Georgetown University to conduct a survey of readers of Catholic media. The Catholic Spirit is inviting you to be a part of this survey. The survey is being conducted online only. To respond online go to CARA’s website: cara.georgetown.edu

You will see a button near the top of the page that reads “Online Research” that you will need to click on. This will take you to a page that lists CARA’s currently active “Online Surveys.” The survey you have been invited to take is entitled “Catholic Media Use.” Click on the link for this survey, then click on the line “Complete the Catholic Media Use survey here,” and you will be taken to the questions. If you need any assistance or have any questions while taking the survey please contact CARA researcher Mark Gray at 202-687-0885 or mmg34@georgetown.edu The survey will be available on CARA’s website until July 15, 2011.

CARA is a national, non-profit, Georgetown University affiliated research center that conducts social scientific studies about the Catholic Church. Founded in 1964, CARA has three major dimensions to its mission: • to increase the Church's self understanding • to serve the applied research needs of Church decision-makers • to advance scholarly research on religion, particularly Catholicism.


“The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched. They must be felt with the heart.” Helen Keller

Marriage 18A

The Catholic Spirit

A Catholic Spirit special section

MAY 12, 2011

God is the bond that unites couples in marriage how to practice the virtue of love in his famous “Ode to Love,” 1 Corinthians 13, “Love is patient, love is kind,” one of the most popular Scripture texts for weddings. He provides additional advice in Colossians 3:12-17.

By Father Michael Van Sloun For The Catholic Spirit

Marriage or matrimony is one of the seven sacraments. It belongs to a special group or classification of sacraments known as the “sacraments of commitment” — the two major ways for adults to live out their baptismal faith commitment. (The other is holy orders.)

Solemn covenant A Christian marriage is a covenant patterned on the covenant between God and humanity and the union between Christ and the church. God’s covenant is unbreakable, indissoluble and enduring. Despite human failings, God offers forgiveness, renews the covenant and is ever-faithful. Christian couples are asked to be shining examples of God’s covenantal love through the permanence, sincerity and depth of their love.

It’s in the Bible Marriage is a sacred institution established by God, something clearly evident from the very beginning of creation and its natural order (Genesis 1:26-27) with the first marriage, Adam and Eve. Genesis continues with three other famous married couples, the patriarchs and their wives: Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebekah, and Jacob and Rachel. Other prominent marriages of the Old Testament include Moses and Zipporah; Elkanah and Hannah, the parents of Samuel; David and Bathsheba; and Tobiah and Sarah. In the New Testament, the first married couple is Zechariah and Elizabeth, an older couple that set the stage for the greatest married couple of all: Mary and Joseph. Jesus endorsed marriage at the beginning of his ministry when he attended the Cana wedding feast and performed his first miracle there (John 2:1-11). Jesus also taught, “From the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female. For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.’ So they are no longer two but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, no human being must separate” (Mark 10:6-9).

Touching image The wedding ring is the foremost symbol of marriage. One of the most beautiful metaphors

Spiritual bond

for marriage is found in the Book of Ecclesiastes, part of the Wisdom literature. The author writes: “Two are better than one. If one falls, the other will lift up his companion. Woe to the solitary man! A three-ply cord is not easily broken” (Ecclesiastes 4:9,10,12). There are three partners to every marriage — two that are apparent and visible, the husband and wife, and a third partner, invisible, but the most important, God. Instead of “tying the knot,” a common mundane way to describe a marriage, every couple is asked to weave a three-ply rope with God in the middle. The more tightly a husband and wife are bound to God, the more tightly they are bound to each other; and the more tightly they are bound to each other, the more tightly they are bound to God.

Centrality of love Love is the bond shared by a husband

and wife. God is love (1 John 4:8,16). Therefore, the bond that a couple shares, the bond that unites them, is God. John asks, “How can a person love God, who is unseen, if a person does not love his or her neighbor, who is seen?” (paraphrase, 1 John 4:20). As Christians, we believe that one of the main pathways to God is through our neighbor, and that when we love our neighbor, we love God. Jesus is insistent about love of neighbor (see Matthew 22:39; Luke 10:29-37; and John 13:34-35). For a married couple, the neighbor that stands above every other neighbor is one’s spouse, and the primary pathway to God for someone who is married is through one’s spouse. The more a person loves his or her spouse, the more the person loves God. And an important word of caution: The less a person loves his or her spouse, the less the person loves God. St. Paul offers excellent teaching on

A sacramental marriage is a covenant, not a contract. ■ A contract is written on paper; a covenant is written on one’s heart. ■ A contract has fine print with many stipulations and conditions; a covenant is unconditional. ■ A contract is closed with a signature; a covenant is sealed with one’s spoken word. ■ A contract is for a specific amount of time; a covenant is everlasting. ■ A contract may have penalties if specific terms are not met; a covenant has forgiveness. ■ A contract may have an escape clause; a covenant is binding forever. ■ A contract is designed to protect my rights; a covenant seeks what is best for the other person. ■ A contract is a civil or legal document; a covenant is based upon faith and sealed by God. Father Michael Van Sloun is pastor of St. Stephen in Anoka.


Marriage

MAY 12, 2011 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

Pray together, make time for one another, keep romance alive

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Give 100 percent, ask for forgiveness, put God and others first By Annamarie Adkins For The Catholic Spirit

By Dennis and Mary Helen O’Hare

Engaged couples spend hundreds of hours — and thousands of dollars — preparing for their wedding days, but what about preparing for their lifelong marriages? Here are five things to keep in mind after your walk down the aisle to help you have a happy, holy union.

For The Catholic Spirit

On June 27, we will have been married for 30 years. So, what have we learned that may be of some use? Marriage is a covenant. That means forever. We are called to demonstrate God’s unconditional love to this one person for the rest of his or her life. Care. We all have attachment needs that we don’t grow out of. Knowing someone is truly there for us is so important. If that is not you as the beloved of your spouse, then whose role is it? Ultimately, it is the daily little things that make such a difference. Persevere. It is one thing to be loving during the honeymoon; it is a different ballgame to do this over decades. We push through and continue to work on the relationship as the journey changes. Turn to each other. And that means every day, in both good and difficult times. When you’re happy or angry, talk about it, preferably before day’s end. To keep your relationship fresh and growing, find common activities and have fun together. Say: “I’m sorry. Please forgive me.” As spouses, we are two unique individuals with sometimes very different viewpoints. We each More than $405,000 from the bring “stuff” into our marriages: scars, unhelp2010 Catholic Services Appeal ful patterns of coping, weaknesses, unresolved went to support marriage issues. preparation and other It’s important to listen to and care about the programs and services offered thoughts and needs of the other, even when by the archdiocesan Office of we don’t agree. Being first to apologize and Marriage, Family and Life. own our actions is key. Don’t be afraid to get some individual or joint counseling if some barriers just keep getting in the way. Pray. Beginning and ending the day with prayer is so important, especially as life accelerates with careers, kids and other responsibilities. Romance. Dating should not end with the honeymoon. Remember the acronym SPICE: Spiritual. Physical. Intellectual. Creative. Emotional. This should describe your balanced romantic life. We also make room for a formal, planned “date” every couple of weeks, which is even more important if and when kids come along. They will survive without you for a few hours, and you’ll be better spouses and parents for it. Bless and protect. Make sure that you say thank you a lot. Every week or two we get together to discuss the “business” of our lives, including calendar, planning and problem-solving. But we always begin with a time of blessing, where we name three things to honor each other for from the past couple of weeks. Protection is also key. We protect our hearts from unhelpful attachments. We protect our priorities from the “tyranny of the urgent.” We protect our time to nurture our covenant relationally. Build relationships, community. Ours is not a supportive culture for a covenant marriage. Find friends and couples who have similar values to grow with.

Pray for love. More than likely, your spouse (and your future children) will rely on you as a constant source of love and comfort. But without a good prayer life, you’ll probably be running on empty sooner rather than later.

CATHOLIC COUPLES DISH THEIR

secrets FOR A SUCCESSFUL MARRIAGE TOP

DID YOU KNOW?

Dennis and Mary Helen O’Hare have been married for 30 years and have five children and one grandchild. They are parishioners at St. Joseph in West St. Paul. Dennis serves on the archdiocesan Commission on Biomedical Ethics.

The blessing of being a believer is that God has all the love you need to give to your loved one, if only you ask for it. So when you hit the bottom of your love tank, turn to God — who is love — and ask him to fill you with his perfect charity.

Forget “50-50.” God made women and men to be complementary, not interchangeable. Each of you will bring your own gifts to your union, but they will not be “equal.” And that’s OK. So don’t rack up your contributions and compare them to your spouse’s contributions; the tally will never work out to be perfectly even. Sometimes you’ll need to give more; sometimes your spouse will. But it will only balance out if you both give 100 percent. Banish divorce. Before you tie the knot, it’s imperative that you and your spouse agree that divorce is not an option and not in your vocabulary as a couple. It is not something you’d ever threaten in an argument; rather, it is unspeakable and to be avoided entirely. Frankly discuss what situations might tempt you to consider divorce and what you can do beforehand to prevent them from happening.

CELEBRATE MARRIAGE DAY AT THE CATHEDRAL Archbishop John Nienstedt will celebrate a 10 a.m. Mass for married couples on Saturday, June 11, at the Cathedral of St. Paul. Couples will have the opportunity to renew their marriage vows. After Mass, there will be a reception to honor couples celebrating silver and golden anniversaries in 2011 and all couples married more than 50 years. The event is sponsored by the archdiocesan Office of Marriage, Family and Life. For more information, or to RSVP, call (651) 291-4488.

Only death should do you part. God hates divorce. Say “please forgive me” first. The best way to be the “winner” of any argument in God’s eyes is to say you’re sorry first — no matter who was right or wrong. This act of humility will save you and your spouse from hours — or days — of the silent treatment, stewing emotions and worse. Remember how Jesus said to forgive seven times seven? Be prepared to forgive — and need to be forgiven — that much. The best way to say it is: “Will you please forgive me?” That way, your spouse has to respond and a conversation of resolution will open up. Prioritize — God, others, yourself. Most of us have gotten away with being pretty selfish for most of our formative years. But marriage — and children — puts an end to all of that immediately out of necessity. Upon entering the state of marriage, your paradigm needs to shift to serve these three priorities in this order: God, others, yourself. You’re the last one on the list, but the good news is the last shall be first in the Kingdom of God. Annamarie Adkins has been married for eight years. She is the mother of four children and a freelance journalist. Her husband, Jason Adkins, is executive director of the Minnesota Catholic Conference. They are parishioners at St. Agnes in St. Paul.


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Marriage

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • MAY 12, 2011

Spiritual, financial benefits won by simplifying wedding By Susan Klemond

Tips for a simpler, more meaningful wedding

For The Catholic Spirit

After their June 4 wedding ceremony at St. John’s Abbey in Collegeville, Brooke Tuohy and her fiancé, Caleb Wenzel, won’t be taking a limousine to a lavish reception at a fancy hotel. A limo rental alone would eat up a significant portion of the couple’s wedding budget. While the average American couple spends about $25,000 on their wedding, Tuohy and Wenzel have opted for a $4,000 budget. Saving the money for a house was one reason for simplifying, but beyond that the couple wanted to focus on what comes after the wedding. “We’re trying to do it reasonably,” said Tuohy, a West St. Paul native who now lives in St. Joseph. “We really wanted to keep the focus on the fact that this is the beginning of a marriage and it’s not just about the wedding day.” As society pressures couples to plan expensive, elaborate weddings, some like Tuohy and Wenzel are finding that by setting a more modest budget together and finding creative ways to cut costs they’re better able to prepare for the sacrament of marriage and their life together.

Pressures divide, not unite Planning a big wedding can separate a couple when they need to grow together, said Deacon John Wallin, who has prepared about 50 couples for marriage in the past five years at St. John the Baptist in Dayton and St. Albert in Albertville, and has worked with Catholic Engaged Encounter for more than 30 years. “Those are pressures that are just not necessary on both of them and it starts to divide them,” he said. “It starts to pull at each other and for a lot of the guys it becomes the bride’s day, whatever they want they get, even though they don’t want to do it that way and it kind of brings the division right there on that given day.” When couples start to understand the sacrament and how to live it out, they realize they don’t need everything the wedding industry tells them they need,

Paul Middlestaedt / For The Catholic Spirit

Brooke Tuohy playfully kisses her fiancé, Caleb Wenzel, at the St. John’s Abbey Chapel. The couple will spend just $4,000 on their wedding.

said Deacon Wallin, who sees more couples choosing smaller weddings with more realistic budgets. Setting a wedding budget together can help couples be open, make sacrifices and reveal their own interests, Deacon Wallin said. “When you start putting money into things, you understand what you think is important and what you don’t think is important.” Though they initially planned to get married last summer, one reason Tuohy and Wenzel decided to postpone their wedding was because Tuohy’s mother was diagnosed with cancer. The longer engagement has helped them grow stronger in their relationship and not feel as rushed with wedding planning, she added. During the planning period, couples also decide on their joint approach to money and other issues, said Michelle Gagnon, a St. Louis, King of France

parishioner who was married in 2007. “There are just a lot of future conversations that come up that, at the time, you think are centered on the wedding but really are going to be centered on how you approach life,” she said.

A debt-free beginning When she and her husband, Philippe, decided they didn’t want to take on wedding debt, Gagnon said they set the tone for a debt-free marriage. “Instead of starting out that way and getting used to debt and kind of making our peace with it, we didn’t make peace with it; we just didn’t do it,” she said. The Gagnons were able to invite 500 guests while staying within their $13,000 wedding budget, in part, because many of the guests served at the wedding, she said. Friends and family offered DJ, photography and other services. The youth group Gagnon led helped prepare the

■ Church halls are often less expensive to rent than regular halls and most let you bring in your own food. ■ Buy wedding and bridesmaid dresses off the rack when possible and save up to 50 percent. ■ Church halls and other venues may have table decorations you can use without having to purchase them. ■ Order paper online and print your own personalized invitations to save up to 75 percent off pre-made invitations. ■ Have guests donate to a charity you choose rather than bring gifts. ■ If friends and family members are willing to serve as bartender and DJ, they can better monitor music played and keep minors from drinking. Some church halls have sound systems so you may not need to hire a DJ with a separate system. ■ Don’t skimp on how you look. You can save money in other areas, but you’ll have better memories of the day if you feel good about how you look. ■ Plan your wedding to take place soon after the Christmas or Easter holidays, while the church still has flowers and decorations on display.

reception dinner and also did clean up. Having the support of friends and family during the wedding made the Gagnons confident that this support would continue during their marriage, she said. “I think it really helped to build community,” Gagnon said. “It helped to have people be part of your life. They felt like they were kind of part of the marriage.” By keeping their wedding reception simple, Tuohy said she and Wenzel plan to spend more time with their guests — they’ve invited 175. “It’s just a time for us to talk to our family and friends who have come to watch us get married,” she said. “To me it’s not about the decorations. We want it to look nice but it doesn’t have to be so perfect. It’s really easy to get lost in the details but for me that’s not the important part.”

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Missionary Oblates Celebrate Fr. Louis Studer, OMI. and his staff cordially invite you to join us as we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the death of our founder, St. Eugene De Mazenod.

Fr. Louis Studer, OMI

On Sunday, May 22, a con-celebrated Mass will be held at 2:00 p.m. at Christ the King Retreat Center in Buffalo, Minnesota.

Find us on Twitter at:

www.twitter.com/catholicspirit Become a fan of The Catholic Spirit Facebook page at

www.facebook.com/TheCatholicSpirit

There will be an Open House with hors d’oeuvres and desserts in the Garden Court from 3:00-5:00 p.m. For more information, call 763-682-1394.

Christ the King Retreat Center is located at 621 First Avenue South, Buffalo, MN 55313 Phone: 763-682-1394 Email: christtheking@kingshouse.com Website: www.kingshouse.com Please write or call for a free brochure


“Sing to the Lord, all the earth, announce his salvation, day after day.” 1 Chronicles 16:23

Arts & Culture The Catholic Spirit

Exploring our church and our world

MAY 12, 2011

21A

Christian music stars to perform in Maple Grove The Catholic Spirit Three of contemporary Christian music’s hottest stars will perform together in concert at St. Joseph the Worker in Maple Grove Friday, May 20. Catholic singer/songwriters Steve Angrisano, Jesse Manibusan and Sarah Hart, who have appeared at World Youth Day and at Christian music festivals around the country, will take the stage at 7:30 p.m. for a night of high-energy praise and worship music. The all-ages concert is co-sponsored by Relevant Radio and The Catholic Spirit. “Music has unique way to touch hearts, and research tells us that the music that taps into our souls during our formative years tends to be the most memorable to us the rest of our lives,” said Bob Zyskowski, associate publisher of The Catholic Spirit. “So, for that reason, The Catholic Spirit is delighted to help make

MANIBUSAN

HART

ANGRISANO

events like the one at St. Joseph the Worker possible. “We’d love to have those who attend Tweet (#4thpower) about their thoughts during and after the concert,” he added.

Youth rally On Saturday, May 21, Angrisano, Manibusan and

Hart will speak and perform their music at a rally for youth in grades nine through 12 at St. Joseph the Worker. Registration begins at 12:30 p.m. Bishop Lee Piché will welcome the youth and lead the opening prayer. The rally, which includes several talks and faith-sharing opportunities, ends at 4:30 p.m.; however, participants are invited to stay for the 5 p.m. parish Mass. The theme for the rally is “Love to the 4th Power,” drawing on Ephesians 3:17-18: “. . . And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the Lord’s holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ. . . .” Tickets are $15 for the concert and $18 for the youth rally. To purchase tickets, call Barry Shay at (763) 4256505 or email him at BSHAY@SJTW.NET.

Singer John Michael Talbot to perform at area churches By Julie Pfitzinger For The Catholic Spirit

Popular Christian recording artist John Michael Talbot has spent many years on center stage performing sold-out shows at large concert venues. But just over two years ago, he felt that God was inspiring him to lead his music ministry in a different direction. “I was beginning to feel constrained, somewhat like I was in a bubble,” said Talbot in a recent phone interview. “I wanted to bring a more complete, wellrounded ministry to people.” Talbot’s idea of an “itinerant ministry” was born, allowing him to leave the concert halls behind and go directly into parishes, sharing his reflections not only through music but also through spoken observations and prayer. Talbot said there is “about 50 percent sharing and about 50 percent music” during these more intimate presentations. Talbot will be bringing his itinerant ministry program to two metro area Catholic churches this week. On Saturday, May 14, he will be at St. Stephen Church in Minneapolis and will also present a three-day retreat at St. Joseph in Waconia beginning on May 16. (See sidebar for details).

Hunger for happiness Talbot believes the current atmosphere of the nation and the world is weighing heavily on people, leaving them hungry for positive messages. “There is a sense of some discouragement. I’m trying to bring encouragement and hope. Many times, I can see the expressions on the faces of people who may have looked very sullen when they come into our sessions, but leave looking happier and more hopeful,” said Talbot. With the itinerant ministry model, the barrier that Talbot said exists in concert

“I’m trying to bring encouragement and hope. Many times, I can see the expressions on the faces of people who may have looked very sullen when they come into our sessions, but leave looking happier and more hopeful.

JOHN MICHAEL TALBOT

Christian recording artist John Michael Talbot is bringing his music ministry to St. Stephen in Minneapolis and St. Joseph in Waconia.

ministry has been stripped away. “While a John Michael Talbot concert was a peaceful type of experience, these evenings have not only allowed us to go deeper into prayer and meditation, but it is also an informal enough setting where we can laugh and have fun,” he said. Before launching his itinerant ministry, Talbot spent nearly five years in almost total seclusion in the Brothers and Sisters of Charity community in Arkan-

sas, which he founded. Talbot said he believes he was able to gain energy during that period, which is allowing him to share music and reflections with people in this new way. “It was a time when I began to focus on becoming the person God created me to be,” he said.

Music for new missal Talbot, who has produced more than 50 records and 20 books since the early 1980s, is releasing a new CD next month called “Worship and Bow Down,” which features the “Mass of Rebirth,” based on the new Roman Missal translation. “When I heard about the new Roman Missal, I got kind of excited and did several settings,” he said. “I ended up going with contemporary

Ministry sessions There is no charge for the John Michael Talbot ministry sessions and no preregistration is required; free will offerings are welcome. Saturday, May 14: 7-9 p.m. St. Stephen Church, 2211 Clinton Ave. S., Minneapolis. Monday, May 16 through Wednesday, May 18: 7-8:30 p.m. St. Joseph Church, corner of E. First Street and Elm Street, Waconia. For more information about John Michael Talbot, visit his website at or find him on Facebook at WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ JOHNMICHAELTALBOT. WWW.JOHNMICHAELTALBOT.COM

chant settings — there are elements of Gregorian chant, Eastern and contemporary chant in the music,” said Talbot, who worked closely with noted Catholic music publishing house Oregon Catholic Press on this recording. “There is music that is tailored for daily Mass, with a simple melody line, but it can also be dressed up into a full choral setting for a major celebration.” Calling the music “ancient but new,” Talbot said he is particularly pleased with the settings of the Hail Mary and “Nothing is Impossible,” based on the Annunciation. “The message that nothing is impossible with God is one that resonates. We just need to hold on to our faith and keep going,” he said. Right about the time Talbot began touring with the itinerant ministry program, he also launched a Facebook page that receives more than 1 million hits per month. Having the opportunity to connect with people worldwide has been another blessing, he said, and a great way to build community. “We only have two rules. We expect people to share, but not argue. We will all be civil and respectful to one another,” said Talbot. “It is a way for people to be in touch with other believers and a really new, exciting way to evangelize.”


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Calendar

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • MAY 12, 2011

Dining out Fish fry at Knights of Columbus Hall, Bloomington — Every Friday: 5 to 9 p.m. at 1114 American Blvd. Cost is $10.95. Call (952) 888-1492 for reservations. Chicken and rib dinner at Knights of Columbus Hall, Bloomington — Every Wednesday: 5 to 9 p.m. at 1114 American Blvd. Cost is $10.95. Call (952) 888-1492 for reservations. KC shrimp and steak dinner at Knights Events Center, Shakopee — May 13: 5 to 8 p.m. at 1760 Fourth Ave. E. Cost is $10 for shrimp or steak and $13 for both. Children’s meal available for $2. KC Pancake breakfast at Transfiguration, Oakdale — May 15: 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at 6133 10th St. Cost is $7 for adult and $5 for children 6 to 12. Proceeds benefit St. Paul’s Outreach. Pancake breakfast at Immaculate Conception, Columbia Heights — May 15: 8:30 to 11:45 a.m. at 4030 Jackson St. Free will offering. Spaghetti dinner at Sacred Heart, Rush City — May 20: 5 to 7 p.m. at 425 Field Ave. Cost is $7 in advance and $7.50 at the door. Spaghetti dinner at Blessed Sacrament, St. Paul — May 21: 5 to 8 p.m. at 1801 LaCrosse Ave. KC turkey dinner at Knights Events Center, Shakopee — May 22: 4 to 7 p.m. at 1760 Fourth Ave. E. Cost is $10 for adults and $4 for children 3 to 10. KC benefit breakfast at Knights of Columbus Hall, Stillwater — May 22: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 1910 S. Greeley St. Cost is $6 for adults and $3.50 for children 12 and under.

Parish events Spring treasure sale at Our Lady of Guadalupe, St. Paul — May 12 to 15: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily at 401 Concord St. Tacos for sale also. Benefit dinner for Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Chimbote, Peru at St. Michael, Prior Lake — May 14: Mass at 5 p.m., social at 6 p.m. and dinner at 6:45 p.m. at 16311 Duluth Ave. For information and reservations, call (952) 447-9062.

Knights of Columbus traveling rosary at Lumen Christi, St. Paul — May 15: 2 p.m. at 2055 Bohland Ave.

Don’t miss The BLAST block party in Mound The BLAST block party at Our Lady of the Lake in Mound will be held May 21. Gates open at 6 p.m. for the outdoor event under an enormous open-air tent. Concert features the Gin Blossoms and GB Leighton. Beer, wine, pop and water will be available, as well as food from Lord Fletcher’s. Proceeds benefit Our Lady of the Lake School. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door. This is an 18 and over event. For more information, visit WWW.OLLBLAST.COM. RSVP, call (651) 698-5581. Rummage sale at Sacred Heart, Robbinsdale — May 19 and 20: 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday and 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday ($3 bag day) at 4087 W. Broadway. Rummage sale at St. John Byzantine, Minneapolis — May 19 to 21: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday ($3 bag day) at 2201 Third St. N.E. Rummage sale at St. Thomas the Apostle, St. Paul — May 19 to 21: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 8 a.m. to noon Saturday ($3 bag day) at 2119 Stillwater Ave. Beer, Brats and Bingo at St. Katharine Drexel, Ramsey — May 21: 6 p.m. at 7101 143rd Ave. N.W., Suite G. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. For information, call (763) 323-4424. Blessing of bicycles at the Basilica of St. Mary, Minneapolis — June 5: 12:30 to 2 p.m. at 88 N. 17th St. For more information, visit WWW.MARY.ORG

Retreats Healing retreat at Christ the King

Retreat Center, Buffalo — May 20 to 22: 7 p.m. Friday to 12:45 p.m. Sunday at 621 First Ave. S. Presenter is Father Dick McAlear, OMI. Suggested offering is $155. For information, visit WWW.KINGSHOUSE.COM. ‘Centering Prayer: Look and Look Again’ at Villa Maria Retreat Center, Frontenac — June 4: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 29847 County 2 Blvd. Cost is $50 and includes lunch and snacks. For information visit WWW.VILLAMARIARE TREATS.ORG.

Prayer/ liturgies Legion of Mary prayers in front of Planned Parenthood, St. Paul — Every Friday: 3 p.m. at 1965 Ford Parkway. For information, call (651) 439-9098. Healing Mass at Holy Name of Jesus, Wayzata — May 12: Rosary at 6:30 p.m., Mass at 7 p.m. at 155 County Road 24. Father Don Piché is the celebrant. Taizé prayer at St. Hubert, Chanhassen — May 12: 7 p.m. at 8201 Main St. Candle light service includes sung prayer, silence, scripture readings and a reflection.

Ordination anniversaries

Cathedral Music Series featuring the Marietta College Concert Choir at the Cathedral of St. Paul — May 15: 7:30 p.m. at 239 Selby Ave. Senior Wellness Education series, ‘Who Gets Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate?’ at Lumen Christi, St. Paul — May 18: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 2055 Bohland Ave. A light lunch will be served prior to the presentation. To

Healing Mass for persons with disabilities and their care-givers at St. Raphael, Crystal — May 22: 4 p.m. at 7301 Bass Lake Road. Sponsored by the Archdiocesan Outreach to Persons with Disabilities and Prenatal Partners for Life. Knights of Columbus traveling rosary at St. Agnes, St. Paul — May 29: 2 p.m. at 548 Lafond Ave.

Singles Sunday Spirits walking group for 50plus Catholic singles — ongoing Sundays: For Catholic singles to meet and make friends. The group usually meets in St. Paul on Sunday afternoons. For information, call Judy at (763) 221-3040 or Al at (651) 482-0406.

School events Annual gala to benefit Pope John Paul II School at St. Maron, Minneapolis — May 13: 5:30 p.m. social hour followed by dinner and entertainment at 602 University Ave. N.E. Featured speaker is U of M athletic director Joel Marturi. Cost is $75 per person. ‘Peter Pan and Wendy’ presented by Totino-Grace High School, Fridley — May 14: Shows at 1 and 3 p.m. at 1350 Gardena Ave. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for students and seniors. For information, visit WWW.TOTINO GRACE.ORG. Raingarden workshop at Benilde-St. Margaret’s School, St. Louis Park — May 17: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at 2501 Hwy. 100 S. Learn how to use native plants for gardening, limit fertilizer use, capture rainwater and redirect downspouts. Cost is $10. Register online at WWW.METROBLOOMS.ORG. Golf tournament to benefit Holy Name of Jesus School in Wayzata at Pioneer Creek Golf Course, Maple Plain — May 22: 1 p.m. at 705 Copeland Road. For information and to register, visit WWW.HNOJ.ORG/SCHOOL.

Soup and salad luncheon at Sacred Heart, Rush City — May 15: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 425 Field Ave. Quilts, drawings, handcrafted items. There will be an express line for those with short lunch hours. The Basilica of St. Mary’s Sunday Night Live at Joe’s Garage, Minneapolis — May 15: 6:30 p.m. at 1610 Harmon Place. Young adults gather for food, fellowship and fun while discussing legislative advocacy.

Knights of Columbus traveling rosary at Nativity of Our Lord, St. Paul — May 22: 2 p.m. at Stanford Ave. and Prior Ave. S.

FATHER SIEBENALER

FATHER KEISER

FATHER SIEG

FATHER VALIT

50th ordination anniversary celebration for Father John Siebenaler at St. Mary, New Trier — May 15: Mass at noon at 8433 239th St., Hampton. 40th ordination anniversary celebration for Father Jerome Keiser at St. Francis of Assisi, Lake St. Croix Beach — May 22: 10:30 a.m. Mass followed by a reception at 16770 13th St. S. All are invited to a parish picnic outdoors from noon to 3 p.m. 40th ordination anniversary celebration for Father Thomas Sieg at St. Michael, Prior Lake — May 22: 10:30 a.m. Mass followed by a reception from noon until 2:30 p.m. at 16311 Duluth Ave. S.E. 50th ordination anniversary celebration for Father Robert Valit at St. Michael, Stillwater — May 22: 2 p.m. Mass followed by a reception at 611 S. Third St.

Other events Open forum with priests and Mass with Bishop Lee Piché at Unity Hospital, Fridley — May 18: 10 to 11:30 a.m. with Mass at noon at 550 Osborne Road. For hospital volunteers, sacristans, eucharistic ministers and pastoral ministers. Garage sale to benefit Holy Family Catholic Adoption Agency at the Anoka County fairgrounds, Anoka — May 25 and 26: Wednesday 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Thursday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 3112 St. Francis Blvd. For information, call (763) 421-8917.

Calendar Submissions DEADLINE: The Catholic Spirit is biweekly. Items should be submitted by Noon Thursday, seven days before the anticipated Thursday date of publication. Recurring or ongoing events must be submitted each time they occur. LISTINGS: Accepted are brief notices of upcoming events hosted by Catholic parishes and institutions. Items are published on a space available basis. ITEMS MUST INCLUDE the following to be considered for publication in the calendar: • Time and date of event. • Full street address of event. • Description of event. • Contact information in case of questions. E-MAIL: SPIRITCALENDAR@ ARCHSPM.ORG.

(No attachments, please.) FAX: (651) 291-4460. MAIL: “Calendar,” The Catholic Spirit, 244 Dayton Ave., St. Paul, MN 55102.


23A

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • MAY 12, 2011

New missal text reflects different translation approach CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17A tled “Liturgiam Authenticam,” which established new principles upon which the translation of liturgical texts was to be based from this point forward. As opposed to the dynamic equivalence of “Comme Le Prevoit,” this new document called for “formal equivalence,” a way of translating that demands a more exacting translation, without paraphrases or glosses. The root behind these new principles was nothing other than the experience of the church, gained since the council. It must be admitted that the current translation in use was completed after only a few years following the Second Vatican Council’s conclusion, and there needed to be time to process and digest the new language of public prayer. “Liturgiam Authenticam” sought to affirm what had worked well since the Second Vatican Council in the transla-

tion of liturgical texts, but also to correct what needed refinement. Our new translation of the “Novus Ordo,” to be used later this year, is an attempt to follow the new principles of translation outlined by the church in “Liturgiam Authenticam.”

A look back Closely connected to the release of “Liturgiam Authenticam” was the decision of Blessed John Paul II to announce in the Jubilee Year of 2000 the publication of a new “Roman Missal,” that is, a new book of prayers for the Mass. The final Latin text of this missal was not completed until 2002. This would be the third such “typical edition” missal since the Second Vatican Council, the first being released in 1969, the second in 1975. The missals of 1975 and 2002 were mostly simple reprints of the original 1969 Latin text, but they did add new

prayers and new saints, and offer clarifications on the celebration of the Mass. For example, the 2002 missal includes new prayers for Masses offered in honor of St. Josephine Bakhita, an African nun from Darfur. When the third edition of the Roman Missal was released in 2002 in Latin, the episcopal conferences around the world were given the historic and monumental task of translating this new text into the vernacular, utilizing the principles found in “Liturgiam Authenticam.” And so, for the past decade, this has been the constant project of liturgists, theologians and bishops’ committees. It has been a laborious process, but one that has involved much more consultation, conversation and debate than the 1974 English text. After these many years of consultation, debate, votes and thorough analysis, the English translation of the third edition of

the Roman Missal is now ready for use in the United States. We will begin to use it on Nov. 27. While these new words will be challenging to us all for a whole host of different reasons, this moment in our church’s life is nevertheless a privileged chance to once again truly listen to what we are saying when we participate in the Holy Mass. In this time of learning and new beginnings, priests and laity alike will need to slow down and truly pay attention to what we are saying and hearing at the Mass, so as to learn again — better yet, so as to remember again the meaning of this foundational prayer. If we do this, not only will we be better able to proclaim new words at Mass, we ourselves will be made new. Father John Paul Erickson is director of the archdiocesan Office of Worship.

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“John Paul II is blessed because of his faith — a strong, generous and apostolic faith.” Pope Benedict XVI, speaking May 1 after formally beatifying the late pontiff

Overheard 24A

The Catholic Spirit

“The [life] issues put us in touch with one aspect of humanity: They show what we are capable of when we lose our moorings, when we are not DOERFLINGER guided by clear thinking on right and wrong.”

Quotes from this week’s newsmakers

Seven men ordained transitional deacons Photos by Dianne Towalski, The Catholic Spirit

— Richard Doerflinger, associate director of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Secretariat for ProLife Activities, in remarks April 28 after receiving the inaugural Evangelium Vitae Medal at the University of Notre Dame

For more photos go to THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT.COM

“There was a not a single bombing here for about a decade of the war on terror. Now we know the reason.” — Father Akram Javed Gill, who leads the 150-member St. Peter Canisius Catholic Church in Abbottabad, Pakistan, where al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden was killed May 2 by U.S. forces

“The church needs us. It needs us for evangelization. It needs us to disseminate information and often to correct information.” — Elizabeth Scalia, who writes “The Anchoress,” commenting during a May 2 meeting between the Vatican and Catholic bloggers from around the world

May 12, 2011

Above, seven men were ordained transitional deacons May 7 at the Basilica of St. Mary in Minneapolis. Above, candidates (from left) Kevin Abikisi, Robert Abotzabire, Peter Akudugu, Evan Koop, Benjamin Little, Nicholas VanDenBroeke and Albert Wugaa stand before Archbishop John Nienstedt during the Rite of Ordination. Koop, Little and VanDenBroeke were ordained for the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. Abakisi, Abotzabire, Akudugu and Wugaa were ordained for the Diocese of Navrongo-Bolgatanga, Ghana, and will return home for ordination to the priesthood. Right, Allison Koop, Evan Koop’s sister, and her fiancé, Burton Hendrickson, pray together after Communion.

Class of 1971 marks 40th anniversary of unique ordinations Back in 1971, the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis experimented by holding ordinations to the archdiocesan priesthood at the home parishes of the men graduating from the St. Paul The Seminary. Before Catholic Spirit then, ordinations were at the Cathedral of St. Paul. The change was an effort to bring the ordination celebration closer to the people, according to Catholic Bulletin archives. This month, five members of the ordination class of 1971 mark the 40th anniversary of those unique ordinations: ■ Father George Grafsky, whose ordination was at St. Michael in West St. Paul. ■ Father Jerry Keiser, Visitation, Minneapolis. ■ Father Jim Notebaart, St. Joseph, Red Wing. ■ Father Steve O’Gara, St. Mark, St. Paul. ■ Father Tom Sieg, the chapel at the Academy of Holy Angels, adjacent to his home parish, St. Peter, Richfield.

News Notes

Another member of the class, Father Charles Brambilla, was ordained in Rome that year and marked his anniversary last month. At the direction of Archbishop John Roach, ordinations returned to the cathedral in 1975 to demonstrate “the unity of the priesthood,” the Catholic Bulletin reported.

show — at a discounted rate. To order tickets, call the box office at (952) 9341525, and let them know that you are coming to celebrate with the Community Superstar Award winner on May 26. Mention the promotional code “fifteen” to receive the discounted ticket rate. Ticket purchases are not available online.

‘Community superstar’

Senior Service expansion

Brenda Coleman, energetic volunteer at Holy Name of Jesus in Medina, a local leader of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network and a tireless board member of The Catholic Spirit, is one of 14 “community superstars” being feted by the Chanhassen Dinner Theatres in conjunction with its staging of “Jesus Christ Superstar.” Recognizing Coleman and other local volunteers seemed a natural fit with the theme of the show about Jesus, “the ultimate compassionate superstar,” noted the Chanhassen’s Kris Howland. Coleman will have her “superstar” evening Thursday, May 26. Friends and family are invited to take part in the celebration — including dinner and the

Six Benedictine Health System related organizations have joined the Catholic Senior Services program of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. The organizations are: ■ Benedictine Health Center at Innsbruck, New Brighton. ■ St. Brigid’s at Hi-Park, Red Wing. ■ Benedictine Health Center of Minneapolis, Minneapolis. ■ Benedictine Senior Living at Steeple Pointe, Osseo. ■ Cerenity Care Center-Marian of St. Paul, St. Paul. ■ St. Gertrude’s Health and Rehabilitation Center, Shakopee. The pro-life mission of Catholic Senior Services is designed to coordinate and

enhance Catholic, parish-based housing and services for older adults throughout the archdiocese.

Half a century of service After 55 years of service at St. Michael in Stillwater, staff member Dorothy Schnell-Gerson is retiring. She started working as a volunteer secretary in her home in 1956. Over the years, she has served as parish bookkeeper, financial secretary for the parish’s special donation projects and parish council secretary. Schnell-Gerson also has been a member of St. Michael’s Council of Catholic Women since 1955. In 2008, she was presented the Holy Cross Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice award for distinguished service to the church by lay people and clergy. That year, she also received the Spirit of Stewardship Award from the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. On Sunday, June 5, there will be a reception in Schnell-Gerson’s honor after the 11 a.m. Mass at St. Michael.


Salute

The Catholic Spirit May 12, 2011

to Grads

2011

Read the reflections about the past and future, written by graduating seniors selected by their Catholic schools and parishes

Gabby DeLuna, left, and Nestor Ramirez are two members of Cristo Rey Jesuit High School’s first graduating class.

Pages 3B-12B

Dave Hrbacek / The Catholic Spirit

Cristo Rey students step out and up Jesuit school’s first graduates prepared to live out college dreams By Pat Norby The Catholic Spirit

Nestor Ramirez and Gabby De Luna each have unique, yet similar stories, just like all of the 61 students who are among the first graduating class at Cristo Rey Jesuit High School in south Minneapolis on June 11. Both are from low-income Latino homes, which make up about 60 percent of the students, many of whom travel from across the Twin Cities to attend Cristo Rey. Both are considered at-risk students who will become the first in their families to attend college this fall. Ramirez lives in north Minneapolis with his father and a younger brother, but hasn’t seen his mother for about four years. However, he added, he hardly sees his father and brother because of their work and school schedules. “My dad is hard working,” said Ramirez, who had just 15 minutes to talk after school before heading to his current job at the Showplace ICON Theatre in St. Louis Park. “People say ‘follow your dreams and do whatever is going to make you happy,’” he said. “I have a different opinion on that. I see my family troubled with debt.” While he has been pushed by teachers and staff to

get his work done, he said he also has received a lot of support and encouragement at school and at the companies where he has worked.

A working perspective From his work at K-Mart, the theaters, Cub Foods and Best Buy, “I know how to handle customers really well, how to start conversations and how to keep going with conversations,” he said. “With the school’s internship program, I have worked at Wells Fargo, General Mills and currently M&I Bank. That has taught me a lot about computers and computer programming, data entry, filing, answering phones, how to be proper. I’ve gained a lot from them.” Those experiences piqued his interest in accounting, which he sees as a stable career that he plans to study at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter. It is a career, he said, that he can imagine himself in and that will provide a stable income. “I want to be sure that I have money,” he said. “I think that Cristo Rey informs you of all the possibilities out there” for community colleges, four-year colleges and trade schools. His face lit up with excitement about his own future, when he said that he just learned he would be receiving a full scholarship to Gustavus, which he could

otherwise not afford to attend. Although he feels confident about the school work and being away from home, he does have one concern. “My biggest fear is making new friends and new relationships,” he said. But Cristo Rey and its 78 partner corporations and nonprofits have given him the tools he needs to deal with that, he said, as he ended this interview with a firm, businesslike handshake.

From dreams to reality De Luna said that attending Cristo Rey was a natural transition from nearby Risen Christ School, which she attended from third through eighth grade. During her grade school days, De Luna dreamed of being a fashion designer, she said. During her sophomore year at Cristo Rey, she wanted to be a lawyer. Then she found her passion in science, which pulled her into another possible career. “I want to go to St. Mary’s University in Winona and study dentistry,” said the outgoing teen, who claims to be “really shy.” Although she has been accepted at St. Mary’s and at St. Benedict in St. Joseph and Loras College in Dubuque, Iowa, she is waiting to hear more about financial aid before making a final decision. PLEASE TURN TO BUSINESS ON PAGE 2B


2B

Graduation

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • MAY 12, 2011

Business, school mentors impressed by students’ growth CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B “I never guessed I’d be accepted at St. Mary’s, St. Ben’s or Loras College . . . and to learn how to be in the corporate world,” she said. Like Ramirez, De Luna chose to attend Cristo Rey, although her parents encouraged the choice. “I really like that you get a lot of help from teachers,” she said, adding that her peers are friendly and more disciplined than what she has heard from friends about students in other schools. Communication is one of the top skills that De Luna said she has gained from her studies and work experiences. “Coming here helped me talk more and interact more with people,” she said. “Classes helped me with that.” And her work experiences taught her to be responsible and “stay on task.” De Luna lives with both of her parents, who are members of Holy Rosary parish in Minneapolis. “I do think that I’m really lucky,” she said. “I have always had support from both my parents.” And because her Catholic faith also is important to her, she is glad that it is a part of the curriculum and overall environment at school.

A far-reaching mission Nationwide, 24 Cristo Rey Jesuit High Schools are “dedicated to providing an education in the Jesuit tradition which integrates college preparatory academic and professional work environments, preparing [6,500] students [in 22 cities] from under-resourced families for success in college and life,” according to its promotional literature. Students are connected in their freshman year with a sponsor corporation, said Rick Campion, development fund

“I have become a better person by working with them. It’s made me a better manager, and I have a 13-year-old, so it’s made me a better mother.

KRIS DONNELLY Student supervisor and mentor at Youth Frontiers

director in Minneapolis. In subsequent years, students attend a job fair and apply for jobs that interest them. Their wages go toward their tuition, along with a small amount paid by each family. Campion began working at Cristo Rey in 2007 in a storefront across the street from the current building, which was built by Pat and the late Jim Ryan of Ryan Companies Inc., he said. A member of St. Joseph in New Hope, Campion left his position of 12 years at Totino-Grace in Fridley because he believed in the Cristo Rey mission, he said. And he has been rewarded through his work for the school and with the students. “My prayers have become more action,” he said. Jesuit Father Timothy Manatt, Cristo Rey president, said the school model works because it appeals to both the political left and right. “It’s a hand up, not a hand out,” he said. Today, many recent college graduates have a sense of social responsibility, he said. So, if the company they work for hires Cristo Rey students, that makes an impression, Father Manatt said. Kris Donnelly, director of school relations at Youth Frontiers, said she has

grown more impressed with the Cristo Rey model over the past year, as she has seen how the two students she supervises have grown and developed. In fact, she and the rest of the staff are looking forward to having four students in the office next year.

Business gives and receives The youth answer phones, work on the data base and help with special projects at the nonprofit retreat organization. Youth Frontiers leads 650 retreats each year at public and private schools around the country, which focus on character values such as kindness and respect. Donnelly, a member of Our Lady of Peace in Minneapolis, said that the Cristo Rey students “are a daily reminder of what it is that we are already called to do.” “I tend to put more thought into how I’m going to interact, how I’m going to talk about a project that we’re working on then I would have with the rest of my team on staff,” she said. That realization has prompted her to think about how she interacts with other people in the office as well. “I have become a better person by working with them,” she said. “It’s made me a better manager, and I have a

13-year-old, so it’s made me a better mother.”

Hope for the future Meg Brudney, executive director of the Hire-4-Ed Work-Study Program at the school, said the greatest reward of working at Cristo Rey is “watching these kids blossom” at school and work. Her job is finding jobs for the students. “Hands down, this is the best job I’ve ever had. It’s fun to work with teenagers but especially these teenagers. They know they are being given an opportunity,” said Brudney, a member of Holy Name in Minneapolis who has been with Cristo Rey for one year. When Cristo Rey students enter a work environment, they step up, she said. “You see the self-confidence they have. They look you in the eye,” she said. Working in a corporate environment gives them a view of, and hope for the future, while exposing them to people who have been in college and in business. Those are opportunities that come more naturally to students in middle- to upper-income families, she added. Cristo Rey also is a Spirit-filled environment, Brudney said. “To be in an environment where you can share your faith is enriching. It’s had a huge impact on my spirituality and faith life,” she said. Those involved with Cristo Rey have high hopes for the future of the school. Their vision includes expansion from the current 268 students in the four-year school to a full house with 400 students — all connected to a corporate sponsor, all graduating and going on to college or other advanced education and then providing physical and financial support for the next generation of Cristo Rey students.

Look here for Catholic graduation ceremonies, dates and times High schools Academy of Holy Angels, Richfield ■ Commencement exercises: 4 p.m. Sunday, June 5, Academy of Holy Angels. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 7 p.m. Thursday, June 2, St. Peter, Richfield. Father Michael Tix, celebrant. Benilde-St. Margaret’s School, St. Louis Park ■ Commencement exercises: 7 p.m. Friday, June 3, Benilde-St. Margaret’s, William Haben Activities Center. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 11 a.m. Sunday, May 22, Downtown Marriott, Minneapolis. Father Tim Wozniak, celebrant. Bethlehem Academy, Faribault ■ Commencement exercises: 8 p.m. Friday, May 27, Bethlehem Academy, Van Orsow Auditorium. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 25, Divine Mercy Church. Father Kevin Finnegan and Father Erik Lundgren, celebrants. Convent of the Visitation, Mendota Heights ■ Commencement exercises: 3 p.m. Sunday, June 5, Visitation School, Commers Gymnasium. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 11 a.m. Sunday, May 22, Visitation School Chapel. Father Michael Joncas, celebrant.

Cretin-Derham Hall, St. Paul ■ Commencement exercises: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 1, Cathedral of St. Paul. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 9 a.m. Wednesday, June 1, Lumen Christi Catholic Community, St. Paul. Father John Forliti, celebrant. Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, Minneapolis ■ Commencement exercises: 2 p.m. Saturday, June 11, Cristo Rey. Immaculée Ilibagiza, speaker. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 6 p.m. Friday, June 10, Holy Name, Minneapolis. Bishop Lee Piché, celebrant. DeLaSalle High School, Minneapolis ■ Commencement exercises: 6:45 p.m. Thursday, May 26, Basilica of St. Mary, Minneapolis. Bishop John LeVoir, speaker. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 25, DeLaSalle High School, Florance Center. Father Kevin McDonough, celebrant. Hill-Murray School, Maplewood ■ Graduation Mass: 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 3, Cathedral of St. Paul. Holy Family Catholic High School, Victoria ■ Commencement exercises: 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 18, Holy Family Catholic High School. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 2 p.m. Sunday, May 15, St. Victoria, Victoria. Father Bob White, celebrant.

Providence Academy, Plymouth ■ Commencement exercises: 8 p.m. Friday, June 3, Providence Academy. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 4 p.m. Friday, June 3, Basilica of St. Mary, Minneapolis. Bishop Lee Piché, celebrant. St. Agnes High School, St. Paul ■ Commencement exercises: 7 p.m. Friday, June 3, St. Agnes School. University of St. Thomas School of Law Professor Elizabeth Schlitz, speaker. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 9:30 a.m. Thursday, June 2, St. Agnes Church. Bishop Lee Piché with Father John Ubel, celebrants. St. Thomas Academy, Mendota Heights ■ Commencement exercises: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 2, Cathedral of St. Paul. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 31, St. Thomas Academy. Father Thomas O’Brien, celebrant. Totino-Grace High School, Fridley ■ Commencement exercises: 7 p.m. Friday, June 3, Totino-Grace High School. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 1, Epiphany Church, Coon Rapids. Father Doug Pierce, celebrant.

Universities St. Catherine University, St. Paul ■ Commencement exercises at The O’Shaughnessy Auditorium, St. Paul

campus: Associate degrees — 11 a.m. Saturday, May 21. Graduate degrees —11 a.m., Saturday, May 21. Bachelor degrees — 2 p.m. Sunday, May 22. St. Mary’s University, Minneapolis ■ Commencement exercises: 12:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. Sunday, June 5, Harrington Mansion & Event Center (formerly Zuhrah Shrine Center,) 2540 Park Ave., Minneapolis. University of St. Thomas, St. Paul ■ Commencement exercises: School of Law — Noon Saturday, May 14, location to be announced. Opus College of Business — 7 p.m. Saturday, May 21, Anderson Athletic and Recreation Center, St. Paul Campus. Graduate degrees — 7 p.m. Saturday, May 21, Anderson Center, St. Paul Campus. Speaker: Bill George, former CEO of Medtronic, Harvard Business School professor. Bachelor degrees — 2 p.m. Saturday, May 21, Schoenecker Arena — Anderson Center. Speaker: Ken Hackett, Catholic Relief Services president. ■ Baccalaureate Mass: 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 20, Cathedral of St. Paul.


Graduation

MAY 12, 2011 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

Christian Glanville

Victoria Blackstone

De La Salle High School, Minneapolis

St. Agnes High School, St. Paul

Christian Glanville plans to attend the University of Minnesota. He is the son of Peter and Karin Glanville and is a member of the Upper Room in St. Louis Park. What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? Work harder than the next person. My grandpa taught me this when I worked for his construction company. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school? I am proud to be a National Merit Scholar . . . hard work pays off. What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? My mission every day is to bring smiles to weary faces . . . that is the most meaningful way to impact lives on a daily basis. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. In my sophomore year, I was in the musical “Les MisĂŠrables.â€? Our cast bonded together over the 150-year-old story. It was truly ethereal to connect on such a deep level with a beautiful story of compassion and redemption. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “Letters from a Skepticâ€? by Greg Boyd changed the way that I approach my faith. [It] was the inspiration I needed to begin growing in my own faith. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? I would have a conversation with the famous Lutheran pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer. . . . I would ask about his struggle to reconcile his involvement in violent attempts on Adolf Hitler’s life with his faith.

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3B

Victoria Blackstone plans to attend Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Va. She is the daughter of J. Robert and Virginia Blackstone and is a parishioner at St. Mark in St. Paul. What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? Humility. I learned that just because I thought something was right did not make it right, and I was not in control. God was. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. Volunteering. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. My great-grandfather passed away. At first, I was angry with God for not letting me travel to where he lived to say goodbye. Then, I realized that God wanted me to be there to help my family, who was also grieving. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “The Autobiography of Malcolm X� helped me to realize the importance of closely examining the prejudices I may have toward others. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? Strive to keep us educated in our faith. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? Che Guevara. I have always been fascinated by his revolutionary ideas and amazed by his dedication to serve the least of the people. What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? To serve to the best of my ability, to find the path God intends for me, and, a bit more random and indulgent, own a cow.

Totino-Grace High School

Enter to Learn, Leave to Serve This has long been the charge of Lasallian education, and for the past four years the Totino-Grace Class of 2011 has lived out this mission by balancing academic achievement with faith, service, and community. They have dedicated themselves to academic excellence, won championships in athletics and the arts, served others through countless hours of volunteering locally and nationally, and made lifelong friends. They have prepared themselves well for what lies ahead. Most importantly, they have accomplished this while they grew deeper in their faith.

Congratulations Class of 2011!


4B

Graduation

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • MAY 12, 2011

Miriam Aragon

Erin Pfarr

Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, Minneapolis

Le Sueur High School, Le Sueur

Miriam Aragon plans to attend St. Mary’s University in Winona. She is the daughter of Martina Aquilar and Marcial Aragon and attends Sagrado Corazón in Minneapolis. What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? Continue your education no matter what! It’s essential for getting a good job. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school? I am proud I was accepted to my first choice for college. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. A couple years ago, I was Catholic, but not very into practicing the religion. Then, I went to Mexico and spent time with my uncle who, at the time, was training to become a priest. He helped me strengthen my faith. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “I Am the Messenger” by Markus Zusak taught me that everyone has a mission. Even the most ordinary person has something to accomplish in life. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? Jesus. I would have so many questions to ask. What problem in the world most concerns you? How do you think it can be solved? Lack of religion, lack of faith. We need to give God a moment more often. What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? Bring my grandparents to the United States. Graduate from college. Take my mom to Rome and Jerusalem to see firsthand where Jesus lived.

Erin Pfarr plans to attend the University of Minnesota. She is the daughter of David and Robyn Pfarr and attends St. Anne in Le Sueur. What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? I learned that setting my goals high and working to achieve them is worth the effort. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school? I am proud of the growth I have made as a visual artist. What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? I was a role model and mentor to a sixth-grade volleyball player this fall. I encouraged her in her pursuits on and off the court. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. I always feel close to God when cantoring at church. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen changed the way I thought about novels. It opened my eyes to the merits of challenging, classical literature. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? Church youth groups are a great way for young adults to stay connected. What problem in the world most concerns you? How do you think it can be solved? Feeding a growing world population. Agricultural technology has the answer. If you could go back in time five years, what advice would you give yourself? I would tell myself to follow my passions and not be afraid to try new things.


Graduation

MAY 12, 2011 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

Connor Harlander

Rebecca DeNio

Roseville Area High School, Roseville

Academy of Holy Angels, Richfield

Connor Harlander plans to attend Loyola University in Chicago. He is the son of Dan and Meghan Harlander and is a parishioner at St. Cecilia in St. Paul.

Rebecca DeNio plans to attend the College of St. Benedict in St. Joseph. She is the daughter of Denny and Christine DeNio and is a parishioner at St. Peter in Richfield.

What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? To take advantage of opportunities to explore new things.

What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? I learned how to interact with my peers and elders. . . . To respect other students and teachers, and gain others’ respect in return.

Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. One thing I am proud of accomplishing in high school is being nominated for the MSHSL Triple “A” Award for excellence in Academics, Arts and Athletics.

Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. I am most proud of being a Scholar of Distinction, while being involved in school activities, like the dance team, the spring musical and campus ministry team.

What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? Community service. Volunteerism is something that is important to me and I worked to get more students involved in giving back to their community. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. Realizing it is OK to be open about my faith and explore and discuss it with others, and also realizing the abundance of support that exists around me. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? The books that most changed the way I think are “The Alchemist” by Paulo Coelho and “Sophie’s World” by Jostein Gaarder. “The Alchemist” changed my perspective of the world and how I change, of crisis, and of moments of success. “Sophie’s World” helped me integrate the worlds of science, philosophy and religion, provided me with insight and helped me form my personal faith. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? Provide a community where young adults feel welcomed but also viewed as equals with valuable insight. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? Alexander the Great, to figure out the secret to leading and inspiring people. If you could go back in time five years, what advice would you give yourself? You will make mistakes. The trick is to not dwell on them or regret them. What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? I want to change the world by giving back and inspiring others to do the same. I want to travel and I want to be able to say I lived a meaningful life.

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5B

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What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? My role as a dance team captain allowed me to have one-on-one time with girls that needed help, whether it be with dance itself or advice on how to excel in high school, in general, and be the best person you can be. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. My most significant faith experience was participating in the presentation of the Passion of the Christ with Campus Ministry Team. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “The Kite Runner” by Khaled Hosseini made me realize that I will never understand the extent to which people suffer all around the world. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? Help make it possible financially for students of all income levels and backgrounds to attend Catholic schools and universities. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? Martin Luther King Jr. I would like to have heard his famous speech in person and ask him what made him so determined. What is your favorite quote? Include the author. “Do you really think all this is an accident? We were brought here for a purpose, for a reason, all of us. Each one of us was brought here for a reason.” — John Locke, “Lost” What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? To excel in nursing in college, have a family and continue to improve myself.


6B

Graduation

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • MAY 12, 2011

Colin Gallaher

with my classmates and retreat leaders.

Benilde-St. Margaret’s, St. Louis Park

What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “Lone Survivor” by Marcus Luttrell. This book really shows the extent of the sacrifices that some members of our military are willing to make. It also taught me how much our media and society focus on unimportant headlines.

Colin Gallaher plans to attend the University of Wisconsin — Madison. He is the son of Dan and Susan Gallaher and is a parishioner at Our Lady of Grace in Edina. What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? It is extremely important to always work hard and do your best, especially during challenging times. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. I am proud of being able to find a balance between athletics and academics.

What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? I think it is important that the church is able to connect with young adults via technology because I think the church will find this is a great way to communicate with them.

and teachers need to volunteer to help as well. What is your favorite quote? “The difference between a successful person and others is not a lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather in a lack of will.” — Vince Lombardi

What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? The most meaningful way I have helped other students is through an organization that helps incoming freshmen adjust to high school.

If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? George Washington because he was a respected leader and man of character, and he was one of the many people who was able to lay the foundation for our country.

If you could go back in time five years, what advice would you give yourself? Always be open to branching out and experiencing new things.

Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. I had my most significant faith experience at a class retreat my senior year. It was easy for me to feel God’s presence during the course of this weekend

What problem in the world most concerns you? How do you think it can be solved? The lack of good education because it often leads to many more problems. I think that organizations need to focus on building schools in poor countries,

What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? Serve our country; become a leader in my community; and strengthen my relationship with God.

Danielle (Dani) Blaschko

Katie Moran

Le Center High School, Le Center

Convent of the Visitation School, Mendota Heights

Danielle Blaschko plans to attend the University of Minnesota Rochester. She is the daughter of Scott and Carol Blaschko and is a parishioner at St. Mary and St. Henry, Le Center.

Katie Moran plans to attend the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind. She is the daughter of Dan and Sheryl Moran and is a parishioner at Our Lady of Grace in Edina.

What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? I learned how to manage my time well. I was busy my senior year with school, homework, work, volunteering and fun. I learned how to prioritize.

What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? It’s important to set goals but not be limited by expectations.

Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. I will be graduating at the top of my class, as valedictorian. What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? For one hour of every day, I lead a reading group in a second-grade classroom. Learning in elementary school is very important because it is the stepping stone into high school. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. I really enjoy teaching Children’s Liturgy of the Word on Sundays. Working with these preschool children is very rewarding, as I know that I am helping them become better Christians. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “In the Time of the Butterflies” by Julia Alvarez is about three sisters who fight for their rights in communist Cuba. The book taught me to fight for what I believe in because my opinion matters. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? My parish has many fun activities that require volunteers. The annual Christmas fair, the annual summer festival, children’s Liturgy of the Word, faith formation classes and various other activities are really enjoyable and get young adults involved in the church. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? Rosa Parks because: 1) she is a woman who fought for her beliefs; 2) she fought for the rights of her race. I would like to tell Rosa that I look up to her. What is your favorite quote? Include the author. “Life is one grand, sweet song, so start the music.”

What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? By reassuring underclassmen that they will get through the hard times in high school and encouraging them to be the best young women that they can be. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. Attending Salesian Leadership Camp with a group from Visitation. It was inspiring to see student leaders, nationwide, who are excited about their faith. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? The entire “Mark of the Lion” series by Francine Rivers taught me the value of living out my faith in even the most insignificant of moments. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? Personally reach out to them. Family friends that are priests have had a positive impact on my faith and character. Without that personal contact, the church can begin to feel like a vague and distant structure. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? Pope John Paul II. I admire his ability to spread God’s love to the entire world. What problem in the world most concerns you? How do you think it can be solved? That people don’t connect with one another as much anymore — kids play video games instead of running around the neighborhood together or watch movies in the car instead of talking with their families. This can be solved by people unplugging and just being with one another. What is your favorite quote? Include the author. “Do not wish to be anything but what you are, and try to be that perfectly.” — St. Francis de Sales

— Ronald Reagan

What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? Have a family. Be a well-known doctor. Get to know multiple cultures.

What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? 3) Run the Boston Marathon. 2) Raise a large, faith-filled family. 1) Learn to fully abandon myself to God.


Graduation Camille Santrach Hill-Murray School, Maplewood Camille Santrach plans to attend the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Mass. She is the daughter of Peter and Melissa Santrach and is a parishioner at St. Odilia in Shoreview. What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? Llife itself is one big lesson. Every day we face new challenges, and our ability to be successful is determined by how we react to those challenges. Mistakes are merely opportunities to learn and grow. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. I am very proud of being invited to speak on the student panel at the AdvancED Fall Conference, which focused on improving education. What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? I try to always be there to listen to my friends and support them when they need someone to talk to. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. Serving a meal to the homeless and visiting with

MAY 12, 2011 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT them at Simpson’s Shelter. I was reluctant to go that night because I would get home late and still have hours of homework. . . . I was reminded that I had opportunities that many of the men at the shelter will never experience. I left Simpson’s Shelter thanking God that I got to go home and do homework. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “When Bad Things Happen to Good People” by Rabbi Harold Kushner . . . helped me understand that not everything happens for a reason. I came to the understanding that God does not, as Rabbi Kushner says, “send” us the problem; he gives us the strength to cope with the randomness of the universe. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? Create more opportunities for youth to learn about the traditions of the church. . . . If youth were to know the meaning behind the traditions, I think they would find Catholicism more interesting and become more involved in their faith. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? Maria Montessori. Her method of education fascinates me. I would love to be able to hear from her what her vision of education for the world is.

What problem in the world most concerns you? How do you think it can be solved? The lack of quality education for a large number of children. Although it will take many different solutions, I believe that one way is for teachers to adopt new methods of instruction that involve “brainbased learning.” What is your favorite quote? Include the author. “Do not worry about tomorrow; tomorrow will take care of itself.” — Matthew 6:34 What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? I hope to become a Montessori teacher, make a significant contribution to education reform, and become a mom.

Anthony Barrett

Christina Gutierrez

Roseville Area High School, Roseville

Cretin-Derham Hall, St. Paul

Anthony Barrett plans to attend the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind. He is the son of John and Amy Barrett and a parishioner at Corpus Christi in Roseville.

Christina Gutierrez plans to attend the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind. She is the daughter of Karen and Rafael Gutierrez and is a parishioner at St. Thomas More in St. Paul.

What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? Decisions affect your future. More often than not, the good decisions are rewarded and the bad decisions have consequences. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. I have been the captain of the swimming and diving team for two years and the lacrosse team for one year. It means a lot that my friends look up to me enough to vote me a captain. What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? This year, I am serving as a youth human rights commissioner for Roseville High School. I give back by advocating for students and helping secure their rights. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. After a very rough and competitive varsity football game against our main rival, Mounds View, the opposing captains came over to our huddle and invited us to pray with them at midfield. A Mounds View captain led the prayer, in which he gave thanks for our safety, and asked that we remember to always make room for God in our lives. It amazed me that prayer could bring us together. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “A Separate Peace” by John Knowles made me realize that life is precious. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? Set up retreats that kids can go on. . . . My own confirmation retreats were what led me to become active in my church. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? John F. Kennedy. I would ask him how he balanced his faith and public duty. What problem in the world most concerns you? How do you think it can be solved? International relations. . . . I hope that this problem can be solved by public advocating, compassionate leadership and guidance from God. What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? I want to become a doctor; write music as a hobby; and work with youth as a coach or youth group leader.

7B

What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? Not giving up on my commitment to both academics and extra-curriculars paid off! What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? I hope I’ve helped some students feel better about themselves just by always being myself. . . . I try to show through my actions that you can be happy and lead a successful life by being yourself, no matter how different you are. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. My brother was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma during my junior year, and I found myself asking questions about God and the reason things happen in the world. I found a lot of consolation in becoming closer to my brother. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “Omnivore’s Dilemma” by Michael Pollan influenced the way I think about and choose the foods I want to eat. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? Plan Masses that involve more youth. Young people will become the adults of the church, but if they’re turned off by what the church is doing, they won’t continue to live faithful lives with the church and continue to attend Mass. Mass should be made more relevant, more accepting and more engaging. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? John Lewis and all the members of the SCLC (a student non-violent committee during the Civil Rights era). I would talk to them about the actions they took and the thoughts they had while changing the history of America. What problem in the world most concerns you? How do you think it can be solved? Environmental degradation and scarcity of good food. I see them as being related, and I believe they can be fixed together. By finding more sustainable ways of planting nutritious foods that don’t degrade the environment, we can reduce the amount of waste and pollutants. What is your favorite quote? Include the author. “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” — Gandhi


8B

Graduation

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • MAY 12, 2011

Julia Banasikowski Prior Lake High School, Savage Julia Banasikowski plan to attend the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind. She is the daughter of Ewa and Richard Banasikowski and is a parishioner of Holy Cross Catholic Church in Minneapolis. What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? Self-discipline. I had to balance my free time with my responsibilities. I had to take care of my priorities. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. I am proud of maintaining a high GPA while being involved in extracurricular activities, church, sports and good relationships with my friends and family. What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? If I saw that someone needed help with schoolwork, I dedicated some of my time to them. If they didn’t understand a certain class, I would make sure they got help either from me or another student. I also volunteered with the National Honor Society

and an English mentoring program for seventh-grade students.

What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? If the church encouraged youth groups and emphasized that the future belongs to us, hopefully more young adults will be drawn to it.

Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. I spent much of my sophomore year in high school preparing for my confirmation in spring 2010. . . . Being confirmed that year gave me an even greater responsibility as a Catholic and made me a role model for younger members of the church.

If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? Pope John Paul II. His work during his pontificate made a big impact on the world. . . . He was a faithful and forgiving man who I look up to.

What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “The Little Prince” by Antoine de Saint-Exupery . . . proved to me that there is a child inside of every one of us . . . that represents innocence and awe.

Challenge Yourself CHANGE OUR WORLD www.stthomas.edu

What problem in the world most concerns you? How do you think it can be solved? I believe that as time progresses, people become less influenced by the importance of religion and are more drawn to questionable lifestyles. I hope that people can one day see the beauty of leading a moral life. What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? Pursue some kind of career that involves visiting different areas of the world and understanding various cultures. I also hope to stay connected with my Polish heritage that I have been raised with, as well as my Catholic faith.


Graduation

MAY 12, 2011 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

Erin Steiner

Michael Coleman

Holy Family Catholic High School, Victoria

Anoka High School, Anoka

Erin Steiner plans to attend Saint Louis University, St. Louis. She is the daughter of Mary and Owen Steiner and is a parishioner at St. Hubert Church in Chanhassen. What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? Everything that’s worthwhile requires hard work and dedication.

9B

Michael Coleman plans to attend the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul. He is the son of Pat and Nancy Coleman and is a parishioner at St. Stephen Church in Anoka. What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? I have learned that nothing meaningful comes without challenges.

Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. Being a captain for my sports teams.

Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. I am proud to have been voted captain for both the wrestling and football teams.

What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? Being a part of Campus Ministry class and leading retreats and school events.

What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? I have tried to set an example for others to follow.

Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. My mission trip to South Carolina for Catholic Heart Work Camp.

Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. My most significant faith experience was going on a NET retreat.

What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett taught me to never let anyone stop you from reaching your goals. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? Winston Churchill. He was a strong and inspirational leader in a difficult time. What problem in the world most concerns you? How do you think it can be solved? Homelessness is one of the biggest issues that we face. . . . We need more affordable housing for low-income families, along with health insurance that is accessible and realistically priced for people with limited financial means.

What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “My American Journey,” by Colin Powell, taught me about service and hard work. What is your favorite quote? Include the author. ”Leaders are made, they are not born. They are made by hard effort, which is the price which all of us must pay to achieve any goal that is worthwhile.” — Vince Lombardi If you could go back in time five years, what advice would you give yourself? I would tell myself to enjoy the ride. What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? I hope to make my family proud, serve others and be a good person.


10B

Graduation

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • MAY 12, 2011

St. FrancisSt. James United School

Now Registering FOR 2011 486 View St. St. Paul, MN 55102 www.sf-sj.org

651-228-1167

Call for further information and/or appointment to visit

Nicholas DeVetter St. Thomas Academy, Mendota Heights Nicholas DeVetter plans to attend St. John’s University in Collegeville. He is the son of Carol and Michael DeVetter and a parishioner at Annunciation in Minneapolis. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. The Cadet award is given to a wrestler that most exemplifies the values of St. Thomas Academy on and off the mat. I was extremely proud and humbled to have been voted by my teammates to receive this award all three years that I wrestled for St. Thomas Academy. What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? By helping to lead and being a good example for the students on the wrestling, soccer and lacrosse teams. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. In the winter of my freshman year my dad was diagnosed with leukemia. The experience that has followed has transformed and strengthened my faith in ways that I would never have imagined. This experience has brought my entire family closer together, and closer to God, and for that blessing we are all truly grateful. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “The Things they Carried” by Tim O’Brien . . . helped me become more aware of the great sacrifices that soldiers make . . . as well as the evil and foolishness of war. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? By allowing them to be more involved in initiatives to help others such as raising money for those in need. Also, by supporting youth groups that go out and make a positive impact on the community. What is your favorite quote? Include the author. “It’s not the size of the dog in the fight, it’s the size of the fight in the dog.” — Mark Twain.

Andrew Weiler Totino-Grace High School, Fridley Andrew Weiler plans to attend Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind. He is the son of Dan and Carol Weiler and is a parishioner at St. Charles Borromeo in St. Anthony. What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? When I was with a group of Totino-Grace students in Guatemala last summer, I learned the importance of taking time to simply be with others. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. I am especially proud of the work that the missions group of student ministry did this year with Common Hope, an agency promoting education in Guatemala. What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? My hope is that by leading chapel, serving at a school Mass, or participating in a service project, I encourage students in my school to live out their faith. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. In my “Philosophy of God” class during junior year, we looked at fundamental questions like the existence of God, and I grew in faith because I was better able to give reasons for beliefs that I had long just accepted as true. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? In “Crime and Punishment,” I was intrigued by Dostoevsky’s recurring reference to the biblical story of Lazarus during the main character’s own resurrection. . . . I learned that, through fiction, authors can illuminate truths about humanity. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? Provide role models who live out their faith in everything they do. The adults in our lives have a powerful impact.


Graduation

MAY 12, 2011 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

Congratulations to our 2011 8th grade graduates God’s Blessings and Good Luck!

St. Croix Catholic School Serving the St. Croix Valley for over 150 years

621 South 3rd St. Stillwater, MN 55082

651 439-5581 www.stcroixcatholic.com

11B

Paul Hillen Jr. Providence Academy, Plymouth Paul Hillen Jr. plans to attend Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Mass. He is the son of Karen and Paul Hillen and attends St. Anne in Hamel. What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? Hard work can bring you a long way. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. I am proud of the overall personal change from when I stepped in the doors in ninth grade to when I will graduate this June. What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? I believe I have been able to do the greatest good by being a house leader, mentoring younger students and planning activities that help students from various grades and interests get to know each other better. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. The Theology Classics course I am taking this year. This class . . . allowed me to understand my faith . . . accept the faith on an intellectual level and it has given me tools to defend Christianity and Catholicism in years to come. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? The Catholic Church has to stay relevant without compromising core dogma to get kids to “buy in” and stay engaged. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? Abraham Lincoln. I strive to be an autodidact just as he was and follow his impressive character. He led the charge to bring down, arguably, our country’s greatest evil and stood for what was right. What problem in the world most concerns you? How do you think it can be solved? The immorality of popular culture and the effect this has on young people. It’s tough when we, as young people, are constantly bombarded with these messages at a time in our life when we need moral formation. What is your favorite quote? Include the author. “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.” — Aristotle If you could go back in time five years, what advice would you give yourself? If I could go back to before freshman year, I would have studied more and worked much harder at sports. It does sound cliché, but now I appreciate the importance and benefit of hard work in every aspect of life, especially academics and athletics. However, I’m thankful I figured that out now and not 10 years down the road.


12B

Graduation

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • MAY 12, 2011

Macdaniel Malecha Bethlehem Academy, Faribault Macdaniel (Mac) Malecha plans to attend Minnesota State University, Mankato to study law enforcement. He is the son of Bruce and Gina Malecha and is a parishioner at Divine Mercy in Faribault. What is the greatest lesson you learned in high school? Don’t be afraid to stand out. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school. I was student council president for my junior and senior years. What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? I have always been open to talk with and advise underclassmen. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. I was invited to have dinner with Archbishop John Nienstedt and we spoke on topics regarding the seminary. What can the Catholic Church do to keep you and other young adults engaged in the life of the church? Youth groups and retreats. NET Ministries is a great thing to keep kids interested.

NOW YOU HAVE A CHOICE!

What problem in the world most concerns you? How do you think it can be solved? Abortion — the simple solution would be to make it illegal. What is your favorite quote? Include the author. “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.” — Theodore Roosevelt If you could go back in time five years, what advice would you give yourself? Everything I went through has made me the well-rounded man I am today. What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? Graduate college in the top 10 of my class; work as a law enforcement officer in my home community; and have a loving family.

Dan Green Hastings High School, Hastings

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Dan Green plans to attend St. John’s University in Collegeville. He is the son of James and Karla Green and is a parishioner at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton in Hastings. Name one thing you are proud of accomplishing in high school? Becoming the captain of my soccer team. What is the most meaningful way you have helped another student or students in your school? The most meaningful way I have helped a friend was by introducing him to the faith. Describe the most significant faith experience you have had during high school. Watching the same friend get baptized, confirmed and receive the Eucharist this Easter. It was one of the the most joyful moments of my life. What book did you read in high school that most changed the way you think and why? “The Screwtape Letters” by C.S. Lewis opened up the way that I think about living every day of my life. If you could have a conversation with a historical figure, who would it be and why? Pope John Paul II. He has been a model of what a true human being should be. What problem in the world most concerns you? How do you think it can be solved? The problem that concerns me most is the labels that society gives people. Cliques divide and take people away from their identities as children of God. What is your favorite quote? Include the author. “The future starts today, not tomorrow.” — Pope John Paul II What are the top three things that you hope to accomplish in your life? Travel to the Vatican, get married, and make one person’s life a little easier.

The Catholic Spirit - May 12, 2011  

Saluting the graduates. Coming soon: Stewardship tool kit. Secrets for a happy marriage. State bishops testify in support of marriage amendm...

The Catholic Spirit - May 12, 2011  

Saluting the graduates. Coming soon: Stewardship tool kit. Secrets for a happy marriage. State bishops testify in support of marriage amendm...