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Newspaper of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis

The Catholic Spirit October 18, 2010

TheCatholicSpirit.com

News with a Catholic heart

The archdiocesan strategic plan:

Blueprint for our local church’s future Inside: How will your parish, school be affected? 4A-9A, 12A-15A How will this impact pastors’ work? 7A What will the restructured archdiocese look like? 10A-11A How does this affect the role of the laity? 16A What’s the future of Latino ministry? 18A — Special Issue —

 New to you?

 Want the whole plan?

 There’s more inside

This special planning issue of The Catholic Spirit goes out to all Catholic households in the archdiocese.

A link to the entire archdiocesan Strategic Plan for Parishes and Schools is available at THECATHOLICSPIRIT.COM.

Turn to the B section for the regular issue of The Catholic Spirit, which includes an interview with author George Weigel on his new sequel biography of Pope John Paul II.


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Strategic Plan

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • OCTOBER 18, 2010

ARCHBISHOP’S LETTER

Fostering a communion of faith, hope and love The following letter, dated Oct. 17, 2010, is reprinted from the archdiocesan strategic plan. Dear Friends in Christ, After two years of consultation, and much prayer and reflection on the part of many, I am announcing our Strategic Plan for the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis. This plan is the culmination of a process launched in February 2009 when I named the Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Task Force. In formulating their recommendations to me, task force members have considered the input of thousands of people including ARCHBISHOP pastors, parish and Catholic school NIENSTEDT leaders and staff, parishioners and Catholic school families. I have made decisions regarding the future of our parishes and schools based upon the task force recommendations in consultation with the Presbyteral Council, the Archdiocesan Finance Council, and others. I recognize that some people directly impacted by the decisions will find them difficult to embrace. I am also hopeful that upon reflection everyone in the Archdiocese will see the long-range benefits that these changes will bring. I respectfully ask for your acceptance and understanding. The strategic decisions and initiatives outlined in this plan are necessary to ensure the health of our local Church, which is the Archdiocese, for us now and for generations to come. The main goal of the planning process is a revitalized and sustainable local Church,

Official Newspaper of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis © 2010 The Catholic Spirit Publishing Co. 244 Dayton Ave., St. Paul, MN 55102 (651) 291-4444; Fax (651) 291-4460

The main goal of the planning process is a revitalized and sustainable local Church, responsive to the needs of all of our brothers and sisters in Christ. ARCHBISHOP JOHN NIENSTEDT

responsive to the needs of all of our brothers and sisters in Christ. The changes are aimed at fostering a dynamic communion of faith, hope, and love in this local Church. This vision, which is as old as the first gathering of disciples with the Lord, informs the mission that guides us today: making the name of Jesus Christ known and loved by promoting and proclaiming the Gospel in word and deed through vibrant parish communities, quality Catholic education, and ready outreach to the poor and marginalized. You are likely familiar with at least some of the factors prompting the need for change. A disproportionate number of parish and school buildings are located in areas where the population is no longer growing. Demographic shifts and economic pressures have exacerbated these challenges. Another set of factors is the number of priests available for ministry and the challenges of providing sufficient ordained and lay pastoral leaders throughout the Archdiocese. While the merging and clustering of parishes will involve significant challenges, we must have faith that

great good can come about when we work together. As our patron St. Paul reminds us, we are called to be one body in Christ (1 Corinthians 12:12). The Church is not primarily about buildings; it is about people and relationships fostered in and through Christ. It is therefore hoped that the strategic decisions and initiatives of this plan will allow us to become more relationship focused, so that the mission of Jesus will be more effectively accomplished. I invite you to join me in working together to create even more vibrant communities in our parishes and Catholic schools. The Church is growing — and changing. Please take comfort in knowing, as the Second Vatican Council reminds us, “beneath all the changes there are many realities which do not change and which have their ultimate foundation in Christ, who is the same yesterday and today, yes and forever” (“Gaudium et spes,” 10). Together, we can look to the future and do what the Church has done for two millennia: adapt to changes that best serve the faithful while remaining true to our Catholic faith. Let us work together to comfort the afflicted, welcome the stranger, educate our children, and greet the challenges and even greater opportunities before us with faith in our Savior, Jesus Christ. Please join me in praying for the future of our Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis. May God bless you! With every good wish, I remain, Cordially yours in Christ,

The Most Reverend John C. Nienstedt Archbishop of Saint Paul and Minneapolis

The Catholic Spirit

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Strategic Planning

OCTOBER 18, 2010 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

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OVERVIEW

In this issue This issue of The Catholic Spirit features coverage of the archdiocesan strategic plan announced in parishes the weekend of Oct. 16-17. The planning section includes interviews with

Archbishop John Nienstedt and planning task force members, and it features maps of the parish status changes. We have also reprinted parts of the long version of the plan to provide context. (A link to the entire long version of the plan can be found at THECATHOLICSPIRIT.COM and PLANNING.ARCHSPM.ORG.)

Watch upcoming issues of The Catholic Spirit (our next one is Nov. 4) and our website for reaction to the plan and subsequent coverage of how it is unfolding throughout the archdiocese. You can also find past stories about the planning process in a special section on our website. — The Catholic Spirit

Benefits of plan will be apparent over time, archbishop says By Joe Towalski The Catholic Spirit

The archdiocese’s strategic plan for parishes and schools has now been announced, but the work of implementing its initiatives is just beginning and it will take time to reap the plan’s benefits, according to Archbishop John Nienstedt. “We’re asking pastors and their staffs to work with our chancery staff to address the recommendations and how they will be implemented over a period of time,” he said in a recent interview with The Catholic Spirit. “The real benefit I see is not that we’re going to implement these [initiatives] within six months or even in a year or maybe two,” he said. “But it gives us a road map as to how we are going to be moving toward the future.” No changes to parishes are slated to begin before January, according to the plan. Changes in schools will not begin before June. All decisions regarding the future of individual Catholic schools will be made by the pastor, principal and other local leaders and recommended to the archbishop. Although some parishes will be merged into others and other parishes will move into new clustering relationships, the plan calls for more collaboration among all parishes. Once that happens, Archbishop Nienstedt said, “I think it will allow us to be a better church, to put our resources behind what they need to be behind” — including liturgical worship, religious education and outreach to the poor. “I saw that in New Ulm when I was there,” said the archbishop, who headed the rural Minnesota diocese from 2001 to 2007. “It took three years there for us to put a plan for our parishes and schools together, and I was there for another three years. I began to see there was greater harmony among what we call the ‘area faith communities’ — people working together in a more systematic way.”

The real benefit I see is not that we’re going to implement these [initiatives] within six months or even in a year or maybe two. But it gives us a road map as to how we are going to be moving toward the future. Archbishop John Nienstedt

The plan, in addition to initiating structural changes in various parishes, also outlines a number of other strategic initiatives, including ongoing formation for priests, deacons and lay pastoral leaders; strengthening the commitment to Catholic education, faith formation, youth ministry, and evangelization and outreach; and instituting best practices in the areas of finance and administration. The plan also creates a regional vicariate structure. Regional vicars appointed by the archbishop will exercise various canonical and administrative responsibilities and make regular parish visits. Archbishop Nienstedt said he had a similar vicariate structure in place when he headed the New Ulm diocese. “I think better communication, with the priests in particular, is one of the big things I see as a value in the vicariate system,” he said.

How did we get here? Archbishop Nienstedt initiated the planning process in February 2009 with the appointment of a 16-member Strategic Planning Task Force in response to a variety of challenges facing the archdiocese.

Those challenges include economic and demographic factors: ■ While the number of Catholics in the archdiocese is growing, fueled largely by immigration, the archdiocese projects there will be 19 fewer priests eligible to be pastors, 10 years from now. ■ Many parishes and schools are not located in areas where population growth is the strongest — in “exurban” areas located between suburban and rural areas. ■ In parishes across the archdiocese, 32 percent of weekend Masses are less than one-third full and Catholic schools, as a whole, have 20 percent more seats than they have students. A significant number of parishes and schools face serious financial challenges. More than 25 percent of parishes, for example, are being monitored by the archdiocese due to serious debt and budget issues.

Consultative process The strategic planning process has sought to address these challenges with a consultative approach. In the spring of 2009, priests began meeting in their deaneries to draft proposals for the task force outlining potential changes. Dozens of meetings were held around the diocese for input into the plan. And input was also collected via letters sent to the archdiocese, a voice-mail hotline and a website comment form available in various languages. While Archbishop Nienstedt let the task force do its work, he was very engaged in the process, said Father Peter Laird, task force co-chair and vicar general of the archdiocese. The archbishop also consulted with others, including priests and the presbyteral and finance councils. PLEASE TURN TO ARCHBISHOP ON PAGE 20A

Task force made information gathering a priority, co-chairs say Catholic Spirit editor Joe Towalski recently interviewed Father Peter Laird and Father John Bauer, co-chairs of the archdiocesan Strategic Planning Task Force, appointed by Archbishop John Nienstedt in February 2009. Last July, the 16-member task force made its planning recommendations to the archbishop. The condensed and edited interview appears below; you can read the entire interview at THECATHOLICSPIRIT.COM. The archbishop had guiding principles for the planning process. Did you have guiding principles as well as you led the task force in its work? Father Bauer: We tried to get as much information as we could. If task force members wanted something, we tried to give them information so they could make decisions with clarity and with all the background information and materials they would find helpful. Father Laird: The principles that the archbishop gave us made it clear that we weren’t doing a corporate reorganization. We were doing a reorganization of a community of faith. . . . I think one of the things that became clear was because it is a family that’s being in a certain sense

cese. It’s just that, moving forward, we may need to do that in a new way. And that was the hardest [challenge], I think. Father Bauer: And knowing that’s going to affect our brother priests is another piece of that. We have small enough numbers that we know everyone, and we know the ones that are going to be impacted by it.

It would have been very easy to make recommendations based on real cut-and-dried kind of things, but we really tried to listen to what the needs were. FATHER BAUER

FATHER JOHN BAUER

reorganized, that every member of the family would be affected. So, I think the task force, at least implicitly, very much believed that this [strategic plan] is for the whole archdiocese — it’s not for the rural areas, it’s not for the urban areas; it’s for the whole archdiocese. What was the biggest challenge of all this? Father Laird: These are emotional issues. I don’t mean merely emotional

FATHER LAIRD

issues — our faith is always connected to our values and our beliefs, and we are an incarnational church after all. We were aware that we were dealing with decisions that will affect people’s lives. The prospect of a merger or the prospect of a cluster, that’s going to change the pattern of people’s lives, and change is never easy. We wanted to respect the fact that people had been fed and nourished in various ways in the history of the archdio-

What is the biggest thing you learned from going through this process, either about the archdiocese or the church in general? Father Bauer: I learned how much people care about their parishes, about their faith. It was reflective on all different levels, including the work of the task force. We were going to have an upcoming deanery presentation, and one of our members who wasn’t familiar with that part of the archdiocese actually went out and toured it so she would have a better awareness. People really cared about what they did and took it very seriously. Father Laird: I think part of that learning process for me personally was that a PLEASE TURN TO VIBRANT ON PAGE 20A


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THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • OCTOBER 18, 2010

Strategic Planning

PLAN SUMMARY

Comprehensive plan rooted in church’s mission church and school buildings were built in earlier eras when population patterns and other demographic factors were considerably different than they are now. During the European immigration booms in the late or more than 160 years, the faithful, priests, and religious of what is now the Archdiocese of Saint Paul 19th and early 20th century, the various immigrant and Minneapolis have endeavored to make the groups settling in the core cities of Saint Paul and name of Jesus Christ known and loved. Ever since Father Minneapolis needed parishes where their native lanLucien Galtier established the area’s first Catholic guage was spoken and their national customs were church near the Mississippi River, generations of observed. Large, ethnic church buildings were built as a Catholics have sought to meet the needs of their age, point of pride, sometimes within a few blocks of anothpromoting and proclaiming a Gospel message that is at er Catholic church building which was home to another ethnic parish community. once ever ancient and ever new. This model no longer serves the current reality. The The Roman Catholic Church in these 12 counties of east central Minnesota, formed by Sacred Scripture and dramatic demographic shifts of the past half century: Tradition, has tried through worship and service to the movement out of core cities to the suburbs; the make present here the one, holy, Catholic and apostolic decrease in household size; and the aging population Church of Jesus Christ. Now, like those who have gone have resulted in a fundamental need for change. Catholic schools have also unbefore us in faith, the local dergone dramatic change in the Church which is the Archdiocese past half century due to these of Saint Paul and Minneapolis Although the mission same factors. When many of the must order the household of faith current Catholic schools were anew. of the Church and the built, families were able to send The Strategic Plan for the their children to Catholic schools Archdiocese of Saint Paul and message of the at relatively nominal cost thanks, Minneapolis was developed with in large part, to the great gift of the objective of making our local Gospel are timeless, religious communities providing Church more agile and able to fulfill its mission. It establishes a the ways we live out the sisters and brothers to administer and teach in those schools. framework for archdiocesan-wide mission of the Church The decline in religious vocastrategic initiatives and calls for tions and the increase in gifted changes to parish and Catholic school operation and infrastruc- evolve in response to the lay school staff, as well as the need to pay competitive wages, ture. signs of the times. have changed the dynamic of As such, this Strategic Plan is Catholic education in this counthe most comprehensive plan initry over the past 50 years. The tiated in the history of the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis. The changes need for more specialization, more technology in the called for under the plan will be made as a part of a coor- classroom, greater accountability regarding educational dinated strategy taking into account all aspects of parish quality, and the dramatic shift in demographics have and school life with an emphasis on continual evalua- changed fundamentally the landscape for all schools: public, private, and parochial. The challenge facing tion and improvement. Because we are all members of one local Church, these Catholic schools is to make them affordable to all famichanges are important for all of the 800,000 Catholics lies who wish to send their children to Catholic school. In summary, the current infrastructure grew to serve a who live within the Archdiocese. The changes are, in fact, important to everyone in our community: whether different population. As a result, a disproportionate one participates in weekly Mass at a parish or attends number of parish and school buildings are located in one of the Catholic universities located within the areas where the population is no longer able to sustain Archdiocese; whether one is served by a Catholic more than one parish or one school. In fact, in parishes Charities program or is cared for in a Catholic hospital; across the Archdiocese, 32 percent of weekend Masses whether one is young or old, Catholic or not, this are less than one-third full and Catholic schools have, Strategic Plan is structured to serve all our brothers and on the whole, 20 percent more seats than they have students. sisters in response to the call of the Lord Jesus. Now we are faced with a challenge: maintain too Changes outlined in the Strategic Plan will be implemented over a period of years. No changes to parish many aging buildings at often great expense or refocus structures are slated to begin before January 2011. No those resources on creating revitalized communities changes to schools will begin before June 2011, responsive to the mission of the Church today and as we although some schools will be asked to review their sus- move into the future. While part of the answer is greater outreach and evangelization, there is also the need for tainability. The structural changes outlined in the plan were intentional decisions which will foster sustainability made following careful analysis of changing population and growth. Another factor is the number of priests available for patterns, outreach potential, changes in the number of clergy and religious as well as the growth in ecclesial lay ministry. Despite a significant number of seminarians in ministry, location and condition of buildings, and formation for the Archdiocese, it is projected that we will have 19 fewer priests eligible to be pastor in 2020 financial stress on parishes and schools. Beyond good stewardship of limited resources, the than are eligible now. Even with a growth in priestly primary goal of the Strategic Plan is fulfilling the mis- vocations the need exists to foster a more vibrant local sion of the Church in the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Church which brings to full recognition the gifts of the Minneapolis: making the name of Jesus Christ known lay faithful. An additional dynamic is the arrival during recent and loved by promoting and proclaiming the Gospel in word and deed through vibrant parish communities, decades of immigrants from different countries of origin quality Catholic education, and ready outreach to the than those of previous eras. The immigrants of today continue to be an important factor of growth for this poor and marginalized. local Church. It is therefore necessary to ensure that these brothers and sisters receive the same benefit that  Context for the archdiocesan strategic plan. Although the mission of the Church and the message immigrants of old had to the sacraments, to pastoral of the Gospel are timeless, the ways we live out the mis- care, and to educational opportunities, in the language sion of the Church evolve in response to the signs of the and cultural custom with which they are familiar. times. For more than 2,000 years the Church has done Welcoming our brothers and sisters arriving in the Archdiocese today is an essential sign of the universalijust this while remaining true to her core teachings. Right now, a disproportionate number of church and ty of the Church and an acknowledgement of the gifts school buildings are in areas where population growth PLEASE TURN TO CHANGES ON PAGE 5A has slowed or changed dramatically. Many of the The following information is reprinted from the archdiocesan strategic plan.

F

The archdiocese is growing  The number of households of registered parishioners is approximately 215,000. The number of households is expected to grow by about 7.5 percent in five years, so that by 2014, the number of households will be approximately 248,000.  The growing diversity of the Catholic population is creating an increasing number of parishioners who do not register at a parish, but who attend Mass in their parish of choice.  Growth is being fueled almost exclusively by immigration. Immigrant Catholics are now spread throughout all parishes. They are not just concentrated in the core cities.  Growth is unevenly distributed across the archdiocese, with concentrations of growth in the exurban areas (between suburban and rural areas).  Current weekend Mass attendance is reported to be 34 percent of registered Catholics. This archdiocese is aligned with the national estimate.

Socio-economic, ethnic diversity growing, changing  The socio-economic distribution of parishes at each end of the scale is growing, while the middle is declining.  From 2005 to 2015 the fastest growing age group within the Twin Cities is 55 to 69 years of age.  Mass is regularly celebrated in Spanish, Korean, Vietnamese, Filipino, French and Hmong.  23 parishes are currently identified as centers of Latino ministry in the archdiocese.

Parishes, schools living beyond means  In fiscal year 2006 cash to debt ration was 0.7, meaning that for every dollar of debt, there was 70 cents of cash.  In fiscal year 2009, the archdiocese was monitoring 55 parishes because of debt and operational budget issues. In 2003, there were 33 parishes being monitored.

Catholic education a challenge to grow  The number of children reported in parish faith formation programs has declined from 52,452 in 2004-2005 to 47,523 in 2008-2009.  The number of children in no Catholic faith formation is increasing.  Catholic elementary school enrollment in the past five years has declined 11.4 percent from 28,704 to 25,418.  Catholic high school enrollment has increased 5.4 percent in the past five years from 7,420 to 7,820.  Tuition has increased 36 percent since 20032004.


Strategic Planning

OCTOBER 18, 2010 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

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PLAN SUMMARY

Highlights of changes ■ Strategic initiatives which will encourage cooperation, improve stewardship of resources, and increase transparency in the areas of: qualified pastoral leadership; Catholic schools; and finance and administration to improve ministry, evangelization, and outreach in the Archdiocese. ■ 21 parishes will merge with 14 receiving parishes during the next several years, bringing the Archdiocese from 213 parishes in October 2010 to 192 following the implementation of the announced decisions. Masses will continue to be celebrated at the church building of the merging parish until a decision which contradicts such use is made by the parish pastoral and finance councils of the receiving parish community, in consultation with the Archbishop and the Presbyteral Council. ■ 33 parishes will enter into new cluster arrangements with one pastor leading two or more parishes, following implementation of the announced decisions. ■ 25 parishes are identified for structured collaboration with neighboring parishes; many of these sites may eventually move toward a cluster; all parishes and schools are called into greater collaboration. ■ Certain schools are under urgent review to determine sustainability; it is likely that local leadership at these schools will decide that some of these schools should close at the end of the 2010-2011 school year.

Seven guiding principles of the strategic plan

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Full sacramental ministry. Changes are aimed at providing a stronger sacramental presence for all Catholics, while fostering the ministry of priests, deacons, and, where appropriate, lay ecclesial ministers. Competent pastoral leadership. Coordinated and ongoing formation and training for clergy and lay leaders, as well as established best practices in administration will help ensure inspired ministry. Emphasis will be placed on collaboration of the ordained and laity in leadership and service in the Church.

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Special concern for the needs of the poor, marginalized, and immigrant. Throughout our history the poor, marginalized, and immigrant have been acknowledged as a gift to the Church. The Strategic Plan calls for all parishes within the Archdiocese to help support certain parishes and schools in locations most critical to advancing this mission yet are not likely to be financially sustainable for the foreseeable future because of the economic circumstances of those they serve.

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Catholic school support and inclusion in the planning process. Under the Strategic Plan, all Catholic school communities are expected to review sustainability based upon the established criteria for long term viability with the goal of making a high quality Catholic education available to every family who seeks it.

5

Every parish is involved in the discussion. Greater collaboration is required of us all under the Strategic Plan. The establishment of regional administrative centers and regional school discussions, as well as other structures for inter-parish and inter-school communication and cooperation will provide the framework for this increased collaboration.

6

Every parish is expected to evaluate their own resources and adjust accordingly. The Strategic Plan provides a structure for ongoing evaluation of resources, the establishment of sustainable financial models, as well as more transparent communication regarding resources. While the truths of our faith remain constant, we must be willing to adapt our physical structure and policies to address the signs of the times.

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Respect, patience and honesty in all discussions to build on strengths. The spirit of consultation and communication which has been a key feature of the planning process will continue during the coming months and years. The Archdiocese will continue to welcome comments from pastors, parish and Catholic school leaders and staff, parishioners, Catholic school families, and others.

Changes affect all parishes, schools CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4A

giving of ourselves to God and neighbor. As the faithful of the local Church of the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis, we are called to offer these gifts to one another so that the name of Jesus Christ might be known and loved anew.

immigrants bring to this local Church. Finally, the Archdiocese must bring itself into the 21st century in the area of administrative practices. While most parts of the business world have been For all lay faithful who are invited to share their gifts reporting electronically for decades, much of the in service of the Church, this Strategic Plan is foundreporting done by parishes is still on paper. This anti- ed upon the truth that it is the baptismal vocation quated system of data-tracking prevents us from which is fundamental in the Church. This insight, accessing real time data. It also creates more work at reclaimed for the Church by the Second Vatican both the parish and archdiocesan level. For example, Council, calls men and women of faith to holiness of right now some information for required reports is life and to a shared responsibility. Although lay men gathered and data-entered at the parish level only to and women have a principal be mailed to the Archdiocese and responsibility to ensure that our then data-entered again at the economic and public life is The Archdiocese archdiocesan level. This plan informed by Gospel values, the pushes us all forward, requiring of Saint Paul and Church is in need of their gifts of electronic reporting of parish faith and professional excellence. annual reports beginning in the Minneapolis Strategic initiatives under the autumn of 2011. plan call on parishes to encourThe Archdiocese of Saint Paul is not unique in the age lay leaders with gifts in and Minneapolis is not unique in administration to help address the challenges facing it. Many challenges facing it. the operational needs of a parish, other dioceses across the United so that pastors may focus on States, as well as public instituMany other preaching, teaching, and sanctitions locally and nationally, have fying. Other lay faithful may be dioceses . . . gone through reorganization in invited to offer their gifts of minthe past several decades. Even istry for the Church, as many have gone through during the past quarter century men and women already do. In in this Archdiocese, for example, reorganization in the recognition of the great importhere have been changes to tance of laity in the Church, parish and school structures. parishes are being asked to estabpast several decades. Currently, there are 213 parishes lish appropriate qualifications for within the Archdiocese, seven positions, adhere to best pracless than 25 years ago and there are 98 schools within tices, and provide opportunities for ongoing formathe Archdiocese, 24 less than in 1985. Clustered tion and training for lay staff and volunteers. parishes are also an existing reality. Currently, 25 perFor those who serve the local Church as priests, this cent of parishes within the Archdiocese are in a cluster relationship with one pastor serving two or more Strategic Plan re-emphasizes what is central to their call: to imitate the mystery of the Eucharist which parishes. Nationally, the percentage of clustered parishes is they celebrate with and for the faithful. Increasingly higher. Just as our parents and grandparents sacrificed priests have been asked to take on administrative tasks for the future of the faith, the sacrifices asked today of to a point that can frustrate their pastoral responsibilour local Church are meant to ensure that our faith is ities. The Strategic Plan outlines changes aimed at as vital for our children and our grandchildren as it helping priests focus on their essential ministry. For has been for us. United, we can move forward with those who serve as permanent deacons, the plan foschanges that are based in a shared understanding of ters a more structured and focused approach to their the realities we face, as well as rooted in the mission ministry. In order to ensure inspired ministry by all given to us by Christ to spread his Gospel of love and clergy, a more formalized structure of ongoing formation is being initiated under the Strategic Plan. More life. The changes outlined in the Strategic Plan are need- equitably assigning clergy, including retired priests, ed for us to strengthen our local Church in this new those in academia, and those assigned as chaplains, millennium. As brothers and sisters in Christ, we are will improve access to full sacramental ministry for all called into communio, communion as Church, so everyone, including the growing senior population as to be sent forth in missio, mission into the world. and those who speak a language other than English. We are called into a communion of faith, hope, and For those who sacrifice for Catholic Education, love as one body in Christ, a body for the glorified whether parent or student, teacher or administrator, Christ to continue his saving mission in the world. pastor or benefactor, this Strategic Plan is the beginning of a more coordinated vision for Catholic educa The local church: A vision to guide us into the tion in the Archdiocese. We are blessed with an abunfuture. dance of schools with very dedicated supporters. We The core truths of our Catholic faith and the essenalso face challenges which have emerged over the past tial mission of the Church do not change. The seven decades and have yet to be addressed systematically. guiding principles of the planning process as enviThis Strategic Plan begins an effort to answer the funsioned by the Archbishop ensure that the strategic damental questions which must be answered: how decisions and initiatives outlined in the plan are will we sustain Catholic education for generations to aligned with that mission. However, the ways in come?; how will Catholic education remain true to its which we fulfill the mission of the Church do evolve core values while realizing quality academic outover time. The Strategic Plan provides a roadmap to comes?; how are students’ lives enhanced by a realize the vision of this local Church in the coming Catholic education? years and decades. Under the Strategic Plan, Catholic Schools are The faithful in the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis are called to be a vibrant communion of called to meet consistent standards of excellence and faith, hope, and love. Faith illuminates our reasoning financial transparency. This means that when parents by helping us appreciate that the love of God revealed choose a Catholic school they will know that their in Christ Jesus is the highest value which orients our school meets defined standards in the areas of lives and informs our decisions. By Hope we entrust Catholic identity, academic quality, financial manageourselves to the promise of eternal life, sure that if we ment, and community outreach. Schools will underlive in faith, God will provide a way in each and every go regular review of these viability factors to ensure circumstance of life. In Love we live our faith and that they are sustainable going forward. hope through the power of the Holy Spirit, testifying to the union which God both initiates and perfects by PLEASE TURN TO PLAN ON PAGE 17A


6A

Strategic Planning

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • OCTOBER 18, 2010

PARISHES

Strategic decisions will affect parishes The following information is reprinted from the archdiocesan strategic plan. arishes are a primary means of developing a communion of faith, hope, and love among the faithful in our local Church. While all of the faithful of the Archdiocese are entrusted to the pastoral care of the Archbishop, it is impossible for him personally to preside at the Eucharistic liturgy always and everywhere. Thus, the Archbishop has the responsibility to establish and maintain stable faith communities, and to entrust each community with a pastor, who is to provide the pastoral care for that community. The most common form of faith community is the parish, although faith communities may also be designated as chaplaincies or other nonparish communities. Parishes are generally territorial, which means that the parish includes all the faithful living within a certain territory. However, parishes may also be established for persons of a certain nationality, who speak a certain language, or who worship according to a certain rite. The parish community may worship at one or more sites, either a parish church or an oratory. In short, a parish is a community of people, while a church is a building, when the word is used as it is here to describe a structure. It is important to understand that the people and parishes of this Archdiocese are the local Church. Nearly 9,000

P

infants were baptized in parishes throughout the Archdiocese and more than 1,500 adults joined the Catholic Church through the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults last year. During the 2009-2010 school year, nearly 47,000 children and youth were involved in parish faith formation programs and more than 34,000 children were enrolled at Catholic schools here in the Archdiocese. An untold number of adults of all ages engaged in opportunities to deepen their faith through parish programs. Understanding our communion as the local Church helps us be aware of the needs of our brothers and sisters throughout the Archdiocese. It also helps us to appreciate that while we must be one in faith and practice, there is an appropriate diversity among parishes in size and style of worship. The Strategic Plan reinforces our communion by calling all of us into greater collaboration, even as it respects appropriate diversity. â– Summary criteria for long-term viability of parishes within the archdiocese. As part of the strategic planning process, all parishes were reviewed in relation to a standard set of criteria for long-term parish viability: communion; mission; administration; and relationship with the local Church. The Strategic Plan calls all parishes to undergo regular and ongoing evaluation based upon

these criteria going forward. Identification of the criteria for long-term parish viability helps us in discerning how to utilize best our collective gifts in living out the mission of the Church at both the parish and archdiocesan level. Communion: A viable parish celebrates reverent and engaging liturgy, meets the sacramental needs of the faithful, offers faith formation opportunities for all ages, provides compassionate pastoral care, and utilizes the time, talents and treasure of all its members in support of parish life and the local Church. Mission: A viable parish makes the name of Jesus Christ known and loved by all through acts of charity, social justice, and outreach. Likewise, a viable parish is committed not only to the needs of

active parishioners, but also to those who have left or drifted away from the Church, and those who do not have a relationship with Christ. Administration: A viable parish is a good steward of the gifts God provides, as well as the contributions of parishioners. This good stewardship entails living within the means of the parish, adherence to sound administrative and finance practices, competent leaders and staff, and a vision for the future. Relationship to the local church: A viable parish intentionally collaborates with other parishes to create a cohesive fabric of ministry in the Archdiocese in order to more effectively live out the mission of the local Church. â– Types of changes in parishes under the strategic plan. Under the Strategic Plan, there are several types of changes in parishes: mergers, clusters, structured collaboration, and designation as an oratory. (See page 12A for definitions.) Parish mergers and clusters will take place over a period of years and no implementation of structural change is scheduled to begin before January 2011. Certain parishes are identified as requiring close monitoring for debt and other financial sustainability issues. All parishes are expected to communicate and coordinate with one another to improve ministry and increase efficiency.

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Strategic Planning

OCTOBER 18, 2010 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

7A

CLERGY

Sharing gifts among ordained, laity and parishes provides many benefits By Pat Norby The Catholic Spirit

The archdiocesan strategic plan presents two challenges for priests, deacons and parishioners, said Father Kevin Finnegan, who is already meeting those challenges as pastor of Divine Mercy in Faribault, St. Patrick in Shieldsville and St. Michael in Kenyon. “One of the challenges will be for us to cooperate,” he said. “The other challenge is to share our gifts, not only my gifts, but the parishes’ gifts.” Because Divine Mercy has more people and resources, it provides preparation for programs like first Communion and reconciliation. St. Patrick and St. Michael share their pastoral ministry and sense of community, he said. “One thing [the strategic plan] will do is help me, and all of us, to have a longterm perspective,” he said. In the past, St. Patrick and St. Michael have been partnered with other parishes that changed every six to 10 years, he said. “I’m hoping that, being based on priests and gifting . . . we can see for the next 20 years we’re going to be linked with this parish and we’ll share a pastor with this parish.” That will allow for better relationships among the people and more stability in the parishes, he said.

Communication is key Father Finnegan said the collaboration helps everyone learn to communicate with each other. He also sees the benefits and challenges of the proposed requirements with the new Institute for Ongoing Clergy Formation (see accompanying article), whereby all ordained clergy will be expected to have 16 hours of ongoing formation yearly. Father Finnegan recognizes the importance of staying abreast of changes in ministry, just as teachers, doctors and

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Fathers Patrick Hipwell, left, and John Bauer celebrate Mass at Nativity of Our Lord in St. Paul.

lawyers need to be current in their professions. But, he also is well aware of the challenges. “This week, we have four funerals. Even if I wanted extra time to study this week, it’s not going to happen,” he said. “Despite the challenge, we have to do that.” He does look forward to participating in ongoing formation and hopes that it includes education on issues such as immigration, spirituality, theoretical views on priesthood, Catholic schools and young adult ministry.

Ongoing education needed Father William Kenney, 80, said ongoing formation was expected when he was first ordained and throughout his active ministry. The former director of the archdiocesan priests’ personnel board, Father Kenney said when he was ordained, newly ordained priests and new pastors would meet with a senior pastor to help them deal with budgeting, personnel issues and other issues facing clergy. Priests were expected to attend various continuing education programs and also strongly encouraged to take a three-month sabbatical every seven years to travel, study and renew their spiritual and ministerial

lives. “After you’re ordained, you become aware of areas of ministry where you are lacking or you would like more information or support. You don’t know that until you get into the work,” he said. “Every other profession has ongoing education . . . clergy also have a need to do that.” The average priest is going to be a priest for 30 or 40 years, and many things will change drastically over those years, he said. “I think the more you can delineate what it is, the more you can spell out what you want them to do, I think, the more apt they are to do it,” he said. He said the archdiocese should provide programs, whether academic or pastoral, for young clergy or make them aware of what programs are effective and available across the country.

One vision guides vocations Deacon Russ Shupe, clergy placement and diaconate director, sees many advantages to having the new Center for Clergy Formation, Office of Vocations, Institute for Ongoing Clergy Formation, Institute for Diaconal Formation and the Harry J. Flynn Institute for Catechetical Institute all housed at the St. Paul Seminary School of Divinity. “The catechetical institute will help the men to have a solid groundwork of Catholic teaching,” he said. The initiative will provide a solid education for deacons, with many of the instructors that teach the seminarians. He also sees the value of developing good relationships between the future deacons and priests, through combined class and prayer opportunities. “That allows both groups to see each other as co-partners in the ministry in the archdiocese,” he said. “I think it’s important to have that camaraderie with future priests and future deacons.”

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The following excerpts are taken from the archdiocesan strategic plan. The Center for Clergy Formation will be housed at the St. Paul Seminary and will bring together the Office of Vocations, the Institute for Ongoing Clergy Formation, and the Institute for Diaconal Formation. ■ Office of Vocations — The Office of Vocations will remain unchanged. . . . ■ Institute for Ongoing Clergy Formation — A part-time director will guide the work of the Institute for Ongoing Clergy Formation. This work will involve an integrated approach to both priestly and diaconal ongoing formation. While collaboration with the Director of the Institute for Diaconal Formation will be necessary for deacons, the director will coordinate ongoing formation opportunities for the three unique groups within the presbyterate: newly ordained (ordained one to four years), new pastors (ordained five to seven years), and experienced priests. ■ Institute for Diaconal Formation — A full-time director will guide the work of the recently revised diaconal formation program. In collaboration with the St. Paul Seminary and under the direction of its Rector, the director will be responsible for the integration of the revised diaconal program. . . . Father Finnegan said his hope is that the plan helps people realize the archdiocese is everyone’s responsibility.

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8A

Strategic Planning

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • OCTOBER 18, 2010

SCHOOLS

Strategic plan identifies four marks of viable Catholic schools The following information is reprinted from the archdiocesan strategic plan. Viable Catholic schools are an essential element for fulfilling the mission of the Church in this Archdiocese. Catholic schools assist parents, as primary educators, in handing on the faith to the next generation. Currently, more than 34,000 students attend Catholic schools throughout the Archdiocese. Identification of the criteria of long-term viability in the areas of Catholic identity, academic programming, financial management, and community outreach help us in discerning how to best live out the mission of the Church in Catholic schools within the Archdiocese. In some circumstances at certain schools, where the Archdiocese has a direct financial investment, higher standards of accountability and transparency may apply. Ongoing reporting concerning school viability along with site visits conducted by the Office of Catholic Schools maintains accountability standards set forth in the Strategic Plan. A schedule for submitting documentation, as well as for school viability visits, will be communicated annually to all schools in the Archdiocese. Under the Strategic Plan, all schools are called into greater collaboration. The Archdiocese and its schools have retained a national consultancy group whose final report is due in November 2010. While the Strategic Planning Task Force gathered an enormous amount of data and offered insightful direction, it was necessary to receive the assistance of a consultant to bring the knowledge of our local situation distilled by the task force into conversation with best practices across the country. Pastors and principals have been informed of this initiative and a representative steering committee is working with the consultants to

From left, secondgraders Devin Preuhs, Karragen Straub and MaKenna Reinhardt of St. Anne’s Catholic School in Le Sueur pray along with other students from their school at the archdiocesan Children’s Rosary Pilgrimage Oct. 7 at the Cathedral of St. Paul. Dave Hrbacek / The Catholic Spirit

meet their November deadline.

Criteria for school’s long-term viability  Catholic identity. A viable Catholic school has as its foundation a solid Catholic identity. The Catholic school operates in conformance with the laws, teaching, and doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church. It is committed to teaching the fullness of the Catholic faith, values, and practices and to integrating these core values into all academic subject areas. This integration of Catholic faith and values with life distinguishes the Catholic school from

other schools.  Academic quality. A viable Catholic school has a quality, comprehensive program as affirmed by an approved accrediting agency, utilizes technology to develop 21st century skills, and provides for ongoing professional development and formation for staff.  Financial management. A viable Catholic school has a long-range financial plan, has a balanced annual budget, monitors its finances, and reports annually to stakeholders. A viable Catholic School reviews its budget at the end of September and makes adjustments to reflect actual enrollment numbers.  Community outreach. A viable

Catholic school has effective development and marketing efforts to defray the costs of a quality, Catholic education and to attract new students.

Summary of change process in schools Local leaders, with direction and assistance from the Archdiocese, will make decisions regarding the viability of individual Catholic schools. Some schools will be part of structured discussion to determine solutions for problems of Catholic school sustainability and access in particular geographic areas. Final deciPLEASE TURN TO SCHOOLS ON PAGE 17A

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Strategic Planning

OCTOBER 18, 2010 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

9A

SCHOOLS

Plan sets parameters for schools’ own strategic process By Maria Wiering

What makes schools viable?

The Catholic Spirit

Catholic schools in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis are at the beginning of their own strategic planning process. Although schools were a significant part of the archdiocesan planning process, the task force determined that community members needed more information and opportunities for input before the future of schools was determined. The plan addresses Catholic school sustainability, but it does not call for specific schools to merge, cluster or close, said task force member Jim Lundholm-Eades. Catholic high schools were not included in the planning process.

Facing current needs In response to different schools’ current realities, the task force grouped many schools into three categories, based on data provided and ideas and concerns Catholics shared with task force members throughout the process. The categories are “urgent review schools,” “sustainability review schools,” and “shared resource discussion schools.” “These are schools where change in the near future may be needed,” said Brother Milton Barker, a task force member and president of Totino-Grace High School in Fridley. The categories were determined by the results of selfstudies of vitality conducted by the schools, he said. As the plan outlines, urgent review schools are in need of immediate review of finances and sustainability. They are asked to immediately undergo the Catholic Elementary School Review Process for School Sustainability, which the archdiocesan Catholic Schools Office created at the beginning of the strategic plan. This process is designed to help these schools develop a sustainability plan that meets the task force’s criteria for viable Catholic schools in several categories: Catholic identity; academic quality; financial management; and community outreach, or effective marketing. These criteria are based on criteria for school viability as established by the National Catholic Educational Association. Some schools have already gone through this process in consultation with the Catholic Schools Office. Urgent review schools must complete their process in December. An “urgent review” doesn’t mean that a particular school will close. Yet, if a school determines closure is the appropriate outcome, the urgent review timeline ensures that parents, teachers and staff members are notified in time to find a new school or new employment. Sustainability review schools will be asked to undergo the sustainability review in the next three years. Other schools will be asked to enter into sharedresource discussions with other schools and parishes in GLYNN

The Catholic Spirit

Dave Hrbacek / The Catholic Spirit

From left, kindergartner Tatiana Trembath, eighth-grader Samantha Letscher and kindergartner Elliot Wiederholt walk down the hallway of Our Lady of Grace School in Edina in this file photo from September 2009.

their region. These discussions could yield greater sharing of resources or the creation of a regional school. “The archdiocese would hope that decisions about local schools would be made by local communities,” Brother Milton said.

Communication emphasis Principals, pastors and parish trustees will be notified of their situation via letter on Monday, Oct. 18. Principals and pastors will have an opportunity to attend a meeting to address the future of schools in the archdiocese Oct. 20. Schools are asked to send a letter for parents home with students Oct. 21. The task force is notifying schools directly rather than listing their category with the Oct. 16-18 strategic plan announcement so that schools can understand their situation completely, Lundholm-Eades said. By not listing these schools with the parish changes, the task force is also trying to prevent students prematurely withdrawing from schools undergoing urgent review, which would only weaken a school’s situation. “The essence here is the quality of communication,” Lundholm-Eades said. “People should know that the end point of these reviews is not pre-judged.” At the end of the review process, the whole school community should understand the school’s current condition and what its options are, and be able to recommend a plan for the future of the school to Archbishop John Nienstedt. “It’s a very consultative model,” Lundholm-Eades added. “In the plan for schools, this is [Archbishop Nienstedt’s] plan for communities to have access to all the information [and] have the opportunity to develop the best outcome possible for their community for having access to Catholic education.” The task force is also searching for successful models of funding for Catholic schools, said Lori Glynn, task force member and principal of Our Lady of Peace in Minneapolis. Representatives are working with consultants from

As part of the archdiocesan strategic plan for parishes and schools, the task force has identified schools that should undergo review, either immediately or in the near future. As part of the review process, a school is to ensure its community understands its current reality, especially in the areas of financial management, community outreach, Catholic identity and academic excellence. ■ Financial management. Currently, schools are “all over the board” in their use of information management databases, said task force member Lori Glynn, principal of Our Lady of Peace School in Minneapolis. She hopes to see all schools soon using information systems that allow families to pay tuition, check grades and register for classes online. She would also like to see schools connect their information systems to their parishes, so that finances can be on one chart of accounts. ■ Community outreach. Some schools have done a good job of staying in touch with alumni, and some schools have just started to work in this direction, Glynn said. This is especially true for merged schools, where merging alumni programs was often overlooked. Better marketing means more community relationships and sources of funding. ■ Catholic identity. Catholic identity used to be one of the standards measured by the Minnesota Accrediting Association, but the responsibility moved to the jurisdiction of the Catholic Schools Office in 2006. Schools self-evaluate their Catholic identity each year on key points regarding their religious education and incorporation of Catholic teaching and values into the classroom and school life. ■ Academic excellence. Catholic schools in the archdiocese are decentralized, which means that the local school, not the archdiocesan schools office, makes decisions about curriculum, testing, finances and hiring. Before last year, there was no means to compare one school’s academics with another. In 2009, the Catholic Schools Office strongly encouraged each Catholic school in the archdiocese to offer the SAT-10 achievement test to eighth-graders, which would allow the office to collect data across all its schools. Shared standards mean better accademics for all, Glynn said.

the Alliance for Catholic Education at the University of Notre Dame to research funding models and other best practices in other U.S. dioceses. ACE’s final report is due in November. As with the archdiocesan plan for parishes, all schools need to be part of the strategic plan, even if they do not need to undergo review immediately or in the near future, Lundholm-Eades said. “The overall purpose is to have Catholic education available,” Glynn said. “The idea is not to close Catholic schools . . . but to make sure that they’re sustainable and viable, and located in areas that people can access them.”

Parishes urged to collaborate on faith formation, youth ministry The following information is taken from the archdiocesan strategic plan. nder the Strategic Plan, all the faithful are called to renew their commitment to lifelong faith formation. The plan also recognizes the need for ongoing formation for faith formation leaders and catechists. Toward this end the Strategic Plan calls on parishes to collaborate with one another in order to provide the best faith formation programming possible. While some parishes might retain a standalone faith formation program for elementary students, others might con-

U

sider a shared program. Not only are leaders asked to review program content and form regularly to ensure compliance with the Archdiocesan Religion Standards, they are also asked to follow the guidelines noted in the National Directory for Catechesis and the General Directory for Catechesis. Parishes are encouraged to work together to meet the needs of adult faith formation and to make better use of existing faith formation resources. Two important initiatives that should be utilized more fully in parishes are Early Catholic Family Life and All in God’s Plan, two age-appropriate programs

offered by the archdiocesan Office of Marriage, Family, and Life.

Special attention to youth Special consideration will also need to be given to youth in the years ahead. The Archdiocese is developing several initiatives to help young people continue to grow in their faith after Confirmation. Recognizing the good work already being done in a number of parishes, these initiatives will take a regional approach with the aim to bring young people together with their peers across the Archdiocese for formation and worship. Fortunately, several nationally recog-

nized Catholic youth organizations reside within the Archdiocese and efforts are already underway to engage these entities to consider partnerships to meet the faith formation needs of this important age group. Youth and young adults are the future of our Church and more intentional outreach to them is necessary to realize the mission of the Church. To realize this needed outreach, the Archdiocese will establish an Archdiocesan Youth Ministry Advisory Committee and finalize its regional programmatic opportunities by June 1, 2011.


10A

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • OCTOBER 18, 2010

MAPS

Parish under th

For an alphabetical their respective status

ST. PAUL AREA WEST — VICARIATE 3

MINNEAPOLIS AREA

Maps provided by the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis


Strategic Plan 11A

status he plan

l list of parishes and s, see pages 12A-15A

NORTH — VICARIATE 1

SOUTH — VICARIATE 2


12A

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

Strategic Planning

OCTOBER 18, 2010

PARISHES

Alphabetical list of parishes and status under the plan The following informaton is reprinted from the archdiocesan strategic plan. For most parishes there will be no structural change under the Strategic Plan. No structural changes in schools are announced as a part of the Strategic Plan. Therefore, no schools are listed here. All structural decisions regarding schools will be made by leadership at the individual schools with direction and assistance from the Archdiocese.

Definitions Colors correspond to colors on maps, pages 10A-11A. ■ Parish merger Two or more parish communities

merge into one community with one pastor; in each merging relationship there is one parish designated as a receiving parish; the assets and liabilities of a merging parish will be incorporated into the receiving parish (this means that the receiving parish will acquire the church building of any merging parish); Masses will continue to be celebrated at the church building of the merging parish until a decision which contradicts such use is made by the parish pastoral and finance councils of the receiving parish community, in consultation with the Archbishop and the Presbyteral Council; parish mergers are subject to appeal (see page 19A); mergers will proceed as the capacity to handle them effectively and pastorally allows.

■ Parish cluster Two or more parishes that share a pastor; clustered parishes may also share some staff and programming; cluster arrangements will not go into effect before June 1, 2011; questions or concerns about cluster arrangements will be addressed at open meetings in each affected parish; parishes in a cluster arrangement retain their parish status and basic organizational structure; clustering does not necessarily lead to merger of parishes. ■ Identified for structured collaboration Two or more parishes each with their own pastor that are specifically identified to work in collaboration, i.e. sharing resources, cooperating on programming, etc.; while all parishes are called into greater collaboration under the Strategic

Parish

City

Status Under Plan

All Saints

Lakeville

No structural change

All Saints

Minneapolis

Cluster with St. Boniface, Minneapolis

Annunciation

Minneapolis

Annunciation is receiving parish for Visitation, Minneapolis

Annunciation

Northfield

Cluster with St. Dominic, Northfield

Plan, the parishes in this category are specifically asked to engage in particular cooperation and communication with neighboring parishes; many of these sites may eventually move toward a cluster. ■ Designation as oratory An oratory is a worship site established for a particular community or group of the faithful; often, oratories are simply another worship site within a parish; there are some limitations as to what liturgical celebrations can take place in an oratory, for example: all communities are encouraged to participate in Mass on Sundays at the parish church; funerals are only permitted in an oratory with a dispensation from the diocesan bishop; there must be a just cause for a baptism to take place outside of the parish church.

Ascension

Minneapolis

No structural change

Ascension

Norwood/Young America

No structural change (in existing cluster with St. Bernard, Cologne)

Assumption

Richfield

No structural change

Assumption

Saint Paul

No structural change

Basilica of Saint Mary

Minneapolis

No structural change

Blessed Sacrament

Saint Paul

Blessed Sacrament is receiving parish for St. Thomas the Apostle, Saint Paul; identified for structured collaboration with St. Pascal Baylon, Saint Paul; move toward cluster with St. Pascal Baylon

Cathedral of Saint Paul

Saint Paul

Cathedral of Saint Paul (parish) is receiving parish for St. Vincent de Paul

Christ the King

Minneapolis

No structural change

Comunidad Sagrado Corazón de Jesús* Minneapolis *not a parish, this community is a civil corporation

Status to be determined

Corpus Christi

Identified for structured collaboration with St. Rose of Lima, Roseville; move toward cluster with St. Rose of Lima

Roseville

Divine Mercy

Faribault

No structural change

Epiphany

Coon Rapids

No structural change

Good Shepherd

Golden Valley

No structural change

Guardian Angels

Chaska

Identified for structured collaboration with St. Nicholas, Carver; move toward cluster with St. Nicholas

Guardian Angels

Oakdale

No structural change

Holy Childhood

Saint Paul

Identified for structured collaboration with Maternity of the Blessed Virgin, Saint Paul

Holy Cross

Minneapolis

Merge with St. Anthony of Padua, St. Clement, and St. Hedwig all in Minneapolis; St. Anthony of Padua is receiving parish

Holy Family

Saint Louis Park

No structural change

Holy Name

Minneapolis

Cluster with St. Leonard Port Maurice, Minneapolis

Holy Name of Jesus

Wayzata

No structural change

Holy Rosary

Minneapolis

No structural change

Holy Spirit

Saint Paul

No structural change

Holy Trinity

Goodhue

Holy Trinity is receiving parish for St. Columbkill, Belle Creek and St. Mary, Bellechester

Holy Trinity

South Saint Paul

Holy Trinity is receiving parish for St. Augustine, South St. Paul; identified for structured collaboration with St. John Vianney, South St. Paul, move toward cluster with St. John Vianney

Holy Trinity

Waterville

No structural change (in existing cluster with St. Andrew, Elysian)

Immaculate Conception

Columbia Heights

No structural change

Immaculate Conception

Lonsdale

Identified for structured collaboration with Most Holy Trinity, Veseli; move toward cluster with Most Holy Trinity

Immaculate Conception of Marysburg

Madison Lake

No structural change (in existing cluster with Nativity of Mary, Cleveland)

Immaculate Conception

Watertown

Identified for structured collaboration with St. Boniface, St. Bonifacius; move toward cluster with St. Boniface

Immaculate Heart of Mary

Minnetonka

No structural change

Incarnation

Minneapolis

No structural change

Lumen Christi Catholic Community

Saint Paul

No structural change

Mary Mother of the Church

Burnsville

No structural change

Mary Queen of Peace

Rogers

No structural change

Maternity of the Blessed Virgin

Saint Paul

Maternity of the Blessed Virgin is receiving parish for St. Andrew, Saint Paul; identified for structured collaboration with Holy Childhood, Saint Paul

Most Holy Redeemer

Montgomery

Most Holy Redeemer is receiving parish for St. Canice, Kilkenny; cluster with St. Patrick, Shieldsville

Most Holy Trinity

Saint Louis Park

Merge with Our Lady of Grace, Edina; Our Lady of Grace is receiving parish

CONTINUED

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Strategic Planning

OCTOBER 18, 2010

•

13A

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

PARISHES Most Holy Trinity

Veseli

Identified for structured collaboration with Immaculate Conception, Lonsdale; move toward cluster with Immaculate Conception

Nativity of Mary

Cleveland

No structural change (in existing cluster with Immaculate Conception of Marysburg, Madison Lake)

Nativity of Our Lord

Saint Paul

No structural change

Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Bloomington

No structural change

Our Lady of Grace

Edina

Our Lady of Grace is receiving parish for Most Holy Trinity, Saint Louis Park

Our Lady of Guadalupe

Saint Paul

Identified for structured collaboration with St. Matthew, Saint Paul and St. Michael, West Saint Paul; move toward cluster with St. Matthew and St. Michael

Our Lady of Lourdes

Minneapolis

No structural change

Our Lady of Mount Carmel

Minneapolis

No structural change

Our Lady of Peace

Minneapolis

No structural change

Our Lady of the Lake

Mound

No structural change

Our Lady of the Prairie

Belle Plaine

No structural change

Our Lady of Victory

Minneapolis

No structural change

Pax Christi

Eden Prairie

No structural change

Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Maplewood

No structural change

Risen Savior

Burnsville

No structural change

Sacred Heart

Robbinsdale

No structural change

Sacred Heart

Rush City

Cluster with St. Gregory, North Branch

Sacred Heart

Saint Paul

No structural change

Ss. Peter and Paul

Loretto

Cluster with St. Anne, Hamel and St. Thomas the Apostle, Corcoran

St. Adalbert

Saint Paul

Identified for structured collaboration with St. Columba, Saint Paul; move toward cluster with St. Columba

St. Agatha

Rosemount

Cluster with St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, Hastings

St. Agnes

Saint Paul

No structural change

St. Albert

Albertville

Identified for structured collaboration with St. Michael, Saint Michael; move toward cluster with St. Michael

St. Albert the Great

Minneapolis

No structural change

St. Alphonsus

Brooklyn Center

No structural change

St. Ambrose of Woodbury

Woodbury

No structural change

St. Andrew

Elysian

No structural change (in existing cluster with Holy Trinity, Waterville)

St. Andrew

Saint Paul

Merge with Maternity of the Blessed Virgin, Saint Paul; Maternity of the Blessed Virgin is receiving parish

St. Andrew Kim

Saint Paul

No structural change

St. Anne

Hamel

Cluster with Ss. Peter and Paul, Loretto and St. Thomas the Apostle, Corcoran

St. Anne

LeSueur

No structural change

St. Anne/St. Joseph Hien

Minneapolis

No structural change

St. Anthony of Padua

Minneapolis

St. Anthony of Padua is receiving parish for Holy Cross, St Clement, and St. Hedwig, all in Minneapolis

St. Augustine

South Saint Paul

Merge with Holy Trinity, South Saint Paul; Holy Trinity is receiving parish

St. Austin

Minneapolis

Merge with St. Bridget, Minneapolis; St. Bridget is receiving parish

St. Bartholomew

Wayzata

Designate St. George, Long Lake, as oratory of St. Bartholomew

St. Benedict

New Prague

Merge with St. John the Evangelist, Union Hill, St. Joseph, Lexington, St. Scholastica, Heidelberg, St. Thomas, St. Thomas and St. Wenceslaus, New Prague; St. Wenceslaus is receiving parish; St. John the Evangelist, St. Scholastica, and St. Wenceslaus buildings remain open

St. Bernard

Saint Paul

No structural change

St. Bernard

Cologne

No structural change (in existing cluster with Ascension, Norwood/Young America)

St. Bonaventure

Bloomington

No structural change

St. Boniface

Minneapolis

Cluster with All Saints, Minneapolis

St. Boniface

Saint Bonifacius

Identified for structured collaboration with Immaculate Conception, Watertown; move toward cluster with Immaculate Conception

St. Bridget

Minneapolis

St. Bridget is receiving parish for St. Austin, Minneapolis

St. Bridget of Sweden

Lindstrom

No structural change

St. Canice

Kilkenny

Merge with Most Holy Redeemer, Montgomery; Most Holy Redeemer is receiving parish

St. Casimir

Saint Paul

Cluster with St. Patrick, Saint Paul

St. Catherine* *an oratory of St. Patrick, Jordan

Jordan

Designate as oratory of St. Patrick, Jordan

St. Cecilia

Saint Paul

No structural change

St. Charles

Bayport

Cluster with St. Mary, Stillwater and St. Michael, Stillwater

St. Charles Borromeo

Saint Anthony

No structural change

St. Clement

Minneapolis

Merge with Holy Cross, St. Anthony of Padua, and St. Hedwig, all in Minneapolis; St. Anthony of Padua is receiving parish

St. Columba

Saint Paul

Identified for structured collaboration with St. Adalbert, Saint Paul; move toward cluster with St. Adalbert

St. Columbkill

Belle Creek

Merge with Holy Trinity, Goodhue and St. Mary, Bellechester; Holy Trinity is receiving parish

Ss. Cyril and Methodius

Minneapolis

No structural change

St. Dominic

Northfield

Cluster with Annunciation, Northfield

St. Edward

Bloomington

No structural change

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton

Hastings

Cluster with St. Agatha, Coates

St. Frances Cabrini

Minneapolis

No structural change

St. Francis de Sales

Saint Paul

Merge with St. James, Saint Paul; St. James is receiving parish

St. Francis of Assisi

Lakeland

No structural change CONTINUED

ON NEXT PAGE


14A

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

•

Strategic Planning

OCTOBER 18, 2010

PARISHES St. Francis Xavier

Buffalo

No structural change

St. Francis Xavier - Franconia

Taylors Falls

No structural change (in existing cluster with St. Joseph, Taylors Falls)

St. Genevieve

Centerville

St. Genevieve is receiving parish for St. John the Baptist, Hugo

St. George* Long Lake *an oratory of St. Bartholomew, Wayzata

Designate as oratory of St. Bartholomew, Wayzata

St. Gerard Majella

Brooklyn Park

No structural change

St. Gregory the Great

North Branch

Cluster with Sacred Heart, Rush City

St. Hedwig

Minneapolis

Merge with Holy Cross, St. Anthony of Padua, and St. Clement, all in Minneapolis; St. Anthony of Padua is receiving parish

St. Helena

Minneapolis

No structural change

St. Henry

LeSueur

Cluster to potential merger with St. Mary, Le Center (in existing cluster with St. Mary)

St. Henry

Monticello

No structural change

St. Hubert

Chanhassen

No structural change

St. Ignatius

Annandale

Cluster with St. Luke, Clearwater

St. James

Saint Paul

St. James is receiving parish for St. Francis de Sales, Saint Paul; identified for structured collaboration with St. Stanislaus, Saint Paul

St. Jerome

Maplewood

Identified for structured collaboration with St. John the Evangelist, Little Canada; move toward cluster with St. John the Evangelist

St. Joan of Arc

Minneapolis

No structural change

St. John

Saint Paul

Merge with St. Pascal Baylon, Saint Paul; St. Pascal Baylon is receiving parish

St. John Neumann

Eagan

No structural change

St. John the Baptist

Dayton

No structural change

St. John the Baptist

Excelsior

No structural change

St. John the Baptist

Hugo

Merge with St. Genevieve, Centerville; St. Genevieve is receiving parish

St. John the Baptist

Jordan

No structural change

St. John the Baptist

New Brighton

No structural change

St. John the Baptist

Savage

No structural change

St. John the Baptist

Vermillion

No structural change (in existing cluster with St. Mathias, Hampton and St. Mary, New Trier)

St. John the Evangelist

Hopkins

Cluster to potential merger with St. Joseph, Hopkins

St. John the Evangelist

Little Canada

Identified for structured collaboration with St. Jerome, Maplewood; move toward cluster with St. Jerome

St. John the Evangelist

Union Hill

Merge with St. Benedict, New Prague, St. Joseph, Lexington, St. Scholastica, Heidelberg, St. Thomas, St. Thomas and St. Wenceslaus, New Prague; St. Wenceslaus is receiving parish; St. John the Evangelist, St. Scholastica, and St. Wenceslaus buildings remain open

St. John Vianney

South Saint Paul

Identified for structured collaboration with Holy Trinity, South Saint Paul; move toward cluster with Holy Trinity

St. Joseph

Delano

Cluster with St. Mary of Czestochowa, Delano (in existing cluster with St. Peter, Delano)

St. Joseph

Hopkins

Cluster to potential merger with St. John the Evangelist, Hopkins

St. Joseph

Lexington

Merge with St. Benedict, New Prague, St. John the Evangelist, Union Hill, St. Scholastica, Heidelberg, St. Thomas, St. Thomas and St. Wenceslaus, New Prague; St. Wenceslaus is receiving parish; St. John the Evangelist, St. Scholastica, and St. Wenceslaus buildings remain open

St. Joseph

Lino Lakes

No structural change

St. Joseph

Miesville

No structural change (in existing cluster with St. Pius V, Cannon Falls)

St. Joseph

New Hope

No structural change

St. Joseph

Red Wing

No structural change

St. Joseph

Rosemount

No structural change

St. Joseph

Taylors Falls

No structural change (in existing cluster with St. Francis Xavier-Franconia, Taylors Falls)

St. Joseph

Waconia

No structural change

St. Joseph

West Saint Paul

No structural change

St. Joseph the Worker

Maple Grove

No structural change

St. Jude of the Lake

Mahtomedi

No structural change

St. Katharine Drexel Catholic Community* Ramsey *status to be determined

Status to be determined

St. Lawrence

Minneapolis

No structural change

St. Leonard of Port Maurice

Minneapolis

Cluster with Holy Name, Minneapolis

St. Louis King of France

Saint Paul

No structural change

St. Luke

Clearwater

Cluster with St. Ignatius, Annandale

St. Margaret Mary

Golden Valley

No structural change

St. Mark

Saint Paul

No structural change

St. Mark

Shakopee

Cluster to potential merger with St. Mary, Shakopee and St. Mary of the Purification, Shakopee

St. Mary

Bellechester

Merge with St. Columbkill, Belle Creek and Holy Trinity, Goodhue; Holy Trinity is receiving parish

St. Mary

LeCenter

Cluster to potential merger with St. Henry, LeSueur (in existing cluster with St. Henry)

St. Mary

New Trier

No structural change (in existing cluster with St. John the Baptist, Vermillion and St. Mathias, Hampton)

St. Mary

Saint Paul

No structural change

St. Mary

Shakopee

Cluster to potential merger with St. Mary, Shakopee and St. Mary of the Purification, Shakopee

St. Mary

Stillwater

Cluster with St. Charles, Bayport (in existing cluster with St. Michael, Stillwater)

St. Mary

Waverly

No structural change

St. Mary of Czestochowa

Delano

Cluster with St. Joseph, Delano and St. Peter, Delano

St. Mary of the Lake

Plymouth

No structural change CONTINUED

ON NEXT PAGE


Strategic Planning

OCTOBER 18, 2010

•

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

15A

PARISHES St. Mary of the Lake

White Bear Lake

No structural change

St. Mary of the Purification

Shakopee

Cluster to potential merger with St. Mark, Shakopee and St. Mary, Shakopee

St. Mathias

Hampton

No structural change (in existing cluster with St. John the Baptist, Vermillion and St. Mary, New Trier)

St. Matthew

Saint Paul

Cluster with St. Michael, West Saint Paul; identified for structured collaboration with Our Lady of Guadalupe, Saint Paul; move toward cluster with Our Lady of Guadalupe

St. Michael

Farmington

No structural change

St. Michael

Kenyon

No structural change (in existing cluster with Divine Mercy, Faribault)

St. Michael

Pine Island

No structural change (in existing cluster with St. Paul, Zumbrota)

St. Michael

Prior Lake

No structural change

St. Michael

Saint Michael

Identified for structured collaboration with St. Albert, Albertville; move toward cluster with St. Albert

St. Michael

Stillwater

Cluster with St. Charles, Bayport (in existing cluster with St. Mary, Stillwater)

St. Michael

West Saint Paul

Cluster with St. Matthew, Saint Paul; identified for structured collaboration with Our Lady of Guadalupe, Saint Paul; move toward cluster with Our Lady of Guadalupe

St. Nicholas

Carver

Identified for structured collaboration with Guardian Angels, Chaska; move toward cluster with Guardian Angels

St. Nicholas

Elko New Market

No structural change

St. Odilia

Shoreview

No structural change

St. Olaf

Minneapolis

No structural change

St. Pascal Baylon

Saint Paul

St. Pascal Baylon is receiving parish for St. John, Saint Paul; identified for structured collaboration with Blessed Sacrament, Saint Paul; move toward cluster with Blessed Sacrament

St. Patrick

Edina

No structural change

St. Patrick

Inver Grove Heights

No structural change

St. Patrick

Jordan

No structural change; designate St. Catherine as oratory of St. Patrick

St. Patrick

Oak Grove

No structural change

St. Patrick

Saint Paul

Cluster with St. Casimir, Saint Paul

St. Patrick

Shieldsville

Cluster with Most Holy Redeemer, Montgomery

St. Paul

Ham Lake

No structural change

St. Paul

Zumbrota

No structural change (in existing cluster with St. Michael, Pine Island)

St. Peter

Delano

Cluster with St. Mary of Czestochowa, Delano (in existing cluster with St. Joseph, Delano)

St. Peter

Forest Lake

No structural change

St. Peter

Mendota

No structural change

St. Peter

North Saint Paul

No structural change

St. Peter

Richfield

Cluster with St. Richard, Richfield

St. Peter Claver

Saint Paul

No structural change

St. Philip

Minneapolis

No structural change

St. Pius V

Cannon Falls

No structural change (in existing cluster with St. Joseph, Miesville)

St. Pius X

White Bear Lake

No structural change

St. Raphael

Crystal

No structural change

St. Richard

Richfield

Cluster with St. Peter, Richfield

St. Rita

Cottage Grove

No structural change

St. Rose of Lima

Roseville

Identified for structured collaboration with Corpus Christi, Roseville; move toward cluster with Corpus Christi

St. Scholastica

Heidelberg

Merge with St. Benedict, New Prague, St. John the Evangelist, Union Hill, St. Joseph, Lexington, St. Thomas, St. Thomas and St. Wenceslaus, New Prague; St. Wenceslaus is receiving parish; St. John the Evangelist, St. Scholastica, and St. Wenceslaus buildings remain open

St. Stanislaus

Saint Paul

Identified for structured collaboration with St. James, Saint Paul

St. Stephen

Anoka

No structural change

St. Stephen

Minneapolis

No structural change

St. Therese

Deephaven

No structural change

St. Thomas

Saint Thomas

Merge with St. Benedict, New Prague, St. John the Evangelist, Union Hill, St. Joseph, Lexington, St. Scholastica, Heidelberg, and St. Wenceslaus, New Prague; St. Wenceslaus is receiving parish; St. John the Evangelist, St. Scholastica, and St. Wenceslaus buildings remain open

St. Thomas Aquinas

Saint Paul Park

No structural change

St. Thomas Becket

Eagan

No structural change

St. Thomas More

Saint Paul

No structural change

St. Thomas the Apostle

Saint Paul

Merge with Blessed Sacrament, Saint Paul; Blessed Sacrament is receiving parish

St. Thomas the Apostle

Corcoran

Cluster with Ss. Peter and Paul, Loretto and St. Anne, Hamel

St. Thomas the Apostle

Minneapolis

No structural change

St. Timothy

Blaine

No structural change

St. Timothy

Maple Lake

No structural change

St. Victoria

Victoria

No structural change

St. Vincent de Paul

Brooklyn Park

No structural change

St. Vincent de Paul

Saint Paul

Merge with Cathedral of Saint Paul; Cathedral of Saint Paul is receiving parish

St. Wenceslaus

New Prague

St. Wenceslaus is receiving parish for St. Benedict, New Prague, St. John the Evangelist, Union Hill, St. Joseph, Lexington, St. Scholastica, Heidelberg, and St. Thomas, St. Thomas; St. John the Evangelist, St. Scholastica, and St. Wenceslaus buildings remain open

St. William

Fridley

No structural change

The Church of Gichitwaa Kateri* *status to be determined

Minneapolis

Status to be determined

Transfiguration

Oakdale

No structural change

Visitation

Minneapolis

Merge with Annunciation, Minneapolis; Annunciation is receiving parish


16A

Strategic Planning

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • OCTOBER 18, 2010

LAITY

Ongoing formation a new emphasis for lay parish leaders By Dave Hrbacek The Catholic Spirit

Carol Shukle of Our Lady of the Lake in Mound wondered why she was asked to serve on the Strategic Planning Task Force in 2009. “I’m not a religious [sister], I don’t work for the archdiocese,” said Shukle, 58. Yet, she had an important perspective to offer both as a parishioner and a past president (2007-2009) of the Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women. “I felt my role in the task force was to represent the rank and file parishioner,” she said. “I think the archdiocese has a lot of respect for the Council of Catholic Women. Plus, being the president, I was able to get around the archdiocese.”

Important role As it turned out, Shukle and a few others on the task force played a big role in shaping the plan as it relates to lay pastoral leadership. In a section of the plan devoted to lay leadership, the first item calls for lay pastoral leaders to complete six hours of ongoing formation sponsored by the archdiocese. This was a case of the task force making a recommendation, and Archbishop John Nienstedt adopting it. “I was on the ministry subcommittee of the task force, and that was one of the things we talked a lot about,” Shukle said. “We felt it was very important for the leadership in every parish to have the

I felt my role in the task force was to represent the rank and file parishioner. CAROL SHUKLE

highest level of ongoing formation possible. . . . . In order for a parish community to be vibrant, the people who are in leadership positions need to be well-educated and qualified.” This point illustrates a reality about the plan that Shukle believes many can easily overlook — it’s more about making positive changes to improve the parishes and, ultimately, the archdiocese, than it is about merging and clustering individual parishes. “This whole process has always had a vision beyond just plugging holes in the dike,” she said. “It’s a vision to help become the best archdiocese we can and the most vibrant archdiocesan church we

can — that when all of this is done, we’ll be a better, stronger church. “That’s why the role of the laity came to be discussed in this process. The role of lay staff is so integral to the way parishes function and meet the needs of the parishioners.”

Helping the laity An important point in this plan, Shukle noted, is that the archdiocese is doing more than just telling lay pastoral leaders they need ongoing formation. It’s telling them that it will sponsor such formation. The plan calls for the archdiocese to organize at least two opportunities every year for ongoing formation for lay leaders. On top of that, it is encouraging

Retirement Fund for Religious

parishes to do the same, along with trying to channel leaders to enroll in the Archbishop Harry J. Flynn Catechetical Institute at the St. Paul Seminary School of Divinity, or enroll in graduate programs of theology or pastoral studies at the seminary. These programs will be offered at a discounted rate to men and women who work in parishes within the archdiocese. “I’m pleased to see how they’ve taken this concept and outlined how they’re going to offer ongoing formation,” Shukle said. “It looks like the archdiocese is going to take a role in keeping their parish staffs up to date.” Shukle hopes that when people review the strategic planning book they receive in parishes Oct. 16 to 17 that outlines the changes, they will note all of the positive changes and recognize the overall potential for improvement in the archdiocese. “I’ve said all along to people I have talked to that there was just way too high a level of fear about this planning process,” she said. “Yes, there will be mergers, clusters and closings. It was inevitable that there would be some. But, not near the level that people feared. The whole point of the thing is to become a better, stronger church. “I would say to the average parishioners: Give it a chance. Change can be painful, but try to see the big picture. . . . Cooperation among the parishes can make us better and stronger.”

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Strategic Planning Plan about work of faith, hope, love

OCTOBER 18, 2010 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

Schools to be grouped in four categories CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8A

The plan outlines structured responses if school leaders identify challenges to viability in any of these four areas.

sions regarding the future of individual schools are made at the local level and recommended to the Archdiocese. Each school community will receive communication about the change process category, if any, to which their school is assigned.

For our neighbors in this 12 county area, this Strategic Plan reinvests the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis in the work of faith, hope, and love which it has been about since the first permanent Catholic presence was established here more than 160 years ago.

 Sustainability review schools: Certain school communities will undergo the Catholic Elementary School Review Process for School Sustainability during the next three years and develop a plan that meets the criteria for viable Catholic schools.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5A

We are refocusing so as to renew our efforts to build a community that fosters authentic human values and that is always ready to serve those in need. Whether a person serves with us or is served by us, we are mindful of the words of Christ: it is in giving that we receive. This Strategic Plan will assist the local Church in sharing the gifts we have received with all who call this area home. No matter what your role, you play an important part in the future of this local Church. If you have a gift for teaching young people about our faith, think about how you can become more engaged in catechesis; if you are blessed with a pastoral heart, contemplate how you may provide comfort to those in need; if you have a talent for administration, reflect upon how you could help your parish or school respond to the initiatives outlined in the Strategic Plan; if you are gifted with temporal resources, consider how your generosity could further the mission of the Church in this Archdiocese. Please prayerfully contemplate how you might assist the parishes, schools, and institutions of this Archdiocese to promote and proclaim a communion of faith, hope, and love in your local Church, the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis.

17A

 Shared resource discussions: Certain schools will engage in regional discussions to ensure the sustainability of the system of schools and parishes, as well as that of individual faith communities. These school communities will examine potential configurations within a region to either reduce or grow capacity to meet student enrollment and financial projections for the next eight to fifteen years. Possible outcomes of these discussions are greater sharing of resources and the development of regional schools.  Urgent review schools: Certain school communities will begin the Catholic Elementary School Review Process for School Sustainability immediately with direction and assistance from the Archdiocese. An outcome of this process will be a recommendation, based on a decision by local school leaders, regarding the sustainability of the school into the future. A possible decision is that the school is unsustainable and should close.

Types of Catholic schools Currently and going forward, Catholic schools within the Archdiocese can generally be grouped into four categories.

Final decisions regarding the future of individual schools are made at the local level and recommended to the Archdiocese. Each school community will receive communication about the change process category, if any, to which their school is assigned.  Parish school: A school supported by one parish.  Consolidated/regional school: A school which serves a geographic region of an Archdiocese and is supported by two or more parishes.  Schools that receive financial support: A school which may not be sustainable due to financial or demographic factors, but which is designated for special support because it is a presence of the Church in a key geographic area and/or it exists to serve the poor in providing the opportunity of a Catholic education. Such schools must raise a pre-determined percentage of needed development funding with the remainder provided through archdiocesan assistance and grant support.  Independent Catholic school: A school not formally affiliated with a parish. These schools are sponsored by a religious order or have archdiocesan oversight.


18A

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • OCTOBER 18, 2010

Strategic Planning

LATINO MINISTRY

Resource centers to help Latinos spiritually, physically By Julie Carroll The Catholic Spirit

A new chaplaincy, an advisory board and resource centers located throughout the archdiocese are just a few of the changes in the Strategic Plan to improve Latino ministry in the archdiocese. “The immigrants of today continue to be an important factor of growth for this local Church,” it says in a booklet published by the archdiocese summarizing the changes. “It is therefore necessary to ensure that these brothers and sisters receive the same benefit that immigrants of old had to the sacraments, to pastoral care, and to educational opportunities, in the language and cultural custom with which they are familiar. “Welcoming our brothers and sisters arriving in the Archdiocese today is an essential sign of the universality of the Church and an acknowledgement of the gifts immigrants bring to this local Church,” it continues. In the plan, Latino ministry is referred to as a “chaplaincy.” Chaplaincies are defined as “non-parish communities of the faithful entrusted to a parish priest. However, these communities have not been formally established as parishes, either because they are still in the process of developing into a parish or because the community itself is better served by another ecclesial model.” Archbishop John Nienstedt will ap-

Dave Hrbacek / The Catholic Spirit

The plan will ensure that “Spanish-speaking Catholics will have access to full sacramental ministry,” such as preparation for baptism.

point a chaplain to oversee Latino ministry in the archdiocese, according to the plan. A Latino Ministry Advisory Board also will be established to coordinate outreach to Spanish-speaking Catholics.

Resource centers Several parishes in the archdiocese will be designated Latino ministry resource centers “so that Spanish-speaking Catholics will have access to full sacramental ministry, as well as faith formation pro-

gramming, and pastoral care at those locations,” the plan states. While Spanish language Masses will continue to be offered in parishes throughout the archdiocese, centrally located resource centers will provide additional services to Latino Catholics, such as retreats, assistance with social services, and access to Spanish-speaking priests for confessions, according to Estela Villagrán Manancero, a member of the archdiocesan Parish Services Team, and Deacon Ramón Garcia, who served

on the Strategic Planning Task Force. At least one resource center will be located in each of the three vicariates to be established under the plan, according to Villagrán. “I think the Latino centers will be a blessing for the community,” Deacon Garcia said, “because we have many needs: a place to live, jobs, [assistance with] immigration and family problems, health care, insurance, education. We can provide some programs for the community so these families can survive and grow in their faith.” Rather than duplicating services already available through Catholic Charities, the government and nonprofit organizations, the resource centers will serve as a “bridge” to connect people to those services, Villagrán said. The archdiocese also will continue to offer training for Latino lay people to serve in parishes, the plan states. Several parishes with large Latino populations, such as Our Lady of Guadalupe in St. Paul and Annunciation in Northfield, will enter into formal collaboration or cluster relationships with other parishes, according to the plan. A Spanish-speaking staff person will be on-call at the archdiocese for a limited time to answer questions and address concerns regarding the plan. The number is (651) 291-4435.

The Catholic Spirit subscriptions, 651- 291-4444 or on-line at www.thecatholicspirit.com


Strategic Planning

OCTOBER 18, 2010 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

19A

APPEAL PROCESS

How to appeal a parish’s merger The following information is reprinted from the archdiocesan strategic plan. Canon law provides a means whereby certain decisions, including the decision to merge specific parishes as outlined in the Strategic Plan, may be appealed. Parties who are impacted by the decision to merge two or more parishes must follow the process set forth in the Code of Canon Law. The process and the specific deadlines for challenging the decision, are outlined below. Information included here is summary information. For additional information regarding the process for appealing a decision, please consult the Code of Canon Law, canons 1732 to 1739, which may be found online at HTTP://WWW.VATICAN.VA/ARCHIVE/ENG1104 /__P6Y.HTM. Parties seeking to appeal a parish merger must submit a petition for revocation or amendment of the decision to the Archbishop in writing within 10 days of the date of the

1

communication of the decision (October 17). This petition must include an explanation as to why the decision should be revoked or amended. The Archbishop has 30 days from the date of his receipt of the petition to consider the request and the arguments made and issue a new decree. This new decree must either revoke or amend the decision, or reject the petition for recourse. As part of that process, the Archbishop may choose to consult with others, such as the Presbyteral Council.

2

If a party receives a rejection of the petition or if no response to the petition is made within 30 days, further appeal to the Congregation for Clergy may be made. This petition for revocation or amendment of the decision must be submitted in writing within 15 days of the appeal decision issued by the Archbishop or if no response is issued by the Archbishop,

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within 15 days after the expiration of the 30 day response period noted in No. 2 above. The Congregation for Clergy has the right to confirm, invalidate, amend, replace, or modify the Archbishop’s decision.

4

As part of the request for recourse to the Congregation for Clergy a party may request that the decision may not be implemented while the appeal is in process. This request must be made in writing to the Archbishop, as well as in writing to the Congregation for Clergy.

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 Mailing address for the archbishop: The Most Reverend John C. Nienstedt Archbishop of Saint Paul and Minneapolis 226 Summit Ave Saint Paul, MN 55102 Attention: Hierarchical Recourse

Go online for parish transition advice The Catholic Spirit What’s the best way to handle a merger? How do you share news with your parish? What do you do when parishioners disagree? Father John Bauer, co-chair of the 16-member Strategic Task Force who made recommendations for the plan to Archbishop Nienstedt, guided three St. Paul parishes through a merger to form Lumen Christi in the Highland Park neighborhood. He outlined 32 lessons he learned, including communicate, admit mistakes and create committees. Although his advice was originally intended for pastors, it’s relevant for anyone interested in supporting his or her parish through a transition, such as a merger or cluster. Find all 32 lessons listed at THECATHOLICSPIRIT.COM.

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Strategic Planning

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • OCTOBER 18, 2010

OVERVIEW

Archbishop hopes for greater sense of unity CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3A

Change never easy Archbishop Nienstedt said the archdiocese has worked hard to maintain ongoing communications with pastors and parishioners throughout the process. Nevertheless, he said he knows parishioners affected by changes — especially those in parishes designated to merge into others — will experience a variety of emotions, including sadness and anger. He hopes, however, that the changes will become a positive experience for most. “I certainly feel for them,” he said. “I realize one gets emotionally attached to the surroundings, especially a place where people have always worshiped, where maybe their parents were married or their children were baptized and all those sorts of things. Those really do make a difference in the spiritual lives of

people. “But I would really call them to a greater sense of what it means to be Catholic,” he added. “In the Kingdom of God, we’re not going to have [members of one parish] here and [another] here. Everybody’s going to be gathered together around the Lamb. He’s the source of our unity; he’s the source of our hope; he’s the source of our happiness. “I see this plan as calling us to be more Catholic. For people who are being merged, [I ask them] to be open to the fact that there’s going to be a new experience in their faith life, which need not be a negative experience. Hopefully, it will be a very positive experience — a way of seeing how they can worship maybe in a different way, maybe even a better way. For those that are receiving other parishes, it’s an opportunity to reach out with Christian love and embrace these people as their brothers and sisters.”

Vibrant vision led planning CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3A lot of good work has been done in parishes. There are parishes and pastors and lay people in this archdiocese who have been thinking strategically for a long time. And they’re tremendous gifts in the archdiocese that we’ll have to [utilize] going forward. So it’s not just the archdiocese that is all of a sudden doing strategic thinking, there are a lot of people doing strategic thinking. Secondly, [there is] a transition going on in the church in my mind, away from a buildings-first to more of a relationalfirst church. . . . I think there were a lot of wonderful things about the church in the ‘40s and ‘50s and ‘60s, but it tended to be what I would call building-centric, edifice-centric. I think what may have been lost in that is the relationship center of our faith. In the end, it’s not buildings that feed the poor or educate the young or minister to the grieving. It’s people — priests, religious, lay people. And those people in turn — the poor, the elderly, the grieving — minister also to us. There were dozens of public meetings held around the archdiocese regarding the plan since spring 2009. Did you hear anything at these meetings that influenced the content of the final plan? Father Laird: People have an experience of church almost peculiar and particular to the person who experiences it. What that told us is that people wanted a unity in faith and yet an appropriate sort of diversity of expression. I think that’s something the strategic planning task force did a very good job on. We have small parishes in the archdiocese coming out in the plan and we have large parishes. I think it confirmed our own work, that we weren’t out to have a cookie-cutter approach to the archdiocese. Father Bauer: I go back to what I think we heard in those meetings, which is what I said earlier about how much people cared about their parishes and their faith. We really took that seriously. It would have been very easy to make recommendations based on real cut-anddried kind of things, but we really tried to listen to what the needs were of, say, this parish, this deanery — the priests and the people — and then to form recommendations out of that. Outside of clustering, merging, etc., there are a number of other elements in the plan — sections addressing continuing education for clergy and laity, parish administration, outreach to the Latino community. How were these areas identified as planning priorities? Father Bauer: Early on, we divided our work into three subcommittees: one on education and schools, the second on administration and finance, and the third on ministry in general. Out of those subcommittees came recommendations to the task force that we then worked with and passed on to the archbishop. Part of those recommendations were around ministries to certain specific groups, like Latino ministry (see page 18A), ministry to prisons, chaplaincies and . . . competencies for ministry for

both ordained and lay (see pages 7A and 16A). We’re still doing some work with a consulting firm on the recommendations for our schools (see pages 8A and 9A). How much of an influence on your recommendations were financial issues facing parishes and the archdiocese? Father Bauer: There’s no doubt that the finances of some of our parishes were a major factor in some of our recommendations, but I would not want to put that issue as front-burner for all our recommendations. Certainly it was in the background as we looked at some of our parishes. But in terms of the whole breadth of our recommendations, it was one among many issues that we looked at. How do you think the archdiocese will be different 10 years from now because of this plan? Father Bauer: I think we’ll be a more vibrant, stronger archdiocese in a variety of different ways in terms of how we look at ministry to the people of the archdiocese [and] how we provide the services and the programs that we do. I think we’ll see more coordination of those. I think we’ll see a leaner church in terms of our administrative structure and parish-wise. There will be more collaboration. Father Laird: I think in 10 years time, hopefully, it’s an archdiocese that more effectively teaches the Gospel and has an even greater excellence in Catholic education than it does now, that has parishes that are more vibrant in their expression not only of the sacramental life of the church but also in reaching out to the poor. Because the strategic planning process isn’t about turning inward. It’s about, as the church always has the responsibility to do, reading the signs of the times and adjusting the household of faith to engage the world even more vibrantly and more completely. Some people will be experiencing feelings of loss, sadness and anger when they see the plan, particularly if their parish is losing autonomy or being merged with another. What would you say to a person in this situation? Father Laird: The first thing I’d say is, “This is not done lightly, and it surely was not done in any way to diminish your experience of the church. In fact, it’s just the opposite. I realize that it’s going to take time for you to come to that realization and I want to help you through that process. . . . I want to hear what you loved about your parish, and then I want to invite you to make the same investment in this parish that you made in that parish.” Are pastors where changes are happening going to be getting some help to address this with their parishioners? Father Bauer: Our Parish Services Team . . . continues to do work right now. In fact, there is a workshop planned for pastors of merged parishes [this week] . . . to say here are some of the things you need to start working on right now. [The PST] will also be looking at other education pieces to help parishes and priests that are going to have to deal with this.


Newspaper of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis

Benedictines hope to brighten their light

3B October 18, 2010

The Catholic Spirit

Why we honor our saints and our dead

TheCatholicSpirit.com

News with a Catholic heart

At synod Mass, pope urges new pastoral energy in Middle East

A day for

Our Lady

By John Thavis Catholic News Service

Dave Hrbacek / The Catholic Spirit

Second-grader Vincent Vu of St. Agnes School in St. Paul fingers a bead on his rosary as he follows along with his classmates at the Cathedral of St. Paul Oct. 7, joining more than a dozen other Catholic schools in the archdiocese for the annual archdiocesan Children’s Rosary Pilgrimage. Leading the rosary was Father Joseph Johnson, rector of the Cathedral.

Pope Benedict XVI opened the Synod of Bishops for the Middle East with a strong call to support the minority Christian population in the region, and said peace and protection of human rights were essential conditions for the church’s survival there. Celebrating Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica Oct. 10, the pope said the Middle East has a unique place in salvation history as the “cradle” of the church’s evangelizing mission. The synod’s primary goal, he said, was to renew the pastoral energy of Middle Eastern church communities and strengthen their faith identity, so that they can continue to witness the Gospel to all peoples. That task, he said, goes along with the church’s dialogue with Muslims and Jews. In his homily, the pope emphasized the synod’s theme of unity in a land where the church has a rich variety of liturgical, spiritual, cultural and disciplinary traditions. Without church unity, there can be no real witnessing of the faith, he said. The pope encouraged the Middle East church leaders to rise above their present difficulties with the same spirit of Pentecost that moved the early church. “The first Christians in Jerusalem were few. No one could have imagined what happened afterward. And the church still lives with that same energy that made the early church arise and grow,” he said.

in in sequel All of of late latepope’s pope’s life lifepointed pointedtotoChrist, Christ,writes writesbiographer biographer sequel Interview by Maria Wiering The Catholic Spirit

It was Good Friday 2005, and Pope John Paul II was too weak to attend the Way of the Cross at the Colosseum, an 18th century tradition reestablished by Pope Paul VI in 1964. His aides brought in a TV as a means of participation, and he watched the throng of people meditate on the passion, holding candles in the dark against the domineering Roman arches. A now iconic photo of that night was shot from behind the pontiff, his head down, hugging a crucifix. Days after the photo was published, reporters quizzed George Weigel, whose 1999 biography of Pope John Paul II “Witness to Hope” was an international bestseller: Was the aged, suffering pope too sick to show his face? The reporters didn’t get it, Weigel told a large audience at the University of St. Thomas Oct. 4. Pope John Paul II’s life was never about

8B

him — it was always about Jesus Christ. That photo, with the pope’s face obscured and the crucifix prominent, spoke to this message, as did the final months and days of his life, where the world witnessed the pope embrace his suffering, as he embraced that crucifix. He died eight days later. In his new book, “The End and the Beginning” (Doubleday, 2010), Weigel calls Pope John Paul II’s dying his “last encyclical.” A sequel to “Witness to Hope,” the new book covers the last six years of the pope’s life and offers a rich perspective on his legacy, and the events that shaped it. The Catholic Spirit asked Weigel, distinguished senior fellow of the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, D.C., about the book before his St. Thomas lecture “Pope John Paul II: An Assessment and Appreciation,” which was sponsored by the Center for Catholic Studies. (See interview on page 10B.)

Read the interview with George Weigel on pages 10-11B


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OCTOBER 18, 2010 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

NEW PHOTO CONTEST

Archbishop John Nienstedt’s schedule Note: In lieu of Archbishop Nienstedt’s regular column, his letter regarding the archdiocesan strategic plan can be found on page 2A. ■ Saturday, Oct. 23: 5 p.m., St. Paul, Annual Archdiocesan White Mass, St. Paul Seminary. ■ Sunday, Oct. 24: 11 a.m., Minneapolis, bilingual Mass, 125th anniversary of Church of St. Stephen. ■ Monday, Oct. 25: 4 p.m., West St. Paul, NET board of directors meeting. ■ Tuesday, Oct. 26: 8:30 a.m., St. Paul, Archbishop’s residence: Scheduling meeting with staff. 1:30 p.m., St. Paul, Archbishop’s Council meeting. 7:30 p.m., St. Paul, University of St. Thomas, lecture by Peter Cardinal Turkson. ■ Wednesday, Oct. 27: 2:15 p.m., Minnetonka, school Mass, Church of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. 6 p.m., St. Paul, Catholic Community Foundation Legacy Award Dinner. ■ Thursday, Oct. 28: 9 a.m., St. Anthony, Clergy Study Day at the Church of St. Charles Borromeo. 6 p.m., St. Paul, St. Paul Seminary, St. John Vianney Seminary Rector’s Dinner. ■ Saturday, Oct. 30: 9 a.m., St. Paul, Crowne Plaza Hotel, Mass for National Conference for Charismatic Ministries. 1:30 p.m., St. Paul, Archbishop’s Residence: Reception for parents of seminarians. ■ Sunday, Oct. 31:10:45 a.m., Brooklyn Park, Mass at Church of St. Gerard Majella. 3 p.m., St. Paul, Regions Hospital, prayer vigil with Pro-Life Action Ministries. ■ Monday, Nov. 1: 9:30 a.m., Mendota Heights, St. Thomas Academy, All Saints Day Mass. ■ Tuesday, Nov. 2: 8:30 a.m., St. Paul, Archbishop’s Residence: Scheduling meeting with staff. ■ Wednesday, Nov. 3: 8:30 a.m., St. Paul, Archbishop’s Residence: Planning meeting for “lectio divina.” 12 p.m., Arden Hills, North Heights Lutheran Church, lunch and lecture by Father Raniero Cantalamessa. 5:30 p.m., Burnsville, 75th anniversary of the Society for the Propagation of the Faith. ■ Thursday, Nov. 4: 9 a.m., St. Paul, Hayden Center, Mass and blessing of new chapel. 2:30 p.m., Collegeville, St. John’s Abbey Guesthouse, annual retreat of Catholic and Lutheran bishops.

Appointments Two deacons named to parishes Deacons Thomas Quayle and Richard Moore have been given new assignments, effective Oct. 4. Deacon Quayle, who was ordained in 1998, was named to serve as deacon at St. Timothy in Blaine and in outreach ministry at St. Philip Neri in Minneapolis. He previously served as deacon

at St. John the Baptist in New Brighton. Deacon Moore was named deacon at St. Pascal Baylon in St. Paul. Since his ordination in 2002, he served as deacon at St. Thomas the Apostle in St. Paul. OFFICIAL Archbishop John C. Nienstedt has made the following appointments in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis: Effective Oct. 4, 2010: Deacon Thomas Quayle, deacon, Church of St. Timothy, Blaine, and outreach ministry to St. Philip Neri, Minneapolis. Deacon Richard Moore, deacon, St. Pascal Baylon, St. Paul.

Highland LifeCare Center banquet set The Highland LifeCare Center will hold a fundraising banquet for supporters of the organization from 6 to 9 p.m. Oct. 30 at Lumen Christi in St. Paul. The event will include dinner, testimonials and a silent auction. Tickets are $30 and are available by calling (651) 695-0111 or online at WWW.HIGHLANDLIFECARE.ORG. Located on Ford Parkway in St. Paul since 2008, the Highland LifeCare Center is a pregnancy resource center that offers free, confidential services like ultrasounds, pregnancy tests and counseling. In 2009, it served 1,517 clients. The center, which began serving the community in 2000, celebrates its 10th anniversary this month. — The Catholic Spirit


“Your light must shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your heavenly Father.” Matthew 5:16

Local 3B Benedictines hope capital campaign spreads ‘Light of Christ’ to others OCTOBER 18, 2010

News from around the archdiocese

CommonBond townhouses and Tubman facility, Sister Lucia said. This fall, a new 40-unit CommonBond senior apartment building is also scheduled to open there. “We’re thinking that just our presence here is not only the influence we have because we pray for our neighbors three times a day, but also the availability of our worship space and our sisters’ wisdom and compassion,” Sister Lucia said.

By Susan Klemond For The Catholic Spirit

Streetlights at the intersection of Larpenteur and Century avenues in Maplewood ensure that bus riders aren’t waiting there in the dark. But a different kind of light emanates from St. Paul’s Monastery located near the northwest corner. The Benedictine sisters at the monastery have sought to illuminate the area with Christ’s light, through their ministry work and by opening the property to those with physical and spiritual needs. “When we finally realized all the people that we have on campus now, one of the sisters said we’re sort of a light on the corner,” said Benedictine Sister Lucia Schwickerath, the community’s prioress. Hoping to make their metaphorical light shine brighter, the sisters are seeking support for their work serving the church and the poor, as well as for their own long-term needs with a three-year capital campaign called “Celebrate the Light,” which they will launch on Oct. 18 with an event at the monastery.

Supporting work, elderly Nearly half the campaign’s goal of $5.45 million will support not only the sisters’ work but also help them provide health care and other needs for their elderly sisters, Sister Lucia said. The remaining $3 million will go toward a long-term monastery maintenance fund and an endowment fund for the ministries of the 48-member community. This fundraising campaign is the first the sisters have undertaken for their ministry work and their own needs since the community began in the Twin Cities in 1948, Sister Lucia said. “It will mean that our ministries will not only be able to maintain the good

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Going where needed

Dianne Towalski / The Catholic Spirit

Participants in the iLLUMINARE program gather in small groups Oct. 8 to talk about journals they have been keeping. From left, they are Carol Witry, from the Archdiocese of Dubuque, Carole Zempel from the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis, Franciscan Sister Lois Erpeldin from the Diocese of Winona, Kay Osborne from the Diocese of New Ulm, and Celeste Egger from the Diocese of Des Moines. The program, a ministry of the Sisters of St. Benedict of St. Paul’s Monastery, provides experienced church ministers with advanced ongoing formation that nourishes their commitment to their ministry.

work they are doing but they will be able to be more effective,” Sister Lucia said. “They will be able to touch more people. They will be able to grow.” The sisters are seeking support for their work in parishes, health care, childcare and social justice, as well as in the monastery’s three key faith-related outreaches, she said. Their Benedictine Center, located within the monastery, offers space for retreats and reflection. The sisters’ iLLUMINARE ministry offers spiritual and pastoral development and renewal for experi-

enced lay ministers. In the community’s Ministry of Mothers Sharing, women receive spiritual support and prayer as they develop skills to communicate and pray with their families. Early in 2008, the sisters moved into a new, smaller monastery after selling their old one to Tubman, which assists women, children and families in crisis. They also sold a portion of their land to CommonBond Communities, a nonprofit affordable housing provider. Some of the sisters continue to reach out to their new neighbors in the 48

The fact that sisters now work more in ministry than in teaching and nursing reflects their efforts to go where they are needed, Sister Lucia said. The sisters also hope the campaign attracts young women to the sisters’ life and work, and they consider joining the community, she said. Supporting the sisters’ work will especially help women and children in need, said former St. Paul Mayor George Latimer. Latimer is serving as an honorary chair for the campaign along with Archbishop Emeritus Harry Flynn, former Hill Murray High School principal and band director Frank Asenbrenner, and Benedictine Abbot John Klassen of St. John’s Abbey in Collegeville. “The work [the sisters] do is so selfless and so effective and really affecting a large number of people,” said Latimer, a parishioner at St. Stanislaus in St. Paul. “Really, the light is on other people,” Sister Lucia said. “The focus is on our ministries and those people that can be helped by that and also on the sisters and on our own needs.” For more information about the Benedictine sisters and the Celebrate the Light campaign, contact John Joslin or Harriet Rydel at (651) 777-8181.


“Awarding Liu the peace prize inspires those who fight for democracy in mainland China.” Patrick Poon of the Hong Kong-based Chinese Human Rights Lawyers Concern Group, on the awarding of the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize to Chinese human rights activist Liu Xiaobo

Nation/World 4B

The Catholic Spirit

Sacred hymns translated into Hmong language

News from around the U.S. and the globe

OCTOBER 18, 2010 18, the day after Pope Benedict XVI canonizes her as St. Mary of the Cross in Rome.

Miner gift from Chile

Sister Sheila McCreanor, secretary-general of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Sacred Heart, which Blessed MacKillop co-founded in 1866, said the stamp is “entirely appropriate given she was such a great letter-writer.” Sister Sheila has edited three published volumes of Blessed MacKillop’s letters.

Eight years ago, an idea sparked five Hmong women to team up and translate hymns, psalms and other liturgical music from the Mass from English into their native language. The group is projecting the printing of tens of thousands of books with more Cathollic than 200 selections News Service of sacred music for distribution and use in Catholic liturgies by Hmong-speaking communities throughout the United States. Chong Ly, of St. Bernard Parish in Appleton, Wis.. said the group proposed the idea to the Hmong American National Catholic Association, based in St. Paul, “and they agreed to support it.” The association recruited a committee, including Chong and her sister Miva to ensure the contents of the music book were prepared in accordance with Catholic doctrine.

Briefly

Pope interview to be released Nov. 23 “Light of the World,” a book-length interview with Pope Benedict XVI will be released Nov. 23 in the world’s major languages, including English, the head of the Vatican publishing house said. The book is based on interviews on a variety of topics conducted in July by journalist Peter Seewald.

New York to close weakest schools

The Hmong American National Catholic Association’s website is http://hanca.us.

WYD prepares with Facebook, YouTube World Youth Day organizers, who are expecting more than 2 million participants, are preparing for the 2011 event in Madrid with Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and fundraisers using text messages. Social networking sites have been key outlets “for raising awareness, mobilizing, communicating and financing World Youth Day,” said Auxiliary Bishop Cesar Franco Martinez of Madrid, who is

CNS photo / L’Osservatore Romano via Reuters

Pope Benedict XVI receives a Chilean flag at the Vatican Oct. 7. The flag was signed by each of the 33 miners who have been trapped underground for more than three weeks in a copper and gold mine near Copiapo, Chile. At left is Msgr. Georg Ganswein, the pope’s personal secretary.

the general coordinator of the Aug. 16-21 international event. Its official website is WWW.MADRID11.COM. As of Oct. 5, there were more than 165,000 fans of World Youth Day on Facebook, said Maria de Jaureguizar, vice director of communications for World Youth Day 2011. WYD organizers set up 19 separate Facebook accounts in different languages, including Chinese

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and Arabic.

Australia’s first saint to get stamp Blessed Mary MacKillop, known as a prolific letter-writer, will be immortalized on an Australian stamp and limited-edition collector’s postcard to be issued Oct.

A strategic plan for the elementary schools of the Archdiocese of New York will close underperforming schools to reduce growing deficits, channel funds from the sale or rental of shuttered properties to an education fund and replace the traditional parish governance model with a regional structure. The three-year plan, named “Pathways to Excellence,” was released Oct. 5. The short-term target is to reduce by half the subsidies the archdiocese gives to struggling schools, said Timothy J. McNiff, archdiocesan superintendent of schools. In 2009, the archdiocese spent $30 million to support needy parishes and schools.

Hearing Tests Set for Senior Citizens Announcement — Free electronic hearing tests will be given all next week Monday thru Friday from 9 am to 4 pm. The tests have been arranged for anyone who suspects they are not hearing clearly. People who generally feel they can hear, but cannot understand words clearly are encouraged to come in for the test, which uses the latest electronic equipment. Everyone, especially those over age 55 should have an electronic hearing test once

a year. Demonstrations of the latest devices to improve clarity of speech will be programmed using a computer to your particular needs — on the spot — after the tests. See (and HEAR) for yourself if newlydeveloped methods of correction will help you understand words better. Tests will be performed at one of 20 convenient Greater Twin Cities Avada Hearing Care locations.

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“The definitive aim of catechesis is to put people not only in touch, but also in communion and intimacy, with Jesus Christ.” From the General Directory for Catechesis, No. 80

This Catholic Life OCTOBER 18, 2010

Opinion, feedback and points to ponder

The Catholic Spirit

5B

‘Don’t know much about . . .’ religion, survey shows A survey of Americans’ general religious knowledge became a national conversational blip with its revelation that atheists, agnostics and Jews know more about religion than those who are active, practicing Christians. Among Christians, only Mormons scored nearly as many correct answers. People clicked onto the website Patricia Zapor for the U.S. Religious Knowledge Survey by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life to test their knowledge on 15 of the 32 questions (see quiz below). Of those Pew surveyed this summer, at least twothirds knew that public school teachers cannot legally lead a class in prayer; that Mother Teresa was Catholic; that Moses was the Bible figure who led the exodus from Egypt and that most people in Pakistan are Muslim. Less than half the participants in the nationwide survey answered correctly that only Protestants, not Catholics, teach that salvation comes through faith alone.

it right. Sixty-five percent of Catholics knew Moses led the exodus and 65 percent identified Bethlehem as the birthplace of Jesus. Stephen Prothero, a religion professor at Boston University, said during the Newseum discussion that the survey found “zero correlation” to people doing better on the quiz if they have had years of religious education. Prothero, author of “Religious Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know — And Doesn’t,” helped precipitate the Pew survey with his book.

Analysis

No comparable study The survey was a first-time study of its type, so the authors said there’s no way of knowing whether Americans today know more or less about religion than did prior generations. The survey asked nine questions intended to gauge knowledge of other subjects, including politics, science, history and literature. Overall, people got more than half of most of those questions right. Nevertheless, said Pew senior researcher Gregory Smith, “the survey clearly demonstrates that there is an awful lot of important stuff people are unfamiliar with.” In a panel discussion at the Newseum, moderator Ray Suarez, senior correspondent for the “NewsHour” on PBS, noted the irony that “people are ready to go to the barricades over posting of the Ten Commandments, yet they themselves don’t know what (the Ten Commandments) are.” Of the whole sample, 55 percent correctly noted that the “golden rule” is not a commandment. White Catholics scored about the same as the national population as a whole on the 32-question survey, getting an average of half the questions right. Hispanic Catholics came in at the bottom of the breakouts by faith group, averaging 11.6 correct answers. Atheists and agnostics averaged 20.9 correct answers, Jews averaged

Take the quiz Following is a short version of the Pew Forum quiz. 1. Which Bible figure is most closely associated with leading the exodus from Egypt? Job Elijah Moses Abraham 2. What was Mother Teresa’s religion? Catholic Jewish Buddhist Mormon Hindu 3. Which of the following is NOT one of the Ten Commandments? Do not commit adultery Do unto others as you would have them do unto you Do not steal Keep the Sabbath holy

Study raises flags for church

Also read a commentary by Father Robert Barron at THECATHOLICSPIRIT.COM 20.5 correct and Mormons averaged 20.3 correct. White evangelical Protestants averaged 17.6 correct answers, white mainline Protestants scored 15.8 correct, those with no particular religious affiliation got 15.2 correct and black Protestants averaged 13.4 right answers. Catholics didn’t do so well on a key question of Catholic theology, however. Only a little more than half — 55 percent — correctly identified the church teaching that the bread and wine used in Communion become the body and blood of Christ during the consecration.

Catholics don’t do well Catholics also didn’t do well on the seven questions about the Bible, averaging 3.8 correct. Only 42 percent correctly identified Genesis as the first book of the Bible; 55 percent correctly picked Abraham as the biblical figure who was asked by God to sacrifice his son; 33 percent named Matthew, Mark, Luke and John as the four Gospels; and 25 percent identified Job as the character who remained faithful despite great trials. Catholics did better on other Scripture questions. On the “golden rule” question, 57 percent of Catholics got

4. When does the Jewish Sabbath begin? Friday Saturday Sunday 5. Is Ramadan . . .? The Hindu festival of lights A Jewish day of atonement The Islamic holy month 6. Which of the following best describes the Catholic teaching about the bread and wine used for Communion? The bread and wine actually become the body and blood of Jesus Christ. The bread and wine are symbols of the body and blood of Jesus Christ.

He said that the survey should raise some flags of concern for the Catholic Church, especially since 10 percent of Americans describe themselves as ex-Catholics. Study co-author Alan Cooperman said the Catholic Church has always downplayed the Bible in favor of the teachings of the magisterium and the “deposit of faith,” over the centuries. He said one priest he spoke with noted that as a seminarian he hadn’t even studied the Bible until his third year of religious studies. Researcher Smith said the No. 1 predictor of how well people did on the study was their level of education, with college graduates and those with higher degrees averaging more than 20 of the 32 questions right. Those who took some kind of a religious studies course in college did the best, averaging 22.1 questions right. Attending a religious school as a child seems to have had less impact on someone scoring well, Smith said. Graduates of private religious schools averaged 17.8 correct answers, compared with 18.5 correct answers for graduates of private nonreligious schools. Smith attributed the high scores of atheists and agnostics to the process they have gone through to decide they are atheist or agnostic. “These are folks who have chosen to identify with a relatively small and relatively unpopular portion of the U.S. population. . . . It shows they have taken a side, and given considerable thought to these matters,” he said. The survey included responses from 3,412 adults questioned in May and June. The statistical margin of error ranges from plus or minus 2.5 points for the entire sample to as much as plus or minus 11 points for the smallest sample segment, the 117 Hispanic Catholics. Patricia Zapor writes for Catholic News Service.

Elijah Moses Abraham 9. What was Joseph Smith’s religion? Catholic Jewish Buddhist Mormon Hindu 10. According to rulings by the U.S. Supreme Court, is a public school teacher permitted to lead a class in prayer, or not? Yes, permitted No, not permitted

Muslim Christian 13. What was the name of the person whose writings and actions inspired the Protestant Reformation? Martin Luther Thomas Aquinas John Wesley 14. Which of these religions aims at nirvana, the state of being free from suffering? Islam Buddhism Hinduism

7. In which religion are Vishnu and Shiva central figures? Islam Hinduism Taoism

11. According to rulings by the U.S. Supreme Court, is a public school teacher permitted to read from the Bible as an example of literature, or not? Yes, permitted No, not permitted

15. Which one of these preachers participated in the period of religious activity known as the First Great Awakening? Jonathan Edwards Charles Finney Billy Graham

8. Which Bible figure is most closely associated with remaining obedient to God despite suffering? Job

12. What religion do most people in Pakistan consider themselves? Buddhist Hindu

Turn to Page 6B for the answers. Visit the Pew Forum at HTTP://PEWFORUM.ORG to find this and other polls by the Pew Research Center.


6B

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • OCTOBER 18, 2010

Commentary

/ This Catholic Life

Two men of science, two very different paths to fertility

Faith and the Workplace Tom Bengtson

Nobel committee overlooks Austrian doctor who improved fertility awareness science

Most of us don’t think of people suffering professionally because of their faith, but it still happens. Dr. Josef Roetzer, who died earlier this month, was an example. Roetzer is the Austrian doctor who improved fertility awareness science in the 1950s. His work led to the development of the sympto-thermal method of natural family planning. Roetzer studied human fertility, recording observations from more than 300,000 cycles. Roetzer discovered that by combining temperature information with mucus observations, periods of fertility and infertility could be identified with extreme accuracy. His work was revolutionary, but it was shunned by the establishment, which was dominated by the pharmaceutical industry. Austrian Bishop Klaus Kung reportedly said that Roetzer “suffered many a setback in his work” due to his Catholic faith. The Austrian bishops funded Roetzer from 1966 to 1974 so he could continue his research. In 1986, he founded the Institute for Natural Family Planning, which today is run by his daughter, Elisabeth. At the age of 91, Josef Roetzer died on Oct. 4.

Genesis for understanding Humane Vitae. In Genesis 1, God tells the man and women to “be fruitful and multiply.” In Genesis 2, it says “A man leaves his father and mother and clings to his wife, and the two of them become one body.” God gives us two creation stories for many reasons, and one of those reasons is to help us understand the essential components of marriage.

More died than lived

Culture gets it wrong Ironically, Oct. 4 is the same day the Nobel Prize for Medicine was awarded to Robert G. Edwards, the British biologist who developed in vitro fertilization, or IVF. Unlike their reaction to Roetzer’s work, the establishment lauded Edwards’ work. Cynically, one can’t avoid the observation that there are billions of dollars associated with assisted reproductive technology, while there is almost no money associated with the implementation of fertility awareness. So often the culture gets it wrong. Church teaching warns against the immorality of IVF while lauding the

practice of natural family planning. The modern basis for this teaching is found in Humane Vitae, the landmark encyclical issued by Pope Paul VI on July 25, 1968. The heart of Humane Vitae is the inseparability of the procreative and unitive as-

pects of marriage. At Catholic weddings, the priest often proclaims “let no one divide what God has joined.” While the theological basis for the church’s teaching on marriage is vast, I like the two creation stories in

Civility lost in communicating political viewpoints The day after Labor Day, I attended the opening year convocation at the University of St. Thomas. Father Dennis Dease, president of St. Thomas and a close friend, gave what I thought was an instructive and wholesome speech on “civility in our communications.” It was a meaningful and appropriate speech from which many of us Frederick could benefit. Zimmerman This election year, our family has received many e-mails and publications that are near polar opposites to the kinds of communications suggested by Father Dease in his address to the St. Thomas faculty and staff. Some of these publications chronicle the evils of Republicans, some castigate Democrats. Surprisingly, some of the most viscous have been directed at the independent candidate for Minnesota governor, Tom Horner. One of the most conscientious Catholics I know is a high-ranking official in organized labor and lifelong Democrat — a very fair Democrat, but a lifelong one. Another very conscientious Catholic is a staunch Republican — a mostly fair one, also. Inter-

My Turn

estingly, they have respect for one another and are good friends. Importantly, they are civil — not only to each other, but to others. They are both respected on many fronts. I have other friends who are conscientious, and religious, members of the Independence Party. These are also respected. Perhaps we should examine the internal consistency of what we are doing with our

communications, whether originated by us or merely forwarded. Should we condemn all the people who voted for Democrats because they “support intrinsic evils?” On the other hand, are not wars, poverty, crime and greed also dimensions of the pro-life consideration? Respectfully, I think we can all do better. We are unlikely to make any converts by castigating so many people — even as we hold to our own beliefs. Condemnation may not be an effective endorsement of solid values. We may only harden others in their beliefs. We can still hold rigidly to our own beliefs, and express them publicly, while treating people with civility and charity. Who knows, they may be favorably influenced by what we do and say. It will be interesting, in the final analysis, to see who has the most influence and whose values are ultimately respected. My own view is that the country has enough problems that working together in a constructive way is long overdue. Frederick M. Zimmerman is a member of Immaculate Heart of Mary in Minnetonka.

Edwards disregarded that teaching when he developed the technology that led to the birth of the first “testtube baby,” Louise Brown. Ironically, she was born July 25, 1978, 10 years to the day after the publication of Humane Vitae. Since then, more than 4 million children have been born through the in vitro process, but many millions more have died in the laboratory. IVF typically results in the fertilization of several eggs, with weaker ones culled away in a process euphemistically called “selective reduction.” Sometimes, the fertilized eggs are saved; today, more than half a million embryos are being preserved in laboratory freezers in this country, posing mind-bending theological and ethical dilemmas. My wife and I resolved our own difficult infertility trials through adoption. The church teaching helped us to navigate the infertility experience. Without an NFP education organization called the Couple to Couple League, we would never have known of the church teaching. Roetzer’s work is at the core of the method taught by CCL. I am very grateful to CCL, to the church, and to Josef Roetzer, a man who lived his faith. Tom Bengtson, who runs a publishing company, can be contacted through his website at WWW. GEOPRINCIPLE.COM.

To our readers Material printed on the Commentary page of This Catholic Life does not necessarily reflect the opinions of The Catholic Spirit or the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis.

Pew quiz answers 1. Moses 2. Catholic 3. Do unto others . . . 4. Friday 5. Islamic holy month 6. Become the body and blood 7. Hinduism 8. Job 9. Mormom 10. No, not permitted 11. Yes, permitted 12. Muslim 13. Martin Luther 14. Buddhism 15. Jonathan Edwards For quiz, see page 5B.


“Religious freedom . . . requires the freedom to worship and express one’s faith publicly within society.” Archbishop Francis Chullikatt, the Vatican’s representative to the United Nations, addressing the general assembly Oct. 5

The Lesson Plan The Catholic Spirit

Reflections on faith and spirituality

OCTOBER 18, 2010

7B

God hears the cry of the poor and rewards the humble

S

unday’s readings focus on examining the interior attitude with which one ought to pray. In the Gospel’s parable, both the Pharisee and the tax collector are praying in the temple, but only one is justified because of his interior attitude. The book of Sirach tells us that God is a God of justice, and clarifies whose prayers are most efficacious by explaining that anyone who serves God willingly and who is lowly is heard by God. So, the interior attitude of humility moves God to hear the cry of the poor, the oppressed, the orphan and the widow. In the second reading, Paul expresses his most intimate feelings and desires to Timothy: “From now Deacon on, the crown of righteousness awaits me, which the Lord, the just Adalberto judge, will award to me on that Sanchez day.” Paul hopes for the prize, but not because of his own merit. God will give him the prize because he loves him. Luke, in his introduction to the aforementioned parable, describes the character of the righteous Pharisee who despises the tax collector. The Pharisee spoke sincerely, believing all he says about himself and seeing nothing wrong with his self-preening. He prayed by defining himself by what he is not. In a sense, we can see him as a good man. He may be a good spouse because he is not adulterous, and he may

Sunday Scriptures

science he has no sin, nothing has failed; he has been good and responsible in everything he has done.

Readings

So, what is Pharisee’s sin?

Sunday, Oct. 24 30th Sunday in ordinary time ■ Sirach 35:12-14, 16-18 ■ 2 Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18 ■ Luke 18:9-14

The problem lies in his interior attitude. The Pharisee may indeed be sinless, but he thinks he merits a reward; he has not learned that salvation is God’s free gift. Therefore, God has to reward him not because of God’s will, but because he deserved it. The Pharisee’s sin is not his arrogance but his self-reliant attitude regarding justification. The tax collector’s attitude, by contrast, is an attitude of humility. He “stood off at a distance and would not even raise his eyes to heaven but beat his breast and prayed, ‘O God, be merciful to me a sinner.’ ” God justifies the tax collector because he is humble enough to believe he can be forgiven for what are likely very real sins. He recognizes that everything he has received comes from God; he has received nothing by his own merit. He learned that salvation is God’s free gift, not something he deserves. This attitude allows God to work on his humble heart. He shows his mercy and compassion to those who seek him with humility. The prayer of the lowly pierces the clouds; it reaches its goal. The readings invite us to examine our interior attitude when we pray so we can receive God’s mercy and compassion.

For reflection What words come out of your heart when you pray? Ask God to grant you a humble heart, so you can believe you are forgiven.

be a good citizen because he is not dishonest. We find nothing wrong in his actions; he is dutiful to the rules and laws. He is very pious and religious. In his con-

Deacon Adalberto Sanchez is in formation for the priesthood at the St. Paul Seminary for the Diocese of Rockford, Ill. His home parish is St. Joseph in Elgin, Ill., and his teaching parish is Corpus Christi in Roseville.

Daily Scriptures Sunday, Oct. 24 30th Sunday in ordinary time Sirach 35:12-14, 16-18 2 Timothy 4:6-8, 16-18 Luke 18:9-14 “For he is a God of justice, who knows no favorites.” — Sirach 35:12 If we really believed this statement from Sirach, we would be changed forever. Any feelings of self hatred, selfrighteousness or moral superiority we might have would disappear. We would all understand that we are both cherished and in need of forgiveness and mercy no matter what our religious or political viewpoint. Today, slowly and prayerfully repeat this statement until it seeps into your heart. Monday, Oct. 25 Ephesians 4:32 — 5:8 Luke 13:10-17 Even the threat of harsh judgment and criticism cannot stop the spirit of Christ within us from reaching out to those who are suffering. Tuesday, Oct. 26 Ephesians 5:21-33 Luke 13:18-21 Trust that the good that has been planted in your heart will continue to grow. Wednesday, Oct. 27 Ephesians 6:1-9 Luke 13:22-30 The smallest inspiration might prove to have the greatest impact on our lives.

Thursday, Oct. 28 Simon and Jude, apostles Ephesians 2:19-22 Luke 6:12-16 Are you able to give yourself permission to spend time apart from your busy life when faced with an important decision? Friday, Oct. 29 Philippians 1:1-11 Luke 14:1-6 We can become so fearful of making a mistake that we fail to seize an opportunity to relieve suffering. Saturday, Oct. 30 Philippians 1:18b-26 Luke 14:1, 7-11 Notice if you are you still able to laugh at yourself. Sunday, Oct. 31 31st Sunday in ordinary time Wisdom 11:22 — 12:2 2 Thessalonians 1:11 — 2:2 Luke 19:1-10 “Before the Lord, the whole universe is as a grain from a balance.” — Wisdom 11:22 Years ago, I had an opportunity to visit my grade school. Not only couldn’t I image ever fitting into the miniature desk in my first grade classroom, the entire school seemed to have shrunk. Hopefully, something like this happens on our spiritual journey; without knowing quite when or how we outgrow our childhood version of God as an old man with a white beard, waiting for us to fail.

How has your image of God evolved over the years? Prayerfully reflect on ways your God might be too small.

In order to hear the voice of Christ’s indwelling Spirit, we must be willing to be surprised.

Monday, Nov. 1 All Saints Revelation 7:2-4, 9-14 1 John 3:1-3 Matthew 5:1-12a Notice how we forget our own problems when we reach out to someone in pain.

Saturday, Nov. 6 Philippians 4:10-19 Luke 16:9-15 What choices have you made this week that reject our culture’s emphasis on success and material gain?

Tuesday, Nov. 2 All Souls Wisdom 3:1-9 Romans 5:5-11 John 6:37-40 What appears to be an ending is really a beginning. Wednesday, Nov. 3 Martin de Porres, religious Philippians 2:12-18 Luke 14:25-33 We can become so attached to a person, position or role that we forget that the purpose of our faith is to grow in humility, compassion, justice and mercy. Thursday, Nov. 4 Charles Borromeo, bishop Philippians 3:3-8a Luke 15:1-10 Self-righteousness is a sign that we have created God in our own image. Friday, Nov. 5 Philippians 3:17 — 4:1 Luke 16:1-8

Sunday, Nov. 7 32nd Sunday in ordinary time 2 Maccabees 7:1-2, 9-14 2 Thessalonians 2:16 — 3:5 Luke 20:27-38 “But the Lord is faithful.” — 2 Thessalonians 3:3 Several years ago, my husband and I were driving over an icy freeway bridge when our car began to spin out of control. As our car headed for the concrete barrier, I felt an inexplicable sense of calm and peace. Although our car was completely totaled, neither of us was seriously injured. Very often our expectations keep us from recognizing God’s faithfulness. We confuse comfort and a carefree existence with God’s fidelity to us. But, it is in the midst of life’s unexpected twists and turns that we come to recognize the presence of God within and around us. The daily reflections are written by Terri Mifek, a member of St. Edward in Bloomington and a certified spiritual director at the Franciscan Retreat House in Prior Lake.


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The Lesson Plan

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • OCTOBER 18, 2010

All Souls Day: Why should we pray for the dead? By Father Michael Van Sloun

Halloween lesson

For The Catholic Spirit

Nov. 2 is All Souls Day, the special day in the liturgical year set aside to pray for the dead. But why pray for the dead? There is no need to pray for those who have died and gone straight to heaven. This feast presumes that some who die are imperfectly purified of their sinfulness, and while assured of the eventual benefits of eternal life, are barred from immediate access to heaven. Instead, they are held in an unknown place where they are cleansed of their sinfulness, and after an indeterminate time, are finally released to take their place at God’s throne. For centuries, Catholics have said that purgatory is the intermediate place of temporary punishment and purification, and that the length of time spent there is based upon the number and seriousness of one’s sins. The church defined this doctrine at the Second Council of Lyons (1274), the Council of Florence (1439) and the Council of Trent (1545-1563).

Purgatory in catechism The term, purgatory, still exists in church literature today (Catechism of the Catholic Church, No. 1030-1032) despite the fact that it is not mentioned in the Bible. Two New Testament verses allude to a cleansing fire (1 Corinthians 3:15 and 1 Peter 1:7), and they have served as the basis for the concept of purgatory, which evolved from the fifth to 13th

Anoka pushes saints, not ghouls, on scariest night of the year. Read Father Michael Van Sloun’s article about Halloween online at THECATHOLICSPIRIT.COM.

Photo courtesy of Father Michael Van Sloun

Poor souls in purgatory are portrayed on a window at St. Thomas the Apostle in Corcoran.

centuries. Today, the church is more inclined to speak about “The Final Purification” (Documents of Vatican II, The Dogmatic Constitution of the Church, Lumen Gentium, No. 51). A key biblical basis for praying for the dead is found in the Old Testament (2 Maccabees 12:38-46). This story recounts how Judas Maccabeus, a great Jewish general of the second century before Christ, successfully led his army into battle. A day after hostilities ceased, the troops who survived returned to the battlefield to gather up the bodies to give them a respectful burial.

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To their horror, they found amulets, protective charm necklaces sacred to the idols of Jamnia, local pagan gods, tied around their necks and hidden under their armor. This was a grave sin against the First Commandment’s law against idols (Exodus 20:2-6; Deuteronomy 5:79). Immediately “they turned to supplication and prayed that the sinful deed might be blotted out” (2 Maccabees 12:42).

Survivors offered sacrifice In fact, the survivors, who placed an extraordinarily high premium on faithful observance of the Mosaic Law, were so aghast at this sin that they feared their

True happiness can be found by strengthening one’s friendship with God through a love for sacred Scripture and the sacraments, Pope Benedict XVI said. Christians today can find many role models in the saintly men and women who lived throughout history, he said during his weekly general audience in St. Peter’s Square Oct. 6. In his catechesis, the pope described the life of the 13thPope century Benedictine Benedict XVI mystic, St. Gertrude the Great. Far from being a historical figure stuck in the past, this “exceptional woman” remains for today’s faithful “a school of Christian life, a principled life, and she shows us that at the heart of a happy and real life is friendship with Jesus,” he said. St. Gertrude entered the monastery at a very young age and was an extremely talented student, the pope said. She loved literature and music and was diligently devoted to her studies, he said. However, when she was 24, she grew disgusted with her secular pursuits, he said. She said the sense of turmoil and anxiety she felt was a gift from God, who was giving her a sign that she needed to “tear down that tower of vanity and curiosity.”

From the Vatican

Joe Warner

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Father Michael Van Sloun is pastor of St. Stephen in Anoka.

Pope: True happiness found in close friendship with Christ Catholic News Service

Angela Warner

fallen comrades would be consigned to everlasting punishment. As firm believers in the resurrection, they were confident their prayers could help atone for the sins of the dead, release them from the punishment they deserved, and speed them on their journey to eternal light and peace. Consequently, the survivors took up a collection and sent it to Jerusalem so an expiatory sacrifice could be offered in the temple. Consistent with this ancient Jewish practice, the Catholic Church has taught for centuries that our prayers serve as an aid to those who have died, and the premier prayer to offer for their intention is the Eucharist, the holy sacrifice of the Mass. The church also recommends almsgiving, indulgences and other works of penance for the deceased (Catechism, No. 1032). On this All Souls Day or any time throughout the month of November, please consider reserving some time to pray for the dead.

While her ardent love of learning helped bring her to religious life, the saint said it had gone too far and it was driven by pride, the pope said. From that moment on, St. Gertrude began to intensify her relationship with God. She switched her studies from humanistic subjects to theological works, the pope said, and in her monastic life, she went from living what she called being “negligent” to a life of intense prayer and missionary zeal.

Mystic had great gifts St. Gertrude represents one of the most famous female mystics in church history, the pope said, and she’s called “the Great” because of her “exceptional natural and supernatural gifts.” She displayed “a very profound humility, an ardent zeal for the salvation of others, an intimate communion with God through contemplation and a readiness to come to the aid of the needy,” he said. “True happiness is the goal in our life,” the pope said, and the only way to find that kind of happiness is in forging a friendship with God. “This friendship you learn through a love for sacred Scripture, a love for the liturgy and (by cultivating) a deep faith and a love for Mary in order to truly get to know God better,” he said. Speaking in English at the end of the audience, Pope Benedict welcomed nearly 800 friends and family members of 30 men from the Pontifical North American College who were ordained to the diaconate in St. Peter’s Basilica Oct. 7.


Calendar Dining out KC Auxiliary casserole and salad luncheon at Knights of Columbus Hall, Shakopee — Oct. 13: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 1760 Fourth Ave. E. Cost is $7. Fish fry at Knights of Columbus Hall, Bloomington — Oct. 22 and 29: 5 to 9 p.m. at 1114 American Blvd. Cost is $10.95. Call (952) 888-1492 for reservations. KC Chicken and rib dinner at Knights of Columbus Hall, Bloomington — Oct. 27 and Nov. 3: 5 to 9 p.m. at 1114 American Blvd. Cost is $12. Call (952) 888-1492 for reservations.

Prayer/ liturgies Healing Mass at Lumen Christi, St. Paul — Oct. 18: 7 p.m. rosary, Mass at 7:30 p.m. at 2055 Bohland Ave. Father Biju Mathew will be the celebrant. Healing Mass at St. Joseph, Hopkins — Oct. 19: 7 p.m. at 1310 Mainstreet. Father Jim Livingston will be the celebrant. Knights of Columbus traveling rosary at St. Bernard, St. Paul — Oct. 24: 2 p.m. at 187 W. Geranium St. Knights of Columbus traveling rosary at St. Agnes, St. Paul — Oct. 31: 2 p.m. at 548 Lafond Ave. All-night vigil with the Blessed Sacrament at Our Lady of Guadalupe, St. Paul — Nov. 5 to 6: 7 p.m. Fri. to 8 a.m. Sat. at 401 Concord St.

Parish events Rummage sale at St. John the Baptist, Hugo — Oct. 21 and 22: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thurs. and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fri. ($3 bag day) at 14383 Forest Blvd. Rummage sale at Sacred Heart, Robbinsdale — Oct. 21 and 22: 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thurs. and 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fri. ($3 bag day) at 4087 W. Broadway. Rummage sale at Immaculate Conception, Lonsdale — Oct. 22 and 23: 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fri. and 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sat. at 116 Alabama St. S.E. Next to New sale at St. Rose of Lima, Roseville — Oct. 22 and 23: 1 to 8 p.m. Fri. and 8 a.m. to noon Sat. at 2048 N. Hamline Ave. Booya at St. John Vianney, S. St. Paul — Oct. 23: Noon to 7 p.m. at 19th Avenue N. and Bromley Street. Eat in or take out. Sunday Night Dinner at St. Peter, Richfield — Oct. 24: Dinner, followed by presentations. Choose between “The Gospel of Luke,” and “Lights, Camera, Faith.” Second in a fivenight series, also meets Nov. 7 and 21 and Dec. 5. 5:30 p.m. at 6730 Nicollet Ave. S. RSVP to (612) 866-5089. Holiday bingo at St. John the Evagelist, Little Canada — Oct. 24: 6 p.m. at 2621 McMenemy Road. Hot dogs, Culvers custard and other treats available. Tickets are $2 and include 12 games.

OCTOBER 18, 2010 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

Don’t Miss ACCW Appalachia Christmas Mission program The Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women is sponsoring its annual Appalachia Christmas Mission program from Oct. 27 to Nov. 7 Each year, the group collects unwrapped gifts for the people of Beattyville and Pikeville, Ky. Gifts are being collected this year at the Vern and Olive Hupf farm in Randolph. For donation instructions and information, call (651) 291-4545 or (507) 263-2705.

Autumn Bingo at SS. Peter and Paul, Loretto — Oct. 24: 1 p.m. at 145 Railroad St. E. 20 games of bingo and three bonus games. Cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under. Garage sale at St. Thomas the Apostle, Corcoran — Oct. 27 to 29: 1 to 9 p.m. Wed., 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thurs. and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fri. ($4 bag day) at 20000 County Road 10. ‘Hildegard of Bingen and the Living Light’ presented at St. Olaf, Minneapolis — Oct. 28: 7 p.m. at 215 S. Eighth St. Professional mezzo soprano Linn Maxwell will perform. Also an exhibit of art inspired by Hildegard of Bingen will run from Oct. 28 to 31. Pete’s Boutique at St. Peter, Richfield — Oct. 30: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 6730 Nicollet Ave. S. Features crafters and artisans. For information, visit WWW.STPETERSRICHFIELD.ORG. Booya at St. Jerome, Maplewood — Oct. 31: Carry-out only from 7 a.m. until sold out. Bring a container. Also features a quilt raffle, bake sale and Booya boutique at 380 E. Roselawn Ave. ‘Following the Spirit: Helping Young Adults Figure Out Their Next Steps,’ at St. Jane House, Minneapolis — Nov. 1: 7:30 to 9 p.m. at 1403 Emerson Ave. N. First in a three-part series sponsored by Visitation Monastery. For information, call (612) 521-6113, ext. 4. Christmas fair at St. Timothy, Blaine — Nov. 6: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 707 89th Ave. N.E. More than 70 tables, bake shop, luncheon and more. Turkey bingo at St. Bernard, St. Paul — Nov. 6: 2 to 5 p.m. at the parish center, 147 W. Geranium. Cash and turkey prizes. Bazaar at Epiphany, Coon Rapids — Nov. 6 and 7: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sat. and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sun. at 11001 Hanson Blvd. N.W. More than 70 crafters, bake sale, lefse, children’s corner. Turkey bingo at St. Catherine, Spring Lake Township — Nov. 7: 2 p.m. at 24425 Old Hwy. 13 Blvd., Jordan. $5 per card, $1 per coverall. Free lunch served. Sunday Night Dinner at St. Peter, Richfield — Nov. 7: Dinner, followed by presentations. Choose between “The Gospel of Luke,” and “Lights, Camera, Faith.” Third in a 5-night series, also meets Nov. 21 and Dec. 5.

at Benilde-St. Margaret, St. Louis Park — Oct. 30: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 2501 Hwy. 100. A rare opportunity to shop a unique mix of Twin Cities’ retailers and merchants under one roof. Visit WWW.BSMSCHOOL.ORG. Open house at The Academy of Holy Angels, Richfield — Nov. 3 and 4: 6 p.m. both nights at 6600 Nicollet Ave. S. For prospesctive students entering grades 9 to 12. WWW.ACADEMY OFHOLYANGELS.ORG. Children’s dance clinic at Benilde-St. Margaret, St. Louis Park — Nov. 6: 12:30 to 3 p.m. at 2501 Hwy. 100. Open to children ages 4 to 14 and no dance experience is necessary. Cost is $35 for registration before Oct. 23 and $40 after. Visit WWW.BSM SPORTS.ORG.

5:30 p.m. at 6730 Nicollet Ave. S. RSVP to (612) 866-5089. Parish mission at Mary, Mother of the Church, Burnsville — Nov. 7 to 9: 7 to 8:30 p.m. each night. Features Jesuit Father J-Glen Murray at 3333 Cliff Rd. For information, visit WWW.MMOTC.ORG. ‘On the Complementarity of Men and Women’ at Nativity of Our Lord, St. Paul — Nov. 10: 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Prior and Stanford Avenues. Presenter is Dr. Deborah Savage. Part of the speaker series, “Male and Female, He created them: God’s Plan for Authentic Happiness.” Veteran’s Day concert at the Basilica of St. Mary, Minneapolis — Nov. 11: 7 p.m. at 88 N. 17th St. Features the U.S. Naval Academy Men’s Glee Club. Purchase tickets at WWW.MARY.ORG.

Fundraising events North Side Life Care Center banquet for life at the Metropolitan Ballroom, Golden Valley — Nov. 4: 6:30 p.m. at 5418 Wayzata Blvd. Speaker is Kathy Sparks, executive director of Mosaic Pregnancy and Health Centers in Illinois. Complimentary dinner. For reservations call (612) 522-6589 by Oct. 21. Crystal Gayle in concert for Cradle of Hope at The O’Shaughnessy, St. Catherine University — Nov. 6: 7 p.m. at 2004 Randolph Ave. Tickets available through Ticketmaster or by calling 651-690-6700. For information, visit WWW.CRADLEOFHOPE.ORG.

School events National speaker on bullying at Cretin-Derham Hall, St. Paul — Oct. 27: 7 to 8:30 p.m. at 550 S. Albert St. Author Jodee Blanco will speak. For information about her, visit WWW.JODEE BLANCO.COM. ‘Little Women’ presented by CretinDerham Hall, St. Paul — Oct. 29 to 31 and Nov. 5 to 7: Fri. and Sat. performances are at 7 p.m. and Sun. matinee at 2 p.m. at 550 S. Albert St. Cost is $6 for students and seniors, $8 for adults. Funky to Formal shopping boutique

Young adults Frassati Night at St. Joseph, W. St. Paul — Oct. 18: 7 p.m. at 1154 Seminole Ave. W. Meet for a Holy hour and fellowship. Sponsored by the Frassati Saciety of Minnesota. For information, e-mail DYBADUK@YAHOO.COM.

Other events KC craft bake and boutique sale at Knights of Columbus Hall, Stillwater — Oct. 23: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 1910 S. Greeley St. Lunch will be available. ‘Breaking Addiction, Healing, Conversion and the Afterlife’ at NET Center, W. St. Paul — Oct. 23: Noon at 110 Crusader Ave. Features speakers followed by a Mass at 4 p.m. KC craft and bake sale at Knights of Columbus Hall, Shakopee — Oct. 24: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 1760 Fourth Ave. E. Catholic Charismatic Renewal national conference at the Crowne Plaza, St. Paul — Oct. 29 and 30: 1 to 4 p.m. Father Raniero Cantalamessa, preacher to the papal household, will present. For information, visit WWW.NSC-CHARISCENTER.ORG/AFTERNOON GENINFO.HTM. Retreat on the Holy Spirit with papal preacher, Father Raniero Cantalamessa at the Earle Brown Heritage Center, Brooklyn Park — Nov. 1: 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. For information, call (763) 571-5314 or visit WWW.MNCRO.ORG. St. Therese Auxiliary Christmas boutique at St. Therese Care Center, New Hope — Nov. 5 and 6: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fri. and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sat. at 8000 Bass Lake Road.

Singles Sunday Spirits walking group for 50plus Catholic singles — ongoing Sundays: For Catholic singles to meet and make friends. The group usually meets in St. Paul on Sunday afternoons. For information, call Judy at (763) 221-3040 or Al at (651) 482-0406. 50-plus singles meatloaf dinner at St. Joseph, New Hope — Oct. 24: 5 p.m. at 8701 36th Ave. N. Includes social hour, dinner and speaker Cost is $10. Call (763) 439-5940.

9B

Calendar Submissions DEADLINE: Noon Thursday, seven days before the anticipated Thursday date of publication. Recurring or ongoing events must be submitted each time they occur. LISTINGS: Accepted are brief notices of upcoming events hosted by Catholic parishes and institutions. If the Catholic connection is not clear, please emphasize it in your press release. ITEMS MUST INCLUDE the following to be considered for publication in the calendar: • Time and date of event. • Full street address of event. • Description of event. • Contact information in case of questions. E-MAIL: SPIRITCALENDAR@ ARCHSPM.ORG.

(No attachments, please.) FAX: (651) 291-4460. MAIL: “Calendar,” The Catholic Spirit, 244 Dayton Ave., St. Paul, MN 55102.


10B

OCTOBER 18, 2010 • THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT

Communist plot against church makes new book read ‘like a spy novel’ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Q & A with George Weigel

The Catholic Spirit: When “Witness to Hope” was published in 1999, were you expecting to write a second book from the beginning? George Weigel: Yes. I had intended to do the whole story, if I were given the opportunity to do so, and I promised the late pope that I would do that when we had dinner together in December 2004. So this book is, in some sense, a fulfillment of that promise to him, but it’s also something that I had intended to do at the beginning of this whole business in 1995. TCS: At that point, did you expect that his last six years would offer so much to write about? GW: He was a man of constant surprises, so one would have expected there would be a lot more. Obviously, in 1999 when “Witness to Hope” came out, there was the whole Jubilee Year [in 2000] that would have to be contended with, but no one could have predicted 9/11, or the “Long Lent” of 2002 [the American bishops’ months-long public penance of the sex-abuse scandal], or the Iraq War, or any of the things I deal with in “The End and the Beginning.” After the pope died, I decided to take some time to reflect on all of this, and to get materials together and whatnot, but it was during that period, from 2005 to 2008, that the real surprise of this came, and that was coming into possession of materials given to me by Polish historians, colleagues, which paint a remarkable portrait of the communist war against Karol Wojtyla (John Paul II) — the communist attempt to penetrate the Vatican, and so forth. I decided in 2008 that we were going to have to go back through certain aspects of the life of John Paul II. TCS: So those documents came near the end of your research for the book? GW: In 2007, 2008. TCS: Did you know if anything existed before then? GW: I knew that there had been a lot of attempts to

George Weigel, author of the new book “The End and the Beginning,” spoke at the University of St. Thomas Oct. 4. He is a distinguished senior fellow of the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, D.C. Nancy Wiechec / CNS photo

impede the work of the church, but I think that the surprise in this material is the absolute, utter magnitude of this. We’re talking about tens of millions of man hours in effort and billions upon billions of dollars over a period of 40 years to impede the work of the church in Eastern Europe, to diminish and demean its leadership, to penetrate the Vatican, to — after John Paul II became pope — impede his work as pope. And this includes some pretty unpleasant stuff, including an effort to blackmail the pope prior to the 1983 papal visit to Poland. . . . and any other number of dramatic things. So you end up with a book, the first third of which, several people have said, reads like a spy novel, to which I always say, “Yeah, but this happened.” This is non-fiction, this is fact, and the documents are sitting in my safe at home. That was a bit of a surprise. TCS: Were there any other surprises that you came across? GW: I have to say in those materials, and in talking with people about those, the degree to which the Vatican, prior to John Paul II, seemed either unaware of or unconcerned about efforts to get into it [the Vatican] by these communist inteligence services — recruit agents, plant agents, steal documents, influence

negotiations. It’s quite remarkable. They had no counter-inteligence capability whatsoever, and they didn’t seem particularly concerned to have one. TCS: Tell me about the title of the book, “The End and the Beginning.” GW: “The End and the Beginning” is obviously a reference to T.S. Eliot and the Four Quartets, where Eliot says, “In my end is my beginning.” TCS: How do you see that applying to the life of John Paul II? GW: John Paul II described his death as his beginning, as his passover to a new life. I suppose there’s another way it works in this context, and that is that we’re talking about the end of his earthly life, as well as the beginning of his papacy through the prism of these documents. I think “the end and the beginning” also conveys a sense of the remarkable consistency of the pope’s life, that the end of his life and the beginning of his new life in his father’s house, as he put it, was all in continuity with the beginnings of his Christian life and the way he had lived that for more than eight decades. TCS: How did your view of Pope John Paul II’s papacy change as you wrote this second book, given the further reflection you gave to it? GW: There was a brief summary of the accomplishment to date at the end of “Witness to Hope,” but in this book there is a 130-page analysis of the man and his accomplishments, so obviously, a lot of thoughts occurred in the course of that. But I have to say that I’m also powerfully impressed by the degree to which there were these constant threads throughout 26-and-a-half years. Of which perhaps the brightest, thickest thread in the tapestry was this idea that the church is a mission; the church doesn’t simply have a mission. Church exists for the proclamation of the Gospel, to invite people to discipleship, to invite people into friendship with the

That’s how many ways, both in print and online, The Catholic Spirit touches your life. By: 1) Providing clear Catholic teaching. 2) Enriching with facts people’s conversations about our faith. 3) Challenging Catholics to live morally and justly. 4) Inspiring noble acts. 5) Deepening spiritual and prayer life. 6) Celebrating Catholic traditions, 7) Strengthening Catholic identity. 8) Enlivening our Catholic community into action.

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11B

THE CATHOLIC SPIRIT • OCTOBER 18, 2010

Pontificate provided key to understanding Vatican II, says reviewer CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10B Lord, and that continues, and indeed, continues to the very end, where his last priestly service to the church and the world is to invite people into an experience of the Paschal Mystery through his experience of dying. TCS: You describe as his “last encyclical” the experience of the world watching him die. Can you explain what people may have been taught through this? GW: They were taught a lesson that he had attempted to convey in his magisterium of life issues, that there are no disposable human beings. I hope people were taught that. I hope people were taught that configuring one’s own suffering to the cross ennobles that suffering and gives it meaning beyond which human effort cannot go. I think it taught the lesson of conforming one’s self to the will of God, and not resisting that, or whining about it, but simply accepting that, and accepting that with cheer, with good humor. Joaquín Navarro, who was the pope’s spokesmen for many, many years, was asked a year after the pope died if he could describe him in a phrase. And he said, “l’uomo allegro,” in Italian — “a cheerful man.” And that’s the kind of good cheer, good humor, if you will, that comes from faith. I would also say that he was a happy warrior. He was embattled on many fronts, whether it was communism or the culture of death. He was a happy warrior, and he invited other people into a kind of cheerful “jeux de combat” (combat games). Churchill says, it isn’t quite as exhilarating as getting shot having them miss. It’s something like that, I suppose. John Paul II was a man who believed that God’s purposes were going to be vindicated in the fullness of time, so he could be both very intent about his own work and ministry, but also relaxed, in the sense of not fretting about outcomes, because he knew that the outcomes eventually were not of his disposition. TCS: Obviously he was beloved by people beyond the Catholic Church. You mentioned his cheerful disposition. What other attributes do you think people were so attracted to? GW: I think there was a transparent honesty to the

L’Oservatore Romano

The pope hugs a crucifix while watching the Way of the Cross via a television on Good Friday 2005. The photo speaks to the pope’s mission, George Weigel said Oct. 4. man. There was his ability to invite people into an experience of God, and an experience of prayer. And he was just a wonderful human being. He was very good company, and he was a man intensely interested in others. TCS: He was much beloved by young people, especially in a way that they had probably never loved a pope before in history as a collective group. And, he obviously had a special place in his heart for young people, and had much faith in what they could do. Why is this? GW: I think that the answer to the question about John Paul II’s attraction to young people is not difficult to come by. Young people want to be challenged to lead lives of holiness, and in a culture that generally now panders to young people in advertising and dress, whatever, this unapologetic challenge to lead large lives was very, very compelling. The other thing is what I said a moment ago — this luminous transparent honesty. Kids have very good baloney detectors, and there was no baloney. He wasn’t asking kids to do anything that he hadn’t done, and there was nothing false about it. That combination of transparent honesty and challenge made for a very compelling package.

TCS: In his review of your book for the journal “First Things,” [Center for Catholic Studies director] Don Briel wrote, “Perhaps John Paul’s significance lies in the fact that he provided a way to interpret the watershed event of the Second Vatican Council.” Do you see that as a good estimation of his papacy? GW: The Second Vatican Council was unique among the 21 ecumenical councils of history, in that it didn’t provide keys to its own interpretation. Other councils had written creeds, written laws, anathematized people, condemned heresies — these are all ways for a particular council to tell you how to interpret itself. . . . There was none of that at Vatican II. This was a council without interpretative keys, and that’s what he provided for 26-and-a-half years. TCS: Behind this book, behind the research, one of the very exciting things is that you had conversations with the Holy Father; you were able to see him as the man that he was, and not be back in the crowd. Not every biographer has that experience with the person about whom he is writing. When you think back to those conversations, what do you reflect on? GW: He was a real pastor, he was always concerned about my family and whatnot. My father died on Oct. 19, 2004, and the pope knew about this; in fact, he sent a telegram. When I saw him next in December 2004, he asked me how my mother was. Now, this is six weeks before he’s in the hospital for the last time. So, there was this sense of a pastor. There was also this sense of sharing somewhat of his trials, and his suffering and so forth. It was not easy to see how difficult life had become for him, yet it was ennobling to see the spirit with which he dealt with that. TCS: What do you think Pope John Paul II will be most remembered for? GW: I think that he will be recognized as the great Christian witness of the second half of the 20th century, as the pivotal figure in the collapse of European communism, and as one of the great teaching popes of history.

Read the entire interview at THECATHOLICSPIRIT.COM.

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“The search for truth must be pursued by Catholic journalists with passionate minds and hearts, but also with the professionalism of competent workers with sufficient and effective instruments.” Pope Benedict XVI, speaking to Catholic journalists and communications professionals Oct. 7

Overheard 12B

The Catholic Spirit

Quotes from this week’s newsmakers

Award to honor couple for educational philanthropy of charitable assets.

The Catholic Community Foundation will present its 2010 Legacy of Faith Award to Jerry and Delores Slawik during a banquet Oct. 27. The annual award is given to an individual or family in recognition of their leadership and philanthropy in support of the spiritual, educational The and social needs of the Catholic Spirit Catholic community.

News Notes

Through their philanthropy, the Slawiks, members of St. Louis King of France in St. Paul, have provided tuition assistance to more than 1,000 students attending Catholic high schools in the archdiocese. The family started the Skipper Slawik Fund in 1958, soon after Jerry’s 12-year-old brother, Skipper, died in a boating accident. The fund, which was managed by the family until CCF was founded in 1992, represents a significant portion of the $6 million in tuition aid granted by CCF over the past 14 years. For more information about the foundation

Jerry and Delores Slawik

or to make a reservation for the banquet, visit WWW.CCF-MN.ORG.

New look Eighteen years after its founding, the Catholic Community Foundation has a new logo intended to better reflect its unique role as a cultivator and distributor

Stewardship A Way of Life Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis

SAVE THE DATE! Saturday, February 26 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Pax Christi Catholic Community, Eden Prairie

2010 ARCHDIOCESAN STEWARDSHIP CONFERENCE Stewardship a Way of Life: Building Vibrant, Engaged Communities Featuring 3 highly regarded national experts: Father Daniel Mahan, executive director of the Marian University Center for Catholic Stewardship in Indianapolis, author of More than Silver or Gold: Homilies of a Stewardship Priest. Mr. Jim Kelley, president and chairman of the board of the International Catholic Stewardship Conference and director of development for the Diocese of Charlotte, NC. Author of The Stewardship Manual: A Guide for Individuals and Parishes Developing Stewardship as a Way of Life, plus Sustaining and Strengthening Stewardship. Ms. Leisa Anslinger, nationally recognized speaker and author of Forming Generous Hearts: Stewardship Planning for Lifelong Faith Formation.

JUST FOR PRIESTS A Roundtable discussion and boxed lunch

Stewardship is an Integral Part of your Parish’s Mission Presented by Fr. Daniel Mahan

Friday, February 25, 2011 • 11:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Hayden Center • 328 Kellogg Blvd W. • Saint Paul, MN 55102

The tree is said to represent “strength, growth, vitality, trust and seasonality of life,” according to a foundation explanation. Warm, natural colors aim to reflect a well-grounded organization, the strong capital letters indicate strength — defining CCF’s Catholic nature, whom it serves and what it does. The curved line between Catholic Community and Foundation stands for the link between the St. Paul-based nonprofit and the services it provides. The tree element, by the way, has a spiritual context in Psalm 1:3: “You are like a tree planted by streams of water, which yields its fruit in season and whose leaf does not wither. Whatever you do prospers.”

New center director Sam Rahberg will be the new director of Benedictine Center, a ministry of the Benedictine Sisters at St. Paul’s Monastery in Maplewood. He has served as the center’s associate director for the past five years.

OCTOBER 18, 2010

“Beyond our current economic crisis, there is also plenty of evidence that points to the link DIAZ that exists between climate changes (ongoing desertification, land degradation and drought) and migration. In short, there is plenty of evidence to support that the protection of our planet is inextricably linked to the protection of our human family.” — U.S. Ambassador to the Vatican Miguel Diaz, speaking at a church-run conference in Barcelona, Spain, Oct. 5

The Catholic Spirit - October 18, 2010  

Includes Archdiocesan Strategic Plan special section

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