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CATHEDRAL THE M AG AZ I N E O F T H E CAT H E D RA L SC H OOL O F ST . JO HN T HE DIV IN E

Learning to Lead

SPR ING 2016


CATHEDRAL THE MAGAZINE OF THE CATHEDRAL SCHOOL OF ST. JOHN THE DIVINE SPRING 2016

Head of School Marsha K. Nelson Director of Institutional Advancement Jennifer Rhodes Editor Jessie Saunders Contributing Editor and Writer Alida Durham Clemans Design Lilly Pereira Printing Lane Press Principal Photography Caroline Voagen Nelson Photography Matthew Perlman

Please send magazine submissions to: The Cathedral School of St. John the Divine Attn: Cathedral Editor 1047 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10025 Email: news@cathedralnyc.org

FEATURED IN THIS ISSUE

22 Leaders of the Pack

Cathedral’s student leaders are thoughtful, dynamic, unstoppable—and very, very busy

26 Pick your Passion

A new fourth grade project gives us a peek inside the pastimes these students love

30 Back to School

One alumna loved Cathedral School so much she came back—as a second grade teacher

34 Our Visit to Camp Speers

Fifth graders reminisce about their first overnight together as a class


DEPARTMENTS

02 Letter from the Head

18 School Spirit

03 Notes from

20 On the Close

Amsterdam Avenue

10 School Life 12 Uniquely Cathedral 14 Arts Wing 16 Responsible Citizens

of the World

36 Graduation 2015 38 Beyond Cathedral Class Notes Staff Tributes

43 From the Archives 44 The Last Word


LETTER FROM THE HE A D

Leading By Example MARSH A K . N E L S O N , HE A D OF S C HOO L

Head of School Marsha Nelson admires the puppetmaking skills of these Cathedral first graders

ALTHOUGH I HAVE BEEN Cathedral’s Head of School for 14 years, I still find myself impressed and even awe-struck by our incredible students. There are no more meaningful ambassadors of our terrific school than the young people who thrive here and who imbue the school with their intellect, their different perspectives, their sense of wonder, and their leadership skills. Recently, I had the honor of witnessing a small group of Upper School students share their feelings about Cathedral School before an audience of prospective families at the Curriculum and Student Life evening. Each student, in his or her unique way, told a personal story about Cathedral. Though the details were distinctive, each story shared a universal theme—that students at Cathedral enjoy countless opportunities to step up and take chances, to build their confidence, and to shine. I was exceptionally proud of these students who spoke so eloquently about their Cathedral experiences. This issue of Cathedral magazine is all about Cathedral’s leadership opportunities and the myriad ways our students

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grow in vital and lasting ways. From the article about Hoops from the Heart, the student-founded fundraiser for financial aid, to the feature on Passion for Learning, the new fourth grade initiative that gives each student the chance to write about and present a special interest of theirs, this edition of Cathedral is overflowing with examples of our students taking a stand and making an impact. I am not just the Head of School. I am also a Cathedral parent, and I have the privilege of witnessing every day the academic, emotional, physical, and spiritual growth of my own children and all the students who are fortunate to attend school here. Our Cathedral alumni are testaments to the excellent teaching and mentorship that so thoughtfully prepare our students for success in high school, college, and beyond. One of our alumna loved Cathedral so much she decided to come back as a teacher. You can read Luciana Taddei’s inspiring story within. In our classrooms, on the playing fields, in the Cathedral, and out in our greater community, our confident and compassionate students are leading the way. Look out world! s

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Notes from

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NOTES FROM AMSTE RDAM AVE NU E

Left: Fourth graders Dexter B. and Sybilla H. preparing to be interviewed by German ZDF TV

A Magic Kingdom for Everyone Cathedral fourth graders, inspired by a visit to Disney World, challenge the amusement park to change their assumptions about race and gender When fourth graders Dexter B. and Sybilla H. went to Disney World last spring, they had a blast. They went on rides, ate enormous amounts of food, and Dexter even got his picture taken with Minnie Mouse. But, because they have been active participants in Cathedral’s Identity Curriculum, they noticed a few things average fourth graders might miss—particularly how Disney was reinforcing racial and gender stereotypes. They noticed girls being greeted with a “Hi, Princess,” and boys with a “Hi, Prince.” When they got home they wrote a letter to Disney, pointing out examples: “We think some feelings could get hurt,

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say by accident you called someone a prince who wasn’t a prince or a princess, or a knight, or who was identifying differently than what they were called. We suggest you say, ‘Hello, Your Royalty,’ instead.” Their thoughtful comments made an impression on Susanne Lingemann P’06, a producer and reporter for the German television station ZDF TV. In January, Susanne came to Cathedral to interview Dexter and Sybilla about their experiences for a German children’s program, so they could share their determination to make, in their words, Disney “more inclusive and magical for everyone.”

Above: A page of the thought-provoking letter Below: Dexter and family smiling with Minnie Mouse

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N OT E S FROM A M S T E RDA M AVEN U E

Giving Some Z’s There are always a special few who go above and beyond—and at Cathedral, those few are honored with the Z award, a 30-year Thanksgiving Evensong tradition which recognizes those who always pitch in and get the job done. This year, Head of School Marsha Nelson honored parent Lucy Culver P ’17 ’21, with these words:

An Exciting Summer Awaits! The Cathedral School’s summer STEAM program, June 27–August 5, 2016, is a chance to ignite children’s interests in science, technology, engineering, arts, and math while having fun! Cathedral students and outside students who will be in first grade through sixth grade are welcome to enroll. For tuition, registration and topic information, please visit: cathedralnyc.org and click the link to register on the home page. Contact Emmanuel Saldana, STEAM Director, with any questions, esaldana @cathedralnyc.org. Hope to see you this summer!

Once her first child entered kindergarten, our honoree wasted no time rolling up her sleeves and getting involved. No job was beyond her expertise. No duty too small or project too big to escape her thoughtful attention. Spring Fair, Winter Fest, Absalom Jones Benefit, Faculty/Staff holiday party, Annual Fund, Book Fair, all bear the mark of her hard work and loving care for our community. ¶ As a long time Parents Association volunteer, she rose through the officer ranks to become Co-President of the PA and has helped mold the Parents Association into the strong and effective organization it is today. With her professional marketing background and strategic management skills, she ably serves as a School Trustee, securing the legacy of our school for generations to come. ¶ If ever there were a Cathedral Wonder Woman, she would surely be a confident, charming power-house named Lucy. On behalf of the Cathedral School community, it is my honor to present the 2015 Z Award to Ms. Lucy Culver.

TUE S DAY TALKS

This year, The Cathedral School kicked off a new conversation series called “Tuesday Talks.” Cathedral students welcomed psychologist and author Dr. Catherine Steiner-Adair, who spoke about ways families can protect children in this digital age; environmental activist Peggy Shepard, who led a fascinating a discussion on food access and the environment; and Lisa Miller, a noted clinical psychologist who is an expert on the value of spirituality in children.

CHORISTERS SING WITH PLACIDO DOMINGO The Choristers were in high demand this holiday season. They lent their gorgeous voices to the holiday window display ceremony at Saks Fifth Avenue, and accompanied the one and only Placido Domingo for a breathtaking filmed performance of“Silent Night” in the Cathedral. To join the two million who have already watched the video, search “Placido Domingo Silent Night” on Google.

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NOTES FROM AMSTE RDAM AVE NU E

Meet the New Faculty 1

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A new school year brings new faces, including teachers and staff. We asked these Cathedral newbies to share a little bit about themselves for the magazine.

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N OT E S FROM A M S T E RDA M AVEN U E

Worokya Duncan (1)

Director of Diversity What has teaching taught you about yourself ? I’ve learned that one can never stop learning. Children are unintentional mirrors who challenge every assumption and every “fact” to which you align yourself. Be open to their lessons.

Anita Battagliola (2) Second Grade Associate Teacher What has most surprised or inspired you about Cathedral School? I am inspired every day by the classroom communities that are fostered here. It allows each child to express and explore their feelings about their own life and the world around them in such a unique way.

Stephanie Daughenbaugh (3)

First Grade Associate Teacher What has most surprised or inspired you about Cathedral School? Everyone here at Cathedral cares about each and every teacher, child, and worker. I am inspired by everyone’s work ethic, empathy, and passion for children. Cathedral cares about the social and emotional well being of the child, along with academics, which is the key to creating successful leaders of our future.

<< Dr. Worokya Duncan shares a laugh with fourth graders in the school library

Michael Demianiuk (4)

Kindergarten Associate Teacher How do you describe Cathedral School to family and friends? Cathedral is an environment in which children and their learning drive the school.

Nisha Joshi (5)

Technology Manager/ Integrator What has most surprised or inspired you about Cathedral School? The peacocks! And the commitment to the development of the whole child.

Revathi Subramanian (6)

First Grade Associate Teacher What has most surprised you about Cathedral School? The identity and diversity curriculum and the ease with which first-graders take to these topics! I am amazed by the nature and quality of discussions in the classroom.

Deja Williams (7)

Science Teacher, K-2 How do you describe Cathedral School to family and friends? I constantly describe my new position at Cathedral School as a job where I truly feel supported in my goal to be the best teacher that I possibly can. I am working in a place where I feel encouraged to fully express my love of science with my students and to try new and

innovative teaching methods as a means to excite learning.

Shawna Altdorf (8)

Upper School Science and Coach What has teaching taught you about yourself? Teaching has taught me to embrace the struggle. I love seeing resilient students work and work until they find a solution. My students have made me a better learner.

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Paul Lederer (9)

Fifth and Seventh Grade Social Studies Teacher What has most inspired you about Cathedral School? I have been inspired by the various affinity groups, and I wish that other schools had such institutions in place for their students.

Massiel Santos (10)

Third Grade Head Teacher What has teaching taught you about yourself? Teaching in schools has taught me to have a lot of patience and to see children through a holistic lens.

Dori Haber (11)

Second Grade Associate Teacher What has most inspired you about Cathedral School? Lower school assemblies are a highlight every week. Students’ courage and poise as they present talents and share their passion for learning demonstrate the values that The Cathedral School fosters in children.

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The Magister String Quartet, of which Violin Teacher Melanie Baker is a proud member, played a concert for third through sixth grade students at Cathedral this fall.

01 Students in P.E.A.C.O.C.K. (People’s Environmental Action Club of Cathedral Kids) sold water bottles to encourage sustainability 02 Kindergarteners enjoyed a beautiful autumn day picking apples and soaking up the sunshine 03 A trio of young alumnae pose on the porch with Ms. Nelson

First Grade Teacher Lindsay Horman [01] ran her first New York City Marathon this year, right before returning from maternity leave. She gave birth to son Owen last spring. Congratulations on both accomplishments.

05 The soccer team’s first game of the fall season 06 Kindergarteners get ready for picture day 07 The 2015 Alumni Homecoming on Nov. 23 08 Andrew Jan Hauner ’01 returns to Cathedral to shadow his former art teacher Mr. Delacey

Physical Education Coordinator and Sixth Grade Dean Jaclyn Berney has been selected to participate in the NYSAIS Emerging Leaders Institute. ELI is a two-year course of study, during which participants become members of a dynamic cohort, work alongside experienced school leaders and develop a customized program to meet their own personal goals and objectives.

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Peter Maas (Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer) has been named to serve a three-year term on the NYSAIS Business Affairs Council. He was selected this year to participate on his third NYSAIS accreditation visiting committee, serving on the Heschel School’s 10-year accreditation team. Just six months after receiving doubleknee replacement surgery, Head of School Marsha Nelson [03] hiked up Mohonk Mountain at a personal record pace, an incredible milestone. Math Specialist Yojairy Sands [04] returned from maternity leave, on November 2, 2015. Her baby boy, Aaron Emmanuel Sands, was born on July 28th. Congratulations!

In October, Director of Diversity Worokya Duncan spoke at the Black Doctoral Network Conference in Atlanta. Also, as a part of the Long Island Chapter of The Links, Inc., she has been appointed Chair for the Black Lives Matter Symposium that will take place in Nassau County in March 2016.

04 Welcome to Cathedral! Kindergarteners say hello at New Student Orientation

Veteran marathoner Mario Flores [02] (Food Service) ran the 2015 NYC Marathon and finished with the impressive time of 3:53:46.

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High School Placement Director Howard Nusbaum journeyed to Sonoma, California, this summer to attend the wedding of his son, Eric Nusbaum ’02 to Haley Clegg. The two met in college at Washington University St. Louis.

Lower School Music Teacher Kobi Mannarino has founded a folk-rock duo with her husband Al Mannarino. The two play popular hits and perform at a variety of local venues from bars and restaurants to private parties. Kobi and Al have a pure acoustic sound, which highlights their vocal harmony and crisp guitar with percussive accompaniment. For more information visit: www.kobiandal.com.

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SC H O O L L I F E

A Day in the Life K I N D E R G A R T E N

8:30 AM

Kindergarten is a time of enormous exploration and growth in all areas of development: social, emotional, intellectual and physical. It is a time where play continues to be the major avenue of discovery; however, play becomes more directed and learning becomes more explicit. It is a time of enormous joy, but also of productive struggle. Each child leaves kindergarten more independent, more capable, but still very much on his or her own developmental path. —PATRICE SAMUELS, KINDERGARTEN

8:30 AM Checking the weather report during morning meeting. Morning meeting is when the children get organized for the day, learn about what is on the schedule for the day and on the calendar for the week ahead. Through the huge kindergarten room windows, they can see outside and report on the conditions there. 8:45 AM On Fridays, the morning routine is different: the kindergarten joins the rest of the lower school for Assembly in the dining room and common room. This is a wonderful time to interact with the older children, and learn about the seven core values of Cathedral School. 9:15 AM Getting ready for the ABC’s of Fundations. The children, after sitting on their square on the colorful rug, start learning using Cathedral’s phonics and handwriting program. They get to practice “A is for Apple” on the dry-erase easel.

10:00 AM Lower School science means a trip across the hall to visit with Ms. Beary and Ms. Williams in the Lower School science room. It’s an exciting place to explore the strange creatures from the deep ocean, among other mysteries. 11:15 AM Getting the wiggles out in P.E. after lunch, upstairs in the third floor gym. 12:00 PM Then, it’s time to sit down, relax, and listen carefully to a Read Aloud in front of the windows. The kindergarteners have been delving deep into the books of Dr. Seuss, including his classic The Lorax. 2:05 PM On special occasions, the kindergarteners line up and walk into the Cathedral of St. John the Divine for an all-school Evensong, where the Cathedral school choir sings, and a special speaker will teach the children about what it means to be in the Cathedral community.

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Christopher B. â&#x20AC;&#x2122;75 with his wife Rhonda and Cathedral second grader Hudson

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UNIQU ELY CATHE D R A L

Heart is Where the Hoops Are

U N I Q U E LY C AT H E DRAL

Photos top to bottom: Sixth grader Alisha F. diligently keeps score. Brothers Ameer and Aleem S. share a moment after their 13 minute turns. Fourth graders Ben K. (L), Jules L. (R) admire the free throw form of classmate Will D.

The third annual Hoops from the Heart fundraiser filled the Crypt Gym with basketballs for the best of reasons—to help students in need afford a Cathedral School education

JODY VAN DER GOES P’-. ’-/ was not willing to guess if this year’s Hoops from the Heart fundraiser could meet the $20,000 mark. “I’m hoping for $15,000,” she said, as basketballs rebounded around her. The Crypt Gym was full of pizza boxes, dozens of doughnuts, discarded coats, hats, boots and, most importantly, five basketball nets and what seemed like hundreds of arcing basketballs. Jody’s elder son Hank, now a freshman in high school, helped start the event with fellow ’15 alumna Emily Power in 2014. The premise? Make as many free throws as you can in 13 minutes, and raise money for the Absalom Jones Benefit for Financial Aid. Everybody gets into the act, from kindergarteners to alumni, trying their hand at free throws, rebounding the basketballs, or keeping track of the number of shots made. “We talk about community a lot at Cathedral—this event fits into the school,” Jody said, and a perusal of crowd proves it. Christopher B. ’75 stopped by with his wife Ronda Braxton and second grader Hudson. Alumna (and Upper School basketball coach) Luigia Goodman ’06 made 113 baskets in her turn, cheered on by her team and her mother, Catherine Goodman. Aanal S., father of first grader Aleem and fourth grader Ameer (wearing a Stephen Curry jersey) were going head-to-head at competing backboards. Aanal was keeping track of Ameer’s count —an amazing 104 baskets. His little brother? A more than respectable 51. With those kinds of numbers, Jody van der Goes and the other organizers didn’t have to worry: this year’s event raised $20,000 on the nose. s —Jessie Saunders TH E M A G A Z I N E O F TH E CATH E D RA L SC H OOL O F S T. J OH N THE DI VI NE

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A R T S WING

Talk Like an Egyptian In an original play, the sixth grade takes on the fascinating story of Hatshepsut, an influential Pharaoh of ancient Egypt—who just happened to be a woman

“THE FIRST and last lines of Hatshepsut: Queen of Denial are of an inscription found on Hatshepsut’s temple in Karnak, and they are believed to be written by her as well,” Upper School Social Studies Teacher (and amateur playwright) Emmanuel Saldana notes. The inscription says, “Now my heart turns this way and that, as I think what the people will say. Those who see my monuments in years to come, and who shall speak of what I have done.” This year, those speakers were Cathedral sixth graders. The sixth grade play has traditionally been a moment to showcase ancient Greece, but instead attention turned towards another ancient power, Egypt. For six weeks, 6R and 6S researched costumes, painted elaborate scenery, and rehearsed the play, the songs, and the dance numbers. On the morning of the show, a cast of thousands—actually 35—took the stage in the Crypt Gym dressed as Egyptologists, Pharaohs, gods, farmers and spoiled stepsons, most sporting some serious kohl eyeliner. The play, while very entertaining, taught a lesson about what it meant to be a woman in power thousands of years ago. “The average Egyptian said, ‘Our pharaoh should be a man, it’s tradition,’” said Amelia D., “but by the end of the play they understand she was a good leader.” And what can Hatshepsut’s story tell us about being a woman in power today? Another sixth grader sagely noted: “It’s not so much spoken today, as it is silent prejudice.” From the mouths of Pharaohs. s —Jessie Saunders TH E M A G A Z I N E O F TH E CATH E D RA L SC H OOL OF S T. J OH N THE DI VI NE

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R ES PONS IBL E CI TI Z E NS O F THE WO R L D

Dear Mr. Congressman One fourth grader’s inspired idea—to invite Civil Rights icon Representative John Lewis to speak at Cathedral School—becomes a life-changing trip for a group of Cathedral students, and a moment to remember at the Absalom Jones Benefit for Financial Aid

“DEAR CONGRESSMAN LEWIS,” begins the letter from Dalyn B. ’19, “We would like to invite you to our Absalom Jones Benefit. At the Absalom Jones Evensong, we come together to honor an enslaved person who bought his wife freedom and then his own,” she continued. “Our class has been learning about the struggle that people of color have been going through. We know a lot about this because we have been studying about you and civil rights and participation in general. My class knows that you were a speaker at the March on Washington in 1963. Thank you very much for your consideration. With gratitude, Dalyn and the whole fourth grade.” Congressman Lewis said yes. He responded, “This honor means so much to me especially because it was a student-inspired idea. In my own experience, the voices and actions of students are often the most powerful.” Dalyn and her classmates decided to invite Congressman Lewis to the Absalom Jones Benefit, which raises funds for Cathedral’s vital financial aid program, because Dalyn had heard Mr. Lewis speak during a public engagement she attended with her family, and was inspired by his singular story. A living testament of strength over adversity, John Lewis has so much to teach young people about the Civil Rights Movement, and becoming a courageous leader. Along with accepting the invitation to be the Absalom Jones

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honoree, Congressman Lewis generously agreed to host a small group of Cathedral students in his Washington, DC office. To select the students, an essay contest—called “How the Student Voice Makes a Difference” —was organized, and the winners went to Washington. One of the winners, Lila T. ’17, described how she approached the essay: “It’s very hard to express that kind of thing, so I took other people, like Malala, as examples, and I said how their voices were important.” Dalyn, Lila, and the other winners, Rian B. ’15, Oliver B. ’18, and Petra P. ’16, embarked on an unforgettable adventure to our nation’s capital to visit with Congressman Lewis and other policymakers. Leaving Penn Station early on February 11, 2015 (coincidentally

almost exactly 50 years after the historic Selma March for voting rights), they visited the Lincoln Memorial and the Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial before heading to Capitol Hill. In the hush of the Lincoln Memorial, the students admired the huge sculpture of the seated President, then turned to stand where Martin Luther King Jr. had stood to make his “I Have a Dream” speech; then they absorbed the power of the quote, “out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope,” on the side of the MLK Memorial. Before meeting with Congressman Lewis, they met with Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Representatives Rosa DeLauro and Sean Patrick Maloney. During the meeting with Congressman Maloney, Oliver shared a sentence from his winning essay: “Sometimes you can just do a kind deed or stand up to a bully and make a difference in the community.” They were also invited to go on the Congressional House floor. Then it was time for the visit to Representative Lewis. Before entering his office, the walls covered in black and white photographs of

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Clockwise: The fourth grade letter that began this adventure. Cathedral essay contest winners listen attentively to Congressman Lewis Dalyn reads the Gettysburg Address at the Lincoln Memorial A group picture of the winners at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

This honor means so much to me especially because it was a student-inspired idea. In my own experience, the voices and actions of students are often the most powerful.”

indelible moments from the fight for equality, the students were excited and a little nervous. Petra said, “It’s really amazing what he did during the Civil Rights movement, it took a lot of courage. And it’s really, really cool that we are going to get to see him.” John Lewis felt likewise, and reflected on their visit during his acceptance speech at the Absalom Jones benefit. “I’m happy to know that The Cathedral School is stewarding

talented young students and leaders who will continue to embrace the values the were active during the Civil Rights Movement.” He went on, “I said to the young students and I say to you tonight, you must never ever give up or give in. You must keep the faith and continue to work to build a beloved community to redeem the soul of America and make our country and our world a better place. We all live in the same house: not just the American house, but the world house. So it doesn’t matter if we are black, white, Latino, Asian American, or Native American, we are one people, one family, one house.” s —Alida Durham Clemans

WATCH THE VIDEO: Go to: www.cathedralnyc.org/page/ Home?#video/265638

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Sasha S. â&#x20AC;&#x2122;16 takes a leap at the 2015 AIPSL Championship


SC H O O L SP IRIT

You’ve Got a Team It’s fun and games year-round for Cathedral athletes

No-cut policy? Check. Teachers who are also coaches? Check. A 90 percent participation rate for Upper School sports teams? Check. Check out the seven different sports teams at Cathedral, where winning championships, nurturing star athletes, and breaking records is, well, par for the course. But it’s the way these young athletes are encouraged that sets Cathedral athletics apart from other schools. At K-12 schools, middle-grade athletes are often overshadowed by more experienced high schoolers, who often claim the varsity spots and much of the limelight. Here at Cathedral, student-athletes have many opportunities to grow as confident leaders and teammates. The skills they learn while on the courts and playing fields – discipline, cooperation, respect, and strategic thinking—will remain with them throughout their educational experiences and beyond. Go Cougars! s —Alida Durham Clemans

BORN TO RUN Eighth grader Davis R. won five out of six middle school Cross Country meets this fall—and that’s only because he missed one of them. Davis came first out of over 150 participants from New York City independent schools in the 1.5 mile event five times, clocking a best time of 9 minutes and 23 seconds, ten seconds ahead of the next runner. In the upcoming Track and Field season, he plans on running away from the competition in the 800 meter and 1500 meter races.

TEAMS FALL Girls Soccer Boys Soccer Girls Volleyball Girls Cross Country Boys Cross Country WINTER Girls Basketball Boys Basketball Indoor Track

SPRING Girls Softball Boys Baseball Girls Track and Field Boys Track and Field CLUBS Tennis Lacrosse ELECTIVES Ultimate Frisbee Ping-Pong Fencing

Fall, Winter, and Spring, the Cougars pounce on the competition

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On the CLOSE Cathedral fifth graders start from the ground up at the beginning of the school year


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LEADERS OF 22

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FOR CAUSES BIG AND SMALL, THERE’S NO STOPPING THESE UPPER SCHOOL STUDENT LEADERS WHO FOCUS ON MAKING THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE TO BE

BY JESSIE SAUNDERS

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N YOUR AVERAGE Upper School lunch hour, on schedule Day 5, you’ll find dozens of kids carrying their plates of pierogis up the stairs to room 305, for the P.E.A.C.O.C.K. meeting. The students in P.E.A.C.O.C.K., which stands for People’s Environmental Action Committee of Cathedral Kids, will be busy planning their next upcycling project or reusable water bottle sale. A day later, in the Upper School science lab, you might run into the student council debating the benefits of a hot chocolate fund-raiser over ham and cheese sandwiches; or, at the same time, you can find the students in Mission Outreach assembling care packages for the local homeless. If you’re at Cathedral to tour the school, one of the school’s student ambassadors will happily answer your questions – and then run to catch that Mission Outreach meeting before it’s over—or dash to a P.E.A.C.O.C.K. event. Cathedral student leaders don’t just focus their attentions on one problem – they like to tackle them all, and then let everybody know how to help. As P.E.A.C.O.C.K. member and Mission Outreach President Cameron L. ’16 says, “You end up being the people who spread the word about all of the events. You are usually the connection between the events and the rest of the students.”

P.E.A.C.O.C.K. members (L-R) Aksel K., Noah S., Lindsay S., and Lily W.

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P.E.A.C.O.C.K. has been busy. There’s been an electronics drive; a sale of Cathedral water bottles to limit the use of plastic at school; and an adoption of a black rhino. Member Aksel K. ’17 says, “P.E.A.C.O.C.K. has just done an upcycling project for Winterfest. We received tons of materials that could have been thrown away and used them to create beautiful crafts.” Member Noah S. ’19, adds, “the money we made from selling upcycled items at Winterfest will be going to endangered animals.” The club’s goal is “to make the school, as well as the community, greener and more environmentally friendly,” said Aksel, and it also educates its members—Lindsay S. ’18 felt that before she joined she “was not environmentally conscious enough and could do more to help the environment.” P.E.A.C.O.C.K. is sharing their passion with other schools this coming April at a sustainability symposium hosted by The Calhoun School (see box on opposite page). Student Council President Andy D. ’18 explained why he threw his hat into the Student Council ring this year: “I decided I wanted to help make a change in the Student Council. I just felt there was room for improvement and I thought I could help facilitate that.” The verdict? Andy says, “Apparently, the school dances are much better this year.” More seriously, the council has been concentrating on developing leadership skills through small service projects – like a voluntary leaf cleanup on the Close this past fall, and a soup kitchen visit after spring break—in the hopes of hosting a regional middle-school leadership conference next year. Student Council members also pop up in other leadership organizations: the supremely busy Isabel K. ’16 is a student ambassador and officer at P.E.A.C.O.C.K. as well as serving on the council. Student ambassadors are the face of the school for prospective students and their families. It’s a serious role, and one the ambassadors are dedicated to, like Nina M. ’16, who is also a Vice-President of Mission

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Title page: (L-R) Eighth graders and student leaders Elijah F., Isaac B., Nico J., Nicole G., Isabel K., Andy D., JohnClark J., Renata B., and Nina M. Left: Nina and Cameron L. take some time to chat Below: Aksel, Cameron, and Isabel

Sustainability in School Communities Conference

Outreach. Apart from the usual discussions of what the school day is like, and how Cathedral prepares students to go on to high school, Nina likes to point out the school’s nurturing spirit: “If they start in kindergarten, they’re going to grow up with their classmates, and form relationships you can’t get at other places.” Isabel adds, “its really easy to fit in and be welcomed because it’s such a small community.” Mission Outreach, a studentfounded and student-run organization, focuses its efforts on those who need the most help. Mission Outreach president Cameron says, “It is truly a very special group of people. Mission Outreach had always amazed me; the idea of being able to help kids around the world at my age made me so excited. Once I took that initial risk

of trying something different, the non-tangible rewards were great.” Some of those non-tangible rewards include learning the power of positive leadership. Renata B. ’16, a Mission Outreach vice-president, says, “I like being a role model for the younger members.” Recently, Nina explains, “we wanted to do outreach work where we could actually go out and start doing things. So we started Cathedral Bags of Care, which are bags that have food, socks, and other necessities, to give to homeless people in the neighborhood. We’re also working with a shelter for women and children this year.” Cameron reflects, “When you join Mission Outreach, you immediately get the feeling that you are capable of doing great things. Children can make a difference too, and even if you do

Isabel, a P.E.A.C.O.C.K. leader, explains she was invited, along with Aksel and Cameron, to “be on the planning committee along with nine other kids from different independent schools,” for the Sustainability in School Communities Conference. Happening April 9 at The Calhoun School, the conference strives to use the collective power of schools to institute more green policies all over the New York City educational scene. There are workshops, and keynote speakers, including Kehkashan Basu, a 15-year-old environmental crusader named who is a UN ambassador. Cameron says, “Our goal is to spread awareness and spread sustainability to other schools.”

not plan on joining Mission Outreach, remember that you are capable of making the world a better place.” These students make time in their busy school lives to serve the community, and show everyone else the power of giving back, often in multiple roles. It’s the pleasure they get from lending a helping hand, or sharing a favorite memory of Cathedral, that makes the running around and extra hours no burden at all. Isabel puts it best: “It’s definitely worth it, because I love everything that I do.”s

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BY A LIDA DUR HA M CLEMAN S

Pick


Your

Through Passion for Learning, Cathedral fourth graders dare to step forward and share their favorite pastimes with the help of their faculty and staff mentors

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E A DI N G. G Y M NA S T I C S. P H O T O G R A P H Y. D O G S, S O C C E R , A N D E V E N E LV I S P R E S L E Y. These are just some of the interests that fourth graders stood up and shared during Lower School Assembly this fall. Through a new initiative called Passion for Learning, all fourth graders are challenging themselves to conceptualize, write, edit, and present their own passion projects. A requirement to graduate from Lower School, Passion for Learning helps the students develop leadership skills and to prepare them for the demands of Upper School.

“Passion for Learning is a capstone project as the fourth graders prepare to move on to Upper School,” explains Head of Lower School Laura Higgins. “The Passion project demonstrates Cathedral’s core values in a meaningful way.” Fourth grader Elena Z. was nervous before her turn in front of Friday Assembly in October. She had never spoken in front of so many people before. What if she forgot what she was going to say? She had worked so hard and practiced over and over again, so she tried to relax. Finally, it was her turn. Her advisor, Ms. Higgins, introduced her and all eyes were on her, waiting. With a nod of encouragement from her mentor, Elena took a deep breath and began. She stood up straight and spoke confidently and with conviction about her love of cooking. The three minutes flew by and as the crowd of classmates, teachers, and parents clapped, she took a bow and smiled. “I was really proud of myself,” Elena said. Like Elena, each student has been assigned an advisor, who works with the student at every step of the process, helping brainstorm ideas and structure presentations. (For a look at the other projects and mentors, see “Tales from a Fourth Grade Presentation” on the opposite page). The advisors can be any member of the faculty, staff, or administration,

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broadening the students’ connections to the adults in the school community. The idea for Passion for Learning was inspired by the Cathedral eighth graders, who have routinely visited the Lower School to share their interests. Ms. Higgins wanted to give fourth graders the opportunity to impart their knowledge and experience onto the younger grades. “Fourth graders are the leaders of Lower School,” she said. The valuable lessons the fourth grade students are learning about determination, perseverance, and confidence will serve them well as they prepare to take on the challenges of fifth grade— camera, soccer ball or Elvis wig in tow. s

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Tales from a Fourth Grade Presentation

Passion for Learning is a capstone project as the fourth graders prepare to move on to Upper School. The Passion project demonstrates Cathedral’s core values in a meaningful way.”

So many topics, so many students—how were mentors paired with each fourth grader? “Faculty, administrators, and staff selected their advisees based on a shared interest or a previous connection,” said Laura Higgins. She continued, “All of the pairings have been wonderful, but there has been something particularly touching about students connecting with adult members of the community whom they did not already know.” The students and their mentors met between four and six times, and created the presentations using guidelines supplied by Ms. Higgins. Then, it was time for the fourth graders to go it alone. Here is a list of the students, their mentors, and their passions: Taylor A. Reading Dr. Colliton

Natalia G. Reading Ms. Owens

Sebastian M. Designing Ms. Crossman

Sasha B. Skating Ms. Horman

Georgia G. Reptiles Ms. Bear

Spencer R. Lego building Ms. Samuels

Dexter B. Airplanes Ms. Beary

Madeline G. Comics Mr. Koo

Elijah S. Legos Mr. Demianiuk

Davey B. Lobster trapping Mr. Pfeifer

Henry G. Tennis Ms. Bryant

Ameer S. Playing baseball Mr. Mesloh

Graham B. History of Legos Ms. Battagliola

Gabby H. Dancing Ms. Cole

Maxwell S. Basketball Mr. Donaldson

Rebecca C. Computer programing Ms. Subramanian

Sybilla H. Elvis Presley Ms. Nelson

Jaya S. Photography Ms. Taddei

Gage J. Sports Mr. Nusbaum

Fiona S. Dance Ms. Geringer-Dunn

Atlas L.-E. Soccer Ms. Deja Williams

Calum U. Liverpool Soccer Club Ms. Geringer-Dunn

David C. Tennis Ms. Haber Cecelia C. Marine biology Ms. Rho Beverly D. Karate Ms. Kirpicheva William D. Lacrosse Ms. Taddei

Title page: Librarian Sharon Owens helps Natalia G. ’20 with her project on reading.

Clockwise: Fourth grader Elena Z. at the microphone, preparing to begin her presentation. First, fourth grader Ben K. discusses dog do’s and don’ts with Head of Upper School Kevin Roth. Then, he steps up to the podium with help from Head of Lower School Laura Higgins

Miranda E. Gymnastics Ms. Berney

Ben L. Minecraft Mr. Spears Jules L. Soccer Mr. Saldana Benjamin K. Dog care Mr. Roth

Liam W.-N. Reading Chaplain Welch Elena Z. Cooking Ms. Higgins Susannah Z. Basketball Mr. Donaldson

Annabelle G. Soccer Ms. Amitrano

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Back to School An Alumna Grows Up and Goes Back to Teach at the School That Shaped Her Life

BY LUCIANA TADDEI ’04

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Back to School ON MY FIRST DAY as an associate teacher at The Cathedral School, Mr. Nusbaum put me on the spot. “What’s my first name?” he asked. There I was, trying to establish myself as a colleague, and I went totally mute. I mistakenly revealed my surprise and confusion with a blank stare. Relentlessly, he continued, “Okay, what is Dr. Vitale’s first name?” Does anyone even know Dr. Vitale’s first name? Did I make the right decision? Looking around the room filled with people who knew me since I was eight, I was flooded with the memories that drew me back in. How did I become who I am? Dr. Vitale taught me that there is a history behind every word and I am to cherish each story no matter how little the word might seem. I knew he expected more from me when he rubbed the bridge of his nose where his glasses rested. Mr. Pfeifer and Ms. Berney did not allow me to miss a sports season even if that meant picking flowers in the outfield during softball games. Ms. Baru taught me how to use an Apple computer. Ms. Delacey accepted my tone-deaf singing and understood the recorder was not my instrument. She made me feel like the star in Guys and Dolls even though I had just one line. Mr. Delacey is one of the reasons I have a degree in art history. Ms. Martin brought to life the Middle Ages and inspired twelve-year-olds like me to be inquisitive, curious, and enthusiastic in all aspects of our academic lives. Chaplain Welch allowed us to sing at the top of our lungs in the largest Gothic Cathedral in the world. She was our shining light, our example of service and strength. Ms. Brown has given me unconditional love as a child and as an adult. She is the heart of Cathedral. Her smile, warmth, and tough love was and is the medicine that has kept all of us going. Ms. Nelson, my Head of School, watched my mother bring in cupcakes, silly string, and a boom box to the playground on one very scary Halloween. I imagine Mom had to go to Ms. Nelson’s office for that stunt. The Cathedral School supported me, challenged me, and disciplined me at the very start of my student life. My passion for learning was ignited here. In fact, all seven core values came to feel as if they were part of my core. I came back as an associate teacher for the same kind of support. I was comforted to know that those same people would still offer me such valuable guidance. I am deeply grateful for my teachers who inspired me and helped shape the person that I am today. Now, it is my turn to share my expertise with my own students.

My passion for learning was ignited here. In fact, all seven core values came to feel as if they were part of my core.

The most common questions I hear from students when they discover I am an alumna are: “Was there Ms. Whittle’s mac and cheese back then?” Absolutely! “Did you ever get in trouble?” Never! (well…sometimes.) “Was Dr. Vitale really hard?” Yes, but I was his star pupil, obviously. “Did you go to the Spring Fair?” Every year. My favorite events were the dunk tank and the pie-throwing contest. Mr. Pfeifer and Mr. Nusbaum can elaborate on the details. “Did you love Cathedral?” I came back, didn’t I!? The traditions of the school live on in the hearts of Cathedral students long after they graduate. Students receive an excellent education, their perspectives are broadened to celebrate differences, and they build a strong sense of responsibility. However, what makes The Cathedral School unique is how it teaches children lessons of the heart and the soul. In case you are wondering, after four marvelous years of being a member of the Cathedral faculty, I now know everyone’s first name. It’s John Vitale! Shhh…don't tell. s Luciana Taddei teaches third grade reading and writing and Lower School Spanish. After graduating from The Cathedral School in 2004, Ms. Taddei attended Marymount School, followed by Fordham University, where she studied Spanish language and literature and art history.

A glimpse at Luciana Taddei’s 2004 yearbook page

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Ms. Taddei and second grader Stevie M. at the board.

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OUR TRIP TO LETTERS HOME FROM A MEMORABLE

Learning About Each Other BY IMOGEN B., SOPHIE P., + OLIVIA J., CLASS OF ’23 Camp Speers was an such an amazing experience! We’re all looking forward to next year when we can go again. The trip was partly educational, but at the same time we learned many new things about each other and nature. On the trip, there were a few activities that stood out to us the most. Stargazing was a fun and unique experience that isn’t possible in the city. We all loved to share that experience with each other. Another favorite was the night hike, which, while informative, was also adventurous. We learned facts about eyesight adjusting to the dark that were new and interesting. The biggest favorite was unquestionably bonding with our grade mates at night. The cabin was constantly filled with storytelling and laughter. All of us were surprised to learn so much more about each other even after seven years together! Some of the activities that stood out the most to us were canoeing, rock climbing, hiking, and survival techniques. Canoeing was a really fun and playful nature-related activity that was somewhat new to most of us. We splashed around and had fun in the sun but could still lean back and enjoy the beautiful lake. Rock climbing was exciting because we had a clear view of the treetops from the top of the wall. We also enjoyed survival training because we had to build strong huts while working together and learn about the forest around us. On this trip, we learned  that it can be nice to get away from all of the screens. Technology isn’t everything, and natural surroundings can be a nice change. For fifth graders, going to a new place alone for the first time can, understandably, be a little daunting. Camp Speers, however,  is a nice environment that surrounds you with your peers and teachers as well as enables you to figure out new aspects about yourself.

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Packing light for the overnight

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CAMP SPEERS SCHOOL OVERNIGHT TRIP

Friends, Canoeing, and Fun BY NICK V. ’()

Fifth graders zip-line through the trees

The Cathedral trip to Camp Speers-Eljabar is one where students enjoy fun activities and are surrounded by their friends. Personally, my favorite part of the trip was that my friends were there. They made the environment more relaxed and helped me enjoy the experience even more. You also have the opportunity to socialize with some of the older students, which might make you feel more comfortable in the Upper School. This combination of friends and fun made for a great experience at the camp. There are many exciting activities at Camp Speers-Eljabar. One of my most memorable experiences was rock-climbing. You can race with your peers to the top, but it’s all in good fun. However, my favorite activity was definitely canoeing. There were two or three people per canoe, and we had a chance to paddle around the lake and enjoy the view. It was also fun to splash water on others with the paddle (if they didn’t mind) and become soaked yourself! You spend most of your time with other students from your grade, but there also are moments when students from other grades participate in the same activities together. For me, this was a great way to get to know other students from other grades. Many fifth and sixth graders might feel that the seventh and eighth graders are intimidating and will shy away from socializing with them. However, being with the older kids takes away the age barrier and makes them seem more approachable. If you are a fifth grader nervous for the trip to Camp Speers-Eljabar, I can relate to that feeling. This trip could possibly be your first night away from home, but you probably won’t even notice because your friends are there to distract you. If you are new to Cathedral, don’t think of this as a time where your classmates won’t notice you; think of this as a chance to meet new people that might become your greatest friends. Overall, it is a great opportunity to participate in an Upper School tradition and make new friends that you will later share many experiences with.

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BEYOND CAT HE D R A L

Class of 2015

Moving On Up Fabulous Freshman at Spectacular Schools These 28 Cathedral eighth graders became our newest members of The Cathedral School alumni community when they graduated on June 12, 2015. They are thriving as freshman at some of the best high schools—both day and boarding—in New York City and across the nation, a testament to the high-quality education they received at Cathedral. They received acceptances to: Independent Day Schools: The Berkeley Carroll School Hackley School Brooklyn Friends School Horace Mann School The Calhoun School Little Red School House and Elizabeth Irwin High School The Chapin School Loyola School Collegiate School Marymount School Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School The Masters School The Dalton School The Nightingale-Bamford School The Dwight School The Packer Collegiate Institute Dwight-Englewood School

Poly Prep Country Day School Ethical Culture Fieldston School Riverdale Country School Friends Seminary The Spence School Grace Church School Trevor Trinity School Independent Boarding Schools: Choate Rosemary Hall Miss Hall’s School Concord Academy Miss Porter’s School Deerfield Academy Peddie School Emma Willard School Pomfret School Groton School The Putney School

Kent School St. George’s School The Loomis Chaffee School Tabor Academy Middlesex School Taft School Milton Academy Westover School Diocesan Schools: Cathedral High School Notre Dame School Dominican Academy St. Vincent Ferrer Fordham Prep School Xavier High School New York City & Other Public Schools: The Bronx High School of Science Art and Design High School Brooklyn Technical High School Columbia Secondary School F.H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art High School of American Studies High School for Math & Science at CUNY Stuyvesant High School


This process of applying to high school is a gift to us as parents to learn who our children have become, are still becoming, and where they need to go next to continue their growth. It is a gift to the students as well. How many times in your life are you given six months and told, ‘Discover yourself’— it is pretty amazing!”—Yvonne Zampitella P’16

Look for a corresponding photo with alumni note

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BEYOND CAT HE D R A L

Beyond

CATHEDRAL

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B E YO N D C AT H E DRAL

DEAR CATHEDRAL ALUMNI, I hope you are enjoying this latest edition of Cathedral magazine. We want all of our alumni to stay connected to Cathedral School, and to each other. I am eager to keep you informed, interested, and active, but I need your help. Please: • Update contact information • Friend and post on the Cathedral Alumni Facebook page • Become a Class Representative • Support the Annual Fund • Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter • Visit Cathedral

Some upcoming events are: Tuesday Talks: Sports and Social Inclusion Tuesday, May 3, 6:00 PM Features Frank Guridy P’23, visiting Associate Professor at Columbia University, and Peter Carry, former Executive Editor of Sports Illustrated. Admissions Open House Wednesday, May 11, 8:30–10 AM Register: cathedralnyc.org/ admission Spring Fair and Alumni Reunion, Saturday, June 4, 2016 Arrive by 12:30 PM for our all-alumni class photo! We love to hear about your adventures and successes after Cathedral (pictures are great, too). This is your Alumni Association and with your help we can make it great. I hope to see you back here soon! YELKA KAMARA Advancement Associate ykamara@cathedralnyc.org

Look for a corresponding photo with alumni note

1942

Jim Groton continues his work advocating proactive techniques for preventing and de-escalating disputes, and he is writing a book on the subject. His most recent assignment was conducting a training class in Dubai for oil and gas executives from several Asian and Middle-Eastern countries, teaching them how to “keep the peace” in their long-term contractual relationships. Alexander Vanderburgh, Jr., passed away peacefully on Sunday, November 2, 2014, at the age of 86. He is survived by his children Ann S. Vanderburgh, Faith V. Gately, and Alexander Vanderburgh, and grandson Isaac Rueben Winters-Raff. His daughter Ann, writes, “My dad Alex absolutely loved the time that he spent at the Cathedral School, which he always referred to as the Choir School...For my dad, attending the Choir School was a luminous and profound experience; one of the great shaping forces of his life.”

1948

Carl Grashof writes,

“I’m still singing in two choirs, my Church Choir in Downingtown, PA and a Concert Choir in West Chester, PA where we sing the great choral works including the “Messiah” every year. My four years at the Cathedral Choir School were the happiest a lad could have and I’m so very grateful for the opportunity to learn to sing choral music from the Master, Norman Coke-Jephcott. I was his Music Boy which meant bringing him each piece of music performed during Thursday night’s rehearsal with the full choir and I was fortunate to win two of the three music awards given in those years.”

1970

Steven Bargonetti

writes, “I have fond memories of The Cathedral School. Not only did I have great teachers and classmates, but I also was encouraged

to play music, which is not only a passion of mine, but my vocation as well. I’ve included picture from the critically acclaimed play, Father Comes Home From the Wars, which played to sold-out audiences at New York City’s Public Theater, and Harvard’s American Repertory Theater and for which I received an Elliot Norton Award.” Steven is a graduate of Columbia University. As lead guitarist for Hair on Broadway, Steven was featured playing the Jimi Hendrix archetype. He has also performed in The Color Purple, Caroline or Change, The Full Monty, Starlight Express, and Hello Dolly.

1992

Kasara E. Davidson

and her business partner Abril Baloney Sutherland founded Diaspora Enterprise Solutions, LLC, a consulting company that specializes in emerging and developing markets. She has been traveling to Cuba since 2009 and now develops unique programs and projects in and about the Island Nation for DiasporaES clients. Since the beginning of 2015, Kasara has traveled to Cuba twice and given two presentations in the U.S. on the legal and cultural relationship between the United States and Cuba. She is scheduled to travel to Cuba for client business two more times before the end of the year, and 2016 is jam-packed already. Not surprisingly, Kasara smiles a great deal more than when she was a big law corporate attorney.

1999

Max Martinelli

writes, “I got married on August 22, 2015. Over half of the students in our 1999 graduating class attended. Two of them were in my wedding party, and one of them (Nick Canfield) officiated. My wife and I live in Park Slope, in the same building as

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S TAFF T R IBUTE

Linda Brown Announces Plans to Retire Head of School Marsha Nelson shared the news with the Cathedral community that Ms. Linda Brown plans to retire in June 2016.

I am writing to let you know that Linda Brown, after an incredibly long and meaningful career at Cathedral School, has made the decision to retire at the end of this school year. One would be hard-pressed to find a person in our community—present or past—who has not had the good fortune to know Ms. Brown and to experience her warmth and generosity. Everyone knows Ms. Brown – parents, faculty, staff, trustees, alumni, and of course our students. Since coming to Cathedral in 1982, Ms. Brown has ably worn a number of hats. She began as an assistant teacher in Lower School and then transitioned to become a parttime school secretary in the mid-1980s. She also served as an admission interviewer and interim 3rd grade teacher. In 1987 she took over as Cathedral’s full-time receptionist.  A warm and friendly face with a bright smile and kind eyes, Ms. Brown serves as the school’s official greeter and morale booster. Before we had our own nurse, she bandaged countless skinned knees and bumped elbows. She is still “Nurse Brown” in Lower School when she puts on her stethoscope and examines the kindergarten students’ favorite stuffed animals. Over her many years at Cathedral, Ms. Brown has contributed generously to the life of our school. Countless students have been inspired by her love of poetry. And it was through her efforts that Cathedral’s popular Kwanzaa celebration was established. In 2001 Ms. Brown was awarded the Z award, our school’s highest honor. We will pay tribute to Ms. Brown’s wonderful legacy at a celebration to be planned for the spring. In the meantime, I know you will join me in expressing our heartfelt appreciation to Ms. Brown for her 34 extraordinary years of service at Cathedral School.


B E YO N D C AT H E DRAL

Madeleine Rumely and her husband

(with whom we went apple picking recently). Many of us from the same year remain close friends and are still large parts of each other’s lives.” Mathilda McGee-Tubb married Dr. Peter Grieco in April 2015 at the Old South Meeting House in Boston. Numerous Cathedralites, including Madeleine Rumely, Max Martinelli, Adam Robbins, Jessica Hertz, and best woman Cordelia McGee-Tubb ’03, as well as Cathedral parents John and Christine Rumely and Carol Braswell Robbins, were in attendance. Nick Canfield offered a rousing reading by Dr. Seuss, and Andrew Sinanoglou attended through Facetime from Virginia. The ’99 crew gathers frequently to reminisce about Dr. Vitale and the Crypt. Mathilda is an attorney in the Boston office of Mintz Levin Cohn Ferris Glovsky and Popeo and welcomes opportunities to connect with other Cathedralities in Boston.

Look for a corresponding photo with alumni note

Seamus Foley passed away in the fall of 2014. We send sincere condolences to his family. This what Max Martinelli had to say about his friend: “Seamus had a great love for life, and had taken up weight lifting with great passion. He was frequently making jokes, smiling and laughing the loudest. He worked as a trainer a numerous clubs, among them New York Sports Club on 95th and Broadway (in the same zip code as Cathedral). In recent years, Seamus and I saw each other only occasionally. We met for a meal every so often, and a few times he joined us in the park for a barbecue or some outdoor sports.”

2000

Jeffrey Nusbaum is a

second-year resident in the Emergency Department of Mt. Sinai Hospital. He will marry Carly Layfield in July 2016 in Philadelphia.

2003

Cordelia McGeeTubb writes,

“Currently, I’m living in San Francisco working as a web accessibility engineer at Dropbox and pursuing my MFA in comics part-time. My thesis project is a comic memoir, which will probably have a few scenes from my Cathedral days. I was a terrible student in Mr. Delacey’s art classes, but maybe this MFA news will make him proud.”

2008

Claudia Baldacchino

is in her final year at the University of Edinburgh studying English and Scottish literature. She is writing her dissertation on post-Colonial literature. Outside of her studies, she is also employed at the International Office in the University of Edinburgh where she works as part of the Communications team designing, editing and creating content for web and print. She also works as a freelance graphic designer, designing publicity materials, book covers and website content.

2013

Maggie Perlman

writes, “Since graduation, I spent two summers traveling with Global Leadership Adventures, a volunteer organization that allows teens to travel throughout the world, while being enriched by service and culture. In 2014, I traveled to Guatemala to volunteer at a local school in Xela. I couldn’t get enough of my experience in Guatemala and decided to discover more of the unique and vibrant countries of Latin America. This last summer, I explored Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands and the Guanacaste region of Costa Rica to work with animals, nature and kids. In the Galapagos, I met unforgettable natives who had a strong love for the culture, nature and well-being of the islands. The keenness of the natives offering the knowledge of their land was an unparalleled experience. In the future, I hope to be exposed to more Latin American countries and their people, and to not only travel, but to travel with purpose.”

2014

Congratulations to Sharde Johnson, who is the 6th-ranked sophomore in New York State this indoor track season.

2015

Tiara Lewis-Falloon

attends Loomis Chaffee and plays JV volleyball. “Boarding school is fun, but hard. I felt very prepared for high school leaving Cathedral. I have a good idea of time management,” she says.

We want to hear from you!

Please send class notes, photos, and magazine submissions to: The Cathedral School of St. John the Divine Attn: Cathedral Editor 1047 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10025 alumni@cathedralnyc.org

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STA F F T R IBU T E

Edith Thurber Says goodbye to Cathedral after 16 years. “Edith is often, not only our role model, but also the glue that holds us together,” says Howard Nusbaum, Cathedral’s director of High School Placement and Edith’s long-time colleague. Edith has been Director of Admission, Head of Upper School, and taught sixth and eighth grade English, but she is also known for her mean moves with a Frisbee. “I remember the countless number of times I’ve seen Edith and her Upper School minions returning from the Ultimate Frisbee elective,” writes Howard, “Everyone looks battered, reminiscent of a scene from the sandlots of The Little Rascals. I never asked Edith what went on there. I think it would be like the Las Vegas slogan: ‘Whatever happens in Ultimate Frisbee...’” But it is Edith’s deep reserves of thoughtfulness and compassion that make her stand out as an educator and leader. Many alumni remember her choking back her tears reading the list of graduates at the end of every school year, during her tenure as the head of Upper School. Alan Donaldson, now teaching fourth grade, remembers her bringing tours “into my kindergarten classroom and waxing poetic on the developmental stages on display in the Weekend News. She was reverent of the kids’ work, fluent in early-childhood Weekend News-ese, meaning she knew that ‘I WT T TH STR’ was ‘I went to the store.’ She was positive and ebullient but wasn’t afraid to level with the parents. I think her understanding of the school and genuine warmth attracted many families to Cathedral.” Eighth grader Cameron M., a veteran on the Ultimate Frisbee team, has appreciated her energy and encouragement both on and off the field. In English, he remembers, “We were reading the Iliad and discussing Achilles’s emotions when Patroclus dies. Ms. Thurber was talking about how Achilles goes into a rage, then she had us all stand on our desks and scream at the top of our lungs. And she did it with us.”

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F ROM T H E A RC HIV E

WORLD WIDE WHAT? Oblivious to the explosive technological advancements that were about to change the world, these Cathedral students contentedly word-processed on Apple Macintosh computers during a computer class in the early 1990s.

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T H E LAS T WO R D

The Last Word B Y RI CH ARD KOO

I GREW UP IN BROOKLYN in the 1970s and ’80s in an

old Irish and Italian neighborhood, where we were the only Asian family in a five-block radius. When I was in elementary school, a new Chinese family moved in only three blocks away. My parents rolled out the welcome wagon and had the new arrivals over to our home just to say hi. My family stood out at a time—my pre-teen years—when all I desperately wanted was to blend in. Don’t get me wrong: my family was fully embraced by our neighbors. We shared barbecues and babysitting. We went to pool parties and block parties. No one called the fire department when my grandfather burned spirit money offerings to our ancestors in the backyard. Nobody batted an eye when my grandmother cured her own chickens by hanging them off the beams inside our garage. Foodies today might do that all the time, but back when I was ten—well, you can only imagine my horror every time I opened the garage door to get my bicycle. From my child’s point of view, all I could see were the ways that my family was different, and anything that did not conform to the norm in my neighborhood was undesirable. I remember complaining that my shorts were wrong, that my lunch was wrong, that you did not use rice and water when you ran out of glue. My 96-year-old grandmother will remind me that I used to demand to know why my parents moved us from Taiwan if they didn’t want to do things the American way. Why am I sharing my childhood neuroses with the Cathedral community? Well, honestly, it’s good to vent, but more seriously, I know that as a child I grappled with issues of identity, and not always successfully. School was a refuge because I could focus on academics, and I didn’t have to focus on my differences. An A was an A, and a B was something I could never bring home to my mother. Then my fourth grade teacher did something that helped me make peace with my two cultures. One day, Sr. Florence sent me to the faculty room to make some mimeographs. Every child is secretly overjoyed to be entrusted by the teacher with an errand, and I was no exception. The best part? The errand was merely a ruse to get me out of the

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classroom: when I returned, my class had thrown me a Chinese New Year party! There were red construction paper decorations and candy, and on my desk was my very own red tin filled with cards from my classmates, stickers, and more candy. It was doubtful that anyone else in class knew a thing about Chinese New Year. But for one day, I got to share a part of my home-self with my outside-self world. I shared my customs, traditions, and foods. After years of explaining that I did not have turkey for Thanksgiving, I was ecstatic to be talking about food I did eat at family celebrations. To have my culture celebrated was a wonderful experience, and a memory that I cherish to this day. Sr. Florence gave me the opportunity to be proud of my differences, and I am so incredibly grateful. It is amazing what the actions of one teacher can do to help develop a child’s identity. That’s why I am grateful to have found a community in Cathedral where the exploration of identities is encouraged. I look at the work done in the identity and social justice curriculum, and think that our students have a stronger sense of themselves, which gives them a willingness to explore, think, and grow. We have a school full of teachers like Sr. Florence, but I am the only one who has the red metal tin: it is sitting on a shelf in my mother’s garage. s

The errand was merely a ruse to get me out of the classroom: when I returned, my class had thrown me a Chinese New Year party!”

Richard Koo has been a member of the Cathedral School community since 2009. In addition to his role as Upper School math teacher, Mr. Koo has also played Santa Claus, the Grinch, Gru and Marilyn Monroe. He has also been known for dancing Gangnam Style with the class of 2016 —something that his daughters Alexandra ’13 and Isabel ’16 would probably like to blot out of their memories forever.

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MISSION STATEMENT The Cathedral School of St. John the Divine is an independent, Episcopal, K-8 day school for girls and boys of all faiths. The School is committed to a rigorous academic program that integrates the arts, athletics, and leadership development. Located on New York City’s Upper West Side on the 13-acre Close of the Cathedral, the School offers a unique setting for the celebration of the many traditions shared by its families. The School prides itself in being a diverse community in partnership with families who take an active role in their children’s intellectual, ethical, social, and emotional growth. The Cathedral School offers a stimulating environment in which each child can become an articulate, confident, and responsible citizen of the world. Continuing a century-old relationship, the School draws upon the Cathedral’s vast resources and provides its children’s choir. BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2015–2016 The Very Rev. Dr. James A. Kowalski, Chair and Dean of the Cathedral Angie Karna, P ’18, ’20, President James Hooke, P ’20, ’22, Vice President Robin Alston, P ’19, ’23, Secretary Sandor Lehoczky, P ’15, ’17, ’20, ’24, Treasurer Marsha K. Nelson, P ’16, ’21, Head of School Bill Bermont, P ’21, P ’24 S. Courtney Booker, III, P ’19, ’23 Jenni Bounds, P ’21, ’23, Parents Association Representative Satrina Boyce, P ’19, ’21, Jaye Chen, P ’17, ’20 Lucy Culver, P ’17, ’21, Parents Association Representative Linara Davidson ’96 Jay Eisenhofer, P ’17 John Gallo, P ’20, ’23 David Harman Norman Nelson, P ’90 Bruce Paulsen, P ’16 Jefrey Pollock, P ’21 Jennifer Prince ’96 Marta Sanders, P ’13, ’16 Aaron Sack, P ’18 Leila Satow, P ’14, ’17 Elizabeth Stein, P ’18 Sally Thurston, P ’15, ’17 Jody van der Goes, P ’15, ’17 Troy Wagner, P ’22, 24


THE CATHEDRAL SCHOOL OF ST. JOHN THE DIVINE FOUNDED 1901 1047 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10025

Cathedral Magazine (Spring 2016)  
Cathedral Magazine (Spring 2016)