Page 1

Fashion & Accessories Furniture & Industrial

Contemporary Arts Museum Houston 1


Fashion & Accessories Furniture & Industrial

Organized by

Chris Goins

GUEST CO-ORGANIZER

Garrett Hunter

GUEST CO-ORGANIZER

Dean Daderko

CAMH CURATOR

Patricia Restrepo

CAMH CURATORIAL ASSOCIATE & BUSINESS MANAGER

Contemporary Arts Museum Houston 1


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Garza Marfa. Saddle Leather Arm Chair, 2012. Steel tube with natural steel finish, natural saddle leather, mahogany. Courtesy of the artists. Photo by Jamey Garza.

2


“There is a genius in the friction between disparate objects, forms, and concepts… Art can be a painting, art can be a sculpture, art can be a dress, art can be a chair.”

—Garrett Hunter

3


DALLAS HOUSTON LAREDO MARFA SAN ANTONIO WIMBERLEY

4

,T E X A S

AUSTIN


TABLE OF CONTENTS

5

8

Director’s Foreword

10

A Conversation on Texas Design

20

Section I: Fashion & Accessory Design

86

Section II: Furniture & Industrial Design

128

Exhibition Checklist

134

Organizer Biographies

135

Contemporary Arts Museum Houston Staff & Board


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

6


7


Director’s Foreword

TEXAS DESIGN NOW

CAMH DIRECTOR BILL ARNING

8


DIRECTOR’S FOREWORD

The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (CAMH) has always understood itself to be instrumental in encouraging changes that might make the art life of the city more vibrant for all. We stand at unique moment when the ways information is communicated via technological platforms allows creators of culture to remain living in the places that feed their practices and spirit; they can enjoy the lifestyle they desire without forsaking access to sophisticated audiences. In a series of recent CAMH exhibitions, including Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing; Right Here, Right Now: Houston, and the upcoming exhibition Mark Flood: Gratest Hits, we have celebrated the achievements and provided significant scholarship on artists living in the region. Artists here confidently continue working in Texas without sacrificing anything professionally, artistically, or personally. We wondered internally if we could approach the applied arts with same program, idealistic as it might be, and sought out curators whose expertise in the diverse fields of design could make that happen. Garrett Hunter and Chris Goins are both well-versed in Texas culture and were natural experts with whom to consult. At Tootsies, the beloved clothing store on Westheimer Blvd. and Kirby Dr., Goins dressed many of CAMH’s great benefactresses, while Hunter’s interiors are always art-filled and feature many CAMH-associated artists. Dean Daderko and Patricia Restrepo worked closely with them to make this exhibition a celebration of design and a compelling curatorial statement. In my mind, design in the four fields of fashion, furniture, industrial design, and accessories is always a catalyst for fantasy—how would my life look if I sat in this chair, put my flowers in this vase or accessorized with that scarf? I kept losing track of the work to be done during project meetings because I was busily fantasizing about these objects coming to live in my home. I am grateful these makers are nearby to fuel future fantasies and I hope the scholarship in this volume treats their work for the cultural achievement it surely is!

9


A Conversation on Texas Design

TEXAS DESIGN NOW

CAMH DIRECTOR BILL ARNING CAMH CURATOR DEAN DADERKO GUEST ORGANIZERS CHRIS GOINS & GARRETT HUNTER

10


A CONVERSATION ON TEXAS DESIGN

bill arning We’re here at Contemporary Arts Museum

Houston to talk with Garret Hunter and Chris Goins, our Guest Organizers for Texas Design Now. Texas Design Now features fashion, furniture, industrial, and accessory design by artists and artisans working statewide. Can both of you please introduce yourselves and talk about your backgrounds and what you do professionally?

dean daderko

garrett hunter I’m Garrett Hunter. I own a boutique-sized design practice that specializes in interior and architectural design. Working in the field on projects at the scale my firm is used to has led to many opportunities to work directly with industrial designers and artisans. I have curated design-centric exhibitions for galleries as well as the Lawndale Design Fair. DD

Your practice is centered here in Houston, but your clients are more broadly based, aren’t they?

GH

Yes, we have done projects both rural and urban, including cities like Los Angeles and New York, as well as ranch houses and getaways all over Texas. chris goins My name is Chris Goins. I’m the store director of Tootsies here in Houston, and I’ve worked on many different platforms within the fashion world. I’ve been in retail for 20 years, and in luxury retail for the last 10 to 11. I’ve been a buyer, and worked in wholesale, and now I’m working in management. I studied fashion design at Houston Community College, and was so fascinated with all the different layers of the fashion industry that I decided to study Consumer Science and Merchandising, to really understanding buying behavior—why we by things the way that we do. Working over the last several years in retail, I’ve been exposed to different designers at all levels, from beginners to more seasoned practitioners. And I really enjoy the editing process: figuring out what is going to be key for our store, what is going to be key for our clients.

BA

Having spent time with both of you, and now looking at designers in the show, there seems to be a distinction between wilder designs, and those that are more classic and conventional. Working in Houston, do you have clients as adventurous as you’d like?

CG

Everyone has his or her own viewpoint on fashion and design. I always tell clients who say “oh, I could never wear 11


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

that” that seeing a garment on the hanger is not the same as putting it on, which makes it totally take shape and gives it life. I always encourage them. You may hate it, or absolutely fall in love with it, but you never know until you take the leap of faith and put it on. And that’s what fashion is: It’s risk. And it’s so rewarding. GH

I’m certainly fortunate to have clients who tend to be a little bit more adventuresome or edgy than many of my peers. As Chris said, trying something on for size usually brings it to life. So I tend to involve my clients in the process of working with artisans/craftsmen to ensure that whatever piece we are working on or searching for represents them and is at the same time either meaningful or functional.

DD

Can you both talk about what drew you to some of the designers that you’ve chosen for the show?

GH

When I am drawn to a piece, I’m usually looking at the form, the materiality, or the craft. Sometimes the beauty is in the material and how honestly-made a piece is. Jamey Garza and Constance Holt-Garza, for example, are making very beautiful pieces that are completely honest and exquisitely made.

DD

One thing that really strikes me is the way they pair natural leather—which will darken over time—with bright industrial colors. This juxtaposition sets their pieces apart.

GH

Yes, they adapt over time, which ties back into the honesty of the design.

CG

I agree with Garrett in many ways. I’m always interested in work that makes a statement. There’s a beauty in the simplicity of sharp edges and clean lines. Yasmina Johnson is an example: She is a young artist heavily influenced by architectural design. She uses architectural renderings to set the foreground, if you will, and manipulates pieces of fabric to create hard folds and edges that speak to her inspirations. I think a lot of us—whenever we look at a piece of clothing and put it on—identify with a sense of self-expression. The clothing transforms us. All of the designers I’ve selected for this particular exhibition bring something uniquely different to the table and it’s important to recognize that they all have unique viewpoints. 12


A CONVERSATION ON TEXAS DESIGN

BA

I like to think about fashion and interior design as forms of conceptual art that everyone knows how to read. If you send the average person to a museum with a dense conceptual show they may have to ask for help understanding the work, but when we put on our clothes in the morning, we make choices about how we want to present ourselves. And when we put pieces of furniture into our homes, it becomes a moment in which you invite the outside world in. People see and understand something about you based on the choices you make. I came to Houston from Boston, where there’s an underlying conservative streak. People there don’t want to be the most eccentric person in the room. Houston is the antithesis of this—it supports a very showy culture. Shyness isn’t rewarded. I think about the wild clothes and furniture in this show as these very strong public statements. Does this kind of eccentricity influence your work lives?

GH

I’m fortunate to have landed in a culture of people who are responsive to eccentricity, and who pay attention to details. They’re willing to jump into using their home as an opportunity to tell a story about themselves. It’s as much of a component of their personality as the way they dress, or the restaurants they go to, or the art they collect— they express themselves through furniture and the things they surround themselves with.

DD

Houston’s an extra-sophisticated community; people are open to a variety of experiences. People are willing to give unfamiliar things a try. It’s definitely exciting and energizes the creative community here.

CG

There’s definitely an openness to being experimental, not only with furniture design but also clothing design. Everyone is uniquely different in how they cultivate personal style. You see so much individual style here in Houston.

BA

This is a global city. I’m surprised by how multiculturalism appears in the show in all the sections.

GH

It’s a very young city, and because of that I think people are willing to experiment. We might not respect history as often as we could, but the relative youth of the city gives it an element of courage that other regions might not have.

DD

Can we also talk about the lines that we draw, or don’t, between art and craft? Or whether these distinctions are 13


Texas Design Now opening reception photography by Martin Yaptangco.

14


A CONVERSATION ON TEXAS DESIGN

important anymore? I think the boundary is pretty fluid these days. Some of the artists you’ve both chosen have this sense of… CG

Of walking that fine line?

DD

Right. Like James Brummett, for instance. His work activates the space between sculpture and functional furniture. It’s an issue that comes up quite often in this exhibition.

CG

Yasmina Johnston sent me a photograph of her origami dress, which is completely made from paper. It’s a very large piece, but how functional is it? Could a woman feel comfortable wearing it in public? I think it depends on the wearer. Take Claire Webb, for example: Her glitter stacked rings can be three or four inches high. I think these are something a person could wear and feel comfortable with. With these rings, the bigger, the better. Their sculptural quality is quite wonderful.

DD

The line between fashion and costume is something we get to explore here, à la people like Rob Bradford or Yasmina Johnson. Could you talk a little about those differences?

CG

Designer Rob Bradford does fashion and costuming. His work is theatrical. It’s for individuals who want to stand out. He designed a pair of boots for a country-western singer to wear on stage that are completely encrusted in charms. They might not be something you’d wear everyday, but they’re fabulous.

GH

That is something to consider. Sometimes the theatrical component of design is a beautiful and effect way to justify something that might be less practical but still useful on occasion. Michael Wilson creates these beautiful, mysterious narratives through the medium of wood. He allows the material to drive a stunning design, but manipulates in such a way that you can actually sit on it.

DD

Right. The relationship to materials can be organic: You can respond to the material, or you can control it.

GH

In Michael’s case, the material does affect the way it can be used. This engagement with the material affects the way one might perch on his bench, or how the wood carving in a seat might feel against a body due to the way he has carved a seat. 15


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

BA

I’d like to talk about music, because it’s one of the ways that “grillz” got popularized. They originated here but they’re known globally through celebrities and pop culture. As objects they’re pure decoration—they have no physical function; you don’t have to wear a grill. Can we talk about this sort of décor and how it relates to the show?

CG

Sure. Johnny Dang’s Diamond Grillz take fashion to the extreme. It’s extreme adornment, whether they’re drilling a tooth to fit a diamond into it, or making a grill that’s completely encrusted with diamonds. Celebrity culture brought this to the forefront in the ’80s, but the ancient Mayans drilled emeralds into their teeth as status symbols. In music culture, this kind of expression often strikes chord with audiences. There’s an interesting juxtaposition here with Sameera Faridi. I was looking at the intricate beadwork on her saris, and thinking about their similarity to Johnny Dang’s grillz. I find these surprising relationships really fascinating in the context of this exhibition.

DD

Houston, according to the last United States census, is the most ethnically diverse city in the country, and I think that’s represented in this exhibition. One participant is a designer of Nigerian descent, and another works with artisans in Dubai. The organization The Community Cloth —also represented here—works with recently resettled refugee female artisans from Bhutan, Myanmar (Burma), Iraq, Afghanistan, and Sudan. Many of them use back strap looms to weave beautiful scarves, bags, and tunics. The weavers here help keep their local craft traditions alive, because artisans in their home countries may need to be concerned with more basic needs. I also wanted to point out their work because, at around fifty dollars, the scarves they’re making are fairly affordable, and the majority of the cost is returned to the weavers. I think it’s great that many of the objects included in this exhibition are accessible to the average consumer.

GH

Utilitarianism can make something affordable if the initial expense is defrayed over time.

CG

I’d agree that there’s a range of affordability in what’s on view. Being in Houston, Dallas, Austin, or Marfa can definitely help, since it’s often less expensive to source materials here than it would be in other cultural centers.

CG

Price is something that is sensitive for most people. And 16


A CONVERSATION ON TEXAS DESIGN

lots of people don’t mind spending an extra few dollars on a really wonderful piece that they might have for a long time. BA

Early on, we debated whether or not to include people whose sensibilities had formed while they were working in Texas but were now based elsewhere. We decided ultimately we would keep the focus on people who were still living and working in Texas. I’d like to ask about the decision to stay in the state. What are the advantages and disadvantages? What do designers give up by not moving to New York or London or Paris, and what do they gain by staying here?

CG

Staying here fosters our community, and designers here can hone their skill within a relatively focused art or fashion community. For designers that want to keep costs down for studio space, or hire a few individuals to develop a collection, I think Houston is a great place to be. David Peck is an example—he’s been in the design business for a relatively short time. He started with a small studio space and over time he’s opened a retail location where clients can purchase his ready-to-wear designs. It’s a real success story because he’s been able to expand his audience quickly. He’s even doing accessories now. I’m very proud to see how much he’s grown in just the last few years, and I think stories like this prove what and incredible place this is to work in.

GH

The advantage of working in cities here in Texas—versus working in cities like New York or Los Angeles—is that you can focus on what you are doing rather than what others are. There’s also the luxury of large spaces to make things.

DD

Ideas about source and inspiration are interesting to touch on in relation to Manoosh. Anna Wilson, who’s here in Houston, produces scarves for her line that are based on paintings by Marilyn Biles, another Houstonian.

CG

Yes, the Manoosh designs translate Biles’s abstract oil paintings into beautiful silk and cashmere scarves. And Biles is Wilson’s future grandmother-in-law, so there’s a special connection there. This makes me think about David Peck, who takes the photographs that he uses as the basis for the textiles for his collections. I’m seeing more and more of this in the design community, and David has been at the forefront of movements like this. He used a 17


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

picture of a moth he saw at his grandmother’s home as the basis of an abstract textile design, and made a beautiful gown from it. It’s interesting how these family histories come into play. DD

Another notable collaboration is the one between the fashion designer Kate de Para, and the painter Shane Tolbert. De Para has produced silk textiles based on details she isolated in Tolbert’s abstract paintings.

GH

And there are artists like James Brummett, who is a painter and a sculptor primarily, and he also designs furniture. Andy Coolquitt is another good example of this approach. He’s a sculptor first and foremost, but he also creates functional objects, like lights and lamps that cause us to question issues of functionality and the edges of design.

DD

Another example is FINELL. They produce gorgeous leather handbags that are very sculptural, as well as dinner and servingware that bring an exciting aesthetic to utilitarian objects.

BA

One of the themes Dean has brought up in our prior conversations is CAMH’s very long history of looking at visual art and design as part of a larger contemporary lifestyle.* Is this a vision that comes together when you get rid of hierarchies between art forms?

GH

I think this exhibition will strike a chords with many viewers. I hope everyone will enjoy seeing it as much as we enjoyed putting it together.

* In 1948, CAMH (then known as the Contemporary Arts Association) inaugurated its programming with the exhibition This Is Contemporary Art. It was followed by others like The Common Denominator: Modern Design 3500 B.C–1958 A.D. (1958). These exhibitions placed artworks side-by-side with design objects, suggesting that “the contemporary” was not simply an artistic proposition but a matter of personal and aesthetic choice.

18


19


20

SECTION

I


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

22

Esé Azénabor

24

Mary Lou Artz & Xavier Castillo

26

Rob Bradford

28

The Community Cloth

30

32

35

36

FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

54

Yasmina Johnston

56

Manoosh

58

Marilyn Biles

60

Judy Masliyah

62

Dennis Nance with James Hays

64

David Peck

66

Stephanie Montes

68

Alyce Santoro

70

Claire Webb

72

Michelle Yue

Chloe Dao Kate de Para Shane Tolbert Sameera Faridi

38

FINELL

42

Johnny Dang Diamond Grillz

21


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Esé Azénabor DALLAS

22


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

Esé Azénabor’s designs are inspired by the arts and her culture. They are daring, luxurious, extravagant, and show her artistic side through her beading and attention to detail. As the saying goes, Nigerian-born Canadian transplant Azénabor got to Texas as fast as she could. Her arrival on the fashion scene, however, required a few additional detours. But we think you’ll agree her creations were well worth the wait. Hailing from a family who considered fashion design more of a hobby than a career, young Azénabor had to sweep her creative urges under the rug. The Azénabor name was grounded in the fields of medicine, law, and engineering, and she attended the University of Windsor in Ontario, majoring in accounting. A move to Dallas to pursue a masters degree at Southern Methodist University followed, before she detoured to following her dreams and started designing handmade dresses

Opposite page

This page

Wood Hand-Beaded Crop Top, 2015 Cotton, fasteners, marmar beads polyamide, and South African wooden beads Courtesy of the artist

Black Marmar Tunic, 2015 Cotton, fasteners, polyamide, marmar beads, and zipper Courtesy of the artist

Wood Hand-Beaded Stretch Pants, 2015 Buttons, cotton, marmar beads polyamide, South African wooden beads, and zipper Courtesy of the artist

23

for herself, friends, and family. Since she was a little girl, Azénabor held to her mother’s belief in her talent for creating wearable art. In 2012, without any financial assistance, this self-taught designer traded predictable college life for the wild world of fashion with the launch of her self-titled ready-to-wear line. At her sewing machine, she manifested her fascination with heavy hand-beading, crocheted lace, exquisite fabrics, and embroidery. Inspired by a combination of vintage, African, Egyptian, and contemporary European influences, she merged cultures to create her debut haute couture collection, as well as a second, luxurious ready-to-wear collection. She has teamed up with her sister Dosé Azénabor to create her most recent SS15 Collection, and today they are partners for the fashion label. Esé Azénabor’s goal is to empower women through the art of fashion.

Black Marmar Laced Leggings, 2015 Cotton, cotton twill tapes, grommets, lacing, marmar beads, and polyamide Courtesy of the artist


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Mary Lou Artz SAN ANTONIO

Mary Lou Artz was born and raised in San Antonio. She learned the art of being a seamstress from her mother. They spent hours going around to San Antonio’s iconic fashion locales, such as Frost Brothers and Joskes. Her mother would study the latest fashions and then teach her how to draw, cut, and sew by making her own patterns. Artz’s only formal training was in high school Home Economics, where she was easily bored because she had already had learned those skills at a much younger age. She grew up sewing her own clothes—and,

eventually, her children’s and grandchildren’s. Growing up in the Lutheran Church, she first began working on the Lutheran Coronation with another former Fiesta dressmaker, Ardyce Erickson, in 1957. Fiesta dresses are elaborate gowns worn during a coronation and pageant in San Antonio. Artz was recruited in the early 1970s to make dresses and trains for The Order of the Alamo Coronation, which is currently in its 105th year. She worked out of her home where the garage was converted to a studio to house the racks of fabrics

and the tens of thousands of rhinestones kept on hand to fashion the intricate train designs—as well as the 18-foot-long train-shaped tables needed to keep the work accessible. She personally trained a small team of local seamstresses, who spent countless hours fashioning the multiple pieces needed to make up each dress and train. Artz retired from being an official dressmaker three years ago in order to spend more time with her husband of 57 years and her seven great grandchildren on their ranch.

Xavier Castillo SAN ANTONIO

Xavier Castillo studied broderie d’art, fashion design, beadwork, and haute couture techniques at the Paris American Academy (Summer, 2006). With 22 years of experience, Castillo created duchesses’ gowns for The Order of the Alamo Coronation in San Antonio. Castillo’s attention to detail and constant goal of superior

quality make his work— which includes such items as headpieces, crowns, and custom jewelry—exceptional. Elite private clientele have personally requested his expertise to design unique, special event evening gowns. His passion for the fine arts, as opposed to everyday “art and crafts,” has led him to teach professional beadwork

Top to bottom Xavier Castillo Collar and Tiara Worn by Her Royal Highness, Princess of the Treasured Tiara of the Court of Dazzling Adornments, 2010 Cast metal, foam, rhinestones, silk, and wire Private collection

24

Mary Lou Artz Gown Worn by Her Royal Highness, Princess of the Treasured Tiara of the Court of Dazzling Adornments, 2010 Glass beads, glass gems, lamé, plastic gems, rhinestones, thread, and velvet Private Collection

and embroidery. Castillo currently holds private and public classes at his studio, where he offers instruction in the precise art of beadwork, embroidery, feather work, fashion design, custom accessories, headpieces, crowns and professional beading and embroidery.


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

25


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Rob Bradford DALLAS

26


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

Rob Bradford is a Dallasbased fashion designer whose over-the-top creations have been featured in such magazines as Women’s Wear Daily, PaperCity, CultureMap, D Magazine, and Modern Luxury Dallas. Bradford’s love for the beautifully unusual is evident in his use of unconventional materials such as antique textiles and taxidermy. He is also known for his work with metal, beads, and rhinestones. Rob counts designers Edith Head, Bob Mackie, and Adrian as inspirations.

Left to right Taxidermy Duck Gown, 2015 Acrylic, feather, and wool jersey Courtesy of the artist Photo by Cody Kinsfather Warrior Headdress, 2014 Acrylic, crystal, metal, and vinyl Courtesy of Stenly Poks and Tallinn Estonia Photo by Cody Kinsfather

27


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

The Community Cloth HOUSTON

The Community Cloth is a microenterprise initiative empowering refugee women in Houston. It targets economic, educational, and social goals through the provision of seed grants, training, and peer support, and by expanding market opportunities for refugee women artisans. The Community Cloth supports women who want to create and sell handmade, indigenous arts and crafts such as woven bags, knitted scarves, household items,

and more. Through producing and selling their wares, women have an opportunity to express their culture and heritage, learn new skills that will assist them in transitioning to life in the United States, and obtain much-needed supplemental income. Proceeds go directly to the artisans and the program. The Community Cloth is a program of Our Global Village, a 501c3 nonprofit organization based in Houston. Burmese Hand-Woven Scarves and Bags, 2015 Designed by Mu Mu, Po Ne, Pu Pu, Nae Poe, Moo Htoo, Naw Paw, Lae Moh, Hti Moe, and Poe Meh Cotton Collection of The Community Cloth Photos by Jane Foster and Maggie Wong

28


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

29


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Chloe Dao HOUSTON

Fashion designer Chloe Dao put Houston on the fashion map after her win on Project Runway, Season 2. She is known for her sophisticated style, mixed with a sense of ease. Dao’s warm Southern charm and playful spirit is apparent in every collection, as well as in her boutique, which celebrates its 15th anniversary this year. Her DAO Chloe DAO collection is proudly made in Houston. A leader in the fashion community, Chloe serves on advisory boards for Houston Community College, University of Houston, and The Art Institute of Houston. Her community service extends beyond fashion; she supports several nonprofit organizations such as Dress for Success, The Community Cloth, Girls Inc., and Think Pink.

Left to right Runway Dress, 2005 Silk and wool Courtesy of the artist Windsor Dress, 2015 Cotton brocade Courtesy of the artist

30


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

31


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Kate de Para HOUSTON

Shane Tolbert 1301, 2014 Acrylic on canvas Courtesy of J. Webb-Glass and S. Kopchok

32

Michelle Yue Lucite Jewelry, 2014–2015


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

Kate de Para is a textile designer living and working in Houston. Upon earning her MFA in fibers from the Savannah College of Art and Design, de Para began

dyeing, printing, cutting, and sewing textiles for her clothing line Evens. Her mission as a designer is to maintain a balance between traditional and technologically forward

methods of production. Evens is produced entirely in Houston and sold in stores around the country and online.

Left to right Marked Tote, 2015 Oil dye and vegetable tanned cowhide Courtesy of the artist

Gathered Cocoon Smock, 2015 Digitally dyed silk Courtesy of the artist

33

Sammy Suit, 2015 Digitally dyed linen Courtesy of the artist

Coverall Jumpsuit, 2015 Digitally dyed silk Courtesy of the artist

Silk Smock in Silver, 2014 Acid dye, salt, and washed silk Courtesy of the artist


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

34


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

Shane Tolbert in collaboration with Kate de Para

HOUSTON

Shane Tolbert lives and works in Houston. He received his BFA in 2008 from the University of Houston and his MFA in 2010 from the University of California, Santa Barbara. In 2012, Tolbert completed the Edward Albee Foundation Summer Fellowship in Montauk, New York. Recent exhibitions include Windows into Houston: Shane Tolbert– Fine China (2015) at the Blaffer Art Museum’s downtown Houston space; Outside the Lines (2014) at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston; Summertime Blues (2014) at McClain Gallery, Houston; Failing Flat: Sculptural Tendencies in Abstraction (2013) at CentralTrak, Dallas; and Montauk Paintings (2012) at Optical Project. He is represented by McClain Gallery, Houston.

1405, 2014 Acrylic on canvas Courtesy of Shane Tolbert and McClain Gallery, Houston

35

Kate de Para with Shane Tolbert Painter Set, 2015 Digitally dyed silk Courtesy of the artists

Kate de Para Goatskin Backpack, 2014 Dyed goatskin and vegetable tanned cowhide Courtesy of the artist

Michelle Yue Knot Chocker, 2014 Plexiglass Courtesy of the designer


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Sameera Faridi HOUSTON

Sameera Faridi acts as director and head designer of Sameera Faridi, a fashion and lifestyle brand that specializes in custom, high quality South Asian clothing, bridal gowns, and custom couture. Faridi currently serves as president of the Houston Community College Fashion advisory committee. She previously served as membership director of Fashion Group International. Sameera also owns Poshak Fashion & Style, a highly regarded South Asian retail outpost located in Houston, which brings the beauty and style of Eastern culture to the Western world. In addition to a wide range of South Asian clothing for women, men, and children, the boutique offers an extensive selection of carefully curated jewelry and accessories. With three store locations already thriving in key Middle East markets, Sameera Faridi continues to expand her company by making frequent trips to Asia and the Middle East to select fabrics and accessories and handpick every item in the store.

Left to right Nisha, 2015 Diamantes and embroidered silk Courtesy of the artist Aasha, 2015 Embroidered silk Courtesy of the artist Moonlight, 2014 Chion and diamantes Courtesy of the artist

36


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

37


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

FINELL Handbags

AUSTIN

This page AXIS, 2014 Cow leather and metal hardware Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL Photo by Ivan Alonso Opposite page ISO, 2014 Cow leather and metal hardware Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL Photo by Ivan Alonso

38


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

FINELL is a designer and manufacturer of neo-luxe housewares and fashion accessories, based in Austin. “Great design is what drives every part of the FINELL brand,” explains CEO Rebecca Finell. FINELL celebrates simplicity and smart design, letting go of convention to create new utilities and exciting products that redefine modern design. The FINELL brand represents

39

the finest craftsmanship and quality, with products made from an unexpected mix of luxury materials. Offering a progressive aesthetic and innovative features, the finished product aims to be as unique and refined as the customer who appreciates it.

The Founder Rebecca Finell previously founded Boon Inc., serving as president, principal

designer, and chief brand strategist for the leading global innovator in the baby product industry. In January 2013, she launched FINELL, which has already received international design recognition, the attention of top luxury stores, and ongoing features in high-profile press. FINELL products are sold in top retailers across the globe.


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

FINELL Housewares

Left to right SPIN, 2013 Silicone Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy of FINELL POKE, 2013 Silicone Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy of FINELL SWAY, 2013 Silicone Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy of FINELL CRAWL, 2013 Silicone Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy of FINELL Photo by Ivan Alonso

40


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

41


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Johnny Dang Diamond Grillz HOUSTON

Johnny Dang has changed the way entertainers today wear jewelry. Known as the “jeweler to the stars,” Dang creates eccentric jeweled pieces that accessorize and define the lifestyles of popular hip-hop stars. Best known for popularizing diamond-encrusted mouthpieces referred to as “grillz,” Dang influenced a Grammy Award-winning collaboration between Nelly, Paul Wall, and Ali & Gipp. The hip-hop artists’ 2005 single “Grillz” colorfully elaborated on the jewelry phenomenon that was taking over the entertainment industry. Starting as a watch repair technician and renting a small section in a local Houston flea market led to Dang’s passion for creating a brand. Known for his eclectic and over-the-top custom creations, Dang allows customers to design and create their dream piece of jewelry.

C.Stone, collaborator C.Stone writes, produces music, publishes books, promotes events, designs

Top to bottom Original Gold Grill, 2015 Gold Courtesy of the artists White Gold Pazeo Set Grills, 2015 Cubic zirconia and white gold Courtesy of the artists Blue and White Checkerboard Diamond Invisible Set Grill, 2015 Blue and white diamonds and white gold Courtesy of the artists

42

custom jewelry, and runs his company, BreadWinner Music & Marketing Group. He was instrumental in the grand opening of Johnny Dang & Co., a custom jeweler with locations at the Galleria and Sharpstown malls. C.Stone has also dabbled in the acting business, starring in three Johnny Dang & Co. television commercials.

Paul Wall, collaborator Emcee and deejay Paul Wall was born Paul Slayton. Prior to making a nationwide breakout in 2005 with a guest spot on Mike Jones’s “Still Tippin’” and his Swishahouse/Atlantic Records debut, The Peoples Champ, Wall was involved with promotional street teams, deejayed parties, put together underground mixtapes, and was half of the Color Changin’ Click with Chamillionaire. Affiliated throughout the years with Paid in Full and Swishahouse, Wall has made diamond-laced grillz. His clientele includes Lil Jon and T.I.


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

43


44


EsĂŠ AzĂŠnabor. Wood Hand-Beaded Stretch Pants (detail), 2015. Buttons, cotton, marmar beads polyamide, South African wooden beads, and zipper. Courtesy of the artist.


Rob Bradford. Taxidermy Duck Gown (detail), 2015. Acrylic, feather, and wool jersey. Courtesy of the artist.


The Community Cloth. Burmese Hand-Woven Scarves (detail), 2015. Designed by Mu Mu, Po Ne, Pu Pu, Nae Poe, Moo Htoo, Naw Paw, Lae Moh, Hti Moe, and Poe Meh. Cotton. Collection of The Community Cloth.


Chloe Dao. Runway Dress (detail), 2005. Silk and wool. Courtesy of the artist.

Kate De Para in collaboration with Shane Tolbert. Painter Set (detail), 2015. Digitally dyed silk. Courtesy of the artists.


Sameera Faridi. Nisha (detail), 2015. Embroidered silk. Courtesy of the artist.


Xavier Castillo. Collar and Tiara Worn by Her Royal Highness, Princess of the Treasured Tiara of the Court of Dazzling Adornments (detail), 2010. Cast metal, foam, rhinestones, silk, and wire. Private collection. Photo by Ronald Jones.

Mary Lou Artz. Gown Worn by Her Royal Highness, Princess of the Treasured Tiara of the Court of Dazzling Adornments (detail), 2010. Glass beads, glass gems, lamĂŠ, plastic gems, rhinestones, thread, and velvet. Private collection.


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

53


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Yasmina Johnston DALLAS

Yasmina Johnston is a fashion designer and artist from Dallas. Having a background in the arts, she used her talents to create a line of clothing that incorporates an avantgarde approach into modern design. Her philosophy towards “Inner Orbit Systems” was to define and understand your inner core within yourself and how you project yourself on the exterior. Johnston believes that her designs are part of her inner idea of herself, and like an artist, she is self-expressing. The line was first established because of her high concept pieces, and then was later focused on a ready to wear approach. Johnston is influenced by modern architecture, Japanese culture, Islamic design, and technology. Her brand is dedicated to designing contemporary abayas. Johnston is in pursuit of integrating multiple fashion inspirations in one cohesive ready-to-wear line. “The Islamic Arts has always been a great attraction for me,” she says. “I believe that it has great importance in understanding design work and the math/sciences. Islamic Art is timeless and yet time-relevant. It carries with it a history and importance and yet it is very modern and pure through time. Our world is moving at a rapid speed, yet it travels fluidly in a parallel.” Having received her AA in Fashion Design at The Art Institute of Dallas, Johnston has had the opportunity to work with other local fashion designers and artists. Recently, she was accepted into the London College of Fashion where she will be studying for a BA this fall in Fashion Design and Technology. Johnston hopes to gain industry knowledge abroad and become a fashion designer that can unify two ends of a spectrum to truly be innovative.

54

This page Body Cage, 2015 Cotton and plastic Courtesy of the artist Photo courtesy of the artist Opposite page Modular, 2014 Pleather and thread Courtesy of the artist Photo courtesy of the artist


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

55


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Manoosh HOUSTON

Left to Right Bright Sun, 2015 Digitally printed cashmere, thread Courtesy of the artist Anticipation, 2015 Digitally printed cashmere and modal, thread Courtesy of the artist Different Rules, 2015 Digitally printed cashmere, thread Courtesy of the artist

56


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

Anna Wilson, COO As COO of Manoosh, Wilson draws on her vast experience to bring a unique and fresh perspective to the brand. She spent her teenage years working as a florist at Stargazer’s Florist in Corvallis, OR. There, she honed her creative skills and artistic talent for blending bright, vibrant blooms together into aromatic works of art. During college, Wilson continued her work as a florist, designing and arranging flowers for an event company. In the off season she worked as a stationer, creating wedding invites for brides. She was also commissioned to work with renowned florist Mark’s Garden and celebrity party consultant Mindy Weiss for a gorgeous wedding in Portland. This experience pushed her skills as a florist to the limit, convincing Wilson that she was best suited for a creative career. She was born in Juneau, Alaska, and spent her childhood years in the Midwest and Pacific Northwest. She graduated from Oregon State University with a degree in History and minors in Latin and French, then continued on to earn a masters degree in Medieval History. She spent her first year after graduation teaching Latin, history, and grammar to middle school and high school students. The creative gene runs deep in Wilson’s family: several family members are or were artists, most notably her great Aunt Jane Peterson, one of the

first female Impressionist painters and a contemporary of Picasso. Two of her greataunt’s pieces are currently on display in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Nancy Guthrie, Owner/CEO Nancy Guthrie applies her talents as CEO of Manoosh. The child of an artist, Guthrie grew up surrounded by the inspirational beauty of art and enjoyed many extracurricular art programs during her youth. Guthrie realized early on that despite her heritage, her talents lay outside of the arts. Her professional career has spanned many roles and industries, ranging from computer programmer to the coordinator of a food bank. She has also actively volunteered with numerous nonprofit organizations. When the idea to use her mother’s art to develop beautiful accessories and gifts struck her, she realized that it was an opportunity to marry her business experience with her desire to help others succeed. In the future she hopes to develop employment opportunities for low-income women and donate a portion of the proceeds to support arts programs. Nancy lives in northern New Mexico with her husband John, a Presbyterian minister.

“It was the perfect opportunity to showcase local artists in a fresh way.” —Anna Wilson

57


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Marilyn Biles with Manoosh

HOUSTON

This page

Opposite page

My Dream of Morning, 2015 Adhesive, oil, oil pastel, and paper on canvas Courtesy of the artist

Hearing Color, 2010 Oil and oil pastel on canvas Courtesy of the artist

58

Scarves by Manoosh


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

As life often does, the life of Marilyn Biles has come full circle since her tenure as a fashion illustration student at Moore College of Art in Philadelphia. Inspiration comes from her inner feelings and life experiences. Her daily practice of meditation brings her out of her comfort zone and facilitates improvisational 59

healing spaces that appear in and beyond the surface of her paintings. That is where change happens; form and color transport her to another dimension when words cannot. The specific emotions and memories may be personal, but viewers who choose to contemplate the work from a place inspired by their own inner life may

also experience them. Biles’s paintings have become the inspiration for a line of women’s accessories under the Manoosh label, bringing beauty to all who view her works through this avenue of presentation. Art is life and can bring beauty, insight, and purpose to transform and touch everyone who views her work.


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Judy Masliyah HOUSTON

60


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

Judy Masliyah has always been compelled to learn and create. She studied languages, humanities, and fine arts before discovering her true creative outlet in clothing design. In the years following graduation from The Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City, Judy established apparel companies in New York, California, and Texas. She also acquired a broad range of work experience in costuming for both film and theater. She opened her shop, My Flaming Heart, in 2010. It began as a venue to house her collection of antiques and oddities alongside her own jewelry and dress designs and quickly expanded to include clothing for men and children. Attractive, yet mildly disturbing, her garments evoke the nostalgia of other eras. Her original fabric designs provocatively encompass incongruent genres. Her jewelry is a subversive use of found objects, hardware, or broken bits reimagined into new pieces.

Opposite page ‘In Crowd’ Gown, 2015 Cotton fabric Courtesy of the artist This page ‘Mushroom’ Dress, 2015 Cotton and linen blend fabric Courtesy of the artist

61


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Dennis Nance with

James Hays HOUSTON

Dennis Nance received his BA from Austin College in Sherman, TX with a concentration in Fine Arts and French. He recently got into sewing and makes clothing and costumes for both everyday wear and special occasions. Weird Wear by Dennis and James is a line of handmade shirts by Nance and James Hays. Nance is a native Houstonian with extensive experience working with artists and exhibitions for Houstonarea arts organizations and is currently Exhibitions & Programming Director at Lawndale Art Center. He is a past member of BOX 13 ArtSpace and a recent recipient of an Idea Fund Grant, funded by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, and an Individual Artist Grant from the Houston Arts Alliance for the project Cast of Characters, which will include an exhibition at BOX 13 ArtSpace and 2016 calendar.

Weird Wear by Dennis and James, 2013–Present Buttons, cotton, and thread Courtesy of the artists

62


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

63


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

David Peck HOUSTON

David Peck USA is a fullscale American fashion house based in Houston, specializing in clothing design, manufacturing, and fashion brand development. A skilled team of over 25 individuals design, manufacture, market, and sell David Peck’s signature lines as well as manufacture the designs of other regional and national women’s wear and children’s wear brands. David Peck USA is equally dedicated to helping emerging designers grow and develop by providing education in the areas of collection development and sample creation, and by and offering graphic design services and photo/video production. Alongside the few fashion houses producing in both New York and California, David Peck USA is a catalyst for local design and domestic manufacturing.

This page Polilla Gown, 2014 Digital print on charmeuse Courtesy of David Peck USA Photo by Cody Bess Opposite page Cunningham Gown, 2014 Digital print on charmeuse Courtesy of David Peck USA Photo by Cody Bess

64


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

65


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Stephanie Montes AUSTIN

s.t.e.f. is an American-made, eco-friendly women’s clothing line based in Austin. The entire collection consists of organic cotton, soy, and hemp fabrics as well as reclaimed textiles and materials that would otherwise be disposed of. Craftsmanship and honesty are constant themes throughout every season, featuring handmade garments with timeless designs that effortlessly blend sustainability with sophistication. The founder and designer, Stephanie Montes, has many years of experience in the fashion industry. She obtained a BA in Fashion Design and studied haute couture techniques at the Paris American Academy. The quality of each collection s.t.e.f. produces is apparent as the designer applies her knowledge and skilled hand to every aspect of the her line. This is a clothing line with a conscience, one that strives to make women look and feel beautiful, while promoting sustainable and ethical fashion.

This page Hand-Dyed Organic Cotton Dress, 2009 Cotton canvas, hand-dyed organic cotton, organza, and satin Courtesy of s.t.e.f. studio collection Photo by Li Fan Photography Opposite page Organic Cotton Pleated Top with Pencil Skirt, 2014 Organic cotton Courtesy of s.t.e.f. studio collection Photo by Li Fan Photography

66


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

67


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Alyce Santoro MARFA

68


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Alyce Santoro is a social surrealist, delicate empiricist, rhythmanalyst, atmospheric phenomenologist, and philosoprovocateur. Formally trained in marine biology and scientific illustration, Santoro set out at first to communicate about the wonders of science through art, later honing in on the expression of the wonders of nature in general, including consciousness and associated phenomena. She refers to many of her works combining sound, image, assemblage, and text as philosoprops—devices used to demonstrate a concept, spark a dialogue, or invite us to consider the ways we imagine the world to be. Works made from her Sonic Fabric—an audible textile woven from cassette tape— have appeared in over fifty exhibitions in museums and galleries around the world. Phish percussionist Jon Fishman and the Cidade da Cultura de Galicia complex in Spain have commissioned her to create custom editions of this unique material.

From left to right Voidness Dress, 2008 Sonic fabric Courtesy of the artist Score (Cacophony) Dress, 2005 Sonic fabric Courtesy of the artist Sonic Superhero Dress, 2003 Sonic fabric Courtesy of the artist

69


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Claire Webb HOUSTON

Left to right Gush, 2012 Glitter, gold leaf, and hot glue Courtesy of the artist Arrive, 2012 Figurines, glitter, gold leaf, and hot glue Courtesy of the artist

70

Ride, 2012 Figurine, glitter, gold leaf, and hot glue Courtesy of the artist Sentiment, 2012 Glitter, gold leaf, and hot glue Courtesy of the artist


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

Claire Webb spent her formative years in the damp, forested hills of the Pacific Northwest, but has lived and worked in Houston since her undergraduate education began in 1999 at the University of Houston, where she received a BFA in metalsmithing in 2005. She keeps a private studio at home, but also founded and manages a jewelry and 71

metalsmithing studio at Houston Makerspace, where she also teaches jewelry/ metalsmithing classes. Her work often combines minimalism with profusion, a union most evident in her Stack series in which wearers are encouraged to layer rings creating a dynamic space crisscrossed with unique shapes. The origins of form and proportion underpin

many of her pieces, as does an affinity for processes that translate forms through different states of matter. In addition to principles of visual economy, her work weaves in threads of decadence, whimsy, and playful humor. Her work has been included in several exhibitions in Houston, Dallas, and Austin.


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Michelle Yue HOUSTON

Michelle Yue is a designer and musician based in Houston. Her passion lies with minimalism and futuristic art as creative expressions, and she infuses that passion into her jewelry line. Born 1989 in Austin, Yue has lived most of her creative life in Houston. Since childhood, she has studied various forms of artistry including piano, drawing, painting, graphic design, and jewelry design. In 2008, Yue began fashion blogging under the alias Missnonhuman. Her fashion blog took off, and through constant study of aesthetics, she developed her own style. Yue graduated from the University of Houston in 2014 with a BA in Art History. It was through the study of art history that she was exposed to the many different ideas, concepts, and philosophies of design. Today, all of these studies contribute to her unique vision and desire to create. In a world of rampant consumerism and disposable commodities, Yue creates wearable goods that are almost indestructible and timeless—pieces that can be worn with each and every outfit that the buyer already has.

From left to right Lucite Bangle, 2014 Plexiglas Courtesy of the designer Lucite Collar, 2014 Plexiglas Courtesy of the designer Photo by Andi Valentine

72


SECTION 1—FASHION & ACCESSORY DESIGN

“An interesting plainness is the most difficult and precious thing to achieve.”—Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

73


74


Yasmina Johnston. Modular (detail), 2013. Pleather and thread. Courtesy of the artist.


Manoosh. Autumnscape (detail), 2015. Digitally printed cashmere, thread Courtesy of the artist.

Marilyn Biles. Hearing Color (detail), 2010. Oil, oil pastel, paper, and adhesive on canvas. Courtesy of the artist.


Judy Masliyah. ‘Mushroom’ Dress (detail), 2015. Artist designed cotton fabric. Courtesy of the artist.


David Peck. Lydia Gown (detail), 2011. Digital print on charmeuse. Courtesy of David Peck USA.

Dennis Nance with James Hays. Weird Wear by Dennis and James (detail), 2013–Present. Buttons, cotton, and thread. Courtesy of the artists. Photo by Ronald Jones.


Stephanie Montes. Hand-Dyed Organic Cotton Dress (detail), 2009. Hand-dyed organic cotton, organza, cotton canvas, satin. Courtesy of s.t.e.f. studio collection. Photo by Ronald Jones.


Alyce Santoro. Voidness Dress (detail), 2008. Sonic fabric. Courtesy of the artist.


Claire Webb. Hollow 1,2,3 (detail), 2012. Hot glue, glitter, figurine, gold leaf. Courtesy of the artist.

Michelle Yue. Lucite Bangle (detail), 2014. Plexiglas. Courtesy of the designer.


83


84


85


SECTION

II

86


88

Amy Blakemore

90

James Brummett

92

Andy Coolquitt

94

Alyson Fox

96

Garza Marfa

98

Peter Glassford

100

Angel Oloshove

FURNITURE & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

87

108

Oudvark

110

Ryan Reitmeyer

112

Warbach

114

Michael Wilson

116

Michael Yates

118

Peter Zubiate


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Amy Blakemore HOUSTON

This page Sammie, 2014 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Photo by Michael O’Brien Opposite page Dewayne, 2014 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Photo by Michael O’Brien

88


SECTION 2—FURNITURE & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Amy Blakemore (born 1958, Tulsa, OK) lives and works in Houston. She received a BS in Psychology and a BA in Art from Drury College in Springfield, MO, and an MFA from The University of Texas at Austin. From 1985–86 she was an artist resident at the Core Program at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Blakemore has exhibited her photographs throughout Texas and

89

internationally for the last thirty years, including Day for Night, the 2006 Whitney Biennial curated by Chrissie Iles and Philippe Vergne in New York, NY, and solo presentations at James Harris Gallery in Seattle, WA (2010) and the 2005 Pingyao International Festival for Photography in Pingyao, China. Alison de Lima Greene organized a twenty-year retrospective

of her work, Amy Blakemore Photographs 1988–2008, at MFAH (2009), which traveled to the Seattle Art Museum (2010) and the Oklahoma City Museum of Art (2011). Blakemore is head of the Photography department at the Glassell School, MFAH, where she has taught for the past 26 years.


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

James Brummett HOUSTON

James Walter Brummett ways that set him apart from weaves his stories through his contemporaries. Born in painting, photography, video, Houston in 1979, Brummett fabrication, and design. For attended San Francisco the past 15 years, he has Art Institute and New York worked in diverse fields University. He lived and of art executing his vision worked in New York City through his paintings and until 2012 and spent time use of wood, steel, and in Berlin and Africa. Now textiles. His experiences back in Houston, he applies with varied materials allow his experiences to create non-traditional and tradiartistic companionship tional mediums to fuse in between art and function

90

through his paintings and his fabricating business, JWB Studios. Brummett has participated in several solo and group exhibitions at galleries including Hello Project Gallery in Houston, Sur la Montage in Berlin, and Jericho Ditch on the Isle of Wight in VA.


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Opposite page Blue Bench, 2015 Concrete, hand-dyed cotton cushion, latex and oil paint, and polyurethane Collection of Le Hammer and Brian Williams Photo courtesy of the artist This page Mark Bench Number One, 2014 Concrete, hand-dyed cotton cushion, polyurethane, and wood Private Collection Photo courtesy of the artist

91


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Andy Coolquitt AUSTIN

Andy Coolquitt was born in Texas in 1964, and currently lives in Austin. In September 2014, Coolquitt presented his fourth solo exhibition at Lisa Cooley, entitled somebody place. In April and May of 2014, he was artist-in-residence at the Chinati Foundation, which culminated with an exhibition, Multi-Marfa Room, at the Locker Plant in Marfa, TX. In the spring of 2014, he had two major solo exhibitions, including This Much at Galerie Krinzinger in Vienna, and no I didn’t go to any museums here I hate museums museums are just stores that charge you to come in there are lots of free museums here but they have names like real stores at Maryam Nassir Zadeh in New York City. In 2013, he was an artist-in-residence at 21er Haus in Vienna, Austria, and opened an exhibition there that July. In Fall 2012, he presented a major solo exhibition titled attainable excellence at AMOA-Arthouse (now The Contemporary) in

Opposite page Last Year, 2015 Video slideshow, 20:49 minutes Courtesy of the artist and Lisa Cooley, New York

92

Austin. This exhibition was organized by the Blaffer Museum in Houston, and opened there in May 2013. A full-color monograph published by the University of Texas Press accompanied the exhibition and features contributions from Dan Fox, Matthew Higgs, Jan Tumlir, and Rachel Hooper. Coolquitt is perhaps most widely known for a house, a performance/studio/domestic space that began as his masters thesis project at the University of Texas at Austin in 1994, and continues to the present day. Recent exhibitions include Burn these eyes captain, and throw them all in the sea! at Rodeo Gallery in Istanbul; The Problem Today is not the Other but the Self at the Goethe Institute, New York, and Illuminations, curated by Matthew Higgs at Richard Telles Fine Art in Los Angeles. His work is included in the collections of the Philbrook Museum of Art, the Ă–sterreichische Galerie Belvedere, and the D. Daskalopoulos collection.


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

93


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Alyson Fox AUSTIN

Alyson Fox makes things from paper, fabric, metal, ceramics, tape, plaster, office supplies, photographs, old tattered things, new polished things, furniture, and packing materials. She has degrees in photography and sculpture. She enjoys designing things for commercial ends and designing things for no end at all. Her work has been published in The New York Times, Architectural Digest, and Wallpaper*, to name a few, and has been shown both nationally and internationally. She is currently collaborating with companies on textile work, exploring personal curiosities, and just launched her own line of goods under the name fox_a. She lives and works in Austin with her husband and puppy dog. She has collaborated with some of the following companies: H&M, & Other Stories, Lululemon, West Elm, Hawkins New York, and Ink Dish. She has a book of portraits titled A Shade of Red (Chronicle Books, 2011).

From left to right Layered Shapes Rugs: Dhurri Style, 2013 Hand-woven wool and silk Courtesy of Hawkins New York Landscape Rug, 2014 Hand-woven wool and silk Courtesy of Hawkins New York Photo courtesy of the artist and Hawkins New York

94


SECTION 2—FURNITURE & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

95


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Garza Marfa MARFA

Saddle Leather Cot with Blanket Pillows, 2015 Powder coating, steel rod, vegetable tanned leather, and vintage Bolivian blankets Courtesy of Garza Marfa Photo by Constance Holt-Garza

96


SECTION 2—FURNITURE & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Garza Marfa is the husband and wife design team of Jamey Garza and Constance Holt-Garza. Jamey was born and raised in the Austin area, receiving a BFA from the University of Texas and an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. Constance is a native San Franciscan, receiving a BA from the University of the Pacific before opening her own clothing store. As Constance developed a line of clothing for her store in the 1990s, Jamey honed his fabricating

97

skills by designing and building furniture and fixtures for boutique retail and hospitality clients in the SF area. In 1999 Jamey was invited by Liz Lambert to work with her team on the renovation of the Hotel San Jose in Austin. The experience of making the furniture for the Hotel San Jose led Jamey and Constance to look toward creating a furniture line that would embody a sense of the Southwest, while maintaining the influences of California Modern

and a minimal aesthetic. In 2003, Jamey and Constance moved to Marfa, Texas and began the groundwork for Garza Marfa Furniture. In 2012, the couple launched their line of Saddle Leather and Painted Steel Furniture designs at the Heath Ceramic locations in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Jamey and Constance continue to blend their educations and experiences in art, fashion and design into a growing line of furniture and textiles that is Garza Marfa.


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Peter Glassford LAREDO

Born in 1967, Peter Glassford studied fine arts at the University of Texas at Austin (1986–1991), concentrating in sculpture. Afterward, he focused on working in his studio. He began making furniture as sculptural work before moving to Mexico in 1996, where he honed his carpentry skills. A native from the Texas border, Glassford found Mexico

culturally influential. In 1998, he made a major shift and joined a Mexican partnership based in Guadalajara, crafting high-end furniture for the United States market using traditional methods. Presently, he oversees all design of his work while continuing to produce his signature pieces.

This page

Opposite page

Sameera Faridi Aasha, 2015

Untitled (Gold Parota Gold Screen), 2013 Stainless steel and wood Courtesy of the artist

Laredo Chair, 1994–Present Parota Wood Courtesy of the artist Sameera Faridi Nisha, 2015

Gold Laredo Chair, 1994–Present Gold leaf and wood Courtesy of the artist Silver Laredo Chair, 1994–Present Silver leaf and wood Courtesy of the artist Stephanie Montes Black & White Applique Gown, 2014

98


SECTION 2—FURNITURE & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

99


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Angel Oloshove HOUSTON

From left to right Vessel, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist

100

Tantra Body, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist

Soft Fuzz, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist

Vessel, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Angel Oloshove began her artistic practice as a painter at the California College of the Arts in Oakland, California. Studying under the artist Raymond Saunders, she was opened up to the idea that an artist can create any life and any work. Coming from a conceptual painting background, she eventually found sculpture. Oloshove’s work reflects her life experience as toy designer and commercial artist living in Japan for six years. She took sculpture workshops at small studios tucked away in massive apartment buildings and

The Feminine Mystique, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist

101

Art of Jan, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist

apprenticed with Japanese doll artists. In Japan, Oloshove learned the importance of creating intimate interactions with the viewer and developed a true sense of artistic integrity. She is interested in connecting to the viewer in an ethereal way. Oloshove draws from her travels through Thailand, Singapore, and Korea, where she absorbed abstract religious iconography juxtaposed with supersaturated pop culture. The pairing of sacred sites with ultra-modernity continues to influence her. This iconography has become

Vessel, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist

abstracted though the cultural meat-grinder and is a part of her visual vocabulary. Oloshove wants to make beautiful relics that connect intimately with the viewer and offer up golden moments of transcendence. Oloshove is just two years into living in Houston and already sees the work reflecting the new cultural landscape of which she is a part. Her most recent work is directly influenced by her life in Texas, the endless possibility in the West, and its great big skies.

Vessel, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy the artist


102


Amy Blakemore. Lewayne (detail), 2015. Porcelain. Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston. Photo by Ronald Jones.

James Brummett. Mark Bench Number One (detail), 2014. Polyurethane and casted concrete, hand-dyed stued cotton cushion. Courtesy of the artist. Private collection.


Alyson Fox. Geometric Rug (detail), 2015. Hand woven wool and silk. Courtesy of the artist.


Garza Marfa. Saddle Leather Cot with Blanket Pillows (detail), 2015. Powder coating, steel rod, vegetable tanned leather, and vintage Bolivian blankets. Courtesy of Garza Marfa.


Angel Oloshove. The Feminine Mystique (detail), 2014. Ceramic. Courtesy of the artist.

Peter Glassford. Untitled (Fold Parota Gold Screen) (detail), 2013. Wood and stainless steel. Courtesy of the artist.


107


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Oudvark HOUSTON

Oudvark is a modern line of lighting designed and produced by Amanda Medsger in Houston. Founded in 2012, Oudvark was inspired by the sprawling metropolis of Houston and a longing connect to nature in such a large, urban space. The line explores the idea of bridging the gap between nature and manmade elements. It aims to connect the interior world to the exterior with the use of natural materials as a means of design and building. Amanda sources all her wood and stone

108

within Texas, collecting pieces that are sculptural in their natural state. She uses each unique piece to begin designing.

The Designer Medsger received her BS in Advertising from The University of Texas at Austin. Although she never sought a career in this field, the principles learned in art direction and design courses led her to a career in design. She first began installing large-scale displays, mostly for retail establishments, in

Austin. She became a freelance designer in her birth city of Houston soon after moving back to Texas from Madrid, Spain. Medsger now designs and produces lighting under Oudvark as well as co-runs (along with her partner, Alicia Redman of Settlement Goods) RMMR Projects, an interior design firm based out of Houston. Oudvark explores Medsger’s love for nature as well as her desire to be surrounded by simple, well-designed interior objects.


SECTION 2—FURNITURE & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Opposite page Travis Walnut, 2013 Cotton, electrical parts, handblown glass, and Texas black walnut Courtesy of the artist Photo by Brooke Schwab This page Domingo Stone, 2015 Cotton, electrical parts, and Texas sandstone Courtesy of the artist Photo by Brooke Schwab

109


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Ryan Reitmeyer HOUSTON

From left to right Mold Spores, 2015 Cotton, latex, and viscose Courtesy of Carol Piper Rugs, Houston

110

Tattoo, 2014 Cotton, latex, viscose, and wool Courtesy of Carol Piper Rugs, Houston

Bleeding Trellis, 2014 Cotton, latex, and viscose Courtesy of Carol Piper Rugs, Houston


SECTION 2—FURNITURE & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Ryan Reitmeyer is the managing partner of Carol Piper Rugs, which has locations in Houston and Dallas. After completing his masters at the Bard Graduate Center in Decorative Arts, Design History, and Material Culture, his career began

in New York working for two of the most renowned rug firms, Carini Lang and Michelin & Kohlberg. In 2006, Reitmeyer moved to Houston and joined Carol Piper Rugs, where he began to design and produce custom rugs for the brand.

On floor Brain Folds, 2015 Linen and mercerized cotton Courtesy of Carol Piper Rugs, Houston

At the Pet Shop, 2015 Linen and mercerized cotton Courtesy of Carol Piper Rugs, Houston

111

Dirty Rug, 2015 Bleached jute Courtesy of Carol Piper Rugs, Houston

Inspired by colors and patterns found in nature and the unexpected, Reitmeyer has designed a significant body of rugs. Carol Piper’s custom rugs are designed in Houston and hand-woven in Nepal and India.


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Warbach AUSTIN

Lightning, 2015 Acrylic, LEDs, steel, and wiring Courtesy of Warbach

112


SECTION 2—FURNITURE & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Warbach is a design–build studio located in the heart of Austin, created by Nathan Warner and Buck Hubach. From initial conception to final installation, they pride themselves on their ability to see every job through from start to finish, and encourage client involvement. Warbach

113

is mostly known for their ability to create unique, custom light fixtures and for their immaculate attention to detail. Some of the best designers and architects in the business have called on them to collaborate in order to ensure that each piece is designed, built, and installed

using the best materials with precision and integrity. Their work is better seen than described, Warner explains: “We just happen to make artwork and light it up with lights. I always say that our canvas is the ceiling and walls.”


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Michael Wilson WIMBERLEY

Michael Wilson enjoys turning wood into an art, incorporating the natural idiosyncrasies of the wood he selects to add character and beauty to each piece. It’s his personal affinity, along with the material, that evokes the ultimate design. Most of Wilson’s work is free-form; he works with a painter’s hand. His carvings resonate with brush strokes, soft and fluid at one moment

and deliberate and exacting in the next. With his palette of different woods, each species is worked with traditional joinery then mixed with modern design. The exquisite pieces are branded and dated when finished. This Japanese-American designer is a self-taught woodworker and furniture maker. His pieces are functional, beautiful, and soulful.

Opposite page Nozomi Dining Table, 2015 Stacked laminated stained walnut Courtesy of the artist Bottom Hayabusa Coffee Table, 2015 Stacked laminated stained walnut Courtesy of the artist

“I create modern, organic, sculptural designs, interweaving function and art, and combining equal parts Western and Eastern sensibilities with meticulous technique.” —Michael Wilson

114


SECTION 2—FURNITURE & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

115


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Michael Yates AUSTIN

116

This page

Opposite page

Sling Chair, 2013 with Alyson Fox Oak and wool Courtesy of the artists Photo by Dennis Burnett

Giacomo Rocker, 2013 Cord, paper, and walnut Courtesy of the artist Photo by Dennis Burnett


SECTION 2—FURNITURE & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

A self-taught designer and woodworker, Michael Yates has been producing fine furniture and objects since 2003, when he abbreviated his engineering career and founded Michael Yates

117

Design. He has had the profound honor of building his grandmother’s casket, has lectured for the Japan America Society, and has also served as president of the Guild of Austin

Artisans. His work has been published and purchased both nationally and abroad, and his Giacomo Rocker was awarded a Core77 Design Award for furniture in 2013.


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Peter Zubiate SAN ANTONIO

118


SECTION 2—FURNITURE & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Peter Zubiate was born in 1970 raised in Marfa and Midland, TX. He grew up in his father’s woodshop, which consisted of handmade and restored antique furniture. This formed the backdrop of what he creates and how he creates. He continues to make and exhibit while grabbing influence from all facets of life. Zubiate’s unique method of woodworking combines elements of both innovative design and the tradition of furniture making. He has respect for the domestic canon and a sense of the absurd, incorporating occasionally animated lines and elements into his work. The pieces hover between functional and sculptural, with a focused interpretation of tools, folk implements, and the natural world. Use suggests form but doesn’t fully confine the finished product. Occasional flourishes, a silly handle, or a recognizable image set him apart from the strictly craft-oriented.

Left to right Bench with Green Stripe, 2006 Enamel paint and white oak Courtesy of the artist Cart Table, 2012 Aluminum, enamel paint, and reclaimed pecan Collection of Alberto and Patricia Molinar Kit, 2012 Enamel, paint, and white oak Courtesy of the artist Dresses by Judy Masliyah

119


120


Ryan Reitmeyer. Bleeding Trellis (detail), 2014. Viscose, cotton, latex. Courtesy of Carol Piper Rugs, Houston.


Warbach. Lightning (detail), 2015. Steel, acrylic, LEDs, wiring. Courtesy of Warbach.


Peter Zubiate. Cart Table (detail), 2012. Reclaimed pecan, enamel paint, aluminum. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Ronald Jones.

Michael Yates. Giacomo Counter Chair (detail), 2015, and Giacomo Dining Chair (detail), 2015. Ebonized Ash, back paper cord, brass. Whitewashed white oak, hand-dyed peach cord. Courtesy of the artist.


125


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

126


127


Exhibition Checklist Fashion & Accessory Mary Lou Artz Gown Worn by Her Royal Highness, Princess of the Treasured Tiara of the Court of Dazzling Adornments, 2010 Glass beads, glass gems, lamé, plastic gems, rhinestones, thread, and velvet Private Collection

Esé Azénabor Black Marmar Laced Leggings, 2015 Cotton, cotton twill tapes, grommets, lacing, marmar beads, and polyamide Courtesy of the artist Black Marmar Tunic, 2015 Cotton, fasteners, polyamide, marmar beads, and zipper Courtesy of the artist Cocktail Dress, 2015 Buttons, Japanese glass beads, metal seed beads, thread, silk jersey, and zipper Courtesy of the artist Wood Hand-Beaded Crop Top, 2015 Cotton, fasteners, marmar beads, polyamide, and South African wooden beads Courtesy of the artist Wood Hand-Beaded Stretch Pants, 2015 Buttons, cotton, marmar beads, polyamide, South African wooden beads, and zipper Courtesy of the artist

Marilyn Biles Hearing Color, 2010 Oil and oil pastel on canvas Courtesy of the artist My Dream of Morning, 2015 Adhesive, oil, oil pastel, and paper on canvas Courtesy of the artist

Rob Bradford Bird Hat, 2011 Acrylic, crystals, and feathers Courtesy of Jan Strimple Boots 2014 Crystal, leather, and metal Courtesy of Shane Walker Taxidermy Duck Gown, 2015 Acrylic, feather, and wool jersey Courtesy of the artist Warrior Headdress, 2014 Acrylic, crystal, metal, and vinyl Courtesy of Stenly Poks and Tallinn Estonia

Xavier Castillo Collar and Tiara Worn by Her Royal Highness, Princess of the Treasured Tiara of the Court of Dazzling Adornments, 2010 Cast metal, foam, rhinestones, silk, and wire Private collection

The Community Cloth Burmese Hand-Woven Scarves, 2015 Designed by Mu Mu, Po Ne, Pu Pu, Nae Poe, Moo Htoo, Naw Paw, Lae Moh, Hti Moe, and Poe Meh Cotton Collection of The Community Cloth

Chloe Dao Runway Dress, 2005 Silk and wool Courtesy of the artist Windsor Dress, 2015 Cotton brocade Courtesy of the artist

Kate de Para Marked Tote, 2015 Oil dye and vegetable tanned cowhide Courtesy of the artist Goatskin Backpack, 2014 Dyed goatskin and vegetable tanned cowhide Courtesy of the artist Sammy Suit, 2015 Digitally dyed linen Courtesy of the artist

128

Silk Smock in Silver, 2014 Acid dye, salt, and washed silk Courtesy of the artist

Kate de Para with Shane Tolbert Coverall Jumpsuit, 2015 Digitally dyed silk Courtesy of the artists Gathered Cocoon Smock, 2015 Digitally dyed silk Courtesy of the artists Painter Set, 2015 Digitally dyed silk Courtesy of the artists

Sameera Faridi Aasha, 2015 Embroidered silk Courtesy of the artist Moonlight, 2014 Chiffon and diamantes Courtesy of the artist Nisha, 2015 Diamantes and embroidered silk Courtesy of the artist

FINELL AXIS, 2014 Cow leather and metal hardware Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL CRAWL, 2013 Silicone Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL ISO, 2014 USA cow leather, hardware Photo by Ivan Alonso Designed by Rebecca Finell, Madeleine Busch, and Tate Chow Courtesy FINELL POKE, 2013 Silicone Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL QUIN, 2014 Cow leather and metal hardware Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL


RAE, 2014 Cow leather and metal hardware Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL SPIN, 2013 Silicone Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL SPIRE, SMALL, 2013 Aluminum and chrome Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL SPIRE, MEDIUM, 2013 Aluminum and chrome Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL SPIRE, LARGE, 2013 Aluminum and chrome Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL SWAY, 2013 Silicone Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL VEN, 2014 Cow leather and metal hardware Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL VERSUS, 2014 Cow leather and metal hardware Designed by Rebecca Finell and Tate Chow Courtesy FINELL VOX, 2014 Cow leather and metal hardware Designed by Rebecca Finell and Madeleine Busch Courtesy FINELL

Johnny Dang Diamond Grillz Blue and White Checkerboard Diamond Invisible Set Grill, 2015 Blue and white diamonds and white gold Courtesy of the artist

129

Invisible Set Princess Cut Diamond Grill, 2015 Blue, white, and yellow diamonds and yellow gold Courtesy of the artist Original Gold Grill, 2015 Gold Courtesy of the artist Rose Gold with Vampire Fangs, 2015 Rose gold Courtesy of the artist Ryan Lochte American Flag Grill, 2015 Blue and white diamonds, rubies, and white gold Courtesy of the artist White Gold Pazeo Set Grills, 2015 Cubic zirconia and white gold Courtesy of the artist

Yasmina Johnston Before London, 2014 Cotton and plastic Courtesy of the artist Evolution, 2015 Cotton, foam, and thread Courtesy of the artist Modular, 2013 Pleather and thread Courtesy of the artist

Manoosh Autumnscape, 2015 Digitally printed cashmere, thread Courtesy of the artist Floating on Color, 2015 Digitally printed cashmere and modal, thread Courtesy of the artist Harmony, 2015 Digitally printed cashmere, thread Courtesy of the artist Laws of Chance, 2015 Digitally printed cashmere, thread Courtesy of the artist My Dream of Morning, 2015 Digitally printed cashmere, thread Courtesy of the artist


Nightscape, 2015 Digitally printed cashmere and modal, thread Courtesy of the artist Outcrop, 2015 Digitally printed silk and modal, thread Courtesy of the artist Redscape, 2015 Digitally printed cashmere, thread Courtesy of the artist Secret Language, 2015 Digitally printed silk chiffon, thread Courtesy of the artist

Judy Masliyah ‘In Crowd’ Gown, 2015 Cotton fabric Courtesy of the artist ‘Mushroom’ Dress, 2015 Cotton and linen blend fabric Courtesy of the artist ‘Tiki Doll’ Halter, 2014 Artist designed cotton fabric Courtesy of the artist

Stephanie Montes Black & White Appliqué Gown, 2014 Hemp, organic and reclaimed cotton Courtesy of s.t.e.f. studio collection Cotton Basquine Dress, 2014 Organic and reclaimed cotton Courtesy of s.t.e.f. studio collection Hand-Dyed Organic Cotton Dress, 2009 Cotton canvas, hand-dyed organic cotton, organza, and satin Courtesy of s.t.e.f. studio collection Organic Cotton Pleated Top with Pencil Skirt, 2014 Organic cotton Courtesy of s.t.e.f. studio collection

Dennis Nance with James Hays Weird Wear by Dennis and James, 2013–Present Buttons, cotton, and thread Courtesy of the artists

130

David Peck Lydia Gown, 2011 Digital print on charmeuse Courtesy of David Peck USA Adelaide Gown, 2011 Digital print on charmeuse Courtesy of David Peck USA Nellie Romper, 2013 Digital print on charmeuse Courtesy of Becca Kolker Cunningham Gown, 2014 Digital print on charmeuse Courtesy of David Peck USA Pollila Gown, 2014 Digital print on charmeuse Courtesy of Becca Kolker Emmy, 2011 Digital print on charmeuse Courtesy of David Peck USA Phoebe, 2011 Digital print on charmeuse Courtesy of David Peck USA

Alyce Santoro Score (Cacophony) Dress, 2005 Sonic fabric Courtesy of the artist

Arrive, 2012 Figurines, glitter, gold leaf, and hot glue Courtesy of the artist Gush, 2012 Glitter, gold leaf, and hot glue Courtesy of the artist Hollow 1, 2, 3, 2012 Brass, figurines, glitter, gold leaf, hot glue, and shrink film Courtesy of the artist Innocence, 2014 Figurines, glitter, gold leaf, googly eyes, and hot glue Courtesy of the artist Ride, 2012 Figurine, glitter, gold leaf, and hot glue Courtesy of the artist Sentiment, 2012 Glitter, gold leaf, and hot glue Courtesy of the artist You Are Still, 2012 Base metal, figurines, glitter, hot glue, paper, and silver Courtesy of the artist

Michelle Yue

Sonic Superhero Dress, 2003 Sonic fabric Courtesy of the artist

Knot Choker, 2014 Plexiglas Courtesy of the designer

Voidness Dress, 2008 Sonic fabric Courtesy of the artist

Lucite Bangle, 2014 Plexiglas Courtesy of the designer

Shane Tolbert

Lucite Collar, 2014 Plexiglas Courtesy of the designer

1405, 2014 Acrylic on canvas Courtesy of Shane Tolbert and McClain Gallery, Houston 1301, 2014 Acrylic on canvas Courtesy of J. Webb-Glass and S. Kopchok

Claire Webb Abundance, 2015 Brass, figurines, glitter, gold leaf, hot glue, and shrink film Courtesy of the artist Approach, 2013 Brass, figurines, glitter, gold leaf, and metal Courtesy of the artist

Royal Collar, 2015 Plexiglas Courtesy of the designer


Furniture & Accessories

Crow, 2014 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston

Amy Blakemore

Texas, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston

Shudder, 2014 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Fat Jimmie, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Bubbles, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Tuna, 2014 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Goody, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Woozy, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Hen, 2013 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Balls, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Julia, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Knuckles, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Lewayne, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Loon, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Felix, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston

131

Nutbag, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Robby, 2014 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Scarred, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Amy, 2013 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Janie, 2014 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Shot, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Elroy, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Olive, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Sucker, 2014 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Rahm, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Toby, 2015 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston Queer, 2014 Glazed porcelain Courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery, Houston


James Brummett Blue Bench, 2015 Concrete, hand-dyed cotton cushion, latex and oil paint, and polyurethane Collection of Le Hammer and Brian Williams Mark Bench Number One, 2014 Concrete, hand-dyed cotton cushion, polyurethane, and wood Private Collection Mark Bench Number Two, 2015 Concrete, hand-dyed cotton cushion, latex paint, polyurethane, and wood Private Collection Mark Bench Number Three, 2015 Concrete, hand-dyed cotton cushion, polyurethane, and wood Collection of Raza and Mamta Pasha Steel Plate Chair One, 2015 Hand-dyed cotton cushion and steel plate Courtesy of the artist Steel Plate Dining Table, 2015 Steel plate and wood Courtesy of the artist Steel Plate Chair Two, 2015 Hand-dyed cotton cushion and steel plate Courtesy of the artist Three Bubble Wrap Pots, 2014–15 Bubble wrap and concrete Courtesy of the artist

Andy Coolquitt Last Year, 2015 Video slideshow, 20:49 minutes Courtesy of the artist and Lisa Cooley, New York

Alyson Fox House Throw, 2014 Woven baby alpaca and embroidery Courtesy of Hawkins New York Landscape Rug, 2014 Hand-woven wool and silk Courtesy of Hawkins New York Manipulated Material Vase, 2015 Found ceramic, paint, and pencil Courtesy of the artist Layered Shapes Rugs: Dhurri Style, 2013 Cotton Courtesy of the artist

132

Woven Platter, 2015 Hand-dyed grass Courtesy of the artist Geometric Rug, 2015 Hand-woven wool and silk Courtesy of the artist

Fox + Yates Sling Chair, 2013 Oak and wool Courtesy of the artists

Garza Marfa 36” Round Cafe Table, 2010 Powder coated steel rod and Texas pecan Courtesy of Garza Marfa Canvas Sling Chair, 2012 Canvas, hemp rope, mahogany, and powder coated steel tube Courtesy of Garza Marfa Saddle Leather Cot with Blanket Pillows, 2015 Powder coating, steel rod, vegetable tanned leather, and vintage Bolivian blankets Courtesy of Garza Marfa Saddle Leather Dining Chair, 2009 Powder coated steel rod and vegetable tanned leather Courtesy of Garza Marfa Saddle Leather Round Chair, 2009 Steel rod with lacquer and vegetable tanned leather Courtesy of Garza Marfa

Peter Glassford Untitled (Gold Parota Gold Screen), 2013 Stainless steel and wood Courtesy of the artist Gold Laredo Chair, 1994–Present Gold leaf and wood Courtesy of the artist Silver Laredo Chair, 1994–Present Silver leaf and wood Courtesy of the artist Laredo Armchair, 1994–Present Parota wood Courtesy of the artist

Angel Oloshove Agar Contour, 2015 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist Arc of Jah, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist The Feminine Mystique, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist Mother Magma, 2015 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist The Prince of Objects, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist Soft Fuzz, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist Tantra Body, 2014 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist Vessel, 2015 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist Vessel, 2015 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist Vessel, 2015 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist Vessel, 2015 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist Vessel, 2015 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist Vessel, 2015 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist Vessel, 2015 Ceramic Courtesy of the artist

Oudvark Aurora Stone, 2015 Cotton, electrical parts, and Texas limestone Courtesy of the artist Charlene Stone, 2015 Cotton, electrical parts, and Texas limestone Courtesy of the artist Cooper Branch, 2015 Cotton, electrical parts, and Texas cedar Courtesy of the artist


Travis Sconce, 2013 Cotton, electrical parts, handblown glass, and Texas black walnut Courtesy of the artist Travis Dome, 2015 Cotton, electrical parts, handblown glass, and Texas black walnut Courtesy of the artist

Michael Yates Giacomo Counter Chair, 2015 Brass, ebonized ash, and paper cord Courtesy of the artist Giacomo Dining Chair, 2015 Hand-dyed cord and whitewashed white oak Courtesy of the artist

Ryan Reitmeyer

Giacomo Rocker, 2013 Cord, paper, and walnut Courtesy of the artist

At the Pet Shop, 2015 Linen and mercerized cotton Courtesy Carol Piper Rugs, Houston

Richey Table, 2013 Felt, glass, and powder coated steel Courtesy of Cooper Richey

Bleeding Trellis, 2014 Cotton, latex, and viscose Courtesy Carol Piper Rugs, Houston

Peter Zubiate

Brain Folds, 2015 Linen and mercerized cotton Courtesy Carol Piper Rugs, Houston Mold Spores, 2015 Cotton, latex, and viscose Courtesy Carol Piper Rugs, Houston Dirty Rug, 2015 Bleached jute Courtesy Carol Piper Rugs, Houston Tattoo, 2014 Cotton, latex, viscose, and wool Courtesy Carol Piper Rugs, Houston

Warbach Lightning, 2015 Acrylic, LEDs, steel, and wiring Courtesy of Warbach

Michael Wilson Burnt Stump Series, 2015 Oil and water oak Courtesy of the artist Hayabusa Coee Table, 2015 Laminated and stained walnut Courtesy of the artist Nozomi Dining Table, 2015 Laminated and stained walnut Courtesy of the artist Q, 2015 Walnut Courtesy of the artist Sumo Beach, 2015 Laminated walnut Courtesy of the artist 133

Bench with Green Stripe, 2006 Enamel paint and white oak Courtesy of the artist Cart Table, 2012 Aluminum, enamel paint, and reclaimed pecan Collection of Alberto and Patricia Molinar Kit, 2012 Enamel paint and white oak Courtesy of the artist Pink Panther, 2013 Enamel from 1970 Dodge Challenger Pink Panther edition and white oak Courtesy of the artist


Organizer Biographies Chris Goins Chris Goins has worked in the fashion and design industry for more than a decade, gaining experience in the luxury retail, home, beauty, and fashion markets. While completing a BS from the University of Houston in Consumer Science and Merchandising, she began her career working as a buyer at Kuhl-Linscomb. Recently appointed the General Manager of Retail for the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (as of July 2015), Goins previously served as the Store Director of the iconic luxury fashion retailer Tootsies in Houston. Inspired by intricate details, impeccable construction, and boundarypushing designers who explore unexpected materials and movement, Goins has made a name for herself as one of Houston’s most-trusted sartorial experts.

Garrett Hunter Garrett Hunter is the principal and owner of an eponymous boutique design firm located in Houston. His career began under internationally renowned designer and dealer Pam Kuhl-Linscomb. Today, his firm has designed and completed numerous residential and commercial projects in Houston, Austin, New Orleans, Los Angeles, New York City, and rural projects throughout Texas. Inspired by contemporary art and esoterica, his projects explore the friction between minimalism and avant-garde grandeur. In 2011, Hunter curated an exhibition at Peel Gallery called California Cool, which displayed important furniture, textiles, graphic design, and jewelry with a focus on the Los Angeles area. In 2012, Hunter curated the Lawndale Design Fair at the Lawndale Art Center, which highlighted active contemporary designers at all career stages.

Dean Daderko Dean Daderko is the Curator at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston. His recent exhibitions include Double Life (2015), More Real Than Reality Itself (2014), LaToya Ruby Frazier: WITNESS (2013), and Parallel Practices: Joan Jonas & Gina Pane (2013).

Patricia Restrepo Patricia Restrepo is the Curatorial Associate and Business Manager at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston. After graduating from Rice University and receiving her master’s degree from the Katholische Universitat Leuven in Belgium, Restrepo served as the Editor-in-Chief of Artparasites in Berlin and New York. She has also worked at the Institute of Aesthetic Research (Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas) in Oaxaca, Mexico and the Saatchi Gallery in London.

134


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Contemporary Arts Museum Houston Staff Bill Arning Director

Kenya Evans Gallery Supervisor

Tim Barkley Registrar

Max Fields Communications Associate

Quincy Berry Assistant Gallery Supervisor Amanda Bredbenner Director of Development Libby Conine Major Gifts Manager Beth Peré Development Coordinator, Special Events Jamal Cyrus Education Associate and Teen Council Coordinator Dean Daderko Curator

Ara Griffith Grants and Gifts Coordinator Monica Hoffman Controller Connie McAllister Director of Community Engagement Valerie Cassel Oliver Senior Curator Shane Platt Assistant to the Director Sue Pruden Director of Retail Operations

Mike Reed Assistant Director of Facilities and Risk Management Patricia Restrepo Curatorial Associate and Business Manager Jeff Shore Head Preparator Michael Simmonds Tour Programs Coordinator Erin Thigpen Gift Processing and Development Coordinator Amanda Thomas Graphic Designer Amber Winsor Deputy Director

Contemporary Arts Museum Houston Board of Directors Jonathan B. Fairbanks Chairman Jereann Chaney President Dillon A. Kyle Vice President Andrew C. Schirrmeister III Vice President W.G. Griggs III Treasurer

Vera Baker

Mary Hammon Lee

Elizabeth Crowell

Erica Levit

Gregory Fourticq

Leticia Loya

Michael Galbreth

Libbie Masterson

Barbara Gamson

Elisabeth McCabe

Dan Gilbane

Greg McCord

Glen Gonzalez

Andrew McFarland

Melissa Kepke Grobmyer

Cabrina Owsley

John Guess Leslie Ballard Hull

Elizabeth Satel Young Secretary

135

Madeleine Kades J. David Kirkland, Jr.

James Rodriguez Reginald R. Smith Margaret Vaughan David Young


TEXAS DESIGN NOW

Texas Design Now is generously supported by Sara and Bill Morgan. Additional support for this exhibition is provided in part by Brochstein’s Inc., Scott and Judy Nyquist, and Mickey Rosmarin and Tootsies. This exhibition has been made possible by the patrons, benefactors, and donors to the Museum’s Friends of Steel Exhibitions:

The Museum’s operations and programs are made possible through the generosity of the Museum’s trustees, patrons, members, and donors. The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston receives partial operating support from The Brown Foundation, Inc., Houston Endowment, the City of Houston through the Houston Museum District Association, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Texas Commission on the Arts, The Wortham Foundation, Inc., and artMRKT Productions.

Director’s Circle Chinhui Juhn and Eddie Allen Fayez Sarofim Michael Zilkha Curator’s Circle Dillon Kyle Architecture, Inc. Marita and J.B. Fairbanks Mr. and Mrs. I. H. Kempner III Ms. Louisa Stude Sarofim Major Exhibition Circle A Fare Extraordinaire Bank of Texas Bergner and Johnson Design Jereann Chaney Elizabeth Howard Crowell Sara Paschall Dodd Jo and Jim Furr Barbara and Michael Gamson Brenda and William Goldberg Blakely and Trey Griggs George and Mary Josephine Hamman Foundation Jackson and Company Louise D. Jamail Anne and David Kirkland KPMG LLP Beverly and Howard Robinson Lauren Rottet Robin and Andrew Schirrmeister Leigh and Reggie Smith Yellow Cab Houston Mr. Wallace Wilson The catalogue accompanying the exhibition is made possible by a grant from The Brown Foundation, Inc. Funding for the Museum’s operations through the Fund for the Future is made possible by generous grants from Chinhui Juhn and Eddie Allen, Jereann Chaney, Marita and J.B. Fairbanks, Jo and Jim Furr, Barbara and Michael Gamson, Brenda and William Goldberg, Leticia Loya, Fayez Sarofim, Robin and Andrew Schirrmeister, and David and Marion Young.

136

CAMH also thanks its artist benefactors for their support including Michael Bise, Bruce High Quality Foundation, Julia Dault, Keltie Ferris, Mark Flood, Barnaby Furnas, Theaster Gates, Jeffrey Gibson, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Jim Hodges, Joan Jonas, Jennie C. Jones, Maya Lin, Julian Lorber, Robert Mangold, Melissa Miller, Marilyn Minter, Angel Otero, McKay Otto, Enoc Perez, Rob Pruitt, Matthew Ritchie, Dario Robleto, Ed Ruscha, Cindy Sherman, Shinique Smith, John Sparagana, Al Souza, James Surls, Sam Taylor-Johnson, William Wegman, and Brenna Youngblood.

United is the official airline of the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston Editor—Rose D’Amora Design—Amanda Thomas Printing—Specialty Bindery & Printing, Houston, Texas Photography—All photography by Paul Hester unless otherwise noted ISBN: 1-933619-56-2 LOC: 2015948312 © 2015 Contemporary Arts Museum Houston Contemporary Arts Museum Houston 5216 Montrose Boulevard Houston, Texas 77006 T 713 284 8250 | F 713 284 8275 CAMH.org

Profile for Contemporary Arts Museum Houston

Texas Design Now  

Texas Design Now On View: August 22, 2015 - November 29, 2015 Texas Design Now features fashion, accessory, furniture, and industrial desig...

Texas Design Now  

Texas Design Now On View: August 22, 2015 - November 29, 2015 Texas Design Now features fashion, accessory, furniture, and industrial desig...

Profile for thecamh
Advertisement