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Re-imagining Commercial City Signage for for Panjim Panjim


The Indian signage scenario, in all it’s people friendliness, is disorganised and chaotic. Its inconsistencies and variations depend on space and budget available to each shop owner. The result of which is the visual clutter on the streets, often stealing from the local flavour of city. One such site is the M.G. Road at Fontainhas in Panjim. In an effort to provide a delightful yet standardized identity to all shops meanwhile preserving the visual identity of the locality, we propose adding one more player to the ecosystem. The local crafts ecosystem is struggling to thrive and create an identity in the mainstream market. What if signage, which is the face of the streets, became a platform to exhibit these crafts?


Who’s to gain?

Retaining brand identity

Bright, bold signs

Shopkeepers/ Brands

Visibility

I n c re a s e i n re a l e s ta te value


Who’s to gain?

Less visual clutter, more heritage architecture

Community Building

The City

Conservation of heritage

StreetSafety caused by an increase in footfall


Who’s to gain? Recognition

Support

Gain of Regular Clientele

Visibility

Craftsmen Conservation of craft

Novelty in craft

Capital

Creative Stimulation


Creating an active eco-system Signage is a main-street requirement of the capitalist city, one that fulfils current requirements of commercial activity on the streets. Rather than apologising for it’s mis-use, or imposing tight regulations on the system that tend towards greater violations, we aimed to create a meaningful ecosystem out of which Harmonious products and artefacts could emerge. By reconnecting the crafts community with mainstreet patronage models, we can conceive of a street that is a celebration of local craft, a visible reminder of their presence, and a continued patronage model. The active ecosystem then produces all the artefacts required for main-street commerce to thrive, in a more contextual fashion.


Selected Crafts ( relevant for signage applications )

Terracotta

Kashta kari : Wood carving

Traditionally made by the Kumbhar community, for utilitarian purposes of storage. Today decorative items are made out of terracotta such as flower garden pots, pen holders, ashtrays, bowls, statues of saints and goddesses. Makers also draw inspiration from religious or historical themes.

Wood carving was traditionally done by the Suthar and Badhai communities for temple interiors, doors and exteriors, palanquins and temple chariots. Teak was used for constructing buildings and making furniture, doors and windows, and rosewood for decorative carving.

Region Mapusa, Bicholim, Calangute

Region Mapusa, Bicholim, Calangute


Selected Crafts ( relevant for signage applications )

Otim Kamm- Brass Ware

Azulejos

The Kansara community made brass lamps that were used for religious ceremonies and festivals in temples. Today brass is mainly used mainly for casting decorative items like oil lamps, church bells, candle stands, ashtrays and temple towers. The most famous piece is the lamp Samai that is a tree like oil lamp with flower motifs.

These blue floral tiles introduced to Goa by Portuguese depict name plates, or various religious, historical, or town scenes.

Region Mapusa, Sanquelim, Bicholim

Region Bicholim


The Beauty of Symbiosis


Classifications

Shops requiring a General repetitive guideline

Cafes, Bars and Restaurants

Brand outlets with Rigid type / logo guidelines

Additional Information


The process


Signage variants


Re-imagined facades : MG Road, Panjim


Re-imagined facades : MG Road, Panjim


Re-imagined facades : MG Road, Panjim


Re-imagined facades : MG Road, Panjim


Profile for The Busride

Reimagining Commercial Signage for Panjim City  

Our winning entry for the Charles Correa Foundation competition envisioned a future with Crafts integrated into the main-street city facades...

Reimagining Commercial Signage for Panjim City  

Our winning entry for the Charles Correa Foundation competition envisioned a future with Crafts integrated into the main-street city facades...