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WINTER 2013

A DIY HOLIDAY HOW TO CELEBRATE

THE HOLIDAYS ON CAMPUS

5

WAYS TO SPEND YOUR WINTER IN BOSTON

NO TEAM? NO PROBLEM

BOSTON TERRIERS FOOTBALL CLUB

BABY, IT’S COLD OUTSIDE BOSTON’S BEST HOT DRINKS

READY, SET... PARTY LUXE WINTER LOOKS


WINTER 18

22

Campus Campus

Arts Arts

08

22

SCHOOL SPIRIT

How to Celebrate the Holidays on Campus

10

CAMPUS BUZZ

A Social Guide to Campus

City City

14

WINTER WONDERLAND A Boston Winter Photo Walk

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ONCE YOU QUACK...

You Never Go Back: An Inside Look at a ConDUCKtor

A DIY HOLIDAY

Decorating Tips for Your Dorm

25

DE-STEREOTYPING BOSTON

Busting Boston’s Movie Myths

Fashion Fashion

37

HOLIDAY SHOPPING GUIDE

What to Buy for Your Family and Friends this Holiday Season

40

STREET STYLE

BU’s Best Dressed this Winter

2013

40

On Our Cover Our cover features two Boston University students. Sasha Arias [CAS ‘14] and Shaun Shapiro [COM ‘15]. Our spread also features Heidi Auvenshine [SMG ‘16] and Esteban da Cruz [CAS ‘14] in our holiday spread. MODELS WEAR: SCOOP, MES DEMOISELLES PARIS WOVEN KNIT SWEATER, $460; JEANS, MODEL’S OWN. FRED PERRY, TONIC GINGHAM TIPPED SHIRT IN DARK CARBON, $145; BLACK JEANS, MODEL’S OWN.


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48

Music Music

Abroad Travel

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54

Every Night of the Week

Off to Richmond, UK

YOUR DAILY GUIDE TO BOSTON’S LIVE MUSIC

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YOUR MUSICAL PASSPORT

Exploring International Artists

Food Food

48

BABY, IT’S COLD OUTSIDE

ESCAPING THE METROPOLIS

56

FOREIGN FESTIVITIES

Holidays Around the World

Sports Sports

58

SET THE PACE

Boston’s Best Hot Drinks

Boston University’s Equestrian Team

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64

DOUBLE TROUBLE

From Food Truck to Brick-andMorter

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NO TEAM? NO PROBLEM

Boston Terriers Football Club

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LEORA YASHARI Editor-in-Chief

“fires & flannels”

JASON FELDMAN Chief Branding Officer

SAM DUTRA Photography Director

“ice skating on the frog pond”

FRANKIE BARBATO IRENE BERMAN-VAPORIS TIMOR BALAISH Features Editor Copy Editor Broadcast Manager CHARLOTTE PARKER CINDY RUIZ Social Media Manager Public Relations Officer

ASHLEY ROSSI Art Director

“watching holiday movies”

SECTION EDITORS KATIE SMITH, Campus ASHLEY ROSSI, City Life CARLY HOFF, Arts RACHAEL ALLEN, Fashion ALYSSA LANGER, Food JESSICA LEACH, Music KATIE LOHEC, Travel PETER ZAMPA, Sports

“eating christmas cookies”

COPY EDITING TEAM SARAH EPSTEIN · KELLY GAUTHIER · ELISE MARRINAN · TAYLOR MAZZUOCCOLA · GABRIELLE MILLER · SAMANTHA PETERS · STEVIE SNOW · REBECCA TAN // ASSISTANT COPY EDITORS: K ATE CAMPBELL · SONIA SU

PHOTOGRAPHY TEAM AARON GOLDSTEIN · K AREN LOEWY · DANIELA AMAYA · MCKENZIE WILER · CLARA BURR LONNON · ALICIA WINTON · CARLIN STIEL · FALLON MORAN · K ARA KORAB · BARRON ROTH MADISON SCHAEFER · SARAH MCCULLOUGH · SARAH RUBIN

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE WINTER ACTIVITY ?

ART TEAM DESIGNERS: K ARINA CROSS · AMY ALEXANDER, CASSIDY KELLY HEAD ILLUSTRATOR: AMBER HUFF

PR + SOCIAL MEDIA + BRANDING + AD TEAMS ADVERTISING: LUCIANA RAMOS SOCIAL: REBECCA PARK · CLEO YAHN

BROADCAST TEAM

“Snow pants!”

CINEMATOGRAPHER: JOSH JASON CORRESPONDENT: PETER ZAMPA AC: KEVIN PATRICK WELDON · LAUREL IRVINE

WRITERS CAMPUS: SARAH WU · MARISSA CHOY · BAILEY CLEMENT · ABBY LESSELS · CASSANDRA CARROLL · GRACE GULINO // CITY: CATALINA CASAS · EMMA MCADAMS · SAMANTHA PETERS · STEPHANIE PAGONES · BRITTANY COMAK · ALLIE ORLANDO · KARA CZECZOTKA · ALEXANDRA CAPIK // ARTS: LAWRENCE KNOX · VANESSA DE BEAUMONT · SARA DELNEGRO · RYAN SEGUJLIC · PRIYA DADLANI · AYUSH KUMAR · VANESSA RODRIGUEZ // FASHION: ASHLI MOLINA · BRIDGET JARECKI · EMILY GOLDMAN · ISABELLE EPSKAMP · JACLYN ROUILLARD · JEMMA DOUGLAS · MEGAN SMITH · SARAH WU · DEVON DELFINO // FOOD: AMY GAINES · RACHEL LOWE · STEPHANIE SMITH · ALYSSA BARSANTI · SARAH WU · CLARA BURR-LONNON · MEGAN SMITH · MARISA SYMEONIDES · LIA BERGER · ELISHA MACHADO · JULIA FERREIRA · CORINA PINTADO // MUSIC: JENNA REYES · BRENT DONENFELD · DANICA DANIELS · DEE HIBBARD · KATHRYN RADIN · VICTORIA WASYLAK · LIA BERGER // SPORTS: KELLY LANDRIGAN · BRIAN ELBERG · DANIEL ALTER · CHRIS GRAY // TRAVEL: KANDI WALKER · LUCY FINN · ALEX KAUFMAN · INES BOUSSEBAA · SEBASTIAN SCHOLL · LAURA ROSE · LEA KOMITZKY · ANNA WEST


CONTRIBUTORS STORES Crush Boutique 131 Charles St., Boston 264 Newbury St., Boston 617-720-0010 @crushboutique LF Boston 353 Newbury St., Boston 617-236-1213 @lfboston Scoop NYC 177 Newbury St., Boston 617-874-4400 @scoopnyc Fred Perry 301 Newbury St., Boston 857-233-4698 @fredperryboston

SUPPORTERS L7 Studio Taylor Barnes 310-367-4900 Boston University Faculty Professor Safoura Rafeizadeh Dean Micha Sabovik Boston University College of Communication Hair and Make-up Styling Alicia Leone [SMG ‘14] fb: Makeup by Alicia Leone

HAVE YOU HEARD? >> DAILY STORIES    thebubuzz.com >> WEEKLY VIDEOS    thebubuzz.com >> SPECIAL EVENTS

PHOTO

BY JOH N

SHAPIR

O

>> THE MAGAZINE

THANKS OUR WINTER ISSUE WAS MADE POSSIBLE ONLY WITH THE HELP OF OUR TALENTED STUDENT CONTRIBUTORS, PARTNERSHIPS WITH LOCAL BUSINESSES AND ORGANIZATIONS. WE ALSO WANT TO THANK OUR VERY OWN COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION FOR ALL THE HELP AND SUPPORT IN CREATING OUR MAGAZINE!

Comments? Questions? Interests?

/@#THEBUBUZZ

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 5


EDITOR’S NOTE

Winter 2013 PHOTO SHAPIR O

by mirroring what is referred to fondly as the iGeneration. Our unique, everchanging need to cope with a generation where face-to-face communication is secondary to technology is naturally apparent throughout campus. Our classrooms provide us with a strong platform, a basis for understanding what it will take to survive and succeed in the fields we learn. What students continue to learn, though, is that the key to our survival is outside of the classroom within various internships and work experiences.

N BY JOH

BOSTON UNIVERSITY CONTINUES to evolve its curriculum

PHOT O BY

It is safe to say working on The Buzz is quite the journey—unexpected setbacks constantly push us to the brink of what we can handle. But we continue to surprise ourselves, rising up from the pitfalls to create a magazine, a website, an event, a video, a brand and all it is we hope to do in our own future paths.

O

6

SM I T

OUR NEW LOGO With new art direction comes a new logo. The Buzz brand continues to evolve under the hands of our talented staff.

SHAPIR

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

H [N Y U ‘14 ]

-Leora Yashari

N BY JOH

Have you heard the Buzz?

PHOTO

I would like to think each issue is better than the last—each student working on The Buzz continues to grow, as does our team. Needless to say, I am remarkably proud of this issue. Our winter issue is an incredible representation of what BU students can do with skills acquired within our classrooms. I am proud of this team and the dedication that continues to persist within our staff and within our community.

JACO B

As editor, I have always stressed the significance of one imperative skill: face to face interactions. In our world, where laptops and smart phones are as important as most limbs, we often forget that no matter your particular school, everyone ultimately goes into the business of communication—a business which would be meaningless without personal interactions. I urge everyone on this staff, which fluctuates from 80 to 120 students, to continue looking around­—take notice of the students that work side-by-side you to create this spectacular brand. Working together and learning from one another to create a fantastic final product will make you forget all the setbacks.


CAMPUS BUZZ p. 10

CAMPUS

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 7


HOW TO CELEBRATE T HE HOLIDAYS ON CAMPUS BETWEEN FINALS and Boston’s bleak weather, the holiday season may seem gloomier here than it does celebrating at home. While it may not feel exactly like a traditional white Christmas or happy Hanukkah, there are a few easy ways to get in the holiday spirit right in your Boston University dorm.

SCHOOL 8


decorate your dorm Stringing twinkling lights around a dorm room can make gloomy winter days a lot more cheery. The traditional white lights can stay up all year round, but adding new colors can bring rooms even more holiday cheer. Avid Christmas lovers should try multicolored or red and green lights, and Hanukkah enthusiasts should try a string of pretty blue lights. Create your own winter wonderland from cut out white paper snowflakes. Most dorms are too small to have a Christmas tree, but if you crave that piney smell that fills your house around the holidays, cut off a few pine tree branches and put them in a small vase. Brittany Straugn (CAS, COM ’16) makes celebrating the holidays on campus look easy. “My roommates and I always put up Christmas lights after Thanksgiving break. It is so fun,” Straugn said. “We also listen to carols and attend the holiday themed dinners in the dining hall together.”

bake One of the best parts about the holidays is the food, especially the sweets. Noah Bastein (SMG ’16) said he takes advantage of upperclassman who have kitchens in their apartments. “I bake a lot of cakes for my floor in my friend’s off-campus apartment,” Bastein said. Get a group together and have a cookie decorating party. Wear ugly Christmas sweaters, put on holiday music and decorate cookies or gingerbread houses. Those living without kitchens in dorms do not have to miss out on all the fun. Have some people over and make an easy microwavable cookie recipe to get your holiday cookie fix.

gift swap Grab a group of friends and organize a gift swap. Write names on separate pieces of paper, put them in a cup and have each person take out a name. Put a price limit so everyone knows how much to spend on a gift. Cristina Gallotto (COM ’17) likes to play Yankee Swap, also known as White Elephant or Nasty Christmas. “I have an annual tradition at home to have a Yankee Swap with my group of friends,” Gallotto said. “I brought it here to BU this year to get my friends and I into the holiday spirit.” Everyone shows up to the event with a present and picks a number out of a cup. The person with number one gets the chance to pick a gift from the pile. The person with the number two can either steal the gift from the first person or pick a new gift, and this continues on until every person has a gift.

SPIRIT

BY BAILEY CLEMENT

ILLUSTRATIONS BY AMBER HUFF PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA


SOCIAL tweet, tag, follow, go.

— KATIE SMITH & SARAH WU

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2

Since 1966, the BU Terriers have won 28 Beanpots [29 overall] in 44 years, including 12 of the past 15. @BOSTONTWEET

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Waiting for the bus to go to Allston in the cold is one of the only times when I really miss living in Warren Towers #BU. @LDELCAMP12 Miss the piano outside the GSU? It’s been moved inside the GSU Link. Now you can tickle the ivories through the winter. @BU_FYI

1. @STEFUNNYYYREE  This is what I get for compaining about the cold weather in California...

2. @RONISMITH   Painting the town white. #bu #latenight #snow #landscape #boston

3. @DIEGOCRNJ   The Boston Struggle. #thestruggle #boston #bu #stuvi2 #charlesriver #snow #beautiful #instagood #instahub #iphoneonly #picoftheday #kelvin

4. @BOSTONTWEET The @FaneuilHall Christmas Tree has arrived.

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YOU TELL US: HOW ARE YOU SPENDING YOUR WINTER BREAK? TAG @THEBUBUZZ WITH THE HASHTAG #BUZZWINTER AND YOU COULD BE FEATURED IN OUR NEXT ISSUE!

I love that every single week, students stand out by Marsh Plaza and brighten my day for #freehugfriday #thatssoBU #proudtoBU. @KATECAM330

BU students on average spent 17% of their day awkwardly shuffling to the back of the BU Bus #sardines. @CAROMO02


ONCE YOU QUACK... p. 18

CITY THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 11


THE GROWING

on-the-go HOW BOSTON’S MOBILE CULTURE CONTINUES TO

EVOLVE BY BRITTANY COMAK

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAMANTHA WOOD

Refreshments on wheels are not necessarily a new trend. American kids have chased ice cream trucks down streets for years, and peanut and hot dog street vendors are a staple around most city ballparks. By now, food trucks around Boston are commonplace. It is routine for some students to run to a truck after class to grab a taco or some grilled cheese. The aroma from most of the trucks is enough to draw any college kid away from the dining hall. Boston has only recently seen the development of its mobile businesses to include not only typical street food, but cafes and stores on wheels too. Away from the Boston University campus over in Dewey Square, trikes, or mobile tricycles, are on the rise. Alessandro Bellino caught on to the new trike trend, opening The Coffee Trike in 2011. On a tricycle, Bellino serves coffee, lattes, hot chocolate and other hot beverages.

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MOVEMENT


“I was looking around for a [permanent] space in Boston or Cambridge...and then I sort of couldn’t find anything,” Bellino said. Bellino said the emerging mobile food culture in Boston gave him the idea for mobile coffee instead. Thus The Coffee Trike was born. “I didn’t know if I wanted to invest that amount of money and invest that amount of time into a shop,” Bellino said. According to its website, The Coffee Trike partners with local businesses in both Acton and Hadley, Mass., for its coffee and milk. The trike also uses biodegradable paper goods. However, last year, his business saw a 50 percent decrease in sales during its first winter. It comes as no surprise that Bostonians might want to hide inside instead of freeze while standing in line outdoors for their coffee. “But that’s the great test,” Bellino said. “If it’s cold, are people going to come out?” Bellino’s trike can be found in Dewey Square from Monday through Thursday. In the summer and fall, Bellino sets up at the SoWa Open Market on Sundays. New and creative mobile businesses continue to open, despite the Boston cold. Fresh Truck opened in July and offers a healthy and mobile alternative to grocery shopping by selling fresh fruit and vegetables. Josh Trautwein, Fresh Truck’s cofounder and chief marketing officer, said the goal of the truck is to improve community health and what he likes to call “food literacy.” “We increase awareness around the benefits of healthy eating,” Trautwein said. “And we use the bus as a centerpiece.” Fresh Truck provides an alternative to shopping at corner markets, which offer less variety and more expensive products, for Boston families who lack the time or income to shop for produce at traditional grocery stores. Fresh Truck changes location every day. On Mondays, for example, the truck serves Charlestown and Boston’s Seaport. On Fridays, BU students can head over to nearby Mission Hill and Fenway to shop. “We try to target neighborhoods where there is a lack of access,” Trautwein said. “In some cases there has been an expressed interest from residents or community health initiatives from hosptials.”

Fresh Truck is able to maintain lower costs for consumers because as a truck instead of a storefront, its overhead costs are lower. This is a perk for Bostonians who rely on the truck’s lower costs. “We set a pricing structure that balances sustainability against affordabilty,” Trautwein said. And for Fresh Truck, the positive community response has been overwhelming. “Because of our hyper-local model of delivery in communities, we have become really close with our neighborhoods,” Trautwein said.

WE SET A PRICING STRUCTURE THAT BALANCES SUSTAINABILITY AGAINST AFFORDABILTY

Although the truck is taking a break and reopening in March, it is using the time off to upgrade the truck and “winterize” it, as well as add new food to its product list such as grains, nuts, cereals and breads. Edith Murnane, Boston’s director of food initiatives, said she thinks Fresh Truck is a good idea. “We all have to go grocery shopping, and in some areas it’s more difficult to do that,” Murnane said. “Fresh Truck helps alleviate that.” However, Murnane said while mobile trucks offer a fresh new alternative to traditional brick-and-mortar stores, the mobility of the trucks is not yet entirely changing the food industry’s landscape in Boston. “It’s a little new to be changing our lifestyle right now,” Murnane said. “I think it makes certain things perhaps easier for us.” For Trautwein, the truck’s reopening in March cannot come soon enough. “We can’t wait for the spring when we will be in a better position to build upon our success,” he said. Ashley Rossi also contributed reporting.

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 13


WINTER WONDERLAND WHERE TO CAPTURE THE BEST SNOW-COVERED BOSTON PHOTOS BY CATALINA CASAS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CATALINA CASAS

1

LONG WHARF ALTHOUGH IT GETS VERY COLD IN THE WINTER, THE LONG WHARF, A SHORT WALK FROM QUINCY MARKET, IS A GREAT LOCATION TO TAKE PICTURES. THE BAY IS A PERFECT PLACE FOR PICTURESQUE, POSTCARD-LIKE PHOTOGRAPHS OF SUNSETS.

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BOSTON COMMON & PUBLIC GARDENS THIS LOCATION MIGHT SEEMS LIKE IT WOULD BE BETTER DURING ANY SEASON OTHER THAN WINTER. THE VAST EXPANSION OF LAND AND ARRAY OF TREES HAVE AN EERIE BEAUTY IN THE WINTER TO PHOTOGRAPH. THE PONDS WILL ALSO FREEZE OVER, BECOMING A PERFECT SKATING RINK AMONG THE PARK’S WINTER WONDERLAND.

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 15


3

QUINCY MARKET

WITH A SWITCH TO THE RED LINE AND A COUPLE OF STOPS DOWN, QUINCY MARKET’S WARMLY-LIT COBBLESTONE STREETS AND MANY SHOPS AND RESTAURANTS MAKES IT PERFECT TO VISIT YEAR-ROUND. BUT IN THE WINTER, FANEUIL HALL LOOKS BEAUTIFUL AMIDST THE SNOW AND THE BARE TREES.

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CHARLES RIVER WHEN FROZEN OVER, THE CHARLES RIVER DAZZLES. BY SIMPLY CROSSING THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY BRIDGE, YOU WILL FIND YOURSELF IN A TREE-LINED PATH ALONGSIDE THE RIVER, WITH SNOW-COVERED TRAIN TRACKS AND ONE OF THE MOST BREATHTAKING VIEWS OF THE BOSTON SKYLINE.

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 17


ONCE YOU

QUACK, YOU NEVER GO

BACK

BY ALEXANDRA CAPIK

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA

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G

ary K. McNally is not your typical Massachusetts commuter. McNally drives into Boston four days a week in the early morning to beat the rush hour traffic. While most people put on business attire for their work commute, McNally dresses in a different kind of uniform. At work he becomes Captain Foghorn, a Boston Duck Tours tour guide, better known as a ConDUCKtor. The Boston Duck Tours are a signature attraction for both tourists and Boston natives. The best of Boston is condensed into an hour and a half tour that offers both a land and water tour of iconic places such as the Boston Common, Bunker Hill and Faneuil Hall. “A Duck Tour is a perfect overview of the city of Boston,” said McNally, a Seekonk, Mass., native. “It gives people ideas of how to spend the rest of their days.” A member of the U.S. Naval Cavalry, Captain Foghorn wears a crisp white uniform as heprepares his beloved “duck,” which is a World War II-style amphibious vehicle named Old Gloria, for his first morning tour, which begins at 9:30. In true captain fashion, McNally arrives at 9:30 on the dot, ready to get the show on the road—and the water. The tour departs from the Boston’s Prudential Center on Boylston Street. McNally cruises down the streets of Boston and waves to onlookers as he drives by. Construction workers, policemen, tourists and Boston locals all light up at the sight of the famous duck-mobile and many even greet McNally and his tour group with a few quacks.

After 15 seasons aboard Old Gloria, McNally has become incredibly comfortable in his own skin. He said when he makes fool of himself on board, it is not really Gary McNally making a fool of himself. It is Captain Foghorn. Before McNally spent his days quacking at people on the street and driving an amphibious vehicle, he worked the overnight shift at the Seekonk Police Department. When McNally’s coworkers came across the duck tour job listing, they thought he would be perfect for the job. At first, McNally did not take the job listing too seriously. However, when he came to the city and chatted with some current tour guides, McNally said he was sold. “As you get older, time becomes more valuable than money after a while,” McNally said. His love of history and fascination with military vehicles are what make the job of ConDUCKtor a perfect match for McNally. He said a tour guide is very much like a performer. Cindy Brown, president and CEO of Boston Duck Tours, said applicants must have many talents and skills to get a job as a duck tour guide. “All candidates must have a Captain’s license [having] enough documented water time to even interview,” Brown said. “Then we go through a ‘casting call’ where we see their acting and improvisational skills.” Brown said McNally’s past police officer experience helps him as a tour guide.

’’

AS YOU GET OLDER, TIME BECOMES MORE VALUABLE T HAN MONEY AFTER A WHILE


“As a police officer he uses great judgment and is focused on safety,” Brown said. Brown said McNally not only cares about the tours but also bonds well with his coworkers and guests. “He is a warm, gentle individual,” Brown said. Despite its repetitive nature, the tours don’t bore McNally. As a seasoned veteran, McNally has a few strategies to keep his routine fresh. “I switch it up for my own sanity,” McNally said. “I’ve been doing this so long I might use one set of facts going up Beacon Hill and the next tour I might use another set of facts.” McNally said guiding five tours a day for four days a week hardly gets boring. In September 2003, for example, McNally was driving down Newbury Street when he stopped at a red light next to a Rolls Royce convertible with a man and a woman inside. McNally began to joke around with the couple and asked them questions from his driver seat. McNally said he asked the man in the car if he wanted to trade the Rolls Royce for his duck boat. To his surprise, the man responded and said his Rolls Royce did not have the ability to float like McNally’s duck-mobile. The light turned green and the car pulled away. All of McNally’s guests on board looked astonished. The couple in the convertible was none other than Bostonnative Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez. “I was so engaged in my tour I didn’t even realize who they were,” McNally said. “Plus, I was too busy looking at the Rolls Royce.” Whether for a famous actor or a regular tourist, Boston Duck Tours have so much to offer. McNally said he promises the duck tour is a treat for all and often finds that the locals end up having just as much fun as the tourists. As McNally said, “Boston is a great city to share.”

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 19


FIVE BEST WAYS... TO ENJOY BOSTON’S WINTER

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BY ALLIE ORLANDO & SAMANTHA PETERS | ILLUSTRATIONS BY AMBER HUFF

KINGS BOWLING 50 DALTON ST. Bowling multiple games and renting shoes can add up. Take advantage of Kings Bowling’s $2 bowling, billiards and food specials on Tuesday nights. Bowling starts at 10 p.m. Open to bowlers 21+.

BOSTON FROG POND BOSTON COMMONS The ice rink has college nights on Tuesdays from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. when admission is discounted. The rink is currently open through March. Admission is $2 for students on Tuesday nights. Rental skates cost $9.

Bikram Yoga is practiced in a 105-degree Fahrenheit room. This is a great way to stay in shape during cold winter months when a jog around the park in the snow may not sound appealing. Students pay $16 per class.

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3 4

5 20

BIKRAM YOGA 561 BOYLSTON ST.

FROST ICE BAR 50 DALTON ST. With an indoor temperature of only 21 degrees Fahrenheit, the Frost Ice Bar is made entirely of ice, including the furniture and glasses. Students pay $16.99 cover. Alcoholic drinks start at $11; nonalcoholic drinks start at $6.

SKYWALK OBSERVATORY 800 BOYLSTON ST. Enjoy panoramic views of a snow-covered Boston from this top floor Prudential Center observatory. Students pay $13 with a valid college ID. In the winter the Skywalk is open daily from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.


A DIY HOLIDAY p. 22

ARTS THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 21


A

DIY BY MARISSA CHOY

A Guide to Do-It-Yourself Holiday Decorations and Gifts

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA

HOLIDAY

Break out the hot glue guns and craft supplies to make some creative and inexpensive do-it-yourself gifts, decorations and partyware this holiday season.

T UT U FAIRY LIGHTS SUPPLIES:

GLITTER DREADAL SUPPLIES:

Tulle

Dreidel

Lights

Glitter and jewels Glue

HOW IT WORKS:

HOW IT WORKS:

1. Cut the tulle into 6 inch by 4 inch pieces

1. Line desired parts of the dreidel with glue

2. Knot the tulle around the string of lights

2. Shake/place glitter or jewels over the glue

3. Bunch them close together to get a “fluffy” look

3. Let dry

22


BEER BOTT LE CHRIST MAS TREE SUPPLIES:

HOW IT WORKS:

Beer bottles (56) White or hot glue Cardboard for the base Pencil or pen Scissors

1. Rinse out all the bottles 2. Arrange the bottles in piles of one, three, seven, 15 and 30

5. Glue to the tops of the bottles 6. Put the cardboard cutout on top and start to glue down the second tier

3. Glue the bottles onto the base

7. Repeat steps five to seven for the next tiers

4. On a sheet of cardboard add the next tier, trace around and cut out the circle

8. Add lights and ornaments as preferred

NEW YEARS EVE MEMORY BOX SUPPLIES:

HOW IT WORKS:

Decorative stickers

1. At your party, for each guest have a 2013 jar

Tissue paper

2. Throughout the night of your party, guests can write down and put their favorite memories with that person in the jar

Empty mason jars Sharpies Paper cut into strips

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 23


24


DE-STEREOTYPING

BOSTON:

qqq MYTH #1 the BOSTON ACCENT

Almost every Bostonian has heard the phrase “Pahk yah cah in Hahvahd Yahd.” It may not seem too “wicked smaht” to assume the famous accent can be applied to all Boston residents, but some movies portray this accent as the norm. Actors such as Mark Wahlberg, Matt Damon and Ben Affleck let their Boston-made vocal inflections shine. Liz Higgins (CAS ’17) is a New England native familiar with the stereotypical Boston accent. “In ‘Ted,’ [Wahlberg] really played up his Boston accent and included a lot of jokes about it throughout the film,” Higgins said.

MYTH #3 THE DANGER ZONE

Busting Boston’s Movie Myths

Those who have never been to “Baw-stohn” may only know that the city is home to the Red Sox, the American Revolution, the founder of Facebook and the world’s blondest lawyer. Movies and television shows often create stereotypes, and many of Boston’s stereotypes stem from how the city is portrayed in the media. Here are some of the biggest myths about Boston that come from movies and television shows. BY VANESSA DE BEAUMONT PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA

MYTH #2

THE CRAZY RED SOX FANS It may seem common knowledge that Boston has passionate sports fans. However, films such as “Fever Pitch” only serve to reinforce the idea that perhaps Boston’s fans take team appreciation to a whole new level. Rachel Delvy (CAS ’17) thinks Jimmy Fallon’s character might have taken it too far in “Fever Pitch.” “It’s obvious that everyone’s really getting into the games...but I haven’t met anyone who’s that intense,” Delvy said.

What do “Boston Legal,”“The Departed,” “The Town” and “The Practice” have in common? Besides being set in Boston, these films and television shows all revolve around the concept of crime, leaving the impression that Boston is a dangerous city. Some often assume Boston would be a dangerous city due to its large size. However, most people who live here would say this city is surprisingly safe.

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 25


5

HOLIDAY that will make you MOVIES feel like a kid again BY RYAN SEGULJIC

1

“HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS”

“HOME ALONE”

This movie truly embodies the Christmas spirit, which may be why cable stations play it at least once a week in the winter. If you are one of those people who stresses so much around finals that your friends try to avoid you, learn from the Grinch and instead be cheery this holiday season.

Christmas is a time to relax with your family and enjoy each other’s company. Except for Kevin McAllister, who somehow always spends Christmas alone battling burglars instead of waiting for Santa Claus in this classic holiday movie.

“The Grinch scared me until I was 8 years old,” said Kyle Yoo (CAS ’14). “Then I saw Jim Carey’s version of the movie, and I thought it was the one of the funniest Christmas stories.”

“After I watched ‘Home Alone’ for the first time, I spent two days pretending my parents didn’t exist,” said Cody Kleiman (CAS ’15). “It lasted until maybe the day before Christmas when they told me I wasn’t getting any presents.”

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COURTESY OF WARNER BROTHERS

“ELF” What could possibly be better than watching Will Ferrell pour maple syrup on top of a plate of pasta? Oh right, watching Zooey Deschanel convince you Santa Claus is real with an angelic rendition of “Santa Claus is Coming to Town.” This Christmas favorite will never get old. “Zooey Deschanel’s smile is brighter than the Northern Lights,” said Dillon Joffe (SMG ’15).

COURTESY OF UNIVERSAL STUDIOS

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“RUGRATS”

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It may seem odd for college students to watch the Rugrats’ Christmas or Hanukkah episodes, but nothing cues nostalgia more than Tommy Pickles in a Santa suit. Watch the kids cut down their Christmas tree or listen to Grandpa’s version of the story of Hanukkah. “When I watch the ‘Rugrats,’ I can feel myself turning back into that 6-year-old child that was afraid of the dark because Chuckie was,” said Alex Yedid (COM ’15).

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“EIGHT CRAZY NIGHTS” The best Hanukkah movie out there stars everyone’s favorite Jewish celebrity, Adam Sandler. While “Eight Crazy Nights” might not be filled with intellectual moments, it’s a fun-filled Hanukkah movie to watch this holiday season. “‘Eight Crazy Nights’ is one of Adam Sandler’s finest works. It is fun for the whole family,” said David Candell (COM ’15).

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READY, SET, PARTY p. 28

ALL WARDROBE PROVIDED BY CRUSH BOUTIQUE, LF BOSTON, FRED PERRY AND SCOOP NYC.

FASHION

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 27


[THIS PAGE] CREAM FUR COAT, STYLIST’S OWN; CRUSH, 8 OTHER REASONS CRYSTAL AND SPIKE NECKLACE, $34. [OPPOSITE PAGE, FROM LEFT] FRED PERRY, TONIC MICRO GINGHAM MARL SHIRT IN NAVY, $145; GLASSES, MODEL’S OWN. CRUSH, AMANDA UPRICHARD CREAM SILK BLOUSE, $184; BLACK FUR VEST, STYLIST’S OWN; SCOOP, BLACK FUR EARMUFFS, $80. FRED PERRY, TONIC GINGHAM TIPPED SHIRT IN DARK CARBON, $145. BLACK DRESS WITH CUT OUT SIDES AND SHEER POLKA DOT SLEEVES, STYLIST’S OWN; SCOOP, BLACK KNIT FUR NECK WARMER, $140.

READY, SET... 28


PARTY

Fashion Editor RACHAEL ALLEN Photography by SAM DUTRA Art Direction ASHLEY ROSSI Assistant Photography by JOHN SHAPIRO

’Tis the season for holiday soirees, twinkling lights and one too many family gettogethers. Make the most of it by throwing on some luxe accessories. Whether it is a necklace, a fur jacket or a cozy scarf, you are sure to be the most festive one in the THE BUZZ | room. WINTER 2013 | 29


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TINSEL TOWN [THIS PAGE] SCOOP, THREE DOTS FOR SCOOP GRAY LONG SLEEVE SWEATSHIRT WITH SEQUINED FRONT, $118; FRED PERRY, TWISTED YARN BEANIE IN BLACK AND GRAY, $60. FRED PERRY, TONIC MICRO GINGHAM MARL SHIRT IN NAVY, $145; FRED PERRY, BLACK AND GRAY TWISTED YARN SCARF, $75.

[TOP LEFT] CRUSH, PARKER BLACK SILK TANK, $178; SCOOP, BLACK KNIT FUR NECK WARMER, $140. [TOP RIGHT] BLACK DRESS WITH CUT OUT SIDES AND SHEER POLKA DOT SLEEVES, STYLIST’S OWN; SCOOP, BLACK KNIT FUR NECK WARMER, $140. FRED PERRY, TONIC GINGHAM TIPPED SHIRT IN DARK CARBON, $145; BLACK JEANS, MODEL’S OWN. [BOTTOM LEFT] CREAM FUR COAT, STYLIST’S OWN; CRUSH, 8 OTHER REASONS CRYSTAL AND SPIKE NECKLACE, $34. [BOTTOM RIGHT] LF STORES, [LEFT] MIKA AND GALA BLACK LONG SLEEVE WOVEN TOP, $124; C.C. EXCLUSIVES CREAM KNITTED HEADBAND, $28; [RIGHT] C.C. EXCLUSIVES GREY KNITTED HEADBAND, $28; NECKLACE, TOP, MODEL’S OWN.


[TOP LEFT] LF STORES, MIKA AND GALA BLACK LONG SLEEVE WOVEN TOP, $124; CRUSH, 8 OTHER REASONS CRYSTAL AND SPIKE NECKLACE, $34; SCOOP, FUR EARMUFFS, $80. [TOP MIDDLE] FRED PERRY, TONIC GINGHAM TIPPED SHIRT IN DARK CARBON, $145; LIGHTS, STYLIST’S OWN. [TOP RIGHT] FRED PERRY, CHECK PANEL CREWNECK SWEATER IN NAVY, $140; FRED PERRY, BLACK RIBBED BEANIE, $60; GLASSES, MODEL’S OWN. [BOTTOM] LF STORES, MIKA AND GALA BLACK LONG SLEEVE WOVEN TOP, $124; C.C. EXCLUSIVES CREAM KNITTED HEADBAND, $28; CRUSH, 8 OTHER REASONS CRYSTAL AND SPIKE NECKLACE, $34. FRED PERRY, HOUNDSTOOTH STRIPE CARDIGAN IN GRAPHITE MARL, $225; FRED PERRY, BLACK AND GRAY TWISTED 32 YARN SCARF, $75.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY AMBER HUFF


HOLIDAY CHEER CRUSH, AMANDA UPRICHARD CREAM SILK BLOUSE, $184; SCOOP, EMERALD FUR NECK WARMER (WORN ON HEAD), $225.

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 33


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WHAT’S THE secret? YOU KNOW IT’S THE HOLIDAY SEASON WHEN STORES ARE PACKED, SHOPPING BAGS ARE HEAVY AND YOU ARE SO HUNGRY THAT YOU THINK ABOUT BUYING THE CHOCOLATE THEY ALWAYS SELL AT DEPARTMENT STORE CASH REGISTERS. LUCKILY, AROUND THE HOLIDAYS, STORES HAVE GREAT DEALS AND PROMOTIONS THAT MAKE SHOPPING A LITTLE EASIER. HERE ARE SOME SIMPLE TIPS TO FOLLOW FOR A HOLIDAY SEASON THAT WON’T BREAK THE BANK OR DRIVE YOU NUTS.

BY MEGAN SMITH

ILLUSTRATIONS BY AMBER HUFF

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What days?

What are some tips?

What time?

The holiday season can be filled with headache-inducing crowds and lines that seem to last a lifetime. To be a savvy shopper, the best days to go to a store are Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Most traffic for stores are during the weekends, so going during a weekday will ensure shorter lines and less crowding said Bryan Tyler, a service experience representative at Nordstrom Rack on Newbury Street.

Despite your weekly yoga classes and mornings at FitRec, your arms just might not be strong enough to handle so many shopping bags. If you feel like you’re being weighed down, ask a customer service representative at any major department store if you can keep a few bags behind the counter—they will most likely agree. Go back to the store at the end of the shopping day and pick them up. Your arms will thank you the next day.

Hopefully you can work around your busy schedule and find some time on weekdays in between classes, jobs and extracurriculars to hit up the shops. The best time during the day to go to stores is any time far away from a meal because meals are when people plan to go shopping. Instead, Shawn, a customer service representative at H&M on Newbury Street said you should plan to go at off times.

“Stores restock on weekday mornings, so going then ensures a great shopping experience,” Tyler said.

4 What should I eat? One of the most important, but often most easily forgotten, things to do is to eat while shopping. But instead of inhaling five coffees, avoid the long Starbucks line and allot some time to sit down for a real (not food court) meal. The nutrients from a big lunch will give you a lot more energy than that giant pretzel you grab on your way between stores (and will probably save some calories too).

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“The best times to come into the store during the holiday season is right when the store opens from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m., or during lunch hours from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m,” Shawn said.


your ready-to-go holiday

SHOPPING GUIDE: What to Buy Your Family and Friends This Holiday Season BY JEMMA DOUGLAS PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA

The stress of gift shopping always hits at once—when you’re in a mall, bombarded by a sea of shoppers, thinking to yourself that a gift card might be the way to go. Before you decide to throw in the towel and head to the food court, here’s list of some gifts that can guide you through your shopping list this holiday season in Boston. THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 37


There are many ways you can go wrong with a present for mom, but a scarf is not one of them. Teach her how to hop on the infinity scarf bandwagon with this colorful number. You can find it at Anthropologie’s Newbury store. ANTHROPOLOGIE 203 NEWBURY ST., BOSTON LOOP COZY SCALLOP SCARF $38 WWW.ANTHROPOLOGIE.COM

OR

Try the Buddy Cork Screw scarf from the Institute of Contemporary Art’s gift shop. It is almost cute enough to replace you. INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART GIFT SHOP 100 NORTHERN AVE., BOSTON BUDDY CORK SCREW $15.95 WWW.ICASTORE.ORG

FOR DAD.. Remind your dad how cool he used to be and head over to Newbury Comics to get him his favorite record. If you aren’t sure what record to buy, Al Green’s “Lets Stay Together” from 1972 is always a safe bet. Your dad will appreciate the thought, and you will probably spend all of your winter break listening to him play it.

OR

NEWBURY COMICS 1 NORTH MARKETPLACE, BOSTON AL GREEN “LET’S STAY TOGETHER” $23.99 WWW.NEWBURYCOMICS.COM

Chances are your dad is a mega sports fan. But even if your family is not from Boston, get your dad some Red Sox gear. It’s only fitting after this year’s World Series.

DON’T FORGET...

FOR MOM..

CITY SPORTS 1035 COMMONWEALTH AVE., BOSTON RED SOX MODESTO HAT $22 WWW.YAWKEYWAYSTORE.COM

FOR YOUR BROT HER...

Whether your brother is younger or older, a boy is always a kid at heart. While he might try to hide that he plays Xbox all day on Saturdays, let’s face it, he does. Any brother would love this Xbox wireless headset to wirelessly chat with friends while playing. MICROSOFT STORE PRUDENTIAL CENTER 800 BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON XBOX 360 WIRELESS HEADSET WITH BLUETOOTH $39.99 WWW.TECHRADAR.COM

OR

Teuscher Chocolates of Switzerland’s champagne truffles might just be the best chocolates to eat during the long winter months. Make it seem like you are fancy and surprise your best friend with some chocolates this holiday season. TEUSCHER CHOCOLATES OF SWITZERLAND 230 NEWBURY ST., BOSTON CHAMPAGNE TRUFFLES, BOX OF NINE PIECES $26 WWW.TEUSCHERBOSTON.COM

OR

If you feel like splurging on that best friend we all have who loves cats, get him or her a pair of brainwave cat ears. The ears can track your emotions and can shoot straight up when you are alert or down when you are relaxed. FOR YOUR BEST FRIEND...

MUSEUM OF SCIENCE 1 SCIENCE PARK, BOSTON BRAINWAVE CAT EARS $69.99 WWW.ENSSC.COM

Boys want to smell nice but might not want to walk into Sephora to buy cologne. Help out and buy him a bottle of cologne that you know will make him smell nice—even after a morning at the gym. SEPHORA PRUDENTIAL CENTER 800 BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON YVES SAINT LAURENT L’HOMME COLOGNE $48-$80, DEPENDING ON BOTTLE SIZE WWW.SEPHORA.COM


OR

FOR YOUR SISTER..

Every girl needs a fashionable travel mug for her tripleshot skinny vanilla latte. This one from the 1960s exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts is perfect.

Most girls have heard of former British model and fashionista Alexa Chung. Most girls also wish they could be Alexa Chung. Why not give your sister an insider’s peek into Chung’s life with her new book, It. You won’t even have to leave Boston University’s campus to pick up a copy.

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS BOSTON GIFT SHOP 465 HUNTINGTON AVE., BOSTON HIPPIE CHIC INSULATED TUMBLER $11.95 WWW.MFASHOP.COM

BARNES AND NOBLE 660 BEACON ST., BOSTON IT HARDCOVER AVAILABLE FOR $22.50 WWW.BARNESANDNOBLE.COM

If you want to fool your girlfriend and make her think you know about fashion, buy her this cute Zara sweater. She will be surprised when she opening the box, thinking you splurged because it looks like this season’s Givenchy sweatshirt. ZARA 212 NEWBURY ST., BOSTON COMBINATION SWEATSHIRT $39.90 WWW.ZARA.COM

OR

FOR T HE GIRLFRIEND.. These notecards are the perfect way for your girlfriend to say thank you for all of her Christmas gifts or graduation gifts this upcoming May. Maybe she will even write you love notes on these trendy Paper Source notecards. PAPER SOURCE 1361 BEACON ST., BROOKLINE GLASSES HELLO A2 STATIONARY $12.50 FOR A PACK OF 10 NOTECARDS AND ENVELOPES WWW.PAPER-SOURCE.COM

FOR T HE BOYFRIEND.. Chances are your Boston boyfriend is preppy. He will love to day drink this holiday season with a Vineyard Vines coozie. VINEYARD VINES PRUDENTIAL CENTER 800 BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON VINEYARD VINES COOZIE ASSORTED COLORS FOR $5 WWW.VINEYARDVINES.COM

Let his friends know that you are a cool and laid back girlfriend by buying your boyfriend this Kate Upton t-shirt. He will love it, and his friends will love you for buying it.

OR

MARC JACOBS 81 NEWBURY ST., BOSTON SKIN TEE – KATE UPTON $35 WWW.MARCJACOBS.COM

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 39


STREET

STYLE

—CORINA PINTADO

PHOTOS BY CORINA PINTADO

KATE KOLBINSLAY // SHA ‘16 TWITTER: @KKOLLOZ COAT: QUICKSILVER SCARF: URBAN OUTFITTERS BOOTS: VINCE CAMUTO PANTS: JOE’S JEANS WHY WE LOVE HER LOOK? ARIANA SIMONELLI // CAS ‘16 TWITTER: @ARIANAIMONELLI

CREATIVE ACCESSORIES & LAYERYING CHRISTINA LYNCH-BIGORNIA // CAS ‘14 INSTAGRAM: @XXXTINALB JACKET: ZARA SWEATER: OLDER BROTHERS PANTS: MACY’S FLATS: LUCKY BRAND SCARF: HAND -ME-DOWN BAG: URBAN OUTFITTERS SUNGLASSES: RAY-BAN WHY WE LOVE HER LOOK? 40

BERRY LIP

BAG: ZARA SCARF, LEATHER JACKET & SHIRT: FREE PEOPLE PANTS: REVOLVE CLOTHING SHOES: SAM EDELMAN SUNGLASSES: TIFFANY & CO. WHY WE LOVE HER LOOK? PRINTED DENIM


YOUR MUSICAL PASSPORT p. 44

MUSIC THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 41


YOUR DAILY GUIDE TO BOSTON’S LIVE MUSIC BY JESSICA LEACH

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALICIA WINTON

Tired of just going out to another Allston bar? Sick of lame DJs? Check out these unique live music sets in local Boston bars and clubs instead.

Y A D S E U T

MONDAY

Church of B oston 69 Kilmarn ock St., Bos ton 617-236 -76 00

The Churc h of Boston is a restaura music club nt and that serves as an outlet fo hip-hop fan r local s with its “M otivate Mo Although ar n days.” tists change every week quality hip , the -hop and so ul is consist ent. Doors open at 8 p.m. Th ere is a $5 co and $10 for ver for girls guys. Open to guests 21 +.

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e bridg nding Ave., Cam a L x i s Phoen ssachusett a M 2 0 spot 1 6 5 -62 e the 6 7 m 5 o c be or 617 g has own f y. Kn venue andin a L d s x i e hoen ry Tu s, the he back The P music eve night ” y l i l d in t a m c Pha tucke x for lo e f i g n a e t ll s tists o “Pho cal ar s sma t o i their l f e o r tu s use ws fea make e sho Th . r corne s. +. sts 19 nre to gue all ge n e p .O 9 p.m rts at a t s c i Mus

TRY SOMETHING NEW TONIGHT!

WEDN ESDAY

Tavern in the Square 161 Br ighton Ave., A 617-78 llston 2-8100

Known as a sp orts re in the stauran Square t and b now ad music ar, Tav ds to it venue. ern s name On W transfo a live ednesd rms fo a y ra nig tables turn in country-them hts, the bar to floo e d nigh cowbo rs for li t, and y boot ne dan stomp cing an ing. d The cou ntry m usic sta and th rts at 9 ere is n p.m. fo o cover r guest . s 21+,


Y A D R U T A S

FRIDAY Moon Howl at the ., Boston St 184 High 95 6 617-292-4

unique to Moon is not e th at l ow n partying Although H unique Bosto a er off s oe roll piano Boston, it d live rock ’n’ t ou k ec h C ict piano bar experience. nancial distr fi is th at s performance b. and nightclu r. Open to h a $10 cove it w . m p. 6 at Music starts . + 1 2 ts gues

Great Scott ve., Allston onwealth A 1222 Comm 014 617-566-9 gs venue brin month, the ch ea to ” ay ll rd te u One Sat ask, don’t lled “don’t ca hts ig ty n ar e p tlife. Th a mixed lorful nigh co me y so ad y re b al mpanied Allston’s f DJs, acco o p u en li feature a queens. finest drag of Boston’s n to 0 cover. Ope . with a $1 m p. 9 at ts Music star guests 18+.

SUND AY

The M id 470 M dle East R est assach 617usetts aurant an 864dN A ve., C 3278 ambr ightclub idge This live m us stays true t ic venue, bar a o its Sund n cultu ay ral id d restaura night the restau entity nt . Wh rant . Eve hosts at ry imm belly ersive could be d a mo w eatin re cu ancing g bab ay to spen l t u rall a d g drape a d in b hanoush w night the y n eads danc hile a wom by es aro an The d u nd yo an u? sugge cing starts sted d a t 8 p.m onati . with on. O a $5 pen t o gue sts 18 +.

THURSDAY The Beehive ston 541 Tremont St., Bo 617-423-0069 e jazz? re satisfying than liv What could be mo every ist a different jazz art Jazz fans can jam to tails. ck ing dinner and co Thursday while enjoy every Thursday from Listen to jazz music e . with no cover or ag 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m restrictions. THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 43


BY VICTORIA WASYLAK IT IS UNDENIABLE that the United States has some of the word’s greatest musical superstars. But sometimes our love for Bruce Springsteen can get in the way of our desire to appreciate a new up-and-coming pop star in Japan. Aside from the foreign musicians who are famous worldwide, most radio stations would rather overplay the same Katy Perry song for commuters on their way to work instead of give exposure to small bands from outside the country. Alejandro Beristain (COM ’17), who is of Mexican descent, said one of the biggest differences between the U.S. and Mexico, for example, is that the two countries differ in exposure to international music. “The American culture, even though it is made up of different cultures, lives inside a bubble,” Beristain said. Beristain said the music in Mexico is half American pop and half Latino, which he said some think is more romantic and acoustic. In Your Ear Records employee Nick Blakey said his Commonwealth Avenue record store tries to sell international music not featured on the radio, such as Middle Eastern music. But hope for another British invasion is not completely lost. Blakey said music sales at his store are not necessarily based on where that music stems from in the world. “It’s more based on genre and place of origin, less so when you have a model of style like rock ’n’ roll, or even progressive,” Blakey said. All rock ’n’ roll music is international, regardless of if it comes from England, Sweden or Germany, Blakey said. Chisom Chukwumerije (CAS ’17) said he thinks America is not as far behind in the international music scene as it appears. “International music is more up and coming. It’s becoming more of a trend,” he said. Great international music exists; it is just a matter of how hard you look. Whether right up north in Canada or across the Atlantic in Denmark, some of the best new music won’t come from your car stereo. ILLUSTRATION BY AMBER HUFF

CANADA: PURITY RING Besides Canadian favorites such as Celine Dion, Avril Lavigne and maybe even Justin Bieber, Canadian natives Megan James and Corin Roddick are making their mark as the duo behind Purity Ring. Last year, the two dominated the world of electronic music with their album Shrines. Unlike a good portion of electronic artists, who incessantly repeat sound effects and use lyrics sparingly, the Canadian duo produces hauntingly detailed music with equally evocative lyrics. With the help of their popular free single “Fineshrine,” their debut album dominated the electronic charts on iTunes and established the band’s reputation, giving them a chance to tour the U.S. this past fall.

BRAZIL: NUNO MINDELIS For those people who prefer finger-snapping jazz or foottapping blues, Nuno Mindelis has sound that fits the criteria. The part-rock, part-blues, part-jazz musician has released nine albums since his debut in 1989. Mindelis was recognized multiple times by popular American magazines in the 1990s but has since faded into the background in the U.S. music industry. However, that has not stopped him from making any new music. Just this year he released his ninth studio album, Angels and Clowns, which was recorded in Rhode Island.

PHOTO COURTESY OF NUNO MINDELIS PRODUCTIONS

YOUR MUSICAL PASSPORT YOUR MUSICAL PASSPORT 44

International music stars that are worth a listen


SOUTH KOREA: SUPER JUNIOR Those people who have not yet overdosed on “Gangnam Style” can enjoy the beats of Super Junior, a nine-member boy band. While nine people may seem like too much, at one point the band had 13 members.

GREAT BRITAIN: DUSTY SPRINGFIELD

The band is even well known in most countries and was nominated for “Best Asian Act” in the 2012 MTV European Music Awards. This year, their tour spanned Asia, South America and Europe.

Fans of classic rock ’n’ roll looking for something new might enjoy tunes from the late Dusty Springfield, whose 1960s era music is Mad Men-worthy. Springfield’s hit “You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me” was featured in the modern television show and introduced a whole new generation of suit and ties to her music. Springfield passed away in 1999, but her old hits are worth revisiting. Springfield is one of the only women considered to be a part of the British Invasion, placing her music alongside that of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.

AUSTRALIA: CUT COPY What started out as a solo project in 2001 by Australian DJ and graphic designer Dan Whitford has become one of the coolest international synth pop acts. Under the moniker “Cut Copy,” Whitford began melding new wave and electronic influences for a sound that is both sonically mellow yet rhythmically buoyant. Now having expanded into a group, Cut Copy has received overseas acclaim, especially with the 2008 release of their second album In Ghost Colours. Since then, the group has been nominated for six awards, including a Grammy in 2012 for “Best Dance/Electronica Release” and an ARIA in 2011 for “Best Dance Release” (which they won). Their latest work was the September release of Free Your Mind­—a fulllength album whose titular single featured True Blood star Alexander Skarsgard in its music video.

DENMARK: THE ASTEROIDS GALAXY TOUR There is little pop music in the world that could truly be considered bad. The Asteroids Galaxy Tour always produces a huge amount of iconic flair between lead singer’s Mette Lindberg’s eccentric vocals and the band’s odd song and album title choices. Their first album was titled Fruit.

SOUTH AFRICA: DIE ANTWOORD Die Antwoord’s rave-rap music is the type of music for clubs or car speakers. Quirky rapping duo Ninja and Yolandi Vi$$er sputter out explicit verses to pulsating beats, not only for entertainment, but to spread messages. The group recently received heated press for mocking Lady Gaga on their 2012 album Ten$ion, which in turn boosted their popularity. Avoid becoming what the bands calls “dwankies,” or lame, and invest some time into listening to their vulgar madness.

PHOTO BY JACOB SMITH [NYU ‘14]

Amy Winehouse’s managers first noticed the Asteroids Galaxy Tour. Shortly after, Apple featured their song “Around the Bend” in a worldwide brand commercial in 2008. Later the band would reach thousands of football fans through a Heineken advertisement featuring their most popular song “The Golden Age.”

NEW ZEALAND: KIMBRA Featured in the Grammy award winning song “Somebody I Used to Know” alongside artist Gotye, Kimbra mixes indie with rock on her album Vows. Kimbra has produced plenty of her own work and has won six New Zealand Music Awards. Many fans of the popular New Zealand band the Naked and Famous would find Kimbra’s music appealing and similar in style.


MUSIC BREAK THE HOLIDAY MUSIC MOLD WITH THE SEASON’S MOST UNDERRATED SONGS BY VICTORIA WASYLAK

01. ”CHRISTMAS WISH”     Neon Trees

This alternative rock band’s song is a pop-y way to lament the absence of a loved one at Christmas.

02. ”I’VE GOT MY LOVE TO KEEP ME WARM”     Frank Sinatra

COURTESY OF MERCURY RECORDS

T PLAYLIST 03. ”CHRISTMAS LIGHTS”    Coldplay

The British rock band’s song is a bit mellow compared to most holiday tunes but serves as a good alternative to the classic “Silver Bells.”

04. ”KISS ME AT MIDNIGHT”     ‘N Sync

Followers of boy band cults can swoon to this stereotypical romantic holiday romance song.

05. ”PLEASE COME HOME FOR CHRISTMAS”     Cee Lo Green The concept of being alone on Christmas is not exactly novel, but Cee Lo’s vocals make up for it.

COURTESY OF CAPITOL RECORDS

This Sinatra classic can make the frigid winter feel as warm as the summer wind.

06. ”ANOTHER CHRISTMAS SONG”    Stephen Colbert

This is not exactly carol worthy, but Colbert’s song is a good cure for anyone with a case of the “bah-humbugs.”

TIRED OF HEARING THE SAME SONGS ON THE RADIO STATIONS DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON? JAZZ UP YOUR HOLIDAY PLAYLIST WITH SOME OF THE MOST UNDERRATED HOLIDAY SONGS. 46

COURTESY OF ELEKTRA RECORDS

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T DOUBLE TROUBLE p. 50

FOOD THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 47


WHERE TO FIND THE BEST HOT DRINKS AROUND BOSTON UNIVERSITY You already walked over a mile from your Allston apartment to get to class, and by the time you get to Central Campus you can’t feel your toes. The door to a local cafe opens and the smell of roasted coffee and the warmth of the store is too hard to resist. What better way to keep warm this winter than with a hot cup of coffee or tea?

BABY, IT’S COLD OUTSIDE BY ELISHA MACHADO & SARAH WU PHOTOGRAPHY BY KATHRYN CAMPBELL

HONEY CINNAMON LATTE Pavement Coffeehouse 736 Commonwealth Ave., Boston

PEACH BLACK TEA Infusions Tea Spa 110 Brighton St., Allston

CHAI LATTE Trident Booksellers & Cafe 338 Newbury St., Boston

Located conveniently at the heart of campus in the former Espresso Royale space, Pavement is known for hot and cold drinks in a chill environment. Order the not-onthe-menu honey cinnamon latte and discover the lightness and smoothness of this coffee, honey and cinnamon combination. Make sure to ask for this sweet drink at the counter during your next visit.

Conveniently located near West Campus, Infusions Tea Spa is the perfect place to grab a cup of tea in Allston. Tea enthusiasts have a seemingly endless number of options and flavor combinations to choose from. The peach black tea has a nice, authentic peach flavor, which gives the drink a natural and earthy taste.

Those who love the classics will enjoy Trident’s chai latte, a drink that blends the flavors of black tea, vanilla, honey, cinnamon and other spices. The drink is creamy, yet it has an element of spice that brings warmth for the winter.

CHOCOLATINO Trident Booksellers & Cafe 338 Newbury St., Boston Get off campus and head down to Newbury Street to try the chocolatino at Trident Booksellers and Cafe. The addition of espresso gives this hot chocolate drink a nice kick. The chocolatino also uses steamed chocolate milk instead of regular milk and is topped with whipped cream, chocolate syrup and cocoa powder.

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Sweet Bakery A PEPPERMINT CANDY CANE STICKING OUT OF YOUR STOCKING MAY BE ONE OF THE BEST THINGS TO WAKE UP TO ON CHRISTMAS MORNING. FOR BOSTON UNIVERSITY STUDENTS WHO MIGHT BE FAR FROM HOME THIS HOLIDAY SEASON, HERE ARE A FEW PLACES TO GET YOUR PEPPERMINT KICK IN AND AROUND BOSTON.

7ate9 Bakery Vittoria Caffe The first Italian cafe in Boston, Vittoria Caffe never disappoints, especially if you have a late-night craving. Located in the heart of the North End, the cafe truly gives guests an old Italian feel. Vittoria is known for their delicious gelato, and the seasonal peppermint stick flavor is no exception. The homemade gelato is creamy with a dense consistency, and every bite has the perfect amount of peppermint flavor. Two scoops of peppermint gelato ($4) are all you need to satisfy your holiday sweet tooth. But make sure you bring cash—the store does not accept credit cards.

290 Hanover St., Boston, 617-227-7606 Open Sunday through Thursday, 7 a.m. to midnight; Friday and Saturday, 7 a.m. to 12:30 a.m.

The bakery’s motto, “We do cheesecake,” is certainly fitting. Unlike your typical bakery, 7ate9 only serves cheesecake, which makes them pretty darn good at it. For the holiday season, the bakery offers seasonal specials— including peppermint cheesecake. Baked with fresh and local ingredients, the peppermint treat has a very distinct taste. It is delicious, with just the right amount of sweetness. This cheesecake is a dessert you won’t want to share. Because the bakery has no storefront, you can order a 9-inch cheesecake ($40) online at www.7ate9bakery.com, and pick it up at one of the local farmers markets throughout the city.

Charles Square Farmers Market, Harvard Square, Cambridge Open every other Sunday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

CANDY CANE LANE

Sweet Bakery is the place to go for gourmet cupcakes. Freshly baked each morning, the candy cane peppermint cupcake is one of the bakery’s seasonal flavors. Available through December 31, the cupcake is perfect for bringing in the holidays. The chocolate cupcake is iced with a red and white twisted peppermint buttercream frosting that would make any cupcake lover feel festive. The cupcake ($3.25) is the perfect excuse for a snack break while holiday shopping on Newbury Street.

225 Newbury St., Boston, 617-267-2253 Open Sunday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

The wired Puppy Escape the frigid weather and warm up with a hot drink at The Wired Puppy. One of the café’s seasonal specialties is the peppermint latte. The latte ($4.50 for a small) is quality in a cup, topped with an elaborate art design. The latte itself has a faint taste of peppermint but is balanced out nicely with the espresso. The drink is not overpoweringly sweet and is topped with the perfect amount of foam.

250 Newbury St., Boston, 857-366-4655 Open daily, 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

BY JULIA FERREIRA

PHOTO BY SAM DUTRA

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 49


THE ALLURE OF OWNING A RESTAURANT around a college campus has its perks. Students who crave a break from the dining hall often become regulars at their favorite lunch or dinner spots. Mei Mei Street Kitchen is no exception. Regularly parked in front of the School of Engineering building, the Mei Mei food truck is often frequented by students more often than Mugar Library. But now, students who live in South Campus will not have to trek to East to enjoy Mei Mei’s dumplings or rice. The popular food truck has opened a brickand-mortar store front on Buswell Street. Mei Mei was started by the three Li siblings—Margaret, Irene and Andy. According to Irene, the name was inspired by her family, who fondly called Margaret “Mei Mei,” which means little sister. They began to build on the truck’s already developed customer base, as it is now a staple on Commonwealth Avenue. “BU has been one of our favorite spots, with so many regulars and really friendly, supportive faces,” Margaret Li said. 50

From truck to brick-and-mortar

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARISA BENJAMIN

DOUBLE TROUBLE

BY ALYSSA LANGER

When the spot on Buswell Street became vacant, opening the storefront was an easy choice. Mei Mei’s new restaurant features the same menu their food truck; however, the new location will allow them to expand their counter-service lunch menu. The restaurant’s new sit-down dinner service will also offer larger and more complex dishes using different meats and seafood. Once the restaurant’s kitchen is open, it will provide the food for both the restaurant and the truck. South Campus residents will be happy to know one of Mei Mei’s goals is to offer late night cuisine until 2 a.m. Who wouldn’t prefer a healthier food option rather than stuffing your face with pizza after a night out? “[We are] really excited to be a part of the BU community,” Margaret Li said. Although going into business with family can be risky, the Li sibling’s different skill sets and backgrounds create a strong business team. Andy Li has experience in fine dining management. Margaret Li has a MBA and is interested in entrepreneurship, and Irene Li has lived on a farm and has past experience as a line chef. “Our big passion is really local sourcing,” Irene Li said. “We are trying to create a healthier local food system, and serving 200 people at BU every Thursday is a way to strengthen our food community.” According to Margaret, the food truck was a vehicle to develop the Mei Mei brand. Mei Mei only serves pasture-raised, humanely slaughtered meat. All of its eggs, milk, meat and most produce is locally sourced. Margaret Li said their local and seasonal food allows Mei Mei to have a flexible menu. Mei Mei’s philosophy is to help people understand where their food comes from and to support local farmers and meat producers. “It’s one of the things we really believe in and want to support,” Margaret Li said. “It’s cool to know the people who make the food you eat.” Tina Covone (SAR ’14), a resident of South Campus, is thrilled to have the Mei Mei restaurant in her area. “I really love living in South because it is like its own little world away from Comm. Ave.,” Covone said. “However, there is a lack of restaurants right on Buswell [Street] and Park Drive. Mei Mei going there is a great idea and it will be a great addition.”


Their signature menu item is the Double Awesome —a scallion pancake sandwich with local greens pesto, Vermont cheddar cheese and twoslow poached then seared eggs. Mei Mei employee Rochelle Li (SAR ’15), who bares no relation to the Li owners, said what she enjoys most about Mei Mei’s food is the local and seasonal ingredients. “I feel like we really take advantage of the seasonal peaks and try to serve the customer the best and most creative foods we can offer,” Rochelle Li said. Despite the typical higher prices associated with locally sourced food, Mei Mei manages to keep costs affordable by getting creative with how they order and use their food. For example, instead of purchasing one particular cut of meat, they buy the whole animal or larger cuts and butcher it themselves. “[Customers] are interested in trying new things and trust us and are willing to try something new,” Margaret Li said. Employees have the ability to be involved in the menu process, which becomes a fun and engaging experience for everyone on staff. Mei Mei currently has 25 employees. When searching for a job, Rochelle Li said she kept Mei Mei’s philosophy in mind. “I wanted to work for a company that has a lot of respect for their customers and employees while also promoting a positive work atmosphere,” Rochelle Li said. When it came time to design their new space, Margaret Li and her siblings wanted to keep the restaurant simple, comfortable and welcoming. Keeping with their business

philosophy, they have made environmentally friendly decisions throughout the construction and design process. The restaurant uses environmentally friendly paints and reusable materials when possible. They installed low-flow toilets and 90 percent of their products are compostable. With the new storefront, BU students who are already Mei Mei regulars now have more options in addition to its already accessible food truck. “ I feel like Mei Mei has made its mark in the BU community and in a great way,” Rochelle Li said.

Mei Mei’s social mission is to bring locally sourced foods to the Boston community.

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 51


have you heard? the weekly buzz

TUNE IN EVERY WEDNESDAY TO THEBUBUZZ.COM Tune in and watch The Weekly Buzz every Wednesday for campus, entertainment, food, music, politics and special event highlights. Each video tells a story. Whether it features the Boston Food Truck Festival, interviews with the famous Andy Garcia or a skinny guide to Thanksgiving, these videos will get you

#BUZZED!

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ESCAPING THE METROPOLIS p. 54

TRAVEL THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 53


ESCAPING

THE METROPOLIS Find Tranquility Within a Bustling City

BY SEBASTIAN SCHOLL PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEBASTIAN SCHOLL

It is easy to get overwhelmed living in a city. There are floods of businessmen power walking past you on their way to work, street vendors on every corner trying to sell you some trinket that you don’t want and endless waves of traffic making it impossible to even cross the street. The constant noise and hustle-and-bustle of city life continues even throughout the night. Cities are characterized by concrete, and it’s a survival instinct to adapt to new surroundings; I believe that’s why urban citizens sometimes act just as “hard” as the concrete streets they live on.

SOMETIMES AN ESCAPE IS NECESSARY—someplace where the

screech of rubber is replaced with the sound of birds anywhere the grey concrete beneath your feet is replaced by green grass. While parks can suffice, I prefer to take it a step further and make sure that I’m able to escape the madness that characterizes most cities by taking daytrips out of the city. Recently, my friend and I took the Tube to Richmond, London, from our Boston University London campus apartments in South Kensington. Richmond is the last stop on the District/Circle Tube Line and about a half hour train ride. 54


Clean, affluent, charming and nostalgic are the best ways to describe this town. Walking through the narrow streets, I passed artisan chocolate truffle shops, boutique and major retail stores, musty bookstores and various moss-covered structures. Major stores like Guess and H&M simply looked out of place — it is too quaint a town for them. There are few times suitable for a feast of fruit, crackers and cheese, so we decided that an impromptu picnic would give us the perfect excuse. Above the bank on a narrow stretch of the River Thames, we snacked and watched colorful boats sail in the sparkling river water. An old man sat near us, playing and singing the electric guitar through a radiosounding speaker. He played by himself, except for a back up choir of crying seagulls. He was calm and often missed pitches and chords in a way that was endearing and authentic. In between numbers, he enjoyed lengthy breaks to smoke long and white cigarettes. His character was distant from the world but integral to the scene — a scene that held beauty and uniqueness. Richmond was a perfect afternoon escape. Strolling the uncrowded riverbank while coopers labored away in dated woodsheds and wandering by cows in the open pastures was an experience that allowed the two of us to decompress. It was an enjoyable afternoon that was free from the city bustle we had grown so accustomed to.

RICHMOND WAS THE PERFECT AFTERNOON ESCAPE.

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 55


FOREIGN FESTIVITIES 1

4

3

C O S TA R I C A BY ANNA WEST

On Dec. 31, Costa Ricans eat 12 grapes and pack suitcases full of vacation attire. Before midnight, they run around their respective neighborhoods, baggage in hand. This seemingly strange event brings good fortune to families by promising a “tranquilo,” or calm, vacation season.

2

AUSTRALIA BY LEA KOMITZKY

Over in Australia, the holidays fall during the summer months. For festive Australians who want to embody Santa Claus during Christmas time, they turn to kangaroos instead of reindeer to pull their sleds. On New Year’s Eve, Australians head to the beach for barbecues and other outdoor activities to ring in 2014.

S PA I N B Y R A C H E L M C G O WA N

Across the Atlantic, Madrid has a tradition similar to Costa Rica that brings good luck. New Year’s Eve in Spain is called “la Nochevieja,” which literally translates to “old night.” The “lucky grapes,” or “las uvas de la suerte,” are another New Year’s tradition meant to bring good luck. At each stroke of the bells at midnight, you take one grape and make one wish. In the end, you essentially have 12 New Year’s resolutions.

5

NETHERLANDS BY INES BOUSSEBAA

On Dec. 5, people in the Netherlands celebrate Sinterklaas, a version of an early Christmas, but with a couple twists.“Sinterklaas,” or Santa Claus, comes on a boat from Spain with his helpers the “Zwartepiet,” people who are painted black, to join in a boat parade. Sinterklaas rides around on a white horse and throws candy at the children. At night, kids leave their shoes out with a carrot for the horse. In the morning a present awaits them.

FRANCE B Y TAY L O R A U B E

In Paris, French families are no strangers to holiday baking and get in the Christmas spirit by baking a cake called “bûche de nöel.” The cake is shaped like a log and decorated elaborately with a festive theme.

A SNAPSHOT OF HOLIDAY TRADITIONS AROUND THE WORLD ILLUSTRATION BY AMBER HUFF


SET THE PACE p. 58

SPORTS THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 57


set the pace 9

  AN INSIDE LOOK AT BOSTON UNIVERSITY’S EQUESTRIAN TEAM PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARLIN STIEHL 58


9

  PURE BRED & BORN

COVER// BU HORSE AWAITS THE NEXT COMPETITION THIS PAGE// EMILY KING [CAS ‘15] MOUNTS UP AT THE BC SHOW OPPOSITE PAGE// TOP// TACK CONSISTING OF GIRTH, BRIDLE AND SADDLE PADS HANGS ON THE DOOR OF A STALL BOTTOM// COACH PHYLLIS CERVELLI GOES OVER THE COURSE WITH EMILY KING [CAS ‘15] AT THE BOSTON COLLEGE SHOW

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 59


0

  PUT YOUR BEST FOOT FORWARD LEAH MOREHOUSE [SMG ‘16] ADJUSTS THE POLOS ON THE HORSE

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THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 61


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9

  BU STALLIONS THIS PAGE// MEGHAN KAUPP [SMG ‘15}, CAPTAIN OF THE BU EQUESTRIAN TEAM, JUMPS A FENCE AT THE BU SHOW OPPOSITE PAGE// TOP// CHARLOTTE BARTON [SMG/COM ‘15] ADJUSTS THE NOSE BAND ON THE BRIDLE BOTTOM// MEGHAN KAUPP [SMG ‘15] CANTERS AROUND THE ARENA LOOKING TOWARDS HER NEXT JUMP

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 63


E

IS THE

veryone has a passion and for Ian Santagata (CAS ’14), it’s football. To him, football is not just a sport—It’s something he loves. When Santagata first arrived at Boston University, he thought he was saying goodbye to his football-playing days. But then Santagata joined the Boston Terriers Football Club in 2010 and is now in his last season as a player, enjoying what the game has to offer. “There’s the energy, the excitement and the pure release of adrenaline [that football] brings,” Santagata said. Due to budget problems, BU was forced to cut its varsity football program in 1997. For the 13 years that followed, there was no football at the school. Despite the wide variety of sports at BU, the missing football program left a void that some students and alumni felt needed to be filled. Anthony Morgante (SMG ’87) and Nikki Bruner (SMG ’13) were among those who felt football needed to return. Morgante, the team’s current head coach, graduated from BU and went on to play five seasons of semi-pro football and spent much of his time as a coach. During Bruner’s freshman year at BU, she connected with Morgante through an advertisment he placed looking for help to start a club football team at BU. Together, they built the football team from the ground up. Morgante advised on all things football and Bruner managed promotions, budgets and recruitment. “I love football and believed that students still deserved the opportunity to play and enjoy the sport,” Bruner said.

BTFC played its first season in the fall of 2010 and has evolved ever since. As part of the Yankee Collegiate Football Conference, the team is made up of college students from the Boston area. The season runs from September to November each year. The club plays teams from Vermont, Connecticut, Maine among others. The team plays its six game season at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Henry G. Steinbrenner Stadium, Sartori Stadium and East Boston Stadium. Students throughout Boston have come together to bring football back to the schools that no longer have affiliated teams. BU may not have a varsity football team but that does not mean that football is not a part of student life for some students. “Boston Terriers Football Club has given over a hundred student athletes an opportunity to play college football, who would have never experienced it otherwise,” Morgante said. “I think that is the most special part of it.” Jon Leung, a Northeastern University graduate student, is playing his second season for BTFC. After moving across the country to a city where he did not know anyone, he found his place on the team. Leung said he enjoys building friendships with members of his team and that the best part of playing with his team is more than just winning games. “The best experiences I have with this team are the trips where a bus full of 18- to 23-year-old football players randomly break into a song or watch a movie on the bus,” Leung said.

FANATACISM

BOSTON TERRIERS FOOTBALL CLUB HAS GIVEN OVER A HUNDRED STUDENT ATHLETES AN OPPORTUNITY TO PLAY COLLEGE FOOTBALL

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NO VARISTY TEAM? NO VARISTY TEAM? NO VARISTY NO VARISTY TEAM? TEA

NO PROBLEM NO PROBLEM NO PROBLEM NO PROBLEM BY CASSANDRA CARROLL PHOTOS COURTESY OF JOW PHOTOGRAPHY

BRINGING COLLEGE FOOTBALL BACK TO BOSTON STUDENTS

THERE’S THE ENERGY, THE EXCITMENT AND THE PURE RELEASE OF

ADRENALINE [THAT FOOTBALL] BRINGS

BOSTON TERRIERS FOOTBALL CLUB


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The Buzz Excecutive Board seeks to deliver news and spread the word about lifestyle trends that we feel interest our readers most. Because, after all, we are BU students too!

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THE BUZZ E-BOARD

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MEET THE STAFF


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“i got an American Girl doll almost seven years in a row”

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“a pet bunny... she was so tiny, I named her T humbelina” HE

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“a life size house made of foam puzzle pieces”

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WHAT WAS THE BEST HOLIDAY GIFT YOU GOT AS A KID?

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“a red wagon that I tried to leave home with” TIM

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“Barbie easy bake oven - I tortured my family with pastries”

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