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spring

2014

4

OF BOSTON’S FAVORITE BARTENDERS

TEA TOAST to spring

LOVE ME TINDERLY

BU JOINS THE TINDER PARTY MENINO: THE MAN, THE LEGEND

BU STRONGER STRENGTH IN OUR MARATHON RUNNERS


SPRING 17

25

Campus Campus

Arts Arts

10

28

LIGHT MY FIRE

BU Joins the Tinder Party

2014

SAMBA SPIRIT

Capturing 20th Century Brazil in

14

Boston

Does Grade Deflation Really Exist?

NOT-SO-HIDDEN TALENT

DEFEATED AND DEFLATED

City City

20

REAL WORLD BOSTON

Life in Boston After Graduation

22

MEDICAL MARIJUANA

Cannabis Dispensaries Open in Boston

2

34

30

CFA Artists You Should Know

Music Music

31

THE PERFECT SCORE

Enhancing Films with Musical Sounds

38

BU’S STUDENT MIXTAPE

From Their Studio to Your Playlist

On Our Cover Our cover features four Boston University students. Travis Brace [COM ‘14], Sierra Sarkis [CAS ‘14], Angelica Body-Lawson [SMG ‘14] and Pedro Gandarias [CFA ‘15].


53

60

Music Fashion

Abroad Food

CONDOM COUTURE

BEHIND THE BAR

50

Raising Awareness Through Fashion

65

On Boston’s Hot Spots

52

72

BU’s Best Dressed this Spring

Is Gluten-Free a Healthy Diet?

STREET STYLE

GOING GLUTEN-FREE

Trav Travel

Sports

57

75

Exploring Life in New Zealand

What the Marathon Means Now

PUSHING THE LIMIT

62

A SKYLINE OF CRANES The Rebirth of Berlin

80

BU STRONGER

78

CONCUSSED

Concussion Research Changes Perspective

88

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 3


LEORA YASHARI Outgoing Editor-in-Chief “people watching and climbing trees”

KELLY GAUTHIER Managing Editor

MEREDITH HOOBLER Incoming Editor-in-Chief

WILLIAM TEO Online Developer

“ WHAT IS YOUR

SAM DUTRA Photography Director

PUBLISHING TEAM PUBLISHING ASSISTANTS: ALLIE RAICH · SAMMY BLANK SOCIAL: ALYSSA LODGE

IRENE BERMAN-VAPORIS Copy Editor

FAVORITE SPRING ACTIVITY ?

“walking through the city!”

EDITORS KATIE SMITH, Campus CARLEE WIESER, City Life VANESSA RODRIGUEZ, Arts ASHLI MOLINA, Fashion ALYSSA LANGER, Food “having lunch in the JESSICA LEACH, Music park.” KATIE LOHEC, Travel KELLY LANDRIGAN, Sports

CLEO YAHN Publisher

“Hubway bikes or rollerblading!”

“Red Sox games at Fenway!”

COPY EDITING TEAM K ATE CAMPBELL · WILLIAM LEPAGE · ELISE MARRINAN · TAYLOR MAZZUOCCOLA · SAMANTHA PETERS · STEVIE SNOW · REBECCA TAN · SONIA SU

BROADCAST TEAM

“eating outside”

BROADCAST MANAGER: TIMOR BALAISH // CINEMATOGRAPHER: JOSH JASON PRODUCTION: HANNAH LEIKIN // AC: KEVIN PATRICK WELDON

PHOTOGRAPHY TEAM ABBY LESSELS · CARLIN STIEHL · JUNJIE ZENG · MADELINE ATKINSON · BARRON ROTH

ART TEAM DESIGNERS: K ARINA CROSS · AMY ALEXANDER · CASSIDY KELLY ILLUSTRATORS: AMBER HUFF · CASSIDY EARLY

WRITERS CAMPUS: BAILEY CLEMENT · ANN NGUYEN · SARAH WU · MARISSA CHOY · ELISHA MACHADO · ABBY LESSELS · KATIE TAMOLA · GRACE GULINO // CITY: CATALINA CASAS · BRITTANY COMAK · LAUREN FORCE · ALLIE ORLANDO // ARTS: SARA DELNEGRO · KATHRYN VAZ · RIVAH CLEMONS · SARAH GUZMAN · KRISTIE EVANS · AYUSH KUMAR // FASHION: CAROLINE SUN · LAURA FINKELSTEIN · BRIDGET JARECKI · ISABELLE EPSK AMP · EMILY GOLDMAN · KATE RADIN · SARAH WU // FOOD: RACHEL LOWE · STEPHANIE SMITH · ALYSSA BARSANTI · SARAH WU · CLARA BURR-LONNON · MEGAN SMITH · MARISA SYMEONIDES · ELISHA MACHADO · JULIA FERREIRA · CORINA PINTADO · HANNAH WEINTRAUB // MUSIC: JENNA REYES · DEE DANIELS · DEE HIBBARD · KATHRYN RADIN · VICTORIA WASYLAK · LAUREN BUKENBERGER · JULIANNE LEE // SPORTS: JOE CALABRESE · DANIEL ALTER · ZACH HALPERIN // TRAVEL: PETER ZAMPA · JESSICA BACCHI · SARAH RYAN · SEBASTIAN SCHOLL · CASEY CARROLL · KATE TOPALIS · ANNA WEST · RACHEL MCGOWAN · SARA MODLIN

4

“lounging in the commons”

CHARLOTTE PARKER Social Media Manager

ASHLEY ROSSI Creative Director

we ask our newest staff members...

“checking out SoWa market”

“throwing a Frisbee around”


CONTRIBUTORS

STORES

SUPPORTERS

Crush Boutique 131 Charles St. 264 Newbury St. 617-720-0010 @crushboutique

L7 Studio Taylor Barnes 310-367-4900

Jack Wills 179 Newbury St. 857-753-4524 @jackwillsUSA Lou Lou 222A Newbury St. 857-265-3952 @loulouboutiques Bobbles & Lace 251 Newbury St. 857-239-9202 @bobbleslace Free People 800 Boylston St. 617-450-4902 @freepeople No Rest for Bridget 220 Newbury St. 617-236-5650 @norest4bridget Goorin Bros. 130 Newbury St. 617-247-4287 @goorinbros

Boston University Faculty Professor Safoura Rafeizadeh Dean Micha Sabovik College of Communication, Boston University

HAVE YOU HEARD?

Study Abroad, Boston University

>> DAILY STORIES    thebubuzz.com

Dean of Students, Boston University

>> WEEKLY VIDEOS    thebubuzz.com

Hair and Makeup Styling Alicia Leone [SMG ‘14] fb: Makeup by Alicia Leone

THANKS Our spring issue is a collective effort by talented students, partners and collaborators who share their thought provoking articles, photos and insights with us. We are so grateful to everyone who contributed to making this issue of the Buzz a success.

>> SPECIAL EVENTS >> THE MAGAZINE

Comments? Questions? Interests?

/@#THEBUBUZZ

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 5


EDITOR’S NOTE

Spring 2014 LEAVING HOME is a strange feeling to say the least. In 2010 many of us left home to move to Boston, where we endured the highest highs and the lowest lows—wearing sandals in the Sleeper showers and sharing what felt like a five-foot wide room with a stranger. All the while, being away from family, friends and anything familiar or safe. I don’t know when exactly that feeling faded, and friends became family, and family became those people who keep calling you when you’re in the middle of your actual life. In 2014 we are leaving home again. Boston is now home to memories of dining hall gossip and Tuesday night lines at T’s, and it’s strange to leave yet again.

NEW FOCUS The Buzz is committed to evolving. After a surface revamp, we focused this issue on creating content that enriched and provoked our readers.

For the past two years, I have spent my time at BU doing exactly the thing I love—making magazines, sharing stories and working with every pocket of talent and ambition this school offers. I feel fortunate to have come across the Buzz, and even more so to have participated in its progression. Creating a publication to showcase your school, your city and the community at large takes blood, sweat, tears and many paper cuts. What keeps me and my staff going is the pride in knowing that we are doing what we love in the best way we possibly can. Our spring issue is a showcase of just that—everything we as students and hopeful professionals are capable of producing. We focused on the issues and stories that concern not only our audience, but ourselves. This year marks the magazine’s fifth anniversary—five years highlighting the writers, editors, photographers, designers and creative producers of Boston University. As Editor-in-Chief, I am proud to leave this magazine, this brand and everything it holds in the hands of a group of highly talented and motivated students who intend to take the Buzz to a level beyond what I ever imagined. I feel confident in our new Editor-in-Chief, Meredith Hoobler, who has the vision and motivation required to lead this group. It’s a bittersweet feeling to leave something you love, but the students at this university continue to prove that their creative ambition will prosper, and revisiting the Buzz, Boston and BU will always feel like home.

-Leora Yashari

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

6


CAMPUS

THE MAN, THE LEGEND BY IRENE BERMAN-VAPORIS PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARLIN STIEHL

ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL. ROBERT PINSKY. ELIE WIESEL. BU HAS A HISTORY OF RECRUITING RENOWNED AND TALENTED LEADERS. Joining the ranks of BU professors this year is former mayor of Boston Thomas M. Menino (Hon. ’01). In February Menino joined BU’s faculty as co-director of the Initiative on Cities, a program designed to explore strategies to help cities flourish in the future. “Mayor—excuse me—professor Menino,” said BU President Robert A. Brown when introducing Menino at the IoC’s first conference in March. The room erupted with laughter. Clearly—even for the university’s president—Menino’s move from mayor to professor will take some time to get used to. And rightfully so. Professor of practice Menino has left behind a 20-year legacy in city hall, during which he quite literally redefined the city. He tackled education, crime prevention, health care, environment, equal opportunity and redevelopment. He retired with an unprecedented 74 percent approval rating, and almost half of all Bostonians reported that they had personally met the mayor, according to a Boston Globe poll.

Although he has made the switch from politics to academia, Menino’s role at BU is one he’s familiar with. “The job is really the same,” he said. “Here I’m helping students get a better education. As mayor I helped people get job opportunities.” In his new position Menino has been meeting with city officials, giving lectures at other universities and in other states, hosting coffee hours for students and planning conferences about urban dynamism—remaining active and engaged despite a recent cancer diagnosis. “Tom Menino is the kind of guy who says, ‘I don’t need your help. I’m going to work; I’m working hard.’ He is very private when it comes to that kind of thing,” Dean of Students Kenneth Elmore (SED ’87) said. For the longest serving mayor of Boston, hard work is the norm. His drive is undeniable. He’s been known to check himself out of a hospital when duty calls, as he did when he heard of last year’s marathon bombing. Recently, though, he’s been enjoying the comparatively relaxed work schedule at BU. It’s routine; it’s predictable. It fits neatly on a piece of paper.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 7


“ “I get here at 9 a.m. I have meetings. Here you have time to plan; as mayor you don’t have that luxury,” he said. “You try to plan, but then things always come up. Here I can have a schedule and stick to it.” “He seems a lot more relaxed now,” Elmore said. “I finally see him sitting back a bit more. He has always been a guy that jokes and laughs, but he really has a good laugh nowadays.” That’s not to say that the 71-year-old former mayor hasn’t been busy. In fact just six weeks after the program’s inception, the IoC held its first headliner leadership summit, Leading Cities Through Crisis: Lessons from the Boston Marathon, on March 24. “I knew good things would happen; I just didn’t realize how fast,” Brown said in opening remarks at the conference. The IoC’s mission is to advance municipal leadership approaches as a support mechanism for helping cities expand into the future, according to Graham Wilson, codirector of the initiative and chairman of the political science department. “The purpose of the IoC is to bring cities together with each other and with 8

experts from Boston University to learn lessons that will help dynamic, urban leadership in the future,” Wilson said. The initiative provides a platform for mayors and municipal leaders to share ideas as they tackle urban problems so that cities can learn from each other and look toward the future. It also gives Wilson and Menino the chance to combine their experiences in academic research and city governance. According to Brown, the idea for the initiative began once it was known Menino was stepping down from office. “I have been really impressed over the years with how he has managed the city of Boston and how Boston is looked at as a leader in so many ways in terms of how a city evolves and grows,” Brown said. “We are in the business of helping cities meet challenges to be even more successful in the future, through bringing cities together to learn lessons from each other,” Wilson said. “The marathon conference was a start on that.” The conference explored how city officials handled the Boston Marathon bombings. Speakers discussed the city’s

response—from security, medical, media, business and government standpoints—and what lessons leaders can take away from it. What is next for the initiative will be a global conference on prevention in early November for mayors from major cities around the world to attend. “The theme will be ‘combining economic dynamism and preservation,’” Wilson said. “By preservation, we don’t mean in glass cases in museums. We mean not only preserving great buildings, but the character of cities.” What Wilson called “Boston conversations,” which will be small meetings led by city leaders, will begin this semester. “Those are going to be more intimate salon-style,” said Katharine Lusk, IoC’s executive director. “Conversations around topics that affect Boston in particular—hosted here at 75 Bay State Road—drawing people from media, government and business to talk about their role within Boston and Boston’s role within the region.” Behind the stately, white entrance of the initiative’s brownstone, Menino meets with students each week for an open discussion of


WHAT MAKES BOSTON UNIVERSITY A GREAT PLACE IS THE SAME THING THAT MAKES BOSTON A GREAT PLACE—ITS PEOPLE. city-related concerns. From 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. every Thursday, students can drop in for a cup of coffee and conversation. Or to simply steal a glance at Menino’s famed 29-inch Louisville Slugger cane. For student body president Dexter McCoy (COM ’14), Menino is a great resource. “Having Mayor Menino on campus is a tremendous opportunity for the student body to learn about true and genuine leadership,” McCoy said. While Menino is adjusting to life at BU and interacting with students, he’s not teaching classes. Instead, this semester Menino is immersing himself in BU culture. “The one thing that every student has been asking me about is the divide between East vs. West,” Menino said. “I don’t know what to do about it. I don’t have a solution.” If the former 53rd mayor of Boston can’t solve BU’s East or West dilemma, it’s likely that no one will. According to Lusk, on average 15 to 20 students attend Menino’s open coffee hours every week. On March 27, during the last hour of the hour and a half long meeting, five students were seen exiting his brownstone. “Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to [speak with] the mayor as much as I’d like,” McCoy said. “Of course, with his illness, he has not been in as much as one might like.” Just over a month into his new career, Menino was diagnosed with an advanced form of cancer that spread to his liver and lymph nodes, according to the Globe. On March 16 the Globe reported that Menino began chemotherapy at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and that the origin of his cancer cannot be pinpointed. “If good vibrations have an affect on outcomes here, I can’t think of anyone I know that is generating more good outcomes over an illness than what is happening to Tom Menino, both on our campus and in Boston,” Brown said. Wilson said the diagnosis hasn’t affected Menino’s work ethic. “Mayor Menino is tough and resilient and to quote him, ‘this is a bump in the road,’ and we are carrying on. We don’t mean to in any way minimize the seriousness of this, but he is eager to carry on working,” Wilson said.

He’s done just that. After his diagnosis, Menino delivered a speech in New York. But that wasn’t quite enough traveling for him; he also went to speak in New Hampshire. He has given talks at Harvard and Wellesley and is doing his best to maintain face time with BU students, though he cancelled the Thursday coffee-hour session that followed the announcement of his diagnosis. “He is committed to keeping that time on his schedule and making sure he is available to students,” Lusk said. “He has a lot of speaking committments in Boston and around the country. We are doing our best to preserve time when folks can get in to see him.” Lusk encouraged interested students to follow Menino on Twitter for the most up-todate information on his weekly meetings, as sometimes coffee-hour sessions are switched to Fridays. Menino has shown no signs of slowing down. He visited the Red Sox spring training in Florida and traveled to Louisiana in early April, according to Lusk. He still misses the mayorship, though. “I really liked being out there in the neighborhoods talking to people,” he said. “Helping people occurs at the local level when you get to know people. It’s not possible at the national and state level.” His official title may be professor, but at Boston University—and in Boston itself— Menino will always be considered mayor. Because calling him “Professor Menino” seems, well, a bit awkward. Menino loves working at BU for the same reason he loved the municipality. “What makes Boston University a great place is the same thing that makes Boston a great place—its people,” Menino said.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 9


LIGHT MY FIRE

WHY BU STUDENTS ARE JOINING THE TINDER PARTY

BY KATIE SMITH & LEORA YASHARI PHOTO BY SAM DUTRA ILLUSTRATION BY AMBER HUFF

10

LEFT, LEFT, LEFT, RIGHT, LEFT.

Guy wearing flip-flops holding a large dead fish? Left. Guy in Photo Booth selfie with a rainbow heat filter? Do people still use Photo Booth? Left. Guy on spring break grinding in between three bikini-clad girls? Definite left. Guy with loose-fitting beanie, little scruff, looking down and smiling gently. Fifteen mutual friends, 12 of them only Facebook “friends.” Okay, fine, right. Aaaand it’s a match! Four minutes later Alex, 20, has sent you a message. “Hey if someone came up to u and asked u to stand on their face, would u do it?” Thanks, Alex. For the college-aged population of America and for the 20-somethings who have given up on meeting their significant other in a sticky bar on Friday at 2 a.m., Tinder is the foremost alternative. Despite the often awkward, occasionally creepy Alex messages, the smart phone using, eye-contact avoiding millennials have taken to Tinder as the newest means for mating and dating. With 850 million profile ratings per day and a climbing 10 million matches per day, Tinder is the leading dating app on the market, particularly for the 18-24 crowd. Boston University was quick to join the Tinder phenomenon when the app launched in late 2012. According to BU students, Tinder has been a successful mechanism in meeting fellow classmates and singles in the Boston area.

“I think young people have trouble socializing, so I can see why there is a market and why people are interested in Tinder,” Karina Barroso (SMG ’17) said. “There is a benefit of meeting people in this format.” David Moghavem (SMG ’15) agrees that Tinder is a useful platform to start a conversation among singles. “I know people that meet girls on Tinder constantly, while others just like to use Tinder to flirt without consequences,” he said. According to Tinder Co-Founder and Chief Marketing Officer Justin Mateen, Boston is approximately the fifth most popular city for Tinder users in the U.S. “Tinder is kind of like being at a party. You connect and interact with people in different ways, and all we are doing is introducing people who want to get to know each other better,” Mateen said. “We seeded a product with college kids who are highly aspirational, who are highly social, and they found value in it.” As numbers continue to grow with over 1 million new users in March 2014 alone, the mobile algorithm that combines dating and social media is at the height of interest among millennials. Traditional dating ideals that led to relationships seem outdated or lost among today’s college crowd. Rather, according to former BU professor Donna Freitas, the current and perpetuating “hookup” culture leaves students believing that dating is non-existent. “The gateway to relationships now seems to be the random hookup that turns into a serial hookup that eventually leads to a commitment—even though commitment goes against the nature of the hookup,” Freitas said. Freitas published The End of Sex: How Hookup Culture is Leaving a Generation Unhappy, Sexually Unfulfilled, and Confused About Intimacy in April 2013. She is currently studying the correlation between social media and romantic relationships. While hookup culture continues to grow, many have attributed the creation of Tinder to the infamous, strictly male, “gay, bi-curious” hookup app Grindr. Mateen disputes any relation between the two, saying that aside from their similar location-based matching systems, they have inherently different value systems.


SOMEONE’S SMARTPHONE IS ARGUABLY THEIR MOST INTIMATE POSSESSION. “Tinder is focused on creating long-term, meaningful relationships and essentially introducing people to allow them to figure out what they want in a relationships,” Mateen said. “It just depends on how old you are and what you are looking for. We did a survey, and less than 7 percent of our users say they use Tinder that way.” Many students find that Tinder is an initiative toward a digitalized version of courtship and have found resons to dowload the app. Leah Robson (CAS ’15) used Tinder for a week before meeting someone she ended up dating for two months. Although she pursued a relationship, Robson admitted that most Tinder users at BU have different experiences and outcomes, and even when she downloaded the app, a Tinder relationship was never her goal. “I am kind of an anomaly,” she said. “But I think most people use Tinder for hookups. I haven’t used it since.” Meanwhile there is speculation around the male versus female applications of Tinder. Most women admit to swiping left with the occasional right, while guys seemingly do the opposite. “I don’t look when I swipe; I just swipe right every time. Or I’ll start a pattern, like two rights and a left,” said Scott Middleton (SAR ’15). “I don’t use it to meet people. It’s kind of like a game to me.” Conversely, Sammy Nassif (SMG ’16) consistently swipes left. “Guys swipe right because they are thirstier—they are more inclined to meet up and get something out of the conversation,” she said. “I swipe left because there aren’t that many people who interest me.” According to Moghavem, Tinder can be used for different reasons, depending on the intent. “If your goal is to find your next spouse, it’s very ineffective. If you’re open to meeting new people without much expectation other than a mutural agreement of attractiveness, then it is effective,” he said. Much like how Mateen described the “Tinder party,” Robson similarly described

Tinder like a party atmosphere. “Just like in the real world, or at a real party, girls are more selective of who they talk to. And the first thing most college students do is judge based on physical appearance,” she said. “I feel like the majority of Tinder users don’t expect to meet anyone seriously and just use it as a means to hookup,” George Padon (SAR ’15) said. “But if you are looking for something serious, I don’t think it’s impossible either.” Mateen feels that this is the direction the app should be going—opening young people up to the possibility of mobile dating. “As the product evolves, the user base evolves, and people start taking [Tinder] more seriously,” Mateen said. “The way I look at it, it’s not superficial. When you walk into a coffee shop or you walk into a classroom, the first thing that you notice about someone is their physical appearance.” Others find Tinder to be an inconducive basis for seeking partners, and claim users of the app are knowingly subjecting themselves to an anti-dating mechanism, as described by Freitas. “Tinder is objectifying. You are looking at pictures of people and essentially rating them based on appearance alone,” Simone Leonard (CAS ’15) said. “I don’t think you get to know people that way.” “I’ve meet up with a couple people, met for coffee and made some pretty good friends,” Garrett Lowther (CAS ’16) said. “I think it’s a good way to meet new people and expand your network.” However, Mateen sees a future of Tinder beyond dating and far beyond college. Though 51 percent of all Tinder users are 18-24, the growing market provides leeway for both younger and older users, creating a bracket of 13 to 55+. “Tinder has gained universal acceptance,” Mateen said. “There were a lot of social platforms that connected you to people you already knew, but none that helped you get to know them better. As life evolves, people will begin using [Tinder] in other ways,

and the product will become more and more social.” Mateen is also excited for a new update in the system, which will allow users to pursue matches in a more sanctioned format than initiating conversation. He says that the newest and largest product feature can be expected in the next two months. He believes this is all part of perpetuating mobile relationships rather than stigmatizing them as wrong or remaining nostalgic for a different generation’s ideas of dating. “Someone’s smartphone is arguably their most intimate possession. There is a very fine line between meeting someone at your coffee shop and meeting someone on Tinder because today the lines are blurred,” Mateen said. “The goal is going offline and going to meet them.”

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 11


“I WAS ABOUT TO ASK YOU THE SAME THING.”

“DO YOU HAVE CHANGE FOR A HUNDO?”

“I FEEL LIKE I’M WAITING IN LINE FOR THE JONAS BROTHERS.”

- BU GIRL AT TAVERN IN THE SQUARE

“I’M PRETTY SURE THERE IS A COVER.” - BU GIRL IN T’S LINE AT THE ATM

- BU BOY IN T’S LINE

- BU GIRL AT TAVERN IN THE SQUARE

“ENGLISH OR ESPANOL?” “HE PLAYED SQUASH...OR SOMETHING WHITE LIKE THAT.”

- FOREIGN BOY AT JULEP

“WAIT WHY DID HE GET KICKED OUT LAST WEEKEND?”

- BU GIRL AT WHITE HORSE

“I HEARD HE SPIT ON A GIRL.”

- BU BOY IN T’S LINE

- BU GIRL IN T’S LINE

OVERHEARD IN PHOTO BY SAM DUTRA

12


“IF SHE ADDED ME ON LINKEDIN I HOPE SHE TALKS TO ME AT THE BAR.” - BU BOY AT T’S

“MY NEW THING IS KAMIKAZE SHOTS. VODKA CRANBERRY IS FOR PEASANTS.” - BU GIRL AT T’S

LINE THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 13


DEFEATED AND

DEFLATED ...IS GRADE DEFLATION REAL?

WHEN I WAS IN HIGH SCHOOL,

my mom would try to quell my anxious and perfectionist habits by telling me, “Cs get degrees.” Boston University students feel the school subscribes to the same philosophy because our university regularly takes the top slot in lists of schools with the most instances of grade deflation. Is grade deflation real or are BU students—and the authors of numerous articles on the subject—creating the phenomenon to alleviate the irritation of grades lower than their expectations? Grade deflation is described as an often systemic phenomenon in which universities or individual professors keep grades artificially low in attempt to raise the value of an A and make the school appear more prestigious among its academic peers. The system is not unique to BU; student bodies at Princeton University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Purdue University and numerous others cry “grade deflation” each year. Dean of Students Kenneth Elmore (SED ’87) said that BU doesn’t mind having a stern reputation. “[Grade deflation] is perverse, but it’s one of those rumors that almost forms an institutional standpoint. You almost don’t mind it being out there,” he said. “If people think they’ve got to work hard here, it’s okay.” 14

While Elmore said that he does not believe BU is a grade deflation offender, he also acknowledged that the university’s difficult standards could contribute to this perception. “We are not cut-throat,” Elmore said. “We are an ambitious bunch of people— all of us faculty, students, staff—and we are competitive.” But what exactly does grade deflation entail? “In my rhetoric class in CGS, my professor always said she would only give out two As on each paper,” said Krystal Ayala (SMG ’15). “So if three people deserved an A, she would pick one that she liked less and give him or her a lower grade.” The professor in question has since left BU, but that kind of control over grades was not an isolated incident. In fact, such grading habits exist within other colleges at BU. “After my chemistry test the other day, a teaching fellow told me that the tests are designed to have a low average,” said Lisa Goldstein (CAS ’16). “Designing [the tests] with a lower average makes it so they get a bell curve distribution rather than a ton of As and Bs.” Goldstein transferred from Purdue University Calumet and has noticed a difference between the overall atmosphere of tests at BU.

BY KATIE SMITH

PHOTO BY SAM DUTRA ILLUSTRATION BY AMBER HUFF

“I think at PUC the professors were a lot more straightforward in what the students needed to know for exams, and the tests were very ‘either you know it or you don’t,’” Goldstein said. “Professors at BU kind of expect more out of the students; they give you a guideline of what you should know, but you have to be able to expand on what you know in order to do well.” While repeatedly low grades may be disheartening in the moment, there could also be a potential benefit to the ambiguous expectations and high standards that BU students are held to. Semester after semester, articles, Facebook posts and tweets detail the impressive drive, ambition and diligence of BU students. “I like to hear about BU grads doing great things because it makes me feel like it’ll all be worth it,” Ayala said. “I think maybe our teachers try to push us and try to make us work harder by giving us lower grades, and some of us are motivated by it and others not. Maybe those that are motivated go out and do better because of it.” BU professors seem to have a different take on grade deflation. Some professors believe that it does not really exist. Professor Jay Corrin, a social science professor at the College of General Studies, does not believe that grade deflation is an


actual issue for BU students. Corrin has taught at CGS for 37 years and has written several textbooks, some which are assigned to CGS students. “I think BU is fairly honest in terms of the grades they give,” Corrin said. “I think [grade deflation] is coming from students who know other students at other universities who are not graded as stringently at other universities, and I think that’s because the faculty at other universities have dropped their standards.” Corrin also reflected on a change in the way students learn that he continually observes. Term papers turned in to him in recent years are generally worse than years before. The professor cited social networking sites and shorter attention spans as the main catalyst. The decrease in attention span in students consequently affects their grades in the course. “I grade term papers very stringently and seldom ever give As,” Corrin said. “I just don’t think students can write at that level. I don’t like to discourage a student, so I seldom give Ds and Fs ... I would say that the quality of formal writing has deteriorated even though the students have gotten better.”

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Elmore noted that professors often push their students to high standards. “Do I think there is a conspiracy for professors to keep grades at a certain place? No, not at all. But I think every professor also has earned their spot and wants to make sure that you walk out of here learning something in the end.” College of Communication professor Patrice Oppliger, who teaches both mass communication theory and research methods, believed students are graded according to the Professor and their method of distributing grades. “I think [BU students] are being graded fairly. It’s sort of that idea of a ‘tough grader,’ which is actually advantageous in our [teaching evaluations] file because our department chairs want us to be more rigorous in our grading,” Oppliger explained. “But the unfair grader is what raises red flags.” Even if grade deflation does exist, neither Oppliger nor Corrin believe that it is truly the issue that students complain about year in and year out. Both recognize that grading at BU is difficult at times, but they also view it as a motivator for students

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to work a bit harder for the “right” grades. Christina Gratton (COM ’14) disagreed. Gratton said that she had experienced classes where students felt the grades were unfair but that students were too scared to say anything. “Having experienced unfair grade deflation, I was uncomfortable coming forth with my disaccord because my teacher preemptively accused the class of feeling entitled to undeserved high grades,” Gratton said. Gratton said that she felt teachers should be proud of students with high grades. “If an entire class does well, no one should be punished or have the grade they deserve taken away from them,” Gratton added. There may be a disconnect between students and professors at BU regarding the grading system, but Oppliger made a point that was reminiscent of my mother’s advice from my high school years. “Please don’t be worried about every point,” Oppliger said. “There’s so much pressure to go to an Ivy League school and get in, and there’s so much pressure with AP scores and SAT scores. It makes me sad that college has become an achievement rather than a place you can blossom.”  

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THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 15


tweet, tag, follow, go.

SOCIAL BU WELCOMES MENINO

INSTAGRAM @IAMJOONIE Mayor Tom Menino with his perosnalized Red Sox Louisville Slugger baseball bat cane. #MLB #redsox

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@KAITLYNSOARES

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“I can’t think of anyone better suited to lead the BU Initiative on Cities than Mayor Menino” - President Brown #mayormenino #bostonuniversity #buioc

@KARLARYS Conference #mayormenino #bu #bostonuniversity #boston

@CANDACEBSHELTON

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Look who I met today! I sat down for an awesome interview with Mayor (not mayor anymore, but still) Tom Menino!

4 TWITTER @MELISSAADAN_

@ANCHOREDABBY

@STEVEMACK617

@BOSTONPOLICE

What is it about Mayor Menino’s presence that can so easily captivate a room. #MeninoatBU

STAY STRONG MAYOR MENINO....really have appreciated your accessibility...

@K_DRUCKER

Awesome speaking with the mayor, glad to have @mayortommenino at #BU

Packed house welcoming #MayorMenino to #BU!

#MayorMenino to the #BPD: “It’s been an honor working with you over the past 20 years...”

@MAYORTOMMENINO

Thanks to those students who came by today, stay tuned for updates on next week’s coffee hours


CITY

: SAVED A BOSTONIAN FACES OFF AGAINST THE PLANNED PARENTHOOD BUFFER ZONE BY LEORA YASHARI

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEORA YASHARI

AS A COLD WINTER TURNS INTO A COLD SPRING, the clutter of people on Commonwealth Avenue remains sparse. Students still opt to take the T or bus to morning class, avoiding Boston’s unforgiving chill. But every morning, regardless of the consistently brutal temperature, an elderly woman stands amid Packard’s Corner greeting passersby, “good morning!” Alongside her, on the corner of Boston’s only Planned Parenthood, a group circles around a 35-foot yellow ring fighting for “the right to life.” “How may I help you today?” she says, an unimposing presence at about 4 feet 10 inches, wearing a velvet bucket hat with daisies. “There must be something I can do to help you this morning.” Underneath her ankle-length coat, she holds a blue and pink knitted baby beanie with brochures inside. “Are you pregnant? How far along are you?” she asks. Even though the majority continues walking, avoiding eye contact and ignoring her questions, she proceeds with a smile.

Eleanor McCullen, the woman who has been the face of the pro-life campaign on Commonwealth Avenue for the past 13 years, has now become the face of a U.S. Supreme Court case over the debate of free-speech vs. privacy. On Jan.15, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in the case of McCullen v. Coakley. McCullen, the claimant, filed suit to overturn a 2007 law that restricts protesters and those that have been termed “sidewalk counselors” from coming within 35 feet of the Planned Parenthood entrance. McCullen’s case against respondent attorney general Martha Coakley made its way to the Supreme Court on March 26 and raises questions of First Amendment rights as well as women’s rights to access reproductive health services, including abortion. “It’s a First Amendment right, that’s what it is,” McCullen said during her morning routine in front of Planned Parenthood. “This is America. If people see something wrong that goes against our Constitution, then they should speak up.” THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 17


Coakley countered that the current buffer zone does abide by First Amendment rights and protects the safety of the public. “Massachusetts’ buffer zone statute strikes the right balance between ensuring safe access to medical facilities and preserving freedom of expression,” Coakley said in a statement earlier this year. “This law has enhanced public safety in a fair and constitutional manner.” The Supreme Court decision is pending a final verdict to be tentatively decided in June. McCullen never expected to one day land in the Supreme Court. The 77-year-old complainant said she spends her days working with women across the city, providing resources for those who choose to carry their pregnancies to term, or those she has convinced. “I’ve always been pro-life, but 13 years ago I decided to come out and see if I could help some people,” McCullen said. “Words are cheap. Actions speak louder than words.” McCullen started by coming to participate in rosary prayers alongside local priests. She recalls the first day she was asked to help as a sidewalk counselor. “That first day I had my first ‘save.’ It

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was a couple, and I said, ‘I could help you. Come to my house, and we’re going to figure out what to do.’ I gave them some chocolate chip cookies and a cup of tea and took them to the center. They have a beautiful son now, Matthew. He’s 12 and they send me pictures of his little league team,” she said. “I love people, and I have a gift for grace.” According to other sidewalk counselors, McCullen’s house is filled with baby clothes, toys and pictures of families she’s worked with over the past decade. “Eleanor is like Mother Theresa,” said Mary O’Donnell, a sidewalk counselor who is often seen walking the block with a fist full of rosary beads. “She is a mother and a grandmother, and she follows [the women] all the way through.” McCullen said she tries to open her home to families who opt to continue their pregnancies, providing financial and medical care, and throwing baby showers or staying in hospitals during the birthing process. Aside from using her personal financial resources, McCullen collects donations to support this cause. “Every child would like a birth day and not a death day,” she said. “We are the last voice of love. I’m not saying don’t change your

mind forever; just change your mind for an hour. Let me show you the different options. This is life and death.” Yet what she perceives as sidewalk counseling can be criticized and labeled as harassment. According to local residents, many of them Boston University students, sidewalk counselors are often aggressive in getting their message across. “I was trying to walk to class, and they started yelling at me that killing babies is like what Hitler did by killing Jews in the Holocaust,” Liz Wiesel (COM ’14) said. “I felt bombarded and uncomfortable. There is only so much ignoring them can do.” McCullen, who continues to advocate for freedom of speech, claims she has never harassed or yelled at anyone during her time outside of Planned Parenthood. “This is the greatest evil of our time. This is deeper than 1942 when all the Jews were exterminated. That was a holocaust. This is a holocaust,” McCullen said. “It’s worse, though. You can’t see the victim.” “What kind of country kills their own children?” she continued. “We’re in a selfish society, and all I do is empower women. You got in bed and now you’re pregnant and now this is modern day birth control. There’s no sense of responsibility.” Instances of aggressive advertising and judgmental outcries from pro-life advocates are often reported. According to statements released by Boston’s Planned Parenthood and Coakley, this is what led to the buffer zone expansion. Another BU student, who requested anonymity, recalls walking past Planned Parenthood one morning to find brochures stuffed in her purse and jacket pocket, which she did not want or ask for. Despite the allegations, McCullen and O’Donnell, among other sidewalk counselors, insist such occurrences are not coming from their group. “We are not here to judge any of the women. We are just here to help,” O’Donnell said. “If they don’t take it, they don’t take it. But the offer is there.”


WHAT SHE PERCEIVES AS SIDEWALK COUNSELING CAN BE CRITICIZED AND LABELED AS HARASSMENT.

McCullen doesn’t believe her fellow activists use aggressive tactics and continues to defend their efforts, even after reports against their group. “Excuse me, please, if you can’t be loving, then you might as well go home,” McCullen said. “Because we are loving. So that [story] surprises me.” As McCullen approached two passersby, a male student from Boston University yelled, “Stay on your side of the line motherfuckers! Stay on your fucking side of the line.” McCullen turned away from the two, “See what I mean?” she smiled. Anne Pierce (SED ’14), president of Boston University Students for Life, seeks alternative ways to help women who are pregnant. “My goal would not be to shame the women walking into Planned Parenthood, but to offer them all the help that I know of. I pray for women and men who face these situations.” As a pregnant woman walked toward the door, McCullen approached her and the woman stopped to talk. The two exchanged information and then McCullen stood back as the woman walked through the yellow line and into Planned Parenthood. McCullen said that the 35-foot line is not only a violation of her First Amendment rights but is what causes the perception of yelling. “Say I was speaking to you but you’re walking to the door. And then I stop and you’re walking, and I say, ‘please come back and talk just for a minute!’ Now all of a sudden I’m yelling,” McCullen said. “Little by little across the country, our rights are being taken away, and people are apathetic.” McCullen remains “cautiously optimistic” in her pursuit to overturn the current law upholding the 35-foot buffer zone. She believes Justice Scalia is the foremost advocate on the bench and that

Justice Ginsburg opposes the decrease or abolition of the yellow line. “If they are really going to be sincere about it, they should take [the buffer zone] away completely,” McCullen said. “It’s not about abortion. It’s about First Amendment rights. If you’re passionate about something, and I’m passionate about the unborn, you’re going to stand up for it—I would hope.” Coakley has passionately advocated for women’s rights, often standing against prolife supporters and advocating for a clearer “separation of church and state,” according to a 2010 interview with WBSM radio. Last December alone, 11 amicus briefs were filed with the Supreme Court to uphold the current buffer zone law. “These briefs underscore our contention that the law balances constitutional rights appropriately while protecting the rights of women to safely receive health care,” Coakley said in a press release. McCullen’s suit has received a surprising amount of support across the country, calling into question the often-cited Hill v. Colorado, in which the Supreme Court ruled in favor of the state’s right to impose an eight-foot buffer between any person entering the facility and any protestors. In her effort to supposedly continue helping women in such close proximity to BU, McCullen feels that her “gentle touch” will be more accepted by students who seek advice if the buffer zone is diminished. “I’m just a grandmother that loves people. I love women, and I love unborn babies,” she said. “I’m a little person trying to establish our constitutional rights for the next generation, which is you!” McCullen smiles at every young woman walking by, “Can I be of any help to you this morning?”

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 19


THE REAL WORLD : BOSTON

LIFE IN BOSTON AFTER GRADUATION 20

During your four years at BU, you’re likely to fall in love with Boston. From partying in Allston to shopping in the Back Bay to acting like a total tourist at Quincy Market, you’ll start considering the city your home, even if you don’t get to venture outside of the BU Bubble as often as you’d like. But as spring semester of your senior year approaches and the idea of adulthood suddenly smacks you in the face, you may realize that your time in Boston is nearing an end. But it doesn’t have to end—just because you have outgrown BU doesn’t mean that you have outgrown Boston. While the city is known for being a college town, it is also a thriving area for young professionals. After graduating from BU, these following alumni chose to enter the “real world” in Boston. BY ALLIE ORLANDO

SHAREEN SHELTON (SMG ’12)

JON BUTTERWORTH (CFA ’10)

WHAT NOW?

WHAT NOW?

Shareen Shelton’s business degree with a focus in accounting led her to an internship at Grant Thorton the summer before her senior year. She still works for this global public accounting firm while living in Allston.

Immediately after graduating from BU with a degree in music education, Jon Butterworth began studying at Berklee College of Music. Since then, he has been privately teaching drum, trumpet and piano lessons to students from 4 to 65 years old. Butterworth knows he eventually wants to move to Los Angeles or Nashville, “the meccas for performing musicians,” but has decided to stay in Boston for the time being to hone his craft. He is currently living in Brighton.

WHY BOSTON? Shelton said Boston is a “great little starter city [with a] hub of innovation and upcoming powerful industries.” She loves Boston culture and the city’s sports teams. She advises students to stay here after graduation to transition into the “real world.” “You already know [Boston], so it’s a nice place to start off,” she said. 

WHY BOSTON? “I don’t think there is any city like this. Everyone seems so genuine,” Butterworth said.


ALYSSA CAREY (SMG ’13)

ERIC LEIST (COM ’10)

ELLEN REAVEY (ENG ’11)

WHAT NOW?

WHAT NOW? Eric Leist is the product marketing manager at Skyhook Wireless. When asked how he obtained this position, Leist said, “Networking, networking, networking.”  Since graduation, he has lived in different neighborhoods around the city, including Fenway and Somerville. He currently lives in South Boston.  “It’s an up-and-coming neighborhood with condo buildings and new restaurants springing up on every block,” Leist said.

WHAT NOW?

Graduating just a year ago with a business degree with a focus in marketing, Alyssa Carey is already working for two advertising agencies. Through an internship during her senior year at BU, Carey made valuable connections that helped her get hired. Carey decided to live in Medford, which is less expensive than living downtown and just a short commute to Boston.

WHY BOSTON? Carey recognizes that adjusting to life after graduation is often not easy and is sometimes scary. This makes staying local after graduation a good choice. “Searching for a job is stressful enough let alone searching for a new city,” she said. Boston’s growing presence of start-ups has affirmed Carey’s conviction that living in Boston is extremely beneficial—but only if you make the most of it.  “Be smart and don’t be afraid to step a little outside your boundaries. Know all your options,” she said.

WHY BOSTON? Although Leist knew that BU was a great resource, he learned that the Boston community has even more opportunities and connections to offer. “We hear a lot about the student population in Boston, but an often overlooked fact is how many of those students stay. There’s a thriving community of young professionals,” Leist said. 

Ellen Reavey graduated from BU with a degree in biomedical engineering but was initially unsure of what she wanted to do. After receiving references from an after-school program she worked with and a certification from Teach for America, Reavey now works for Boston public schools as a high school physics teacher. “I saw an opportunity to use my interest in science in a different way,” she said. Reavey is currently living in the South End by BU’s medical campus.

WHY BOSTON? After graduation, Reavey decided that relocating to her rural hometown in Pennsylvania was not an option because the area lacked opportunities in her field of interest. Staying in Boston made sense for practical reasons, but also because she wanted to know the city she had been living in better. “I wanted to experience the community a little more. There is more to do and see than I thought there was when I was an undergraduate,” she said.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 21


TURNING OVER

A NEW LEAF BY SAM DUTRA

ILLUSTRATIONS BY AMBER HUFF

IN THE NOVEMBER 2012 ELECTIONS, Massachusetts citizens

voted in favor of legalizing medical marijuana as part of Question 3 on the ballot. When dispensaries open in the next few months in Massachusetts, medical marijuana will bring business opportunities and an alternative medicine source to the commonwealth. Massachusetts joined 20 other states, and the District of Columbia, that voted to allow medical marijuana to be distributed with the recommendation of a doctor. Two states have gone even further—in Colorado and Washington, citizens legalized marijuana for “adult use” in the past six months by ballot initiative. Adult use means anyone 21 or older can purchase cannabis from a licensed dispensary. “Massachusetts as a state approved medical marijuana by the greatest margin the history of the United States,” says Tripp Keber, a board member of the Marijuana Policy Project and CEO of Dixie Elixirs & Edibles. “Polling suggests that Massachusetts has a strong appetite to legalize marijuana and likely could pass adult use recreational marijuana by 2016.” The ArcView Group, an investor network that conducts in-depth market research, has found that the legal marijuana

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industry is moving at a faster rate than the smart phone industry. In 2015 ArcView projected that Massachusetts will be the largest market for cannabis on the East Coast. In 1969 a Gallup poll showed that 84 percent of Americans agreed marijuana use should be illegal. A similar poll taken in October 2013 showed that 58 percent of Americans favored its legalization. The U.S. market value made up of all states with active and open sales of cannabis is assessed to be worth $1.43 billion. “Looking at investing in this market from our point of view, it’s a market that’s there,” said Doug Leighton, a venture capitalist and Boston resident who started investigating potential medical marijuana investments after the law was passed in 2012. Colorado and Washington set the example for how legalizing cannabis can affect the communities in which it operates. “When regulators look at what’s happening in Colorado, where as it used to be ‘NIMBY’ [Not In My Backyard], now they’re like ‘bring it!’” Keber said. “Massachusetts has at least two or three times the population of Colorado. If we’re [Colorado] going to do $134 million, what do you think Massachusetts could do?” Melanie Kirsh (CAS ’16), former president of BU’s Students for Sensible Drug Policy Club, said, “We don’t condemn or condone the use of drugs; however, we understand medical marijuana can be very beneficial to those in situations where they experience chronic pain, so we take a positive stance on medical marijuana.” Executive Director of Media Relations Colin Riley doubts that university health services would incorporate medical marijuana into their medical regime. “The university abides by the law and complies with the federal requirements. We want what is in the best interest of our students, especially when it comes to safety, security and health. You don’t want them taking dangerous substances in any sort of way,” Riley said. “I really hope what happens is we start to have a conversation about drugs and alcohol in society,” said Dean of Students Kenneth Elmore (SED ’87).


investigate potential harms. Marijuana use has been found to impair short-term memory, perception and motor skills. Federally marijuana is still an illegal drug; however, the justice department has announced it will not challenge marijuana laws in individual states as long as state governments continue to enforce laws responsibly. Massachusetts health department is in the process of granting dispensary licenses. The companies must be non-profit, and there must be at least one dispensary in each county. Any Massachusetts resident who is eligible for a medical marijuana license will be able to hold up to 10 ounces of useable cannabis, which is considered a 60-day supply. To be eligible for a license, patients must get a written recommendation from a legitimate doctor and must be a Massachusetts resident. However, marijuana entrepreneurs— who have infamously gained the nickname “ganjapreneurs”—have been working to change the image of the industry from its “stoner” reputation to a more legitimate and professional market. “I want to send a message that this isn’t something run by guys with natty dreads in Bob Marley T-shirts. I’m trying to convey a message that there are legitimate business people in the United States that are driving an industry from zero to a couple of billion dollars,” Keber said. Though there is uncertainty as to how medical and legal marijuana as an industry will operate, it is clear that its popularity is growing. “The plant that kids smoke behind their school or in a park is not the same as the medicine. Until people realize how many categories of marijuana there are, it will have a negative stigma attached with it,” Smith said. “The plant has the possibility to help a lot of people live a happier way of life. Why not at least look into it?” This is an exciting time for Massachusetts residents. The conversation over the legalization of marijuana will be ongoing, but such discussions suggest that major changes are coming. *Names have been changed.

Although he said that the university would not prescribe or allow people to use marijuana on BU property, he said, “I see more people with further problems and repeat problems who are abusing alcohol than pot. I’ve seen very few people who have very serious problems because they smoked too much pot.” One of the chemical compounds in the marijuana plant is cannabidiol (CBD). CBD is non-psychoactive, meaning it will not give users the effect of being “high” when consumed, but when ingested, it can have significant medicinal benefits. Four years ago, Keber founded Dixie Elixirs in Denver, an edible company that would give eligible candidates an alternative to smoking cannabis. “Most healthy, active people in the state of Colorado know that smoking anything is bad for them,” he says. “How do you ask a lung cancer patient that is going through chemo who wants to embrace marijuana for medical benefits that he or she must smoke? It doesn’t make any sense. We want to give the patients and adult users the option to ingest or topically apply or absorb through your mouth.” For Robert Smith* (COM ’15), marijuana has benefited his health, though he doesn’t have an official medical marijuana card. “My ailment is a rare, untreatable set of food allergies that cause muscle cramping, tiredness, loss of appetite and frequent nausea. Medically, [marijuana] has allowed me to eat, sleep and interact with friends without having to worry about going to the bathroom or having stomach cramps,” he said. “I think it can be a good alternative,” said Jamie Lodge* (SMG ’14), who has a family member who uses medical marijuana to treat a tendon abnormality. “It’s all natural, and there’s no record of anyone overdosing on marijuana. I think it helps more than harms.” However, Elizabeth Douglas, the director of Wellness and Prevention in Student Health Services at BU, believes there are still risks. “Given that the brain develops until a person is 25, any chronic substance use is very risky during the adolescent and young adult years,” Douglas said. The Massachusetts Health and Human Services Department warns that people should

I WANT TO SEND A MESSAGE THAT THIS ISN’T SOMETHING RUN BY GUYS WITH NATTY DREADS IN BOB MARLEY T-SHIRTS.

PHOTO COURTESY OF DIXIE ELIXIRS

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 23


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BY VA N

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W H AT

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AR TS DIG IN ITA TH L AE GE ARTS

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 25


A decade ago

independent artists struggled to gain followers on their own, but today’s advanced technology has made self-promotion significantly easier. Musician? Download your self-produced EP on SoundCloud. Filmmaker? Upload your movies on YouTube. Painter? Post your pieces for sale on Etsy. However, with all of the potential for success these platforms allow, it is important to remember that nothing is guaranteed. One of the biggest challenges artists face is gaining a following. Christine O’Connor (COM ’15) is familiar with this problem. She runs the social media accounts for Rep Records, a student record label at BU. “I don’t think there’s any shortage of talent out there, and I think that social media makes that more apparent than traditional platforms might have,” O’Connor said. “But it is such a struggle in terms of trying to make a career. I really salute people who dedicate their lives to this.” She believes there is a key component in promoting your work on social media:

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consistency. This semester Rep Records has seen a significant increase in Twitter followers and Facebook likes because they updated sites with new content. BU is home to thousands of artistic students striving to make a name for themselves. There are clubs that help students put their work on display, creating an extremely supportive environment within BU. The Digital Media Club, for example, provides students with the skills necessary to succeed as digital artists. The club’s president, Ryan Whitten (COM ’14), calls their strategy “students helping students.” Club members share their skills to help each other improve. They predominantly focus on helping students set up their own websites, whether they are photographers, videographers, graphic designers or artists of another genre. The club helps students build a foundation to gain an Internet following and to produce something to show potential employers. “As a digital artist, sometimes people think social media is the end all and people will just come to it automatically,” Whitten said. Though the platforms are there, increased competition and the challenge to stand out still exists. “Social media is a great tool to use, but you have to send your stuff to the right people,” he explained. “You have to try to find other audiences than the one you have. You may not be reaching more people per se, but it is better to reach a small number of really engaged fans.” As technology changes, the definition of art constantly changes. Most often people associate the word “art” with traditional art forms like painting and sculpture, but recently it has expanded to include so much more. As a photojournalist, this is something that Kate Campbell (COM ’16) has seen with her work. “A lot of people don’t necessarily consider [photojournalism] an art, but there’s definitely a craft to capturing fleeting moments in an artful way,” Campbell said. “Photojournalism is all about telling a story. It’s capturing a real moment in time that encapsulates the story as a whole in just one image. Obviously this is difficult to do,


but it’s all about developing the ability to notice and anticipate good moments,” she said. Photojournalism is not just a matter of having a camera; it requires the proper skill and equipment. “A photojournalist needs the right tools to effectively tell a story,” explained Campbell. “A good camera is essential—a digital single lens reflex camera, or DSLR, is the standard for the industry. The type of lens used makes a huge difference in the way a picture turns out. Post-photographing, a photojournalist can use a variety of editing software, whether it’s Photoshop, Lightroom or Aperture. Other than that, the best tool for a photojournalist is their senses and intuition. And half the battle is just showing up! That’s what it’s about. Being there. Experiencing a moment.” Mike DeSocio (COM ’17), a photographer, has had some success in utilizing technology to find jobs, but he is not ready to fully rely on his website. “Technology is definitely hit or miss when it comes to promoting my work. Just recently I picked up a few portrait photography jobs just by Facebook sharing my website. Most of the time, however, I’ll be posting on social media for weeks without any translation into tangible jobs or commissions. You definitely have to keep at it, and you cannot expect social media to pay the bills, but keeping your work out there for people to see helps a lot.” Campbell and DeSocio are members of the Photo Club at BU and, like many photographers, are able to share their work via Twitter and Facebook. Graphic design is one of the most rapidly growing digital art fields. It combines visual art like photography, painting and drawing with textual communication. It requires a good eye and a lot of innovative thinking. As a graphic designer, Rebecca Gladstone (CFA ’15) promotes her work using Behance, a website that gives artists a place to have an online portfolio and the ability to connect with other artists. “I use Behance basically to house my work. It’s a nice thing to have in case future

employers are looking for a quick snapshot of my work,” Gladstone said. She uses social media, like Twitter, to follow companies she admires to search for both job opportunities and inspiration. “Art in the digital age means innovation. I find it extremely exciting. I want to make work that connects people, and the digital age is all about that,” Gladstone said. Something that has transcended generations of artists and goes beyond advancement in technology is the fact that artists do not make art for the purpose of grand success; they make art because it is an outlet. It connects people. While artists in the digital age may not be lucrative, their art can have a global presence. Artists need to create—they do what they do because they have an irrepressible passion for art. So while the competition continues to increase with the ever-growing presence of social media, the truly dedicated will withstand it. The importance of creativity does not depend on how many people see it. The importance lies in your pride in your work and your dedication to share what you create with others.



CHECK OUT THESE STUDENT ARTISTS ONLINE: KATE CAMPBELL:

katemcampbell.wordpress.com

MIKE DESOCIO: mikedesocio.com

REBECCA GLADSTONE: behance.net/rebeccaglad

 CHRISTINE O’CONNOR: reprecordsmusic.com

RYAN WHITTEN: ryanwhitten.com

OPPOSITE PAGE// REBECCA GLADSTONE THIS PAGE FROM TOP// RYAN WHITTEN, KATE CAMPBELL, MIKE DESOCIO, REBECCA GLADSTONE

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 27


samba spirit capturing 20th century brazil

A LOOK INTO ONE OF THE MFA’S NEW EXHIBITIONS At its best, art not only manages to captivate the viewer, but also gives artists an opportunity to make a statement about the world they live in. The Museum of Fine Arts’ exhibition “Samba Spirit: Modern Afro Brazilian Art” embodies this concept. The exhibition, which premiered on Jan. 18 and will remain in Boston through Oct. 19, reveals traditions of Brazilian life and inspires viewers.

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ocated in the Bernard and Barbara Stern Shapiro Gallery on the second floor of the MFA in the Arts of the Americas Wing, “Samba Spirit” features paintings by Brazilian artists. The majority of the featured artists are of African descent and have had very little formal education in painting and sculpture. As the exhibition’s central post on the wall states, in the 19th century Brazil had the largest population of enslaved Africans in the Americas. Brazil was the last country on this side of the earth to abolish slavery, not having done so until 1888. This had a significant affect on the work of the featured artists because many of them were born in the early 20th century as descendants of slaves. During their lives they witnessed the dramatic cultural changes that accompanied the end of slavery in Brazil. The diversity that resulted from the abolition of slavery in Brazil was something of a culture shock for its people, as they had to find a way to live together by ending divisions of hatred and prejudice. The influence of slavery on the paintings in “Samba Spirit” is prevalent, but it is just one of the many aspects of life explored by artists.

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Perhaps the most intricate painting in the exhibition, Rain over São Paulo by Maria Auxiliadora da Silva, depicts a bustling neighborhood caught in rain. The exhibit’s curator Karen Quinn finds herself drawn to Auxiliadora da Silva’s work. “She is a keen observer of human experience,” Quinn said. “[Auxiliadora da Silva] has a great sense of composition and color, and her background as a seamstress is evident in her approach and in details such as tiny brushstrokes that look like stitches. I keep going back to study her work because she packs so much into each painting.” Three of Auxiliadora da Silva’s paintings are featured in this exhibition, one depicting São Paulo, another a plantation and the third a fire. “Each image shows the range of natural responses to each situation,” Quinn said. In the mid-20th century urbanization was becoming a global presence, and Brazil was no exception. The artist demonstrates this urbanization in society through her subjects, each embodying unique shapes, sizes and colors. Auxiliadora da Silva’s strength lies in giving all of her subjects a personality, which shines through in the people’s vibrant attire and animated expressions. The proportion of the subject’s body parts to their position in the

BY AYUSH KUMAR & VANESSA RODRIGUEZ PHOTOGRAPHY BY ABBY LESSELS


frame is insignificant to Auxiliadora da Silva. Instead she focuses on gangly looking citizens of São Paulo who seem to occupy as much space as they please. Depicting rural life in Brazil is also a crucial part of “Samba Spirit,” as it was the only reality for many of the poorer Brazilian people at the turn of the century. Tired Donkey by Waldomiro de Deus is simplistic and rudimentary in nature. Four subjects are prominently featured surrounding a defeated donkey. The family’s assumed home rests in the back right of the frame. A plaque accompanying this family portrait explains, “The house may indicate the couple’s pride in home ownership, a significant accomplishment for rural people of color even in the late 20th century,” and the donkey is “a sign of their upward mobility, as well as a source of it through its work.” Depictions of real life aside, the exhibition also delves into the surreal. Boizebú by Waldomiro de Deus is the most jarring painting of the collection. It showcases a large, demon-like figure centered in the composition and surrounded by serpents and horned devils. One of the smaller devils faces the central figure’s ambiguous genitalia, suggesting some sort of sexual ritual. The intended meaning of the painting is unknown; Waldomiro never explained it. An accompanying plaque theorizes that this relationship between the devils “could represent some kind of transition between one existence and the next.” The Inconsolable Widow by Sergio Vidal da Rocha strikes a chord with any viewer who has experienced the loss of a loved one. Vidal da Rocha’s choices are bold, giving the widow a voice in a male-dominated culture. At first glance this piece seems much brighter than the culturally accepted color scheme of a funeral. Black is not traditionally worn at Brazilian funerals, which explains why the men and women in the painting different colored suits and dresses. However, the facial expressions are somber. Funeral attendees

are searching for comfort and solace as the inconsolable widow mourns over her husband, who is just barely visible in the coffin. At the center of the exhibition stand two wooden sculptures, Little King and Man with a Pipe and Hat, by Agnaldo Manoel Dos Santos. Despite his social position, the king features abnormally small limbs and a scared expression on his face, whereas the man with a pipe looks tranquil and confident. Made in the 1950s, both sculptures have been gorgeously preserved and seem to have lost very little of their original shine. Worker by Jenner Augusto da Silveira is a modernist portrait of a pottery maker who looks frustrated with his arms crossed next to a beautiful bowl that he may have recently made. The expression in his eyes haunts viewers and alludes to a feeling we have all experienced. The only way to articulate this feeling is to describe it as “So what?” The painting asks the question, “What is the point of doing anything?” This poor laborer is wondering the same thing: Will all of his work on the bowl eventually be worth it and give him the fulfillment he seeks? “Samba Spirit: Modern Afro Brazilian Art” is definitely worth a trip to the MFA. It provides an amazing insight into life and culture in Brazil during the 20th century. Quinn said she believes this exhibition stands out because of “the personal experiences of each artist and their ability to communicate that through their work. Narrative is important to many of them.” She hopes that people will walk away from “Samba Sprit” with a better understanding of Afro-Brazilian culture and an appreciation of the artists’ abilities to visually express their experiences. Having lived through astoundingly difficult, changing times, these Brazilian artists have important stories to tell that are well-worth exploring.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 29


NOT SO HIDDEN TALENT HERE ARE 4 CFA ARTISTS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT

ABBY FRANK

(CFA ’16)

“I work mostly with oil paints. I have been working on a lot of self-portraits lately and experimenting with different palettes and mark making in my recent paintings. It is very intimidating to go into the studio and start a project. As a student I am trying to develop my own voice and communicate that voice in my artwork. It is challenging to figure out what that voice is while trying to develop my skills in the studio. I’ve really enjoyed my experience at CFA so far. I have learned a lot, and I am excited to continue developing my skills.” 30

LILLY SAYWITZ

(CFA ’16)

“I work from life and my direct surroundings. I try to look at what I see and respond quickly to it; I don’t care about photorealism. For me, it’s more about painting the feeling that I get from the space, like the color and shape. One thing I love about art is its ability to control the feelings of the viewer. I find something obsessively fascinating about the floor of the studio, and with the right color and brushwork, I can make someone else understand how beautiful this particular floor looked on a particular day. I think the communicative power of art is astounding.”

JOHN STEINES

(CFA ’15)

“I like to use easy-to recognize objects with lots of associations, or try to replicate objects with lots of associations—recognition is key. Recently I’ve been using things like matches and clothespins. I like trying to bring out qualities in everyday, run-of-the-mill, potentially mundane objects. I also seem to be obsessed with wood and am trying hard to combine other mediums in my work. I also tend to focus on the playful aspect of materials. My match obsession is part of this. I try to respond to the danger, but also the fun inside the danger.”

REBECCA GLADSTONE

(CFA ’15) “I am a graphic design major. This basically means I am a visual communicator. I like to make work that means something and helps people communicate, navigate and learn. My style is developing. I am trying to find my design voice. I like design where you can see human touches or a handmade element, so I try to incorporate that in my practice as much as possible.”

BY KRISTIE EVANS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MADELEINE ATKINSON


MUSIC

THE NEXT GENERATION OF CREATORS ARE ENHANCING FILMS WITH THEIR MUSIC

T

FINDING

PHOTO BY SAM DUTRA

the perfect score

BY JULIANNE LEE

he search to find a career that brings success and happiness is a common struggle for students. Do you stick with what you’re good at, or do what makes you happy? For two BU students, finding the overlap between their passions and skills has brought about careers that are definitely off the beaten path. An aspiring film composer and music supervisor will now enter an industry where the hardest part is not only finding a voice, but also maintaining it when you cannot always call the shots. “I hate having to choose,” said Anneliese Scheck (COM ’15). Though a film student in the College of Communication, music is a huge part of Scheck’s life. “I don’t want to have to choose if I don’t have to.” Instead of giving up one for the other, she has recently discovered the world of music supervision where she can decide what music best complements a film.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 31


I’VE ALWAYS THOUGHT ABOUT MUSIC VISUALLY. WHEN I HEAR CERTAIN SONGS, I CAN PICTURE MOMENTS.

Although she does not perform or read music, Scheck’s experiences and love of music overcome any technicalities she lacks. “I can’t speak intelligently about music. I don’t play music myself. I can’t read music, but it’s just the feeling that you get,” Sheck said. As a film student, her end goal is to someday make her own films, but along the way she would like to try a career in music supervision for film or television. “I’ve always thought about music visually. When I hear certain songs, I can picture moments,” Scheck said. “I think it would be really sweet to use my love of music and combine it with film.” Scheck’s résumé dazzles of cool. From working at WXPN “World Café” of NPR to hosting her own radio show at WTBU “Indie Rocks Your Socks Off,” she is always looking to share music with others. Anáis Azul (CFA ’17), on the other hand, deals directly with the creation and performance of music. Interestingly, she only started playing piano five years ago. “Maybe that’s why I love it so much,” she said. “A lot of people start so young and their parents want them to do it. I did it because I wanted to do it. If it comes out of you wanting to do it, I think there is all that more value to it.”  “I love collaborating, and I want more collaboration to happen with choreographers or filmmakers,” Azul said. Her first joint project came in high school when she wrote a piece for a

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choreography training program with the San Francisco Ballet. Though only a freshman, Azul has taken on the role of vice president for one of BU’s newest organizations Delta Kappa Alpha, a national co-ed professional cinema fraternity. She described it as “an intersection for all the arts.” She is one of a few CFA members but hopes this will open many new windows for composing music for film. Although she dreams of eventually writing music for dancers, in the immediate future she would like to write music for COM’s production film classes. Many COM film students will venture down the green line to Berklee College of Music, where they can team up with Berklee’s film composition program. As part of her Production I class last semester, Scheck created a non-sync sound film where the picture and sound were recorded separately. After she completed her film, her professor suggested contacting students at the Berklee film scoring practicum as a next step. Visualizing her film accompanied by soft rock, she was faced with the challenge of staying true to her artistic voice when joining forces with composers of many styles. Five students responded who were interested in her story. “They gave me their ideas. This one guy wanted to do detective music,” Sheck said. She was hesitant about picking a composer.

“I didn’t want it to be heavy-handed or melodramatic,” she said. In the end, she found someone with whom she had compatible ideas. “When I watched the film for the first time, I immediately knew what music I would want to write for it,” said Oren Yaacoby, a recent graduate of Berklee who ended up creating the score. “She [Scheck] knew very well what she wanted and that always makes the composer’s work much easier. Also, she was open to hear my suggestions, which is great.” “I scored it mainly for guitar, which is my main instrument, and it made things much easier and more intuitive for me,” Yaacoby said. He is currently pursuing a career in writing music for films and performing his own compositions in Los Angeles. While


Scheck still has a year remaining at BU, she hopes to once again join forces with Berklee students. Both Scheck and Azul have worked with putting music into films, but the procedure for music composition and scoring is very different. In some cases, composers can gain performance royalties for music in advertisements and TV shows, but it is important to realize that the artist is not always the writer. “If you are a song writer and you get your song placed in a movie, now you are earning royalties,” explained Brad Hatfield, an Emmy Award-winning composer who teaches at Berklee and Northeastern. Songs can be exclusive to certain shows or films, or can be non-exclusive and be picked up for many different uses. Scoring an entire film is different from composing music for TV shows or commercials. The score created by a composer supports the specific moments of a film: think Indiana Jones and the distinct melody associated with his adventures. Generally, this music is not licensed and becomes the property of the producing studio. The studio will pay the composer, and it is unlikely that it will be reused since it is created for a specific story. For the most part, music supervisors are all about getting the licensed use of existing music. Directors usually call the shots for the movie and many times will already have the soundtrack somewhat scripted in their head. It is up to the music supervisor and licensing departments to acquire the rights for these songs and edit them to fit the story; think American Hustle, which contains hits from artists from the Bee Gees to Elton John. Sometimes songs are created solely for the movie—like the melody for Titanic turning into “My Heart Will Go On” in the ending credits. Though she still has a long way to go, Azul already understands the challenges that

await. “How a composer maintains their style and also is able to portray what the director wants to do ... it still has to be the composer’s music,” Azul explained. However, she also sees the middle ground. While looking out at snow-covered trees that line the Charles, she felt inspired. “I feel like I can write a piece of music about it,” Azul said. “Using that as an inspiration to write a movie and using that to write an inspiration for a piece of music would give you two very different results, but I feel like you would still be able to find the connections between them.” Though each process is unique, many of the same skills are needed. Hatfield believes it is all about being a team player. “You have got to put your ego to the side,” he said. When you get to the root of it, though they have their differences, the worlds of music and film are all about engaging audiences and telling stories.    

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 33


BOX OF BIRDS ERIK CALDARONE (LEFT), STEPH DURWIN (MIDDLE) AND CHARLIE GARGANO (RIGHT)

BOSTON:

THE NEXT DESTINATION FOR MUSIC BY JESSICA LEACH

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA LEACH

I DON’T REALLY REMEMBER MY FIRST HOUSE SHOW. Given how important house shows are to me now, the first house show I attended should be this huge, significant memory. But it’s not. It’s blended together in my mind with a barrage of other sweaty basement gigs I’ve attended. But whether the first house show I went to was held in dirty Allston or hip Somerville is irrelevant. What really matters is how that first show, whichever one it may be, permanently shaped my perspective on music. As a Boston University student, I’ve had the incredible opportunity to write about music in this city for the past four years, and I’ve loved every second of it. I started by writing big album and show reviews, covering the touring out of town artists that would stop to play one night or two. These artists always claimed that they loved Boston and its people the best, but by the next night, they’d be gone off in another city showering a new audience with the same flattering words. With this, I sensed a disconnection with music. The venues were too big and the fans too casual. Shows were fun, but they were never significant.

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As a disillusioned music writer searching for something “real,” I fell deeply in love with local music. I never before batted an eye at musician friends as potential stories, but there they were: accessible and real, making music while entrenched in their college town surroundings. I noticed the grassroots marketing and networking, and the return to sharing by word of mouth and actual human interaction—something unseen in the music community at large. Here there are no PR agents or press contacts to go through; if you need someone, they are as readily available as a donut from Dunkin’. This is what makes Boston’s local music community work. This is what makes it a self-reliant scene. As we continue to turn gears, it is clear that this city’s accessibility— compared to its bigger counterparts like New York or Los Angeles—is what makes it an attractive option for musicians. In size, Boston isn’t an intimidating city. Its people, though they are nationally notorious for unfriendly manners and foul language, are actually connected and inviting. Within the city is a community of people who devote everything they have to the music scene. They book, promote, record, distribute and


OP-ED support music in every way possible. It’s not always a paying gig, but the payoff is bigger than money. As a writer, I’ve seen how media shapes this scene. Writers, like me, are volunteers to a higher cause. I’m not always writing to help myself, like how I was as a byline-hungry freshman. I know that media, at this level, provides something more like a service, where I’m not encouraged to be critical or prove my own knowledge. My job at its core is spreading the word. It’s a pretty simple way to be involved, compared to all the blood, sweat and tears that go into everything else, but it’s no less important. By reinventing the scene as a destination, local blogs and publications like Allston Pudding and the Boston Hassle fill the void of The Phoenix, which was the epicenter of local art and music before its folding. And Boston is a destination, after all. It’s not a stop on a tour or a city that’s consistently reborn every four years with the next crop of students. Musicians, like New York native and Speedy Ortiz frontwoman Sadie Dupuis, are relocating here as they sense the hard work of a rallied community. I have heard bands call Boston their jumping off point and that it’s not quite on par with Brooklyn, N.Y., or L.A., but I’ve never believed it. Maybe popular music spills out of those other cities in overflowing heaps, like they’re screaming for attention, but Boston’s music scene, as I see it now in its quiet, unassuming glory, is their rival.

GREY SEASON

JON MILLS, MATT KNELMAN, IAN JONES (FROM LEFT)

HOUSE GUESTS (TOP LEFT AND RIGHT)

NOAH YASTROW (COM ‘15), GRAHAM COOKE (SMG ‘15)

THE RARE OCCASIONS (BOTTOM RIGHT)

BRIAN MCLAUGHLIN, LUKE IMBUSCH, JEREMY COHEN AND PETER STONE

FRANK AND DEPENDENT (BOTTOM LEFT)

JANE FITZSIMMONS (CFA ‘15), MEREDITH NERO (CAS ‘15)

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 35


THE BEST OF

THE Bargain Bin BY VICTORIA WASYLAK

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA

DESPITE THE RISE OF DIGITAL MUSIC SALES, CDS AND RECORDS ARE FAR FROM DEAD. MUSIC LOVERS CRAVE THE TANGIBILITY OF AN ALBUM BUT FIND THAT DIGITAL MUSIC IS MUCH MORE INEXPENSIVE. LUCKILY LOCAL RECORD STORES STILL VALUE PHYSICAL MEDIUMS. THESE STORES SELL BOTH NEW AND USED CDS AND RECORDS FOR LESS THAN MOST LARGE CORPORATIONS DO, KEEPING CDS AND RECORDS RELEVANT TO MODERN MUSIC CULTURE.

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Newbury Comics, for instance, sells a wide variety of used CDs and vinyl records for significantly less than most other stores. While buying used music may not be as glamorous as buying a new copy of an album, it certainly is a lot easier on the wallet. College students who are tight on cash can find nearly any used CD for around $5 less than a new copy. For those that may be nervous about the quality of used CDs and records, Chief Operating Officer of Newbury Comics Duncan Browne described the process of buying used albums. Browne said that the process for buying used CDs versus records is very different. This is because scratches on CDs can be removed, but scratches on records cannot. So employees at nearly all Newbury Comics stores are allowed to buy CDs, but only specially trained employees at the Norwood store can buy used records. Trained employees examine records for scratches and warping, which are both flaws that can render a record useless. “Trusting 300 people to correctly buy used vinyl would be a real challenge,” Browne said, admitting that not all Newbury Comics employees would be able to identify a damaged record. Examining CDs, on the other hand, requires much less expertise because minor scuffs and damage can be removed from CDs. Used CDs that have been bought from customers are sorted by quality, and CDs that have any minor damage are sent to Newbury Comics’ Brighton warehouse for repair. “We have about ten machines that basically sand off a microscopic layer of the plastic coating on CDs,” Browne described. “All of the machines can be set to different levels to remove different amounts of scratches, hardly ever leaving any marks on the CD.” Local record store Nuggets is also a mecca for used records and CDs. The Kenmore Square record store is filled to the brim with records from nearly every artist from the heyday of records, as well as a variety of lightly used CDs and DVDs. Owner Stuart Freedman has 36 years of experience and can easily tell if a record if scratched or warped. “We pretty much don’t buy anything that’s scratched up, and CDs and DVDs

have to be in mint condition,” Freedman said. “We have very few returns, if ever.” Freedman added that records vary in condition but are priced accordingly. Most notably, the store is constantly getting new merchandise, so no two visits to Nuggets are the same. “We get new stuff in every single day. We have all types of music besides jazz and punk,” Freedman said. Although major music chain f.y.e. does not offer such a wide variety of used items, there are $5 and $7 CD bins that lure customers inside the store with the promise of inexpensive music. While bargain bin CDs may have the connotation of being undesirable, a little digging can be worthwhile. On a recent trip to f.y.e. in Salem, N.H., I discovered legends like Michael Jackson, Beyoncé and Elton John relegated to the $7 bin and artists like Beastie Boys, Avril Lavigne and The Doors to the $5 bin. Newbury Comics is also known for selling new CDs for less than its competitors. Browne said that this is because Newbury Comics relies on merchandise sales and returning customers to make up for any loss in profits from lower CD prices. “We will sell things at a loss in some cases just to create excitement,” Browne stated. Although due to the increase in digital sales, Newbury Comics does this less and less. “We try to find things that are going to be appealing to people, or there’s a buzz going on, or maybe the artist is coming to town,” Brown said, listing reasons why Newbury Comics might put a new album on sale. Much to the delight of local concertgoers, in a city like Boston, there’s always a buzz about the thriving music scene—and significant deals to be had because of it.

IN A CITY LIKE BOSTON, THERE’S ALWAYS A BUZZ ABOUT THE THRIVING MUSIC SCENE­—AND SIGNIFICANT DEALS TO BE HAD BECAUSE OF IT.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 37


TRACK 1 “DREAMS”

Your brain makes things unavoidable when you have the same dream every night for a week.

TRACK 2 “BEYOND THE PALE” This is the first song I wrote after a long period of writer’s block, and my dog was the first to hear it.

BU MUSIC

MI MIXXTAPE TAPE BU STUDENTS WEIGH IN ON THEIR OWN WORK BY JESSICA LEACH

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PAUL COPPOLA

DIRTY DIRGES

This talented singer and songwriter, who also happens to be a senior at BU, swirls the energy of punk and the storytelling of folk into his quirky musical creations. Coppola placed third in this year’s Battle of the Bands competition.

The Dirty Dirges are manic artists— experimenting their way through every level of folk and rock to create a blend that sounds like bluegrass jazz on drugs. The group played their last show in February, but you can still stream their tunes online.

TRACK 3 “THE WAY I FEEL”

TRACK 6 “IF LOVE IS DEAD (WHAT’S THIS LIVIN’ IN MY SOUL)”

I “wrote” this song two summers ago. I’ve never really written the words down. I just kind of started singing it in my head and mumbling the words to myself one day while I was walking around Boston, fresh out of a break up and kind of homeless. But anyway the cool thing about never writing the lyrics down is that they have been able to mold and change since then. Also, I played it [the song] on a roof for a friend’s film project and made a cool video. And the weird opening chords make me look like I’m good at guitar.

TRACK 4 “PREMONITION”

I was in London when I wrote this. It has nothing to do with the city, but I was there. I never really write my lyrics down, but I was trying to distract myself from actual work so I typed a stanza or two that came into my head. I was listening to a lot of The Mountain Goats and thinking un-affectionately of an ex-girlfriend at the time. Both of these facts are painfully obvious in the song, but I like it, mostly for the jumpy, quick-paced nature of it. I really like to jump around and dance. Originally it was kind of slow, but when I showed it to my roommate in London, Danny, I finished it up really quick and fast, so not to drag on. He told me to play the whole song like that. So I did. It’s fun now.

TRACK 5 “MY MADONNA”

This is probably the only song I’ve ever completely written out and edited before playing it, which is totally why the words sound somewhat more complex than the melodramatic mulling that they are. Again, it’s about girls and fleeting love—blah, blah, blah. It’s long. It’s nice. I also wrote it in London last year.

As [insert poet] would say, “Boy, we dig self-conscious allusion.” This fever-dream rhinestone country number is a real shiner, an assemblage of subtle nods and gross distortions that expand like bouillon cubes. There’s the Dead Elvis impersonator singing the Freudian verses, the drag queen gospel choir singing quotes from Song of Solomon (one section of which two members recited in yearly May Day rites in middle school), the “Ave Maria” to Charles Ives clarinet lines, the silent film piano ... everything clothed in a fringed, polyester cowboy shirt that doesn’t breathe but will outlive you. This song was written and arranged during the recording process, so it’s the most immediate idea on the record.

TRACK 7 “NAWLINS”

This track, on the other hand, is a Gordian knot of overdubs and re-takes. The general goal of the band is to subvert and dissect old folk, blues, jazz and country tropes. An immediate approach on record is to play the expected instruments in different ways. One way is to physically play them differently, such as bowing a banjo, playing a violin like flamenco guitar or blowing only “bent” notes on a clarinet. The other is to fold in more modern styles, like extended dissonances, acoustic noise or screaming. This song is always fun to play—it descends into a Bacchic frenzy, a rabid mass of sound consuming itself. By this point in the live set, I’ve smeared myself in lipstick, and I’m thrashing around in a red union suit. You know, folk music.

PHOTO BY CASSANDRA CHERNIN

Some may refer to St. Nothing as the “Artist Formerly Known as Hall of Mirrors,” but don’t be fooled—BU junior Marco Lawrence’s two electropop projects are far from identical. Lawrence’s new moniker comes with newfound wisdom and experience. In his latest work, Lawrence changes his style while maintaining his emotionally charged lyrics and European club-ready synth.

PHOTO BY JESSICA LEACH

PHOTO BY KARA KORAB

ST. NOTHING


FASHION

tea toast to spring PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA ART DIRECTION BY ASHLEY ROSSI STYLED BY ASHLI MOLINA

Welcome to a world where the line between dream and reality is blurred—a world where spring in Boston is enchanted by the charm of Alice in Wonderland. From top hats to bow ties, we draw inspiration from every corner of our ethereal city’s canvas, painting a picture of what life would be like in a Bostonian wonderland. [THIS PAGE] ANGELICA: FREE PEOPLE, EASY BREEZY WHITE CROCHET SLIP, $88; MAROON SIDE SLIT CAMI, $48; WHITE CROCHET COWL NECK, $128. LOU LOU, LENORA DAME LACE NECKLACE, $80; PURPLE STONE RING, $6; BLUE STONE RING, $6; FAD GOLD CUFF, $20. SIERRA: FREE PEOPLE, FIRST KISS FLOWER PRINT MAXI, $148. LOU LOU, CVZ MAROON FLOPPY FEDORA HAT, $30. PEDRO: H&M, WHITE V-NECK, $5.95; BLUE BOW TIE, $12.95. GOORIN BROS., MAGIC RABBIT BLACK MEDIUM TOP HAT, $150. JACK WILLS, BARBERRY SLIM FIT LAVENDER CHINO PANTS, $69.50. BELT, STYLIST’S OWN. TRAVIS: JACK WILLS, BUCKINGHAM NAVY BLUE SUIT JACKET, $298. H&M, WHITE POLKA DOTTED COLLAR SHIRT, $34.50.


WE’RE ALL MAD HERE [THIS PAGE] TRAVIS: GOORIN BROS., FLYING PRIVATE BLACK TALL TOP HAT, $130. H&M, STRIPED NAVY BLUE HENLEY TEE, $9.95. JACK WILLS, BARBERRY SLIM FIT SKY BLUE CHINO PANTS, $69.50. SIERRA: CRUSH, ELLA MOSS LAVENDER TOP, $134. FREE PEOPLE, EYELET CRÈME TUNIC, $68; ELLE CRÈME FLORAL PRINTED SKINNY PANTS, $108. LOU LOU, AMANO STUDIO MINI MAGNIFYING GLASS NECKLACE, $30; AMANO STUDIO, GOLD CRYSTAL POINT NECKLACE, $44; AMANO STUDIO HOURGLASS NECKLACE, $30; PAN RINGS (2), $10. NO REST FOR BRIDGET, LARGE GREEN STONE RING, $10. [OPPOSITE PAGE] ANGELICA: LOU LOU, BORA ROSE GOLD WATCH, $30; BORA SILVER SQUARE WATCH, $35; BORA BLACK AND ROSE GOLD CLIP WATCH, $30. NO REST FOR BRIDGET, THIN GOLD WATCH, $28.

“If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense.” ― Lewis Carroll

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THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 41


“It’s always time for tea.” ― Lewis Carroll

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[LEFT PAGE] ANGELICA: CRUSH, ALICE + OLIVIA BLACK AND WHITE BOW TANK TOP, $198. LOU LOU, JCR PEARL FLORAL NECKLACE, $48. PINK HI-LOW SKIRT, STYLIST’S OWN. SIERRA: JACK WILLS, HAUXLEY VINTAGE WHITE LACE TOP, $89.50; BUCKINGHAM NAVY BLUE SUIT JACKET, $298. H&M, BLUE BOW TIE, $12.95. SHORTS, STYLIST’S OWN. PEDRO: H&M, WHITE POLKA DOTTED COLLAR SHIRT, $34.50. TRAVIS: JACK WILLS, BUCKINGHAM NAVY BLUE SUIT JACKET, $298; WADSWORTH CLASSIC SUNSHINE CRÈME OXFORD SHIRT, $69.50. [RIGHT PAGE] ANGELICA: BOBBLES & LACE, LEATHER REHAB CRÈME TOP, $45. JACK WILLS, MILLBANK NAVY BLUE FLORAL HAREM TROUSERS, $69.50. LOU LOU, LENORA DAME LACE NECKLACE, $80. PEDRO: JACK WILLS, BARBERRY SLIM FIT LAVENDER CHINO PANTS, $69.50. H&M, BLUE PAISLEY COLLAR SHIRT, $39.95. WATCH, STYLIST’S OWN.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 43


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GAZE BEYOND THE LOOKING GLASS

[THIS PAGE] SIERRA: FREE PEOPLE, FIRST KISS FLOWER PRINT MAXI, $148. LOU LOU, CVZ MAROON FLOPPY FEDORA HAT, $30; AMANO STUDIO MINI MAGNIFYING GLASS NECKLACE, $30; AMANO STUDIO, GOLD CRYSTAL POINT NECKLACE, $44; AMANO STUDIO HOURGLASS NECKLACE, $30; PAN RINGS (2), $10; BLUE STONE RING, $6. [OPPOSITE PAGE FROM TOP LEFT] PEDRO: JACK WILLS, WADSWORTH CLASSIC SUNSHINE CRÈME OXFORD SHIRT, $69.50. ANGELICA: LOU LOU, BLUE STONE RING, $6; PURPLE STONE RING, $6. ANGELICA: NO REST FOR BRIDGET, SLEEVELESS NUDE DRESS WITH LACE, $49; WHITE KIMONO WITH LACE, $39.99. TRAVIS: GOORIN BROS., MAGIC RABBIT BLACK MEDIUM TOP HAT, $150. H&M, WHITE V-NECK, $5.96; BLACK SUSPENDERS, $9.95; BLACK MEN’S DRESS SHOES, $29.95. JACK WILLS, BARBERRY SLIMFIT SAGE GREEN CHINO PANTS, $69.50. SIERRA: GOORIN BROS., FLYING PRIVATE BLACK TALL TOP HAT $130; JULIAN FEATHER, $7; HAT PIN, $44.

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“Imagination is the only weapon in the war against reality.” ― Lewis Carroll

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LACE UP, BOW DOWN [THIS PAGE] ANGELICA: CRUSH, ALICE + OLIVIA BLACK AND WHITE BOW TANK TOP, $198. [OPPOSITE PAGE] SIERRA: FREE PEOPLE, TWISTED FLORAL PRINTED HAREMS, $78. CRUSH, TRUST KEY LONG NECKLACE, $58. LOU LOU, AMANO STUDIO GOLD HOUR GLASS NECKLACE, $30; PAN RING GREEN, $15; JCR MIXED BEADED BRACELETS (3), $18; LENORA DAME CRYSTAL TEAR DROP GOLD LEAF BRACELET, $45. NO REST FOR BRIDGET, LARGE PINK STONE RING, $10. CREAM TANK, STYLIST’S OWN. PEDRO: JACK WILLS, WADSWORTH CLASSIC SUNSHINE CRÈME OXFORD SHIRT, $69.50; BARBERRY SLIMFIT SAGE GREEN CHINO PANTS, $69.50. BELT, WATCH, STYLIST’S OWN.

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BOUTIQUE ST. THE HIGHS AND LOWS OF RUNNING A NEWBURY STREET BOUTIQUE OR CHAIN STORE BY ASHLI MOLINA

PHOTO BY AARON GOLDSTEIN

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE STORE ON NEWBURY? American Apparel?

Zara? Bobbles & Lace? LIT? Do you prefer shopping at chains that offer a big selection or boutiques that offer more unique items? Newbury Street is lined with hundreds of successful chain stores and local boutiques; however, both types of stores are on entirely different playing fields. Large chain stores often have the upper hand in facility, funds, price and clientele. While chain stores threaten boutiques in these areas, the chains lack the special flexibility, creativity and passion of boutiques that make loyal customers out of casual shoppers. Chain stores, such as Gap or Forever 21, answer to corporate overseers that limit an individual store’s ability to target its specific city, change the layout design and show specks of originality. Boutiques, on the other hand, have the freedom to make their own choices. “We aren’t corporately streamlined. We use our own digression as far as the visual appeal of our layout, our window and pretty much anything you can think of. Our staff unites to make decisions,” said Rachel Lubets, the marketing manager of Bobbles & Lace on Newbury Street. This major aspect of boutique business is a favorite among its employees. This complete freedom from corporate influence comes at a price, however. Boutiques do not have the monetary resources to embrace the freedom of picking and choosing designers or laying out the store. Lack of monetary support within boutiques seizes a deserved pleasure—space. “National chains have the funds to

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create a $4,000 store and have a beautiful layout, whereas we go into our small stores with a ton of clothes to present in a little place on a long strip of stores,” said Lisa Shah, the general manager of LIT Boutique. “It’s claustrophobic sometimes.” However, cut backs on a boutique’s already limited clothing selection for the sake of space will cause the loss of its Back Bay clientele, according to Shah. Boutiques cram as much clothing as possible into small spaces, making it difficult to cruise through the store. Where boutiques may feel claustrophobic, chain stores offer space, familiarity and consistency. “Our customers get the same vibe in all of our stores. We work with really awesome people to make a really awesome layout,” said Sarah Jenkins, the manager of Urban Outfitters on Newbury Street. According to American Apparel Assistant Manager Vlonksi Moreau, customers love the consistency tied to chain stores nationwide. He said an American Apparel customer expects the same clothes selection and layout in all stores. Management differences change customer-employee relationships. Absence of corporate command creates a personable atmosphere within the store and allows for closer relationships with customers. In chain stores employees are constantly busy with their rigid duties, whereas boutique employees have duties that are more relaxed and flexible. A boutique’s atmosphere may be friendly, but what happens when the two associates at a boutique are busy helping customers? Brand stores don’t have this issue, as chains

typically have a larger staff available to tend to customers. “In Zara we are too busy to fully pay attention to a single person. I scurry all over the store, so when I stop, I sometimes forget to be helpful and eager,” said a Newbury Street Zara employee who wishes to remain anonymous. “But we’re always there, you know? There’s so many of us!” The attitude of boutique associates is more direct, as some customers have noted. “When you want help at a chain, it’s so hard to get it. When an associate at a boutique helps me choose something, I feel so guilty if I don’t buy it. They put their hearts and souls into the sale,” Ghita Benslimane (COM ’15) said. That’s not to say that chain store employees are unfriendly. It’s about the numbers. Management trains chain employees to handle many customers throughout the day so that they know how to achieve quick and efficient customer service. The number of customers chain store employees help daily easily flies through the high hundreds while boutique employees see fewer than 500 customers on a good day. Newbury’s LIT Boutique welcomes around 200 customers on a strong day and as few as five customers on a bad day, according to Shah. Everything in retail management is intertwined. The crowds en masse are attracted to price and facility. Chain stores usually, depending on the brand’s nature, offer cheaper prices than boutiques. This is all made possible by the massive corporate staff and funding.

n i e Com

W

OPE


Boutiques offer original pieces not seen at chain stores but at prices that will leave you eating leftovers for a week. What a shopper buys will depend on his or her wish to either splurge on a few distinctive pieces or acquiesce to the more-often-thannot lackluster chain store treatment tied to cheaper prices. “When I don’t know what I want or when I’m just looking for something, I’ll go to chain stores. We’re in college and chains are cheaper. I’ll look inside a boutique if I’m planning to shop for a really special occasion,” Eddie Murphy (COM ’14) said. Whether it is on the customer’s end or on the corporate side, it is always about money. International and national brands have the financial support to promote their products, stores and prices so they attract larger crowds. Chain stores also can heavily advertise, which is a luxury many boutiques cannot afford. “Chain stores have scale, so they will certainly threaten a boutique that isn’t smart, strategic, creative and flexible,” said Christopher Cakebread, a BU advertising professor with experience in retail.

We’re

EN

Corporate overseers focus on what Professor Cakebread calls strategy, and it works well for large chains. Should boutiques be following in their footsteps? Several boutiques on Newbury Street, including Bobbles & Lace, LIT and Lou Lou, have not found the need to advertise in the traditional sense. Instead they resort to the modern “find us on (insert social media platform)” technique. A boutique should invest in a digital consultant who can create and maintain an interactive social branding program to build and maintain their customer base, according to Cakebread. But as that endeavor proves to be costly, boutique management often shies away from it. “The unfortunate situation is that a boutique will decry the expense of working with someone like that as it is too expensive. In this digital world it would be shortsighted to not build a professional campaign. That’s usually the way a chain will dominate,” Cakebread said. But boutiques “believe in the something special” they have and successfully live by word of mouth, according to Lubets. “We find more value in dealing with our

community. The owners are locals in Boston, and we are solely in Boston,” Shah said. To advertise, chain stores create seasonal catalogues, use traditional methods, launch video campaigns, put up billboards and partner up with other brands. In a time when advertising strategies are innovative and endless, chain stores use their resources to please customers. Urban Outfitters has even welcomed live bands into their stores and teamed up with Converse in the past for in-store events, according to Jenkins. “Our team loves to do really cool stuff in the store for our customers. We want them to always want to come back,” Jenkins said. So is independence and familiarity enough in store choice? Or is price and profit the real deal? “It’s interesting how retail works. I hated working in Forever 21 but being in a boutique is exciting and personable,” said Sarah Jane, the assistant manager of Lou Lou. Whether you are dealing with tight space, corporate moguls, monetary issues or liberty, both chain stores and boutiques have perks and pitfalls.

CHAIN STORES HAVE SCALE, SO THEY WILL CERTAINLY THREATEN A BOUTIQUE THAT ISN’T SMART, STRATEGIC, CREATIVE AND FLEXIBLE. THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 49


C ND M C UTURE RAISING AWARENESS FOR AIDS AND HIV BY SARAH WU

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA

CONDOM COUTURE. OUTFITS GALORE— MADE OUT OF CONDOMS. An event held annually by BU Face AIDS, Condom Couture is a fashion show where designers create outfits out of condoms and put their work on display to raise money. “Partnered with Partners in Health, BU Face AIDS is one of 80 chapters dedicated to championing the idea that health is a human right, and we work towards this goal by fundraising to support Partners In Health’s care for HIV-affected communities in Rwanda,” said Bronwyn Wada-Gill (CAS ’16), this year’s coordinator for Condom Couture and member of BU Face AIDS for two years. According to BU Face AIDS, the club’s goal is to lead “a student movement to fight HIV/AIDS through young leaders dedicated to global health equity and social justice.” In the past BU Face AIDS has held benefit concerts, Pumpkin Palooza and a World AIDS Week Awareness Campaign. The group won the BU Allocation Board’s AB Program of the Year award in 2013. Last year’s Condom Couture fashion show alone helped to raise $2,315, and members are hoping that even more money will be donated this year. Putting on last year’s show was a collaborative effort. According to Wada-Gill, it took the group four and a half months to plan the event. “It’s very time consuming, but the reward is incredible,” Wada-Gill said.

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From choosing the venue to putting the final product on the runway, a lot of planning goes into pulling off a successful show. Madeline Alexander (SAR ’15), vice president of BU Face AIDS, has been actively involved in helping plan this year’s event. “This year has been a little hectic because our entire e-board graduated last year,” Alexander said. Although finding a date and space that worked was a challenge, this year’s Condom Couture Fashion Show will be held on Friday, April 25, in the Metcalf Ballroom. Condom Couture is starting to become well known on campus. “Some people that I’ve told about it have actually heard about it before, so I think that’s the strangest part about the reactions I’ve gotten. Other than that, people were both confused and impressed,” said Emma Dwyer (SMG ’15) of last year’s winning team. The excitement and success of last year’s event add to the support for the upcoming show. Designers do not need any previous design experience and can come from all around BU. “We recruit designers from other student groups or even just groups of friends who are interested,” Alexander said. “Really anyone who wants to participate can.” Designers for this year’s show were given condoms five weeks ahead to start designing. Each team has a maximum of 1,000 condoms available to them.


“At the beginning of the year we ask local and national condom companies as well as other public heath organizations to donate condoms, preferably expired,” Alexander said. “This year we received condoms from Boston Public Heath Center, the BU Condom Fairy, Project Hope and IBI Synergy.” Designers are allowed to choose their own models to make the fitting process go smoothly. Creating a dress without fabric can be a real challenge, so it must be custom-made to the model’s body. Last year Dwyer’s team chose Catie Tobin (SAR ’15) to model. Dwyer created a hi-low gown made out of red and white condoms. “We wanted to go for a dramatic look, so we made the train as long as we could possibly make it,” Dwyer said. “Our main difficulties revolved around getting the dress to fit our model. It was tough working with condoms! We initially tried to sew the condoms onto the fabric we used but ended up using massive amounts of crazy glue to make the dress.” Tobin thought the bold bright red and the backless design put the dress over the top. “I’m amazed that the designers could pull that off when working with latex!” Tobin said. “[My dress was] pretty comfortable and fitting, although the straps were so thin that I was afraid it was going to come apart and fall off mid-show!” Dwyer said that being a participant in the show was “a wild, challenging, creative, entertaining experience.” This year’s designers will have a lot to live up to. “Last year we had some sexy looking dresses that had some Miami and Latin flare, elegant cocktail dresses that had long trains attached to them, patriotic dresses and there was even a guy that looked like he was a crazy scientist! Needless to say, I’m astounded by the range of creativity we saw that night,” Wada-Gill said. “I’ve never done a fashion show of any kind before! But I think I can safely say it’s different than most others because of the materials used and the cause,” Tobin said. “I’m a public health student, and I’ve

learned a lot through Face AIDS about international health efforts, so I would definitely say I’m passionate about raising funds and awareness for community health workers in Rwanda.” Alexander is excited for the changes that will come with this year’s event. “We are getting help from Off the Cuff this year, a new BU fashion student group. They are helping us with advertising and marketing, and getting brand reps and donations for raffle items through their connection with fashion companies,” Alexander said. All proceeds from Condom Couture will go to the Face AIDS Beyond Medicines Campaign and will support Partners in Health’s programs in rural Rwanda while simultaneously de-stigmatizing HIV, AIDS and other issues of sexual health and supporting the outrageously stylish designs of creative BU student groups.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 51


STREET

STYLE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA

NATE CRUZ // COM ‘14 INSTAGRAM: @CRUHZSHIPP

JENNA HAMBURGER // COM, SMG ‘14 INSTAGRAM: @JENNAWITHFRIES

MORGAN STEELE // COM ‘15 INSTAGRAM: @NALLSOFSTEELE

SWEATER & SHIRT: LACOSTE PANTS: NORDSTROM GLASSES: DOLCE & GABBANA WATCH: KENNETH COLE

NECKLACE: J. CREW SWEATER, JEANS & SHOES: MADEWELL WATCH: MICHAEL KORS SUNGLASSES: BETSEY JOHNSON

SHORTS: LILY PULITZER SWEATER: RALPH LAUREN FLATS: H&M SUNGLASSES: RAY-BAN

WHY WE LOVE HIS LOOK? BOLD COLOR COMBO

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WHY WE LOVE HER LOOK? GRAPHIC SWEATER

WHY WE LOVE HER LOOK? COLORFUL NAILS


FELINE GOOD BY KATE RADIN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA & JUNJIE ZENG

FOR MANY PARENTS, NAMING A NEW CHILD CAN BE A DAUNTING EXPERIENCE, but for Annie Yang (SMG ’13) and Matt Dwan (SMG ’14), the naming of their brainchild came organically. “We were on the way back from a fabric store, and what we liked was velvet,” Yang said, laughing a bit at the memory. “We were really excited about the fabric, joking around like friends with weird senses of humor do, and Matt just goes, ‘What if we call it pussy?’”

Velvet Pussy, to be exact. It’s the name of a clothing line made for the “intelligent, sexy woman who doesn’t take herself too seriously but oozes confidence and strength,” according to Dwan. “I had been joking!” Dwan said. “She didn’t take it as a joke though, so I just said why not. That’s what we wanted it to be about, anyway.” With satin skirts, organza overlays, beaded bras and, of course, velvet, the line captured the attention and hearts of

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 53


all those attending the Fashion and Retail Association of Boston University (FAB) fall fashion show “Glow: A night of fluorescent fashion.” Yang and Dwan produced a seemingly dark palette, drawing on different shades of black, only accenting in silvery and gold hues, and accessorizing with headpieces, necklaces, whips and a whole lot of leg. It is however, the construction of the line that is most amazing. “We actually made the collection in three days, including spending two straight days sewing,” Yang said. “We were kind of just matching up ideas that we found aesthetically pleasing together. We hadn’t really officially designed before. It was unreal.” Unreal is right, especially for Dwan, who had never used a sewing machine before that two-day rush. “For as long as I can remember, I’ve been interested in fashion and design,” Dwan said. “I would flip over paper menus at restaurants and draw dresses on the back. I just loved design.” Despite his obvious love for fashion, Dwan claims he “kind of set fashion aside as a dream,” mostly due to some of the stereotyping that comes with the idea of fashion. “I always hesitate to say [fashion] is a passion of mine because people attach a stereotype to me,” Dwan said. “But I’m just not like that; it’s more than that. When I say like ‘Oh, I’m studying business, but I want to go in to fashion just like every other gay boy in the world,’ people misjudge my motives for going in to fashion.” Dwan came to BU knowing there wasn’t a fashion program but still couldn’t help feeling like he was missing out. “The closest thing they had to any sort of fashion program were costume design sewing classes in CFA, which weren’t even open to me since I’m in SMG,” he said.

Other BU students have noticed this gap in the university programming. “I transferred to BU this fall from Los Angeles and, as a new student to the university, was looking for ways to get involved,” said Jenna Reese (SMG ’16). “By not having a strong, structured fashion program, BU makes it the students’ responsibility to create one. In doing so fashion becomes much more accessible to everyone and allows anyone to test out their abilities within the industry,” Reese said. Sarah Manning (SMG ’16), a student who also modeled for Yang and Dwan, agreed. “I think [the lack of a fashion program] makes the fashion organizations that we do have stronger because they have to make their own rules and pave their own path because people haven’t done it at BU before,” Manning said. Yang and Dwan spent the first part of last semester brainstorming, sketching and collaborating, throwing around words that they sought inspiration from such as “dark,” “sexy” and “strong.” The official description of the line includes words such as “nebulous,” “opulent,” “aphotic,” “tenebrous” and “precocious.” Dwan explains that he just wanted people to look at it and be confused by it. “It was about the particular kind of woman we had in mind,” Dwan said. “Annie is better at describing things. She had a better vision, but it was about a woman who is strong, often fearing she is standing on the edge, just about to crack at some times in her life, but able to get over them, to walk on with confidence and humor.” Yang credits the success of how well received the line was to the chaotic nature of how the line came together. “The last two days before the show were just a rush,” Yang said. “We each designed three pieces, and then that last piece we

WE WERE KIND OF JUST MATCHING UP IDEAS THAT WE FOUND AESTHETICALLY PLEASING TOGETHER. WE HADN’T REALLY OFFICIALLY DESIGNED BEFORE—IT WAS UNREAL. 54


THE VELVET PUSSY MAY SHINE ON THE CATWALK, BUT COMES TO LIFE BEHIND THE SCENES. designed together, sleep deprived,” said Yang. “It was a train wreck,” Dwan said. “But a beautiful train wreck. We had a decoupage mannequin and a crappy sewing machine, and we were just throwing things together—it was so hectic. It was horrible, but it was so fun—so funny—and very emotionally taxing. If it was a random person, I would’ve wanted to stab her; but it was Annie, and it worked.” “It was edgy but not too edgy,” said Michael Vonnoh (COM ’17), a student who attended the show with several friends out of curiosity. “The pieces could be pulled off without looking ridiculous.” The artistic vision did not go without effort the day of the show, but Dwan claims the models are what brought the collection alive. Dwan and Yang didn’t specify how the models were to pose. “We just said to have as much fun as you can. Do the craziest thing you can think of and literally just have fun,” Dwan said. “It’s about them, too. I don’t like the perception of them being hangers. They deserve to be a part of the fun.” If fun was the goal, they certainly reached it. Months after the show Yang still laughed thinking about Reese’s look, reminiscing on one very important accessory. “I remember that outfit because of the whip,” Yang said. The whip was a prop from Halloween that a drunk girl left in Dwan’s apartment. “We were brainstorming and trying to figure out what she could do with that whip. But it worked out,” she said. “It worked out” seems to be a running theme of this fashion duo, and everything has certainly all worked out in their favor thus far.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 55


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MY LIFE IN NEW ZEALAND BY JESSICA BACCHI

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA BACCHI

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 57

TRAVEL

G N I H S U P T H E L I M I T:


WHAT ARE YOU TWO GIRLS LOOKING TO DO TODAY? “What are you two girls looking to do today?” asked the booking agent working the Bay of Islands tour desk. My friend Rachel Lustbader (SAR ’15) and I looked at each other and with nervous voices responded, “Skydiving?” I was disappointed at his lack of admiration. “Skydiving for two. All right. I’ll give you a ring with the details after I talk to the company,” he said. You would think we deserved more of a reaction for something as extreme as jumping out of a plane. New Zealanders have a reputation of athleticism and risk-taking, so I suppose skydiving is just another day on the island. We hopped into a mini-limousine covered in skydiving decals and enjoyed a fifteen minute ride from historic Russel— formerly known as Kororāreka—to the jump site. Up-and-coming New Zealand artists played on the radio as I stared at the clear skies, anxiously imagining my future amongst the clouds. We arrived, signed away our lives, watched a two-minute safety video and put on our jumpsuits. Go time. Walking toward the plane, reality sank in. I kept looking from the plane to Rachel and back, feeling excited but painfully

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nervous at the same time. The plane was small—only a few meters long—and had a plastic-looking door that slid up and down for the jump. There were two benches; Rachel took one and I the other, and we were off. Altitude-gauging watches on our guides’ wrists measured our ascent, and as we surpassed the clouds, my guide Ryan tapped his altimeter and looked at me. “Halfway there already,” he said. Halfway there? By this time I had clearly breached the no-refund point, but the thought of backing out definitely crossed my mind. I used to think it was cool to fly through clouds commercially, but now I was looking down at them in a dingy little plane. From the halfway point, things escalated. Ryan helped me put on my protective hat and goggles and snapped his harness to mine. We reviewed the initial jump technique, and before I could take a moment to conceptualize what I was about to do, the sliding door disappeared. My mind was racing, but I could barely hear my thoughts over the roar of the plane and the wind. Ryan started scooting toward the door, and because I was already strapped to him, I was heading there, too. He sat on the edge of the plane comfortably; I was hovering over him in the air. Lifting up his arm he pointed a GoPro camera at us. “Smile for the camera!” he exclaimed. I’m not sure if you can call the face I made a smile. My teeth were clenched, my eyes were wide and my hat and goggles certainly didn’t help my cause. It seemed like I was faking a smile and waiting for the descent for an eternity, but suddenly, I was free falling. I thought Ryan’s proposition to backflip out of the plane was sarcasm, but in the first few seconds I realized it was not a joke. After the terror of falling back-first into the sky, the experience was breathtaking. I had a view of the entire Bay of Islands, an area on the northern tip of the North Island with bright blue water and dozens of lush islands. Ryan kept pointing out various spots and telling me what they were, but his tips were drowned out by my adrenaline and constant stream of over-excited yelling. The 70-second drop

ended with a parachute-guided glide over the landscape. After we landed, I couldn’t stop laughing—I felt shocked and happy at the same time. That may have been the biggest risk that I will ever take in my life, and I definitely ticked a box off my bucket list that day. As my breathing returned to a slower rate and I changed into my normal clothes, Ryan was preparing for another jump. Watching him orient a new customer and repack his parachute, I started to think. After just over one month, New Zealand has become more than just a place to study and work. It is a source of inspiration to better myself and take chances. Aside from skydiving, I have experienced other firsts on the North Island. On the way to the Bay of Islands, a few of my friends and I stopped at oceanfront sand dunes for some sandboarding. We were advised to stick to riding head first down the slopes, but as it turns out, trying to surf on the boogie boards was more rewarding after repeatedly climbing up hills of sand in the summer sun. The curves of the hill led us straight to the ocean, which meant that each sandy journey ended in the cool water. It was a risk to stand on the boards during the descent; it resulted in some injuries and seriously sandy faceplants. Regardless, when we finished, we left wanting more. The weekend after the Bay of Islands I went on a camping surf trip through my roommate Jessie Mooney’s (SHA ’15) internship. Her internship includes driving to the beautiful west coast of the North Island to catch waves almost every day. A few of us were lucky enough to join Jessie on a weekend getaway to Te Arai Point, a secret surf spot her boss showed us. As a Californian, my friends were surprised I had never even touched a surfboard before. That weekend I found out there may be a reason for that, as I am certainly not a natural on the waves, but that didn’t stop me from having fun. We spent the mornings watching the sunrise, the days catching the surf and the nights relaxing around a bonfire. Gayle Miner (CAS ’15), an


aspiring yoga instructor, led us through presurf yoga flows. To me, the weekend was not only about improving our surfing skills, but about once again getting in touch with myself and the island. As amazing as they were, my travels to the Bay of Islands and Te Arai Point were just a warm-up for my South Island road trip. The moment we got out of our summer finals, Rachel, Mike Phillips (SAR ’15), Luke Adkins (University of San Francisco ’15) and I hopped in a 16-year-old Toyota Camry and hit the road. We drove almost ten hours south to Wellington, New Zealand’s capital, to take a ferry into Picton, a small town on the tip of the South Island. From there, we drove along the West Coast to hike amongst glaciers, fjords, bright blue lakes, mysteriously formed pancake rocks and breathtaking snow-capped mountains. Since we were in the film destination for most of the Lord of the Rings movies, I came into the trip with high expectations. Looking at the landscape out the window of Cameron—the name we gave the battered-down Camry—surpassed my expectations. We drove through mountains so large I had to crane my neck out the window just to see the top of them. As we zoomed through field after field of sheep, I finally believed the statistic that there are seven sheep to every citizen in New Zealand. I had already fallen in love with the country from my North Island experiences, but after visiting the South Island and earning the views with some rigorous hikes, my love grew deeper. Whether it be sandboarding, surfing, hiking or even skydiving, the natural beauty of this country convinces me to try new things and explore my interests. Getting outdoors is part of New Zealand’s national identity, and if some people can jump out of a plane a dozen times a day, I have no excuse not to push my limits.

NEW ZEALAND HAS BECOME MORE THAN

JUST A PLACE TO STUDY AND WORK. IT IS A SOURCE OF INSPIRATION TO BETTER MYSELF AND TAKE CHANCES.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 59


TO TRUST A STRANGER HOW TO TRAVEL FOR FREE BY BELIEVING IN TRUST BY SEBASTIAN SCHOLL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEBASTIAN SCHOLL

How much do you trust complete strangers? Would you trust strangers with your money, health or safety? Most would say no; however, people constantly trust strangers without even thinking about it. Strangers run your bank, and you trust them to protect your money. Strangers make your medication, and you trust them to make it properly. Strangers ensure your safety, and you trust them to respond to your emergency phone calls. Although you may be wary of strangers, if you really think about it, strangers help you maintain the life you live. Most of you have probably heard of Couchsurfing.org—a site that connects travelers with people who have a room or couch to spare—but few of you have likely

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tried it. Many people are reluctant to sleep on the couch of a person they met on the Internet because they are hesitant to trust someone they don’t know. Personally, I believe that Couchsurfing is the best way to travel on a budget, so I decided to make the leap and trust a stranger by Couchsurfing on a trip to Sweden last semester. After an unsuccessful brainstorming session on how to spend my six-day fall break that had just began, I decided to let the airlines decide for me. I went onto Skyscanner and entered “Departing from: London; Destination: Everywhere.” A long list of flights began to load in order from least to most expensive. At the very top of the search results was a $32 flight to Gothenburg, Sweden. It was 12:30 a.m. and I had just booked a ticket to Gothenburg, which departed in six hours. I had never been to Gothenburg, nor did I have a clue where I was going to stay. The only thing I did know was that in less than ten hours I would be there, so I decided that figuring out accommodations for the trip would probably be the best use of my time. I soon learned there were only two hostels in the city, and they were too expensive for my budget, and the hotels were triple those


costs. After visiting all of the last minute deal websites I knew, I realized that it was time to think outside the box. So, I did. I decided to turn to Couchsurfing.org. The site is an international community that connects travelers to hosts in every country on earth. Whether you are traveling and need a place to stay, are at home and have a free couch, or are simply looking for someone new to hang out with, Couchsurfing may be right for you. The site creates a network of people willing to share in profound and meaningful ways, which makes travel a truly social and unique experience. So I logged onto the site, searched Gothenburg and posted the following message: “Hey! I just spontaneously booked a ticket to Gothenburg and need a place to stay tomorrow night. Please message me if you can help! Thanks–Sebastian.” By 3:30 a.m. a man named Alex had replied saying that he would happily host me and to message him once I landed. It was that easy. For the next two days I not only had a couch to sleep on, but a friend to hang out with. He showed me the city and trusted me in his home. And he did it for one reason: “I like to help people travel.” If you accept the idea that almost anything you do is fundamentally a relationship of trust with strangers, you may be comfortable with the idea of sleeping on a stranger’s couch. You have to trust your own judgment and be brave enough to push your comfort zone. Of course there are dangerous people out there, but what is the likelihood that they are the ones opening their doors to strangers? You are as much a stranger to others as others are strangers to you. If you decide that this mutual risk is right for you, consider joining the Couchsurfing community—if you do, over six million free accommodations in 100,000 cities worldwide will be within your reach.

I DECIDED TO LET THE AIRLINES DECIDE FOR ME. I WENT ONTO SKYSCANNER AND ENTERED ‘DEPARTING FROM: LONDON; DESTINATION: EVERYWHERE.’

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 61


A SKYLINE OF CRANES THE REBIRTH OF BERLIN

THE EIFFEL TOWER, LEANING TOWER OF PISA, PALACE OF VERSAILLES, BIG BEN.

The list of European tourist attractions goes on and on. While studying abroad, I had high expectations when visiting some of the world’s most popular landmarks, but usually my expectations fell short. Hunger, the weather, sleepless nights and hangovers always left me cold, sick and irritable during days I went sightseeing. Sites became only significant for the picture I took in front of them. When I traveled to Berlin, Germany, I thought that the Brandenburg Gate and Berlin Wall were just going to be items checked off my list of places to see. Instead I immediately felt the emotional impact of the landmarks, as they serve not only as a reminder of how horrible the human race can be, but also how capable humans are of doing good. Of the dozens of cities I traveled to when studying abroad, the Berlin Wall is probably the only landmark that lived up to my expectations. Between high school lessons on WWII, the Cold War and Germany’s current economy, I have learned my fair share of German history. My father lived in Stuttgart, Germany, during the ’70s so perhaps more than others I have always had an interest in European history during the Cold War era. It was fascinating to see this once arguably struggling city acknowledge a recovery to its previous glory. There really was an apparent cultural struggle between modernism and the country’s past, which was visible in the city’s construction and people.

As part of a seven country, eleven-city tour in my final two weeks abroad, Berlin was my second to last stop. For such a massive city, Berlin was missing one thing: a skyline. Besides the Television Tower, Berlin’s other major landmark is a copper washed cathedral and city gate. In attempts to identify the city’s Northern Stars, I noticed only one thing—cranes. Boasting one of Europe’s most bustling economies, Berlin has officially begun its rebirth. After being almost completely destroyed and losing most of its history to fascist and then socialist regimes, Berlin has the unique advantage of developing its own identity. You can still see a vague division where the city was once separated into East and West. The West was controlled by Allied forces (US, England and France) while the East remained under Soviet control. I was staying a few blocks from the old barrier on the east side next to a farmer’s market and an old train station now turned EDM club. Thirty years ago this would have been socialist Germany, where citizens on this side of the wall as of August 13, 1961, were permanently stuck until its collapse in 1989. It is hard to imagine these social hardships were only destroyed two to three years before most of our generation was born. It is even crazier to imagine how much the country has changed and succeeded in the 24 years since German re-unification. The Deutshe Demokratische Republik Museum in East Germany was first on my to-see list in Berlin. The museum is dedicated

to the social aspects of everyday life and the differences between life in East and West Berlin. This was a great place to start and get a sense of what life was like on “the other side.” Throughout the city there is a bronze path, much like the Freedom Trail, that marks where the Wall once stood—remnants of the wall remain next to restaurants and shops, most covered in gum (a weird symbol of remembrance). Situated at the center of Berlin, an entire stretch of the wall remains near the new 02 World Arena. After the fall of the Wall, hundreds of artists gathered to paint murals on the east side of the Wall, which was formerly untouchable. The murals honor the turmoil and agony of those trapped on the Soviet side. Near the gallery was a compound-like area where an Occupy Boston-esque “town” called Yaam had been established along the banks of the river. Peering in you could see bonfires, a bar and a pickup kickball game with people who lived in this village. Next to this compound were a touristy restaurant and the famous look out tower—Checkpoint Charlie. Here remnants of the original lookout tower remain, and visitors can purchase their very own piece of the Berlin Wall (yes, I fell into that tourist trap). The remnant sits on my desk to remind me of what our world could have been not too long ago and the only time I felt a real connection with a city I had never called home.

BY ASHLEY ROSSI

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ASHLEY ROSSI


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THE BEST OF BERLIN

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1. Curriculum Vitae by Susanne Kunjappu-Jellinek: A black and gray background with each year listed the wall was in operation with roses around the year to indicate how many people died trying to climb to the other side. 2. New York-Berlin-Tokyo by Gerhard Lahr 3. Dawn of Peace by Salvatore de Fazio 4. Ohne Titel by Muriel Raax and Kani Alavil: Meaning “Many small people who in many small places do many small things that can alter the face of the world.” —Afrikanische Weisheit 5. Ohne Titel by Thierry Noir: Noir is one of the revolutionary painters of the Wall. He started painting the Wall in 1984, and his murals have become the symbol for freedom in Europe. Many of the pieces he has painted serve as international symbols of hope.

COFFEE SHOP: GOD SHOT, IMMANUELKIRCHSTRASSE 32 GODSHOT.DE SHOPPING NEIGHBORHOOD: NEU SCHONHAUSER, SPANDAU, SCHLOSSSTRASSE VINTAGE STORE: DAS NEUE SCHWARZ, MULACKSTRASSE 38 DASNEUESCHWARZ.DE HOTEL: THE WEINMEISTER, WEINMESITERSTRASSE 2 THE-WEINSMEISTER.COM

GALLERY: URBAN SPREE, REVALER STRASSE 9 URBANSPREE.COM  MUSEUM: BODE MUSEUM, AM KUPFERGRABEN SMB.MUSEUM  BAR: WEEKEND ROOFTOP, ALEXANDERPLATZ 7 WEEK-END-BERLIN.DE CLUB: POSTBAHNOF, STRASSE DER PARISER KOMMUNE 8 POSTBAHNOF.DE

RESTAURANT: CHIPPS, JAGERSTRASSE 35 CHIPPS.DE

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 63


HOSTEL HORROR STORIES

1

ILLUSTRATIONS BY AMBER HUFF & CASSIDY EARLY

AUSTRALIA

During spring break in Australia, we went to Cairns and the Great Barrier Reef. After a couple of days at our hostel, I noticed little red bumps on my stomach. My friends noticed bumps on their bodies, too, and we all started to panic. Turns out our hostel had bed bugs. One of the girls in our group was so upset she called her mom crying, but that might have been overkill. When we got back to the dorms in Sydney, we had to strip down in the laundry room and throw everything in the hot washer. Then we had to put our suitcases up on the deck to bake in the sun. I’m not sure I’ll ever be able to sleep in a hostel bed again.

THE NETHERLANDS

I was staying in a hostel in Amsterdam, and we got back from adventuring around 10 p.m. We had checked in to the hostel that morning, but we didn’t put our bags in the room. When we returned that night, our room still wasn’t even ready. It turns out that the people in there before us had taken a bunch of mushrooms and puked everywhere. But the hostel had to upgrade us to a different room, so I guess it wasn’t so bad.

3

SCOTLAND

In Edinburgh, Scotland, my friends and I decided to stay at a hostel to save money. A couple of my friends had never stayed at a hostel before and were nervous, but I assured them it was just like a hotel. When we arrived, the walls were neon pink and green. Our room also had a giant—and very creepy— picture of a donkey wearing sunglasses on the wall to remind us to be quiet at night. That night we kept hearing weird noises, and the light in the window across from ours kept switching on and off. The next day someone told us the hostel was believed to be haunted. I don’t believe in ghosts, but I had a hard time sleeping the rest of our time there.

ITALY

With heavy, Euro-trip backpacks in pouring rain, my friend and I arrived in Venice to find that the hostel we booked online didn’t exist. We spent the night in a converted kitchen on cots with an elderly Swedish lady named Karen, who had come to see glassmaking and was swindled instead. The next morning we ate leftover Digestive cookies for breakfast and made our way to confront the Italian con man. To this day we curse Guiseppe Picaro, the tatted body-builder. If it weren’t for my friend’s persistent mother that waged a war on Booking.com, he would have made away with 600 euro and a small victory.

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CZECH REPUBLIC

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I had been staying at a hostel in Prague with no problems when one night I woke up to hear a voice over the loud speaker saying something in Czech. Then an alarm started going off, so my friends and I quickly left the room. As we were evacuating, a guy who was still drunk started yelling that the building was on fire. We were starting to freak out but made it out of the building safely. It wasn’t until we were outside in our pajamas that we found out the announcement was saying that a technical problem was causing to alarm to go off and there was no fire.


FOOD

:

BEHIND

THE BAR

A LOOK INTO THE LIVES OF THE BARTENDERS AT BOSTON’S HOT SPOTS BY STEPHANIE SMITH

ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY ALYSSA LANGER PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA

WITH OVER 50 COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES THROUGHOUT THE BOSTON AREA, THE CITY IS HOME TO A PLETHORA OF YOUNG ADULTS THAT PROVIDE BOSTON’S TOP BARS AND RESTAURANTS WITH TALL ORDERS TO FILL. THESE THIRSTY STUDENTS FLOCK TO THE HIPPEST PLACES IN SEARCH OF THE NEWEST DRINK AND THE FRIENDLIEST STAFF. SINCE BU STUDENTS AND ALUMNI MAKE UP A LARGE PERCENTAGE OF THIS POPULATION, SOME OF BOSTON’S MOST WELL-KNOWN RESTAURANTS AND BARS HAVE BECOME TERRIER FAVORITES. BUT WHO ARE THOSE INDIVIDUALS BEHIND THE BAR CHATTING WITH YOU WHILE MIXING YOUR FAVORITE BEVERAGES? WE HAD THE CHANCE TO SIT DOWN WITH ELIZABETH ROMANO FROM WHITE HORSE TAVERN, MARCELINO HERNANDEZ FROM CAFETERIA, GEORGE GODDARD FROM SUNSET CANTINA AND LISA BURGOYNE FROM T’S PUB TO HEAR WHAT IT’S LIKE BEHIND THE BAR AT A FEW OF BU’S FAVORITE SPOTS AROUND THE CITY.


WHITE HORSE TAVERN, ELIZABETH ROMANO Elizabeth has been bartending at White Horse for 3 years.

MOST POPULAR DRINK: We make the Allston Iced Tea, which is our version of the Long Island Iced Tea. We only had it on the menu for a year or so, but now people just order it themselves, which is cool. It’s different than a normal Long Island: It has Bacardi Limón, Tanqueray, Firefly, which is a sweet tea vodka, sour mix and a splash of Coke. WHAT’S DIFFERENT ABOUT WHITE HORSE: We’ve got a DJ on the weekends so there’s dancing, but we’ve also got the side bar, which is a little bit more low-key. We have pool. So if you don’t feel like raging over here, you can just chill. TYPICAL CLIENTELE: During the weekends it’s definitely mostly college students—we see mostly BC and BU kids. But, during the summer we have a totally different crowd. A lot of the locals come out of the woodwork because the students are gone. BUSIEST TIMES: Since Joshua Tree closed, Thursdays is our busiest night. I think BC kids were going to J-Tree, so when they closed, they just started coming to us, which is great. Otherwise, Friday and Saturday are equally as busy. ON BARTENDING: When I started, learning what’s in every drink and the pricing was the most difficult. It takes a lot of getting used to. I think to be able to mix drinks and make something up on the fly can be challenging—if you don’t know what’s in it, you just have to make it up. OUTSIDE THE BAR: I went to school for graphic design, so I’ve done a couple of jobs here and there, and I used to do posters for White Horse. I kind of got sucked in here for longer than I was expecting, though. I’m not a “lifer” by any means. But I see myself sticking around behind the bar for a little longer.

TEA ALLSTON ICED

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CAFETERIA, MARCELINO HERNANDEZ Marcelino has been bartending for 9 years.

MOST POPULAR DRINK: The top three are the Lunch Lady, which is a mojito-style drink; the Timeout, which is a gin martini; and the Cafeteria Cosmo, made with homemade pineapple-infused vodka. My favorite is definitely the Timeout, but everything we make is delicious. BUSIEST TIMES: In the summer, it’s pretty chaotic—especially during brunch. We open at 9 a.m. and already there will be a line out the door to the corner of the street. It’s easier to handle this bar because it’s smaller, but there’s usually only me and maybe a bar back. Things can get crazy when I have to serve up to 50 people inside and 90 people on the patio in addition to the bar. You just have to have a lot of speed.” ON BARTENDING: Anybody can make a cranberry and vodka, but not everybody can make a good Negroni. There are definitely bartenders that have amazing skills when it comes to craft bartending. BEST BARTENDING STORY: One time I did have an angry customer who didn’t agree with the pricing, which I don’t have control of. He threw the checkbook in my face [and] threatened to kill me. It became a scene pretty quickly. That was crazy. OUTSIDE THE BAR: I’m a big animal rights person, so I volunteer at shelters and do dog training. Besides that, [the] beach and traveling are my things. I try to go back to Puerto Rico as often as I can.

LUNCH LADY

THE BUZZ | WINTER 2013 | 67 THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 67


SUNSET CANTINA, GEORGE GODDARD George has been bartending for 7.5 years.

MOST POPULAR DRINK: Margaritas are definitely the biggest seller on the menu. The most popular is still the Cantina Classic. There’s one margarita on the menu that I hadn’t seen before coming here; it’s the lime and coconut margarita. It may sound crazy, but it’s super good. WHAT’S DIFFERENT ABOUT SUNSET: We’re also in such a great location, so our crowds can get a lot crazier than a lot of other places around here. There’s Agganis Arena across the street. We have Paradise [and] Fenway down the street and then a lot of people from Brookline come through this way. SUNSET CANTINA VS. SUNSET GRILL AND TAP: I’d say the biggest difference between the locations is the time that we each get busy. Here we get a lot of business people and students during the day. They get a little more of a late night crowd. ON BARTENDING: We don’t really do the whole craft cocktail thing. We make up for that in our beer selection. We spend a lot of time talking about different beer styles, breweries and regions where they come from. That, in some ways, I think [is] our “craft cocktail.” BEST BARTENDING STORY: THere’s a lot of unusual things that happen when people consume a fair amount of alcohol. For a while though, our favorite story was about a student that came in on his 21st birthday and drank a lot. On his way out, his pants became unbuckled and just slid down to his ankles. He just didn’t care. And for the rest of his time at BU, whenever he’d come in he was “the guy without the pants.” [He] didn’t have a name, just “no pants.” OUTSIDE THE BAR: Well these days, I do homework and I like to sleep. I’m back at BU for computer science. But when I’m not working, sleeping or doing homework, [and] if I have the time and money, I like to go out and eat and drink.

COCO NU MARG T & LIME ARITA

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T’S PUB, LISA BURGOYNE Lisa has been bartending for 28 years.

MOST POPULAR DRINK: The Tag Team, which is a concoction of whiskey, peach vodka, peach schnapps, cranberry juice, orange juice and a lime wedge. It was created by a BU student—a swimmer—about five years ago. It originally was called the It Takes Two. WHAT’S DIFFERENT ABOUT T’S: I think it’s a very welcoming place where you can feel comfortable coming in alone and you always know somebody here. It’s also supposedly one of few places to do karaoke, which used to be on Wednesdays actually. It got really popular, so for a while we had karaoke on both Tuesday and Wednesday nights, and then for the last 10-15 years it’s been just on Tuesdays. Tuesdays are a busier night for us. Also, we get busier when there are games or concerts at Agganis or Paradise. ON BARTENDING: I love it. It’s a lot of dealing with people; it’s all customer service. If you respect your customer, they respect you. It’s a two-way street. BEST BARTENDING STORY: What happens here stays here; everyone has fun and that’s what you want. There are always interesting souls who stroll through. OUTSIDE THE BAR: I have three kids at home: a 12-year-old daughter and 9-year-old twins, one boy and one girl. So I am usually running around to their activities. I also like playing basketball.

TAG TEAM

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 69


JUICE IT IT UP UP JUICE BOSTON’S BEST

BY ELISHA MACHADO

JUICE BARS

PHOTO BY SAM DUTRA

With summer just around the corner, now is the perfect time to start daydreaming about fun ways to beat the heat. A refreshing juice drink that’s just as healthy as it is delicious is the perfect addition to any hot summer day. Whether you are into the juicing trend or just craving a tasty beverage, these juice recipes are sure to sweeten up your summer. Simply add the ingredients listed below into a juicer and enjoy. For those without a juicer, simply chop up the ingredients and use a blender. Once fully blended, pour the mixture through a mesh strainer and voilà—a delicious, quick and easy creation.

ROOT 487 CAMBRIDGE ST., ALLSTON HOURS: MON.–FRI. 11 A.M.–10 P.M., SAT.–SUN. 9:30 A.M.–10 P.M. LIFE ALIVE 765 MASS. AVE., CAMBRIDGE HOURS: MON.–SAT. 8 A.M.–10 P.M., SUN. 11 A.M.–7 P.M.

SUMMER BLAST

PARADISE ISLAND COOLER

• 2 Gala apples

• 1 medium tangerine

THE FIVE SEVENTY MARKET 570 TREMONT ST., BOSTON

• 1 handful fresh blackberries

• 4 leaves of kale

HOURS: MON.–FRI. 6 A.M.–10 P.M., SAT.–SUN. 7 A.M.–10 P.M.

• 1 handful fresh raspberries

• 1 cup pineapple chunks

• 1 handful fresh strawberries

• 1 cup mango chunks

JUGOS 145 DARTMOUTH ST., BOSTON

• 1/2 banana

• Splash of orange juice

BERRY BEET ENERGIZER

ORANGE DELIGHT

HOURS: MON.–FRI. 6:30 A.M.–7:30 P.M., SAT. 8:30 A.M.–6:30 P.M., SUN. 9:30 A.M.–4 P.M.

GREEN CITRUS REFRESHER

• 3 small beets

• 2 small oranges, including rind, seeded and cut into pieces

• 2 sliced pears

• 1 spliced mango

• 2 peeled lemons

• 8 ounces blueberries

• 2 chopped carrots

• 1 peeled clementine

• 1/2 cup apple juice

• 1/2 lemon squeezed into juice

• 2 peeled Golden Delicious apples

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• 1 cup fresh kale leaves


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THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 71


GOING FREE gluten

BY HANNAH WEINTRAUB PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA

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To eat or not to wheat, that is the question. Eating gluten-free—a dietary restriction for people with celiac disease—has become a mainstream weight loss fad. It seems you can’t go to a dinner without a couple of your friends mentioning that they are glutenfree. However, the gluten-free trend is not a healthier or safer dieting option. One out of every 133 people is diagnosed with celiac disease. The disease affects at least 3 million Americans according to the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center. According to registered dietitian and Boston University nutrition professor Joan Salge Blake, if you are not diagnosed with celiac disease but are simply trying the diet to lose weight, you may be wasting your time. “There is no data to suggest that by cutting out gluten from your diet, you are going to be able to lose weight,” Salge Blake said. Salge Blake noted that a major problem with the gluten-free diet is that when you cut out gluten, you may eliminate important nutrients that may not get replenished by other foods. You may even end up adding more calories to your diet. “Gluten is found in many wheat based products, so if you cut out gluten, you start to cut out a whole group of food such as bread, cereals and grains,” Salge Blake said. “Now there are whole lines of gluten-free food— gluten-free bread, gluten-free cookies—and these products are not necessarily lower in calories than their gluten equivalent; in fact sometimes they are higher. Swapping out a gluten cookie for a gluten-free cookie may actually add more calories to your plate.” So why is this trend making its way through friend circles and celebrity diets? An increase in ‘gluten-intolerant’ cases, diagnosed as non-celiac gluten sensitivity, has caused an increase in the practice of cutting out gluten. This happened to Alayna Eberhart, a recent Boston University graduate who

was just diagnosed with gluten intolerance. Eberhart didn’t feel well after almost every meal she ate last summer, so she went to the doctor to figure out why. “After a few trips to the gastroenterologist at Boston Medical, the doctor suggested trying gluten-free for six weeks,” Eberhart said. Those six weeks cycled into months. After her doctor diagnosed her as gluten intolerant, Eberhart now lives a full glutenfree lifestyle. “Basically my body reacts the same way a celiac person would to gluten, but [the gluten] doesn’t actually damage my organs like it would for those allergic,” Eberhart said. When she saw positive changes, such as a ten-pound weight loss, increased energy, clearer skin and no bloating, Eberhart was told by her doctor that she is part of the small percent of the population that doesn’t suffer from celiac disease but needs to maintain a gluten-free lifestyle. “My mind is clearer, and I feel more energized.” Eberhart said after she changed her diet. “I ran my first 5K a few months into the diet and felt like I could keep running. I had so much energy compared to before; when I would run two miles, it felt like I had weights on my feet and around my chest.” Positive results can sway others to adapt this lifestyle even though some doctors strongly oppose doing so. Dr. Oz, a surgeon and TV sensation, went on Late Night with Seth Meyers and said the gluten-free diet “is complete BS” and a “scam.” However, doctors are still recommending it for intolerance cases. Erica Jaskol (SAR ’16) tried going gluten-free because she began to have a series of digestion problems, and she felt she needed to make a change in her diet. “I kept getting really sick, and it seemed like every time it was after I ate big meals with a lot of bread products or gluten in them,” Jaskol said. While Jaskol said she thought about going gluten-free, she waited to talk to a doctor before making any drastic changes

to her eating habits. After her doctor recommended she stay away from gluten, Jaskol decided to give the diet a try for six months. “I never wanted to try it just to for the sake of trying it though,” Jaskol said. “I only was motivated to feel better.” While Jaskol and Eberhart remain optimistic, this diet does come with a strict lifestyle, and both said they struggle to maintain gluten-free while dining out. “Restaurants that are [creating glutenfree menus] should be providing foods that are truly gluten-free,” Salge Blake said. “I know the restaurant industry has been working hard to help train chefs about this condition and on how to make food gluten-free.” For many who are celiac or glutenintolerant, taking the risk that these items are in fact 100 percent gluten-free might not be worth it. “You just don’t really know what items have gluten in them, such as salad dressings made with flour,” Jaskol said. She resorts to mostly making rice and quinoa dishes at home, although gluten-free supermarket products can have lofty prices. A box of gluten-free Schär pasta at Star Market can cost almost five dollars, while a regular box of Barilla is only half that cost. For other celiac or gluten-intolerant restaurant lovers, Eberhart said, “Some of my favorite restaurants in Boston now have gluten-free options such as Flour, Zaftigs, Otto, Stone Hearth Pizza and Sunset Cantina—their nachos are gluten free!”

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 73


BU FOOD TRUCKS

BY ALYSSA LANGER

ILLUSTRATIONS BY AMBER HUFF

MONDAY

TUESDAY

BU EAST

BU EAST

(COMMONWEALTH AVENUE BY MORSE)

(COMMONWEALTH AVENUE BY MORSE )

BU CENTRAL

BU CENTRAL

(SAINT MARY’S STREET)

(SAINT MARY’S STREET)

LUNCH: RHYTHM ’N WRAPS DINNER: BON ME

LUNCH: RENULA’S GREEK KITCHEN AND BEAN TOWN TACO DINNER: BAJA TACO BU WEST (COMMONWEALTH AVENUE BY CFA)

LUNCH: BON ME DINNER: CUPCAKE CITY

LUNCH: RHYTHM ’N WRAPS DINNER: BON ME

BU WEST

SWEET TOMATOES PIZZA: Pizzas include plain cheese, pepperoni, pesto splash and a special of the day.

(COMMONWEALTH AVENUE BY CFA)

LUNCH: MENG’S KITCHEN DINNER: CHICKEN AND RICE GUYS

BU EAST

BU EAST

(COMMONWEALTH AVENUE BY MORSE)

(COMMONWEALTH AVENUE BY MORSE)

(SAINT MARY’S STREET)

LUNCH: RENULA’S GREEK KITCHEN AND COMPLIMENTS DINNER: BAJA TACO BU WEST (COMMONWEALTH AVENUE BY CFA)

LUNCH: TEA STATION DINNER: FROZEN HOAGIES

LUNCH: MEI MEI STREET KITCHEN DINNER: BON ME BU CENTRAL (SAINT MARY’S STREET)

LUNCH: PENNY PACKER’S AND BEANTOWN TACO DINNER: COMPLIMENTS BU WEST (COMMONWEALTH AVENUE BY CFA)

LUNCH: ROXY’S GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE DINNER: CHICKEN AND RICE GUYS

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

BU EAST

BU EAST

(COMMONWEALTH AVENUE BY MORSE)

(COMMONWEALTH AVENUE BY MORSE)

LUNCH: THE DINING CAR DINNER: FROZEN HOAGIES BU CENTRAL

LUNCH: BARBEQUE LAMB BROTHERS DINNER: BARBEQUE LAMB BROTHERS

(SAINT MARY’S STREET)

LUNCH: BEANTOWN TACO DINNER: BAJA TACO BU WEST (COMMONWEALTH AVENUE BY CFA)

LUNCH: FUGU FOODS

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MEI MEI STREET KITCHEN: The menu changes constantly but includes some favorites such as a scallion pancake sandwich and slow-cooked rice porridge. RHYTHM ’N WRAPS: This truck serves creative vegetarian wraps like the OldSchool Wrap, a wrap filled with vegan sausage, smoky BBQ mayo, caramelized onions and cheese.

THURSDAY

BU CENTRAL

BON ME: The banh mi sandwich that inspired the truck’s name is a must-try.

LUNCH: RENULA’S GREEK KITCHEN AND PENNY PACKER’S DINNER: BAJA TACO AND COMPLIMENTS

WEDNESDAY LUNCH: THE DINING CAR DINNER: BON ME

CHECK OUT OUR FAVORITE CAMPUS FOOD TRUCKS:

*Note hours/locations change per month. For latest information, check.cityofboston.gov and brooklinema.gov.

THE DINING CAR: Popular favorites include the Caprese Sandwich and the Honey Truffle Goat Cheese Sandwich. FROZEN HOAGIES: Menu items change daily, but some cookie options include Nutella, oatmeal and chocolate fudge brownie. LATIN SPOON: Popular items include their Pata-Cone, a cone-shaped shell of fried plantain stuffed with skirt steak, avocado, cilantro and cheese. MENG’S KITCHEN: The truck serves authentic Chinese steamed pork buns for only a dollar. ROXY’S GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE: Some favorites include the Green Muenster Melt, Mighty Rib Melt and Rookie Melt. CHICKEN AND RICE GUYS: Customers can choose between chicken, lamb or a combination of the two, along with perfectly steamed rice, lettuce and their famous white sauce that you wish you could buy by the bottle. RENULA’S GREEK KITCHEN: Main meals include gyros, souvlaki (pork or chicken skewers), pastitsio (baked pasta) and yemista me kima (vegetables stuffed with meat). COMPLIMENTS: Menu items include tempura vegetables, sweet potato fries, tuna lettuce wraps, sirloin sliders and much more.


BY KELLY LANDRIGAN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA

MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014. The day the city of

Boston is anxiously awaiting. It is the day of the 118th Boston Marathon. It is a day that will be filled with emotions: redemption, inspiration, perseverance, hope. Last year’s events were anything but ordinary. However, in a city of extraordinary people, these events only made the city, and the Boston University community, stronger. Run by the Boston Athletic Association, the Boston Marathon is the world’s oldest annual marathon event. Started in 1897, it is now one of the most prestigious running events in the world due to the difficulty in the course as well as the qualification standards to enter. Anastasia Voevodin (CAS ’14) qualified for last year’s marathon after completing the U.S. Air Force Marathon in her home state of Ohio. She finished last year’s Boston Marathon in 3:26:23, which was approximately 45 minutes before the first explosion.

“It was such a turn of events, such a crazy time,” Voevodin said. “To go from being at such an all-time high and having so much joy, to being at such an all-time low and having so much fear, unsure of what was coming.” Held annually on Patriots’ Day, the race is lovingly dubbed “Marathon Monday.” While the marathon brings in a huge number of runners to the city, it also brings in a great number of spectators. It draws nearly half a million people each year, making it the most watched sporting event in Boston. Boston Marathon spectators could fill TD Garden 28 times and Fenway Park 13 times. Last April Kellie Marshall (SED ’14) was one of those of spectators. She was eating lunch at the Atlantic Fish Company with her cousins on Boylston Street and was standing on the patio of the restaurant when the first explosion went off.

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SPORTS

BU STRONGER


To go from being at such an all-time high and having so much joy, to being at such an all-time low and having so much fear, unsure of what was coming.

THIS PAGE// ANASTASIA

VOEVODIN [CAS ’14] HIGHFIVES SPECTATORS. OPPOSITE PAGE//

MARIA STAVROS [SAR ‘15] RUNS ALONGSIDE HER DAD, GEORGE STAVROS .

“I just remember looking down, and I don’t remember seeing it,” Marshall said. “The second one went off six feet away from me.” Marshall had turned to look at what happened, which caused her right eardrum to rupture. The blast knocked her back; she crashed against the wall of the building and hit her head. A table landed on her legs, and she was briefly unconscious in the midst of chaos. Marshall’s cousin Dan was out on the street with Martin Richard, the 8-year-old boy who lost his life in the tragedy. He used his shirt as a tourniquet on Richard’s arm and kept him alive until Richard’s dad got there. Marshall still uses resources provided by Student Health Services and BU, in addition to those provided by the One Fund. Marshall and her cousin Dan will run in this year’s Boston Marathon. “When I’m on Boylston, it’s still difficult to walk by there,” Marshall said. “It’s weird, but I’m excited to finish. I think that will be the most therapeutic thing ever, to show that it’s not going to keep me down.” The marathon has grown in size from nearly 5,000 runners to 27,000 in the last few years. Julia Riley (SAR ’13/’15) finished running last year’s marathon in 3:51:26, just

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19 minutes before the first bomb exploded. A four-time marathon veteran, Riley was about two blocks away from the finish line, waiting for her brother who was running his first marathon, when the blast occurred. “It was just crazy—you were running, but you didn’t know what you were running from,” Riley said. “After that night, it was hard to sleep or anything. I was very on-edge.” Riley’s brother was about to finish as the first bomb exploded. Luckily, he was pulled off the course. “I had a hard time [running] after last year. The first few times would just provoke anxiety,” Riley said. “Then I realized that I can’t let anyone take that from me because running was always my thing. It’s been a good way to just process everything that happened.” With 36,000 registered runners—about 9,000 more than last year—expected to participate this year, the B.A.A. is strongly discouraging bandit runners, those who do not officially register to run. The B.A.A. also instituted new security measures, with bans on backpacks, strollers, water bottles, bulky costumes and masks. The race course has changed throughout the years, but the 2014 course routes through parts of the Greater Boston area: the towns of

Hopkinton, Ashland, Framingham, Natick, Wellesley and Brookline, the cities of Newton and Boston, and the neighborhoods of Chestnut Hill and Brighton. In 2006, the Boston Marathon partnered with the marathons held in London, Berlin, Chicago and New York City to launch the World Marathon Majors, linking the world’s most prestigious marathons together. The goal of bringing these elite races together was to promote interest in the sport of running, according to the World Marathon Majors’ website. The Tokyo Marathon was added as the sixth marathon in the series in 2013. These races split a $1 million prize purse among the top male and female winners from each marathon. Together, the World Marathon Majors have raised $80 million for charities worldwide. Through the Boston Marathon alone, charity runners have raised over $12 million annually, according to the B.A.A. website. Since entry into the marathon is based on qualification, the B.A.A. has worked to appropriately integrate the charity program so that it benefits areas of great need within the Boston community. Since 1989, when the American Liver Foundation became the first charity to receive official entries in the Boston


Marathon, the B.A.A. has grown to support at least 30 charities per year. Many of the runners within the BU community are racing on behalf of a charity team. Carolyn Harper (SAR ’15) is a first time runner in this year’s Boston Marathon, even though it is her third time running a marathon. As a future medical professional, last year’s events greatly affected her decision to run this year. “If that whole thing hadn’t happened last year and if my qualifying time still hadn’t been enough, I don’t know if I would’ve done a charity team to run it,” Harper said. “I just couldn’t imagine sitting on the sidelines this year.” Harper will be racing on behalf of Goodwill, which is the same charity team her boyfriend is coaching for the marathon. Along with the other members of the team, Harper is required to raise $4,000. Liz Rathje (SAR ’15/’17) will also run on behalf of Goodwill. Last year she worked as a medical volunteer through the BU Student Athletic Training Club. Rathje heard the first explosion go off and thought that it sounded like fireworks. Walking toward the finish line, Rathje saw the second explosion occur. “It was hard to come back into reality. It was hard to concentrate in class [at the time],” Rathje said. “It was hard because it was like a part of your innocence was being taken away. You tried to find strength and positivity from it, but it took a while.” Rathje had always dreamed about running the Boston Marathon. The next day, her older brother Jason, a MIT graduate, told her that they were going to run the marathon together. “He texted me and said, ‘This is our city. We’re doing this for our city,’” Rathje said. “We plan on running it side-by-side.” Liz and Jason Rathje aim to raise more than $5,000 together for Goodwill. This will be Rathje’s first marathon. Other entrants have combined their love for the city and their passion for charity as incentive for this year’s race. As a Newton native, Julia Lytle (COM ’14) has strong ties to the city, but those ties are

not the main reason she is running in her first marathon. Last November her mother was diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Lytle’s mom is a practicing physician affiliated with Boston Medical Center, which is where she received all of her treatments. Lytle and her mom are training to run together as part of the BMC’s team. Lytle’s brother, aunt and uncle will also be running with them. The group has set a combined goal of raising $100,000. “We have many connections to BMC, so that’s why we chose to run with them,” Lytle said. “My mom had always wanted to run the Boston Marathon, and with everything that happened last year especially in our personal lives, it seemed like the perfect time to do it.” Some marathoners are simply looking to finish the race this year. Maria Stavros (SAR ’15) and George Stavros, the executive director of The Albert & Jessie Danielsen Institute at BU, are a father-daughter marathon pair. The West Roxbury family tried to run for the first time last year on behalf of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The Stavroses were through Kenmore Square before they were pulled off the course, less than a mile away from finishing. Unable to finish the race, they received automatic bids for this year’s marathon. “I kind of had a feeling last year while I was running that I wanted to do it again,” Maria Stavros said. “In that sense, it wasn’t a question at all.” They have chosen again to fundraise for Dana-Farber. Individually, each must raise $3,500. Together the two aim to raise $10,000, which is a goal they surpassed last year. Dean of Students Kenneth Elmore (SED ’87) is optimistic about the upcoming race. “It is a day of youth,” Elmore said. “I hope we don’t lose that spontaneity, and I hope we don’t lose that energy.” “We will have real determined runners this year,” Elmore continued. “It’s got to be hard. I want you to finish, and I hope that you’ll remember all those people who died, all those people who were injured. I just think running it this year is brave and honorable.”

Looking ahead to race day, what many runners are most looking forward to is finally crossing the finish line.  “We’re going to get ready. We’re going to get out there. We expect it to go well,” George Stavros said. “This feels like the finisher for us.” “It’s such an incredible race, and it’s such an incredible city to run in. I am so looking forward to be able to cross the finish line and to be able to celebrate the joy with everyone—to have that be my lasting memory associated with it,” Voevodin said. “You can’t keep the Boston Marathon down.”

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CONCUSSED

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THE SPORTS WORLD’S MOST CONFUSING DEBACLE

around high-impact movements, such as tackling and checking, those competing in athletic activities as well as spectators should acknowledge the risks and dangers that may not be seen now, but are a potentially detrimental reality in the long run. “I didn’t really think about it until the first one [concussion] I got in college that ended up lasting three months, but now I guess it’s always on my mind,” said Campbell BY DANIEL ALTER of the potential risks of concussions. “If I get ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY KELLY LANDRIGAN hit hard, I immediately do little checks to see ILLUSTRATION BY CASSIDY EARLY if I feel differently.” Long-term problems that result from SPORTS DEFINE A PART OF THE concussions have gained recent notoriety in UNITED STATES’ CULTURE; the news due to a high prevalence of these however, recently those involved in incidents in professional sports. The National professional and college sports have had to Football League has had to deal with its fair deal with the ever-present issue of injury share of concussion-related scandals, from related to concussions. sudden deaths of big-name players to reports “I have had six total concussions—four that the league has endangered former and of which occurred in the span of time from current players because of a lack of medical last April to last November,” said Alex Lawson responsibility. These issues could dramatically (CAS ’16), president of Boston University’s change the culture and nature of high-risk women’s rugby team. sports in the future. “In college I’ve had three concussions, Boston University’s Center for the and before that on the medical records, it Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at says I’ve had three more concussions,” said BU’s School of Medicine is an independent women’s ice hockey defenseman Caroline academic research center that focuses on Campbell (CAS ’14). this specific field of study. Known as the “I am concerned about the possible CTE Center, it is a part of BU’s Alzheimer’s long-term effects of my concussions,” Lawson Disease Center and is funded by the National said. “But it is really something I can do Institutes of Health, according to the nothing about at this point, so it would be a center’s website. waste of time to dwell on it.” The CTE Center is working to develop For BU varsity soccer player Lily a greater understanding of the conditions Creighton (SMG ’16), the risks of getting of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, a a concussion are not one of her concerns progressive degenerative disease of the brain during competition. that is commonly found in athletes that “You don’t think about it ’til it actually compete in high-risk and injury-prone sports. happens,” she said. “However, whenever CTE has recently been detected in a there is an accident on the pitch, the trainers number of retired professional football players instantly check up on the injured athlete.” and other athletes with a history of repetitive “Some athletes tend to think ‘in the brain trauma. now’ and are more concerned with the big Dr. Michael O’Brien, the associate game on Friday rather than the potential director of the Sports Concussion Clinic at consequences of a repeat concussion,” said Boston Children’s Hospital, noted that CTE Claire Pershing (SAR ’16), who is studying headlines have put concussion awareness back athletic training and working at the Case on the map. Center Athletic Training Clinic at BU. “CTE is still one of the more While the rules and dynamics of sports controversial topics because it’s very like football, soccer and ice hockey revolve traumatic,” O’Brien said. “It’s a big question


with a lot of question marks still out there.” Increased attention on concussion risks has helped bring more awareness to the potential for serious harm. “After the fourth concussion, I started experiencing symptoms that were rather concerning, and after hearing about the studies, I decided to take some time off,” Lawson said. CTE results from repetitive brain trauma, either through concussions that cause actual symptoms or through subconcussive hits to the head that do not cause any symptoms. These brain traumas trigger progressive degeneration in brain tissue. The resulting changes in the brain can take place months, years or even decades after the last brain trauma was sustained. Other factors may play a role in developing the disease, as not all individuals who sustain repeated brain trauma develop CTE. “The current scientific suspicion is that people with reoccurring concussions may have a higher risk of related CTE,” O’Brien said. “That relationship, of how many concussions and how often those concussions occur, is still being worked out.” CTE is also often associated with a number of symptoms including personality changes, memory loss, confusion, impaired judgment and depression. Some of the more serious symptoms include progressive dementia and suicidal tendencies. As a physician who works with children, O’Brien noted that the recent CTE headlines have caused parents to be more cautious in allowing their children to play high-risk contact sports. “The first thing [parents] have to realize and recognize is that there are lots of ways to stay fit and healthy without necessarily going to the highest-risk sports, like American football or ice hockey,” O’Brien said. “Athletic departments are in the process of better education and return-to-play protocols to try to ensure that athletes are fully recovered from their concussion before returning to sports,” Pershing said. “As new research associates concussions with various mental disorders and diseases later in life, obviously prevention and

treatment of concussions [has been altered],” Lawson said. “Most teams now require all players to take a baseline IMPACT concussion test before playing, and then again if a player gets a concussion to measure the severity of the damage.” Lawson added. It seems in recent years the popularity and preference for sports has leaned towards those that are more action-packed, fast-paced and hard-hitting. The fear of this recent trend is that the serious risks of injury, specifically head trauma, may be overlooked as the athletes, coaches and spectators will be too caught up in the game. “The new research hasn’t really affected me for too long when it comes to playing hockey. You play a couple shifts at first super cautious, and then you kind of forget about it,” said Campbell. “There’s still this culture around the concussion as an injury that you can just push through, and if you want, you play through it. So a lot of young athletes don’t want to admit to having one and getting checked out.” Carlos Santiago (CAS ’15), a pre-med student, discussed the current CTE research in one of his neuropsychology courses and noted the mistakes made by some of the professional sports leagues. “A lot of the professional teams have known about this research for a long time, and they didn’t pay attention to it because they were too focused on the money coming into the team,” Santiago said. “I think more research can lead to a better understanding of how CTE develops and help create different ways to prevent it.” A factor that most researchers, as well as O’Brien and Santiago, can agree on is implementing preventive measures as early on as possible. “It should start with youth athletics so all of the rules can be uniform throughout the different leagues,” Santiago said. “It’s better to start from the beginning to prevent concussions and CTE than to just implement rules at the major league-level when the probability of developing CTE is high and most likely already happening.”

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 79


ALL IN THIS PAGE// MATT MAGINNIS [SMG ‘16], THADDEUS BABIEC [ENG ‘14] AND JP AFTRING [ENG ‘15] OF THE MEN’S CREW TEAM HEAD OUT TO THE CHARLES RIVER FROM DEWOLFE BOATHOUSE TO BEGIN PRACTICE.

BLADES OUR EXCLUSIVE LOOK AT BU MEN’S ROWING

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IN

Take a look at the Boston University D-I men’s rowing team, as it tackles its spring season. Coached by Thomas Bohrer, the 50-man roster competes year round. The team will wrap its 2013-2014 season at the IRA Championships, held this May and June in Winsor, N.J. PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM DUTRA ART DIRECTION BY ASHLEY ROSSI

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POWER 10 THIS PAGE// THE MEN’S CREW TEAM REMAINS FOCUSED DURING PRACTICE ON THE CHARLES. LED BY VASS RAGOUSSIS [SAR ‘16], JP AFTRING [ENG ‘15], KYLE PEABODY (CAPTAIN) [CAS ‘14] AND LENNY FUTTERMAN (CAPTAIN) [CAS ‘14].

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MUSCLE MEMORY THIS PAGE// JAMIE ODGERS [SMG ‘17] AND KYLE PEABODY (CAPTAIN) [CAS ‘14] TRAIN ON ERGOMETERS BEFORE HEADING OUT ON THE WATER.

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MAKING A SPLASH THIS PAGE// MORITZ FRANZ (CAPTAIN) [SMG ‘14] AND KYLE PEABODY (CAPTAIN) [CAS ‘14] PICK UP SPEED DURING PRACTICE. OPPOSITE PAGE FROM TOP// VIEW FROM THE DEWOLFE BOATHOUSE. // MORITZ FRANZ (CAPTAIN) [SMG ‘14] LEADS STRECHES BEFORE HEADING OUT ON THE WATER. // COACH TOM BOHRER LEADS A POWER SET DURING PRACTICE.

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OVER THE HEAD THIS PAGE// LENNY FUTTERMAN (CAPTAIN) [CAS ‘14], OLIVER SALONNA [SMG ‘16], MORITZ FRANZ (CAPTAIN ) [SMG ‘14], KYLE PEABODY (CAPTAIN) [CAS ‘14], THADDEUS BABIEC [ENG ‘14], LUKA MILADINOVIC [CAS ‘17], JP AFTRING [ENG‘15] AND VASS RAGOUSSIS [SAR ‘16] BRING THEIR BOAT INTO DEWOLFE BOATHOUSE TO END PRACTICE.

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WELCOME TO THE

BROTHER

HOOD BU HOCKEY THROUGH THE EYES OF ONE OF ITS MOST SENIOR PLAYERS BY KELLY LANDRIGAN PHOTO BY BARRON ROTH

WHEN SENIOR GOALTENDER ANTHONY MOCCIA (SAR ’14) watches a game from the Boston

PHOTO COURTSEY OF STEVE MCLAUGHLIN/BU ATHLETICS

University bench, he has a different view than the other 6,150 people watching in Agganis Arena. In short, Moccia sees everything. “I see every hit, every shot, every great play, every mistake. Most of what I do is take everything in and figure out how Coach [Quinn] sees it, and after digesting that in my head, I try to pick my teammates up as well as give tips in line with what Coach [Quinn] will say to them. My time with the players is always positive and designed to help relax them and keep them in the game,” Moccia said. This culture of helping each other is something that this season’s senior class of the Boston University Men’s Ice Hockey team is particularly proud of creating, as each senior made a concerted effort to dissolve the gap between upperclassmen and underclassmen. “All of us individually have worked hard on our skills and we’ve gotten to a point where we’ve made it, and we’ve earned the privilege to wear the BU jersey. At the end of the day, we are a lot stronger as a team than we are individually,” Moccia said. “So part of that is a selfless kind of love for something bigger than yourself, and I think that’s kind of something that you can embody in all facets of your life.” Moccia likes to describe the BU hockey culture as a “brotherhood,” mainly due to the weird dynamic of not only being teammates with the men, but also roommates and friends. Patrick MacGregor (COM ’14), a senior defenseman and co-captain of the team, agrees with Moccia and refers to the hockey family as a small community. “You’re always with the guys. With our team, we’re

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with the guys four hours out of every day during the week and every weekend,” MacGregor said. “As seniors and upperclassmen, we also like to get together a lot with our team like on a Sunday off day, maybe just to watch football games in the fall and stuff like that. You want to have a team that’s together.” For freshman defenseman Doyle Somerby (CGS ’17), the team’s cohesion was something he was not necessarily expecting to experience this season. “The seniors are really close to the freshmen, which is huge because when you have 18- and 19-year-old kids with 25-year-olds, you’re not necessarily going to always mix really well,” Somerby said. “Just from the difference in age, I thought they would be a little farther apart—more distant than they are—but I mean they’re some of my best friends on the team.” The team’s togetherness was never more apparent than during a typical Monday night post-practice dinner in the West dining hall. For approximately two and a half hours, clusters of players from the team would trickle in after practice, each group mixed by class rank and age. The cluster effect continued even in seating, spanning three tables next to each other in the middle of the dining hall. When one player would get up to leave for class, study hall or another obligation, his seat would be immediately filled by another teammate, with conversations effortlessly moving from one topic to the next. “I think the off-ice stuff helps build stronger relationships on the ice,” Moccia said. “We all eat dinner together when we can eat dinner with whoever we want. However, we all choose to eat dinner together because we all care about each other, and we all like hanging out with each other.” Matt O’Connor (SMG ’16), one of Moccia’s goaltending partners, went so far as to call his teammates of the past two seasons “the nicest group of guys I’ve played with.” “I think that’s one of our strengths—our ability to really get along with each other. It’s been effortless really,” O’Connor said. “I think that’s helped us be a brotherhood because we all sort of have those same values.” While the brotherhood mentality plays a major role in the success of the team, having high individual and team expectations further adds to their success. “I think the best team is one on which each individual has high standards, and the team’s standards are just that much higher. I think that’s a great thing about BU hockey–you know you’re playing for a team that has extremely high standards,” O’Connor said.


I SEE EVERY HIT, EVERY SHOT, EVERY GREAT PLAY, EVERY MISTAKE. For those on the outside looking in, it can be difficult to understand the magnitude of playing for a program with such a rich hockey history. No one can understand this outsider mentality better than Moccia, who began his Terrier athletics career as a practice goaltender his freshman year. “It’s tough as a walk-on, let alone a walk-on who is not rostered, because from my perspective, you have to kind of know your place,” Moccia said. Moccia’s hockey narrative is an unusual one. As a walk-on practice goalie, he was unable to travel with the team, practice every day or live with the rest of the freshmen in Kilachand Hall (which was then called Shelton Hall). However, that did not deter him from making an extra effort. “There were so many things in place that were supposed to distance me, but the guys were always supportive, always picking me up,” Moccia said. “I made a point to make sure that I was there for everything, to make sure that I was a part of this team as much as I could be.” Moccia’s hard work paid off. At the end of his freshman year, former head coach Jack Parker offered him a chance to become a rostered member of the team. Now as a senior, Moccia has been able to take on a leadership role and mentor his teammates who never knew him as the practice goalie. “You have to find a balance between leading by example and leading by what you say,” Moccia said. “For me, it has been a lot of leading by example, and I hope that they see my work ethic­—how much I care about each one of them and my strong faith.” Because of his unofficial status during his freshman season, there was a possibility for Moccia to stay and play next season, as he will be finishing his Master’s degree in public health. It was up to the coaching staff whether or not the team would bring in an outside goalie or retain Moccia for a fifth season, which is something that has happened twice with other players in recent years. In December new head coach David Quinn, who took over for Parker after 40 seasons, informed Moccia that he would like him to stay for an additional season. It did not take much convincing. “To hear that a coach that you really respect and look up to wants you back, appreciates what you do for him, and the university, and for the team, it means a whole lot,” Moccia said. “I’m pumped to be here a fifth year—to have all the knowledge and experience and be able to share it with these guys.” While Moccia hopes to improve upon his leadership skills next season, he is excited to share his past team experiences with his younger teammates, so they can improve as a whole unit. It will definitely be a challenge while he

continues his studies, but it will be a challenge that he will have help to face. “For me, knowing that I have 25 brothers—but then over the years more brothers because guys graduate­—and knowing that I have an impact on each of their lives and they each have an impact on mine just kind of makes the sweat, the early mornings and staying up late doing schoolwork worth it,” Moccia said. After an overall tough season for the Terriers, this rebuilding year seems to be exactly what the team needed going forward. Quinn’s motto “do what you are supposed to do” has resonated well with the team. According to Moccia, under the guidance of Quinn, the team achieved one of the highest overall GPAs in BU hockey history last semester, which is a testament to the off-ice precedents that Quinn set for the team this year. “We take hockey very seriously here, but we also take building men for the future very seriously, too,” Moccia said. “Once you get a chance to put that jersey on, you’re always a BU hockey player, whether you stay here for a month or you stay here for five years. There’s a lot of pride in this program, and it’s unbelievable to be a part of it.”

THIS PAGE// ANTHONY

MOCCIA [SAR ‘14]. OPPOSITE PAGE// ANTHONY MOCCIA [SAR ‘14] AND MATT LANE [CAS ’16] AT THE BENCH.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2014 | 89


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The Buzz 2014 staff exhibits passion to communicate and promote BU’s most significant trends and lifestyle stories. Our goal is to make these stories applicable and relatable to all BU students by sharing their relevance and value. As we say goodbye to our senior staffers, we appreciate all of their unique talents and creativity that have contributed to make the magazine a success. We will miss them and wish them the best.

“stealing back the chalk from the janitor who always took it before our meetings”

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