__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

UNION SQUARE

donuts

THE MASTERMINDS BEHIND THE PASTRIES

TAPE THIS

CONVERSE SPONSORS STUDIO TIME FOR LOCAL BANDS

let the

sunshinein FASHION INSPIRED BY THE 70S

DAVID SILK ON THE 1980 U.S. OLYMPIC HOCKEY TEAM


2015

Spring 41 on OUR cover

Our fashion shoot features six Boston University students. From left to right: Scott Thompson (ENG ‘16), Jiayi Tan (Questrom ‘17), Kyle Bannon (SAR ‘16), Morgan Hogue (SAR ‘15), Alastair Prenn (CGS ‘15), Taylor Mazzuoccola (Questrom ‘16)

25 CAMPUS 7 FAKING IT The fearless business of fake IDs

SPORTS 25 BOSTON’S BOYS A breakdown of the 2015 Red Sox lineup

14 UBER AWKWARD Tales from the backseat

28 AFTER THE GAME What happens to college athletes who don’t go pro?

CITY 22 TEMPORARY TRAPPINGS All you need to know about pop-up stores

MUSIC 35 TAPE THIS Converse sponsors studio time for Boston bands

24 BARS OUTSIDE THE BOX For when T’s and T.I.T.S. don’t cut it

38 STUDY MUSIC Finding your groove


35

70

38 FOOD 41 UNION SQUARE DONUTS From farmers market to brick and mortar

TRAVEL 70 HOUSE TURNED HOME On living in a homestay in a foreign country

46 KILLING CANCER WITH FOOD Modified vegan-paleo diet gives cancer patients hope for cure

72 KNOW BEFORE YOU GO Quick hacks while you’re traveling overseas

FASHION 58 STREET STYLE BU’s best dressed this Spring

ARTS 74 COFEEHOUSE AESTHETIC The artistry behind your favorite campus coffeeshops

61 BUSINESS IN FASHION Beyond the label

76 DIVINATION X A look into Nari Ward’s collaboration with the MFA

28

46


EDITORS-IN-CHIEF MANAGING EDITOR PUBLISHER PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR CREATIVE DIRECTOR ART DIRECTOR COPY EDITOR EDITORS Being able to light candles in my apartment

EVENT COORDINATOR PR COORDINATOR AD COORDINATOR COPY EDITING TEAM PHOTOGRAPHY TEAM DESIGNERS ILLUSTRATORS

ASHLI MOLINA & GIANNA FISCHER KELLY GAUTHIER Not having MARIA SIMEONOVA to pull an CARA DIFABIO all-nighter ERICA MAYBAUM We asked our EDEN WEINBERG graduating STEVIE SNOW staff: CALLIE AHLGRIM, Arts KATIE SMITH, Campus What real-life adult JESSICA BACCHI, City responsibility are you looking KATE RADIN, Fashion forward to upon graduation? ELISHA MACHADO, Food VICTORIA WASYLAK, Music KELLY LANDRIGAN, Sports Actually watching ELLA CLAUSEN, Travel primetime T V ALISON ORTIZ because I’m no AVA VARASTEH longer committed to T’s and T IT S ARIELLE SHUTER LEILA ELIHU, LIZ VANDERAU, SAMANTHA PETERS, ISABELLA SHAW, ANN SINGER, ALEX SIRACUSA, REBECCA YOUNG MIKE DESOCIO, BRIGID KING, NICOLE MENKEL, BARRON ROTH, GRACE STAUFFER, TIFFANY TOPOR, STEPHEN VOCATURO, IGOR ZHANG GABRIELA ARRIAGA, KARINA CROSS, TAISIA IVANOVA, ALEENA QAZI, SOPHIA RICHARDSON, CAT YU, MARTINELLI VALCIN TAISIA IVANOVA, JORDAN FORD

ADVERTISING TEAM

SARAH ABREU, OLIVIA COFLIN, ILANA DUBOFF, MAEGAN JERNIGAN, VANESSA QUINTERO, STEFANIE RUBIN

PUBLIC RELATIONS

MAGGIE FAIGEN, HAYLEY GONZALEZ, EMILY SALCEDO, JOHANNA SCHLUTER, ZAHRA SHIVJI, JASMINE SORIANO, KELSEY THOMAS, SOPHIE TURK

WRITERS

ARTS: MONIQUE AVILA, RIVAH CLEMONS, KRISTIE FRANCO, JONAH EATMAN, LEILA ELIHU, GRACE GULINO, MARIA POPOVA // CAMPUS: MAGGIE BUNZEL, JONAH EATMAN, GRACE GULINO, EDEN MARCUS, JULIA METJIAN, SARAH WU // CITY: CAMERON BRODY, NICHOLE KULIKOWSKI, RACHEL LUSTBADER, JOSH MARKOWITZ, KERI MCALPINE, SIDD PADTURE, KENNY RAMOS, GENEVIVE SCARANO // FASHION: MONIQUE AVILA, ARA BUTLER, ALEXIS CHESTNOV, MAGGIE FAIGEN, SUMMER FORD, DANNY MCCARTHY, EMILY MITLAK, NATALIE ODRICH, SAMANTHA PETERS, BRITTANY PONTBRIAND, KATRINA RUBIJEVSKY, TARA RUDOMANSKI, CAROLINE STATILE, HAILEY SUSSER // FOOD: CLARA BURRLONNON, JACQUELYN BUSICK, LEILA ELIHU, KELSEY KING, CORINA PINTADO, SARAH WU, KIMBERLY ZAR // MUSIC: CALLIE AHLGRIM, KERI MCALPINE, ALISON MCEACHERN, RUBEN QUINTEROS, KENNY RAMOS, ERIN SCHROETER, TIFFANY TOPOR // SPORTS: BRITTANY BELL, ZACH HALPERIN, CHRIS PICHER, CURTIS STOYCHOFF // TRAVEL: KELSEY COWHER, SARAH LANE, EL NEVERS, LAUREN O’NEIL, COURTNEY RYDER

CO-EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS CINEMATOGRAPHER ASSISTANT PRODUCER

JADA MONTEMARANO & PETER ZAMPA BRONSEN BLOOM ALISON ORTIZ

Not having to answer these questions


CONTRIBUTORS STORES

SUPPORTERS

Crush Boutique 264 Newbury St. 617-424-0010 @CrushBoutique

Boston University Faculty Professor Safoura Rafeizadeh Dean Micha Sabovik Elisabeth Symczak

December Thieves 524 Harrison Ave. 617-375-7879 88 Charles St. 617-982-6802 @decemberthieves

College of Communication Undergraduate Program, Boston University

Denim Supply Ralph Lauren 342 Newbury St. 617-247-2801 @denimandsupplyrl Free People 800 Boylston St., #41 617-450-4902 @freepeopleboston GANT 324 Newbury St. 617-536-1949 @GANT1949 H&M 100 Newbury St. 855-466-7467 @hmusa Jack Wills 179 Newbury St. 857-753-4524 @jackwillsusa LIT Boutique 223 Newbury St. 617-421-8637 @LITBoutique Lou Lou 222A Newbury St. 857-265-3952 @loulouboutiques No Rest For Bridget 220 Newbury St. (617) 236-5650 @norestforbridget Jy’s Vintage Market at SoWa 460 Harrison Ave. @SoWaVintageMkt ZARA 212 Newbury St. 617-236-1414 @zarausa

College of Communication Graduate Program, Boston University Student Activities Office, Boston University Allocations Board, Boston University Stephanie Pernice and John Warren, SoWa Vintage Market

HAVE YOU HEARD?

Callum McPherson Mohr & McPherson Furniture Gallery Study Abroad, Boston University Insomnia Cookies, Catharine Gatlin, Marketing Manager Hair Styling Oghogho Odemwingie (COM ‘16) 469-667-4355 Makeup Styling Dheandra Jack (CAS ‘16) 617-291-7321

THANKS OUR SPRING 2015 ISSUE WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE WITHOUT THE HELP OF MANY OUTSIDE STUDENTS AND PARTNERS WHO SHARE THEIR TALENTS, INSIGHTS AND TIME. WE WOULD LIKE TO THANK EACH AND EVERY NEW AND EXISTING RELATIONSHIP, AND LOOK FORWARD TO OUR CONTINUED PARTNERSHIP IN THE FUTURE. THIS ISSUE WAS PARTIALLY FUNDED BY YOUR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT FEE.

>> DAILY STORIES thebubuzz.com >> WEEKLY VIDEOS youtube.com/theweeklybubuzz >> SPECIAL EVENTS >> THE MAGAZINE

/#@THEBUBUZZ


Editor’s Note

Spring 2015 AT THE BUZZ, IT’S THE END OF AN ERA AND THE BEGINNING OF A NEW ONE. The past several semesters,

our staff has put countless hours into the development and quality of our magazine. Many creative minds dedicated the past four years to taking our magazine to new heights—they arrived before us, loved the Buzz before us and now we’re watching them go. They have grown within the Buzz and the Buzz has grown as a result of them. Because we’re thankful for their commitment and efforts, we’re dedicating the Spring 2015 issue to our graduating seniors. Without them, we wouldn’t have a producer, leading editors, writers, designers and illustrators. This issue embodies the cyclical nature of our society—themes, trends and topics of debate come and go, but also tend to reappear. Each section features examples of changes and revivals, such as issues in policy and race in City, the hopeful comeback of the Red Sox in Sports and the ’70s style resurgence in Fashion. So while history repeats itself, we are perpetually growing, learning and moving forward together. Though we’re sad to see key staff members leave after sharing many working hours, moments of laughter and dozens of doughnut runs together, we’re excited to see them thrive in their future endeavors. With their departure comes an opportunity for rising sophomores, juniors and seniors to set the next stage of expectations for the magazine. It’s time for the new era to make their mark on our campus. After all, our staff never grows tired of testing abilities and entering new territory. As the cycle continues, we close yet another issue of the Buzz. It is an issue of many firsts complemented by many students’ lasts, and there is something special about leaving this issue for our campus and community to interpret. Whatever way you look at it, life is better #buzzed.

- Ashli Molina and Gianna Fischer EDITORS-IN-CHIEF

6


CAMPUS

Faking It The Business of Fake IDs on Campus BY JONAH EATMAN AND MAGGIE BUNZEL PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARA DIFABIO DESIGN BY EDEN WEINBERG

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


The

picture is too cropped, too saturated and too pixelated when the printer spits out the 3.3 by 2.1 inch card. Alex* must start again. He opens Photoshop on his MacBook Pro and re-calibrates the image, even erasing a little bit of hair at the top of his client’s head that escaped after his first superimposition of the photo on a blue background, required by the state of South Carolina. Alex makes what he calls “high-quality” fake IDs—with hologram and scanning capabilities—out of his dorm room with the help of Photoshop, a printer and a hologram creator. He remains undeterred in the face of enormous consequences—the notion of criminality does not hinder his ability to perform. He feels no guilt either, as it funds his college education. Alex is originally from the South and is proud of his achievements in college, where he was a leader in student government. He hopes to pursue a career in

8

politics after college, but plans to continue his business throughout the remainder of his education. Fake IDs are prevalent on college campuses around the country. At BU, students use them to gain access to bars and clubs and to buy alcohol, despite the risk of arrest. And for Alex, the lure of profit is just too great. “When I’m standing over the scanner late at night pumping out IDs in my room, I don’t think about [the risk], I just think about the day-to-day and I focus on being right there in that moment,” Alex said. “And in that moment, I ask myself, ‘Am I scared?’ And I say ‘no’ because I’m focused on making money. Not going to lie, I feel kind of powerful doing what I do.” Director of BU’s Wellness and Prevention program Katherine Mooney suggests fake IDs only graze the surface of a much more widespread problem: binge drinking.

“We are aware that fake IDs have a presence on campus, but we’re more focused on getting to the root of the problem: why students are drinking so heavily or illegally in the first place,” Mooney said. Despite the many well-known dangers of binge drinking—namely alcohol poisoning—Alex suggests binge drinking and fake IDs will continue to be popular in college simply because the idea of being “grown up” is alluring. “Being able to purchase alcohol and go to clubs makes kids feel cool. It makes kids feel like they fit in. Who would want to give that up just because of a little fear?” Alex said. He makes around $80 per ID, since he charges $110 for each glossy card. In the two years he has been making IDs—first in his bedroom at his home in Atlanta and now from his dorm room at BU— he reports to have grossed a profit of $16,000. He plans on continuing to make fake IDs until


his student loans are paid off and he has a paying job. “Sometimes I freak out that I could get caught by the cops,” Alex said. “But I’m really careful. Friends refer people to me through an alias last name and everything is sent to me via a fake Gmail account. When I mail the IDs off, I never send them from my house so nothing can be traced back to me. As long as I’m careful, I’m safe.” For Aviana Vergnetti (CGS ’15), the “as long as I’m careful, I’m safe” mantra only worked for so long. On Valentine’s Day 2014, Vergnetti was written up by undercover Boston Police officers for possession of a fake ID and the illegal purchase of alcohol. Vergnetti was aware of the ramifications for buying alcohol underage but didn’t realize that the consequences for having a fake ID could be even more serious. In Massachusetts, conviction for possession of a fake ID can result in a $200 to $300 fine and a possible three-month prison sentence. Vergnetti was given 1.5 years of probation in Massachusetts and had to pay a $250 fine to BU. Like Vergnetti, Elana Axler (Questrom ’17), was not aware of the seriousness of fakes in Massachusetts. “I figured I would use a copy of my older sister’s ID because I didn’t want to buy a fake ID,” she said. “I couldn’t imagine the consequences would be too serious if I got it taken away. Maybe a ticket? A fine? I doubted they would even contact the school.” In reality, fake ID offenses often are reported to the university. The Boston University Police Department upholds the laws of the state of Massachusetts and the school can expel a student for possessing a fake ID, as it directly violates the university’s code of conduct. According to the BU Student Lifebook, students in violation of state law will also be subject to probation and other penalties, such as fines and residence separation. However, Dean of Students Kenneth Elmore said the

university handles fake ID violations on a case-by-case basis. “It all depends on the circumstances. If they had it just to have it or were using it to provide alcohol to their underage friends, all those kinds of things will make a difference

...I ask myself, ‘Am I scared?’ And I say ‘no’ because I’m focused on making money. Not going to lie, I feel kind of powerful doing what I do. overall,” Elmore said. “The policy is we expect students to follow the law. If you have a fake ID, you’re violating the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.” Stephanie* did not know this as she approached the House of Blues with her fake ID on Oct.17. Already on probation for having alcohol in a BU residence, Stephanie was risking severe disciplinary action from the school. “The bouncer asked for my ID and I gave it to him and then he asked me for a second form of identification, so I handed him my credit card,” Stephanie said. “The ID is actually a real one—it’s my brother’s girlfriend’s ID—and the credit card was also hers, but it is now expired. Then, the bouncer took out a legal pad and asked me to sign my name. I signed it and even though it matched, he didn’t quite believe it because the picture isn’t of me.” The bouncer called a police officer over, but Stephanie fled, choosing to lose her ID over facing an arrest. Falsifying identification is a criminal offense and a national security issue. Using a fake ID is a misdemeanor, and those caught face hefty fines and the possibility of a six-month driver’s license

suspension, even if there is no conviction. If an individual possesses an ID with a false name, that person can be charged with a felony and up to five years in prison. Even cashiers at local liquor stores must abide by the law, as they risk unemployment and significant fines. “We double-check every ID; that’s just a store policy,” said James Trubiano, a BU graduate and a cashier at notoriously strict Blanchard’s Liquors. “Since we’re the busiest liquor store in Massachusetts, we have to be really strict on IDs because the state is very strict on us, and they’re always checking to make sure we’re following the policies. That’s why we double-check and train all our employees to be able to see if an ID is fake or not.” Even after probation with the state of Massachusetts, Vergnetti continues to use fake identification. In total, Vergnetti has now purchased eight fake IDs and has spent upwards of $400. If her current ID gets confiscated, she is willing to purchase another one. “I don’t regret purchasing the fake IDs,” Vergnetti said. “They’re worth the good time I have.” *Names has been changed to protect identities.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


ADVENTURE AWAITS IN THE UNITED STATES

BY SARAH WU PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARA DIFABIO DESIGN BY KARINA CROSS

B

eirut, Lebanon: 5,434 miles from Boston by plane. For students touched by wanderlust, studying abroad is often the highlight of their college experience. But for many international students, studying abroad in the United States for college is a completely different experience. Typical study abroad programs last from one semester to a year, while international students are here for up to four years for their undergraduate education. For some, the transition was easy. Reina Chehayeb (CAS ’16) visited the U.S. prior to attending BU. Chehayeb attended an American high school in Lebanon, so she was able to avoid the language barrier. It took her a while to adjust, but she never felt out of place.

I decided to come to Boston because I was thrilled to live in a multicultural city. Asen Grigorov (CAS ‘18), like Chehayeb, traveled to several places in the U.S. prior to attending BU—but only major cities. Similarly, Ana María López (COM ’15) had ventured to the States before coming to Boston. However, all three had different reasons for coming to BU to pursue their higher education.

10


“I decided to come to Boston because I was thrilled to live in a multicultural city,” López said, an exchange student from Ecuador attending BU for a year before returning home. “The American [education] system is by far the best for me,” Grigorov said. “I like to be able to take responsibility of my schedules and actions and feel more free.” Like Chehayeb, Grigorov overcame the language barrier. He began learning English informally around age 10, but attended school in London at 13 and studied English in a classroom setting. Although there are many advantages to reverse studying abroad, the journey did not proceed without a few bumps in the road. Adjusting to the dining halls, living alone for the first time and adapting to the lifestyle changes were common struggles. Eating in the dining halls for days on end was challenging. Not only was the food different, but also for some, eating in a dining hall setting was untraditional. The general consensus was that the BU dining halls were subpar. After her first semester, López gave up on the dining halls. In Ecuador, it is unusual to eat alone, like many college students do between classes. She has not found an Ecuadorian restaurant in Boston, so she prefers to cook for herself and learn to make new recipes. Accustomed to the generous spices in Lebanese food, Chehayeb said, “I hate the dining hall food. I think it’s very bland. BU makes the best food during Parents Weekend and the beginning of the semester,” but often lacks quality throughout the rest of the school year. Adapting to the New England environment presented its own set of problems, but also paved the way for new adventures. It is a well-known fact that when students go abroad to Europe, they can easily travel to other countries. Weekend trips are frequent, making cultural immersion equally as important

as academics. Similarly, international students take advantage of the perks of studying abroad in the U.S. Grigorov loves traveling to Miami for its music festivals. Chehayeb traveled to Delaware for a music festival, bussed home with her close friend for Thanksgiving and hiked in New Hampshire. López does not mind traveling alone, and she loves to take the bus. Her favorite place to visit is New York. Going home for break is difficult for those who live overseas. BU listened to its students and recently announced that beginning in the 2015-2016 school year, students will be allowed to stay in their residences during Thanksgiving and Spring Break. The tradition of “Friendsgiving,” or staying with a friend over a break, has become a popular practice within the BU community. Grigorov took the opportunity to stay with a friend over break. “I would rather go with some of my friends and visit their homes and see how they live,” he said. “Get a little more in touch with the American lifestyle.” However, López would not want to change anything about her first semester at BU. “The experience depends merely on the attitude with which I face the changes, not the place itself,” she said. “The hardest thing to adjust to was fending for myself,” said Chehayeb. “My parents spoiled me. You can’t be lazy anymore.” But, she found that it was easy to adjust socially—the opposite of her expectations. She used SPLASH, BU’s club fair, as a way to get involved and found that there really is a place for

everyone on campus. López’s advice for students is simple, yet powerful. “Embrace what makes you unique, and try to get the most of every experience.”

The hardest thing to adjust to was fending for myself.


on a scale of one to ten... what’s behind a college ranking? BY KATIE SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY BY IGOR ZHANG DESIGN BY MARTINELLI VALCIN

P

oliticians go by the Gallup poll, musicians by the Billboard Top 100 and athletes by medals. Universities go by college rankings. In the fall of 2014, USA Today named BU’s College of Communication the second best journalism school in the country. US News & World Report ranked our university number 42 nationwide and 37 globally. These numbers sound great, and hopefully look great on post-grad résumés. In an environment where students are asked to judge their individual performance with grades, it is natural to assume colleges follow the same practice. Rankings let colleges know who is the best of the best, who is the hardest working and ultimately who is number one. It gives schools a sense of how changes they have made—infrastructural or otherwise— measure up against the old system. In an ideological sense, these rankings are a great way to keep universities on track. In a realistic sense, not so much.

12

...What students need to do is visit the campus and see how it feels. It’s not about the rankings; it’s about whether they can spend four years here. A 2014 piece by Boston magazine revealed the ways Northeastern University manipulated the ranking system. Former President Richard Freeland changed admissions, tweaked administrative practices and updated campus facilities in an effort to

boost Northeastern’s US News & World Report rankings. As a result, the school’s national reputation skyrocketed. In one decade, Northeastern jumped from 162 to 42. This situation is not unique. Under John Silber, BU transitioned from a commuter institution to a world-renowned research university. This rise certainly came with its own costs—loss of funding for student publications, restrictive guest policies and insane tuition hikes—but it was all worth it…right? U.S. News & World Report is the standard to which all school rankings—high school and college—are compared. The outlet’s statistical system is a complicated web of geographic locations, test scores, admission rates and degrees offered. The news outlet also speaks to deans, provosts and university presidents about their opinions on the rest of the faculty’s dedication and other so-called “intangibles.” U.S. News &World Report does not speak to students in its methodology.


Instead, the system focuses heavily on funding, with some mention of graduate success. This is undoubtedly an important aspect of higher education—schools need money, and employment is a major goal in higher education. Some outlets have begun ranking schools based on “return on investment” statistics. Essentially, the amount of money that postgrads make each year after crossing the stage has a direct effect on a school’s standing. According to PayScale’s methodology, the higher the salaries, the higher the ranks. This system drastically changes university standings. Harvey Mudd College, a STEM-focused school based in Claremont, California, holds the number one spot. Traditional winner Harvard sits at number 23, and BU falls down to 166. Conversely, sites like College Prowler (now called Niche) average user-submitted rankings of individual aspects of universities like dining halls, party scenes, campus life and academics. The site offers a comprensive analysis of campus life using a process that considers both hard numbers and student views—294,497 student views, to be exact. For what it’s worth, BU took home an A from Niche. However, students’ opinions on their college experiences may not be the best thing for college rankings. “There’s no consistency; it’s all by personal interest,”Colin Riley said, BU’s Executive Director of Media Relations. “Its

scientific principle should guide any research, and if you’re really doing research and you’re suggesting that you can come up with a ranking, then every aspect of it needs to be done as well as possible.” Despite consistently good rankings, educators discourage students from taking them into account during their college application process. Bob Weintraub, a former Brookline High School headmaster and a current SED professor, believes that a school’s ranking is more of an indication of its socioeconomic status rather than its overall quality. “I feel it’s so much more important that a kid goes to college and feels taken care of and inspired. The power of relationships in college is so undervalued,” Weintraub said. “I think BU is mainly focused on the numbers.” “We don’t use the rankings,” Riley said. “It’s sort of an extra bonus if we’re moving in the right vector.” In fact, under John Silber’s administration, the university did not participate in U.S. News’ ranking system. Instead, the outlet was forced to use federally regulated information that the university had reported to the Department of Higher Education the year before. “[Rankings] only reflect the opinions of those who do them,” Riley said. “It may not even be what we think matters. What students need to do is visit the campus and see how it feels. It’s not about the rankings; it’s about whether they can spend four years here.”

While the administration and faculty seem to disagree on the matter, BU students perceive college rankings as badges of honor rather than make-or-break factors in the college application process. “When I applied, I kind of looked at them, and I do think everyone does take them a little too seriously,” said Danielle Cavaliere (SHA ’18). “But BU was the only place I applied to. I applied early decision here, and knew that if I didn’t get in, I still had two weeks for the other deadlines. But I did, and never really questioned my choice after that.” Still, students at BU have a tendency to compare themselves to the schools across the river—in academics, internships, backgrounds and post-graduate salaries. Students complain about administrative decisions, easy classes and busy work. “I love that we graduate outstanding citizens,” Riley said. “People with a broad understanding of world events who will become good parents and good citizens. I don’t see any of those criteria in any of those surveys, but I think that’s really valuable.” Regardless of administrative positions and truths, college rankings cannot be interpreted the same way students interpret grades. An A is different than a 23, and a 166 does not even fit on the traditional percentage grading scale.

U.S. News & World report:

The breakdown the criteria

22.5% undergraduate academic reputation 22.5% retention rate 20% faculty resources 12.5% student selectivity 10% financial resources performance 7.5% graduate rate 5% alumni giving rate *According to usnews.com

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


awkward Tales from the Back Seat BY EDEN MARCUS PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARA DIFABIO DESIGN BY EDEN WEINBERG Whether you’re too lazy to endure the treacherous walk from West to East Campus (we’ve all been there), or you’ve gone out with friends and strayed farther from your dorm than you originally planned, Uber is there to pick you up. The Ashton Kutcher-approved app allows you to enter your pickup location and your destination. Within minutes you have a ride that occasionally doesn’t go as planned. Neha Khosla (COM ’18): “I was heading home and the [driver] seemed normal—he didn’t seem drunk or anything but definitely didn’t speak English very well. I’m pretty sure he took a wrong turn and a cop happened to be parked right there—he stopped us. The cop asked the driver who he was and who I was, but all [the driver] said was ‘I don’t know.’ So the cop yelled at us and told us to get out of the car. Then I explained to [the cop] that he was my Uber driver. He was yelling at the driver, asking him why he said ‘I don’t know’ instead of his name, and the driver was mumbling random things. The cop asked if he had been drinking, and the driver just kept quiet and didn’t answer. The driver didn’t reply, so the cop handcuffed him and told me to find another ride home.” Jasmine Soriano (COM ‘15): The morning after a night out, I remembered leaving my phone in an Uber driver’s car. The driver denied seeing my phone but offered to look further and call me back. He didn’t, 14

so I kept calling and emailed Uber demanding he be fired. Four days later, he called with good news that he had found my phone.

“I squirmed at the thought of him having my information and knowing my address.” In those four days, he sent messages to my friends pretending to be me, saying I’m a slut, poor and ashamed. Days later, he showed up to my house unannounced. I finally got my phone back, but I squirmed at the thought of him having my information and knowing my address. Weeks later I received a voicemail from the Uber driver whispering my name into the phone. Since then, I’ve had to get a restraining order against the driver. Denae Wilkins (COM ’18): “The driver came to pick us up and pulled up in a black Honda civic, and it wasn’t until we got to the car that we realized there weren’t enough seats for all of us. However, if I sat in the front (I’m the tallest), the other four could squeeze in the back. So that’s what we tried to do; except the driver started yelling at us that we were attempting to break the law. We tried to reason with the man,

but he started yelling even more and slammed the door. It didn’t stop there. My friend who got the Uber then got texts from the driver hours later that said, ‘Not cool, lady! You were trying to break the law! Just so you know your ranking went down from five stars to four stars so good luck trying to get where you’re going now.’” Marc Ezzi (Questrom ’17):

“My Uber driver got pulled over for having a suspended drivers license, and in order to prevent him from getting arrested and his car towed at two a.m. on a snowy night, the cop offered an alternative: for me to drive the car. So, I had to drive the Uber driver around in his car.” Let’s hope your next ride doesn’t end up on the Uber awkward horror story list.


juxtaposed

CITY WHEN THE CITY TRANSFORMS FROM DUSK TO DAWN PHOTOGRAPHY BY EDEN WEINBERG, CARA DIFABIO AND ANN SINGER ART DIRECTION AND DESIGN BY ERICA MAYBAUM

quincy market 7:15a.m. vs. 8:30 p.m.


16


storrow drive 6:15a.m. vs. 9:45 p.m. THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


kenmore square 10:15p.m. vs. 9:30 a.m. 18


THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


BY JOSH MARKOWITZ PHOTOGRAPHY BY JACQUELYN BUSICK DESIGN BY ERICA MAYBAUM

From feeding the homeless to collecting trash, some Bostonians are actively trying to solve the problems of a nation. Through abolishing slavery and fighting for women’s suffrage, our predecessors recognized unrest and created solutions. Especially today, different groups have various methods of reaching such solutions. Last August, the fatal shooting by a police officer of unarmed, black Ferguson teenager Michael Brown disturbed the nation. Around the country, men and women of all ages and colors gathered to protest police brutality. Broadcast journalism student John-Michael Sedor (COM ’15) covered a vigil for Ferguson at BU’s Marsh Plaza. “I think the demonstrators were trying to shed light on a very serious issue. But I also think the protesters knew a lot of police would be at the vigil,” he said. One skeptical student, who wishes to remain anonymous, thinks protests are an ineffective way to influence policy. “I don’t understand it honestly,” the student said. “Protests only show one extreme view of a scenario and no one goes out and challenges it. It’s free speech, but who’s listening?”

Protests do make people listen, but do not make people take action. There was extensive media coverage of the protests, yet there was no tangible change following the rallies. Despite the widespread nature of these demonstrations, it has been months, and no substantial policy changes have been made. While people are passionate about voicing their opinions, prostests and social media postings often do not bring about effective or desired policy change. The State of Massachusetts allows private citizens to introduce Public Policy Questions. With as few as 200 signatures, a citizen can have a question placed on the ballot. The purpose of a PPQ is to inform the representative of what their constituents want. PPQs are not binding, but they do “instruct” the representative to vote a certain way. Questions from 2014 covered a wide range of topics, from campaign financing to marijuana legalization. Clearly showing representatives what the people want increases the chance that they will vote cooperatively with the public. However, collecting 200 signatures is not an easy task. Alex Yedid (Questrom ’15) believes more people would be politically active if

the process were simpler. “I am definitely passionate about certain things, but I can’t imagine taking the time to collect hundreds of signatures,” he said. “If you could use the Internet to collect and verify signatures it would be faster and more people would do it.” In today’s fast-paced and easily distracted society, it is easy to move from issue to issue without hesitation. One day, the nation is shocked by police brutality, while the next day, the front page is all about football. Rallies are exciting, but if you want to make a real difference you have to be politically active. Write to your Congressperson or State Senator. Vote in every election. If you have a true passion for something, introduce a Public Policy Question. For instructions on how to introduce a PPQ, visit www.sec.state.ma.us.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


temporary trappings All You Need To Know About Pop-up Stores BY CAMERON BRODY PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIFFANY TOPOR DESIGN BY EDEN WEINBERG

M

ost Bostonians know to avoid the tourist trap of Faneuil Hall at all costs. Last July, however, brought a reason to brave the crowds. In the location that previously housed seafood joint Kingfish Hall, the Japanese retailer Uniqlo opened its first Boston location—-but only for a limited time. While Uniqlo, described by the Boston Globe as “the Japanese version of Gap,” has plans to open six brick and mortar locations throughout the Greater Boston area, the inaugural Faneuil spot has an expiration date. This temporary set-up is called a pop-up store. Companies of all shapes and sizes rent out empty storefronts, old train depots or any otherwise derelict building and literally “pop up” for a set period of time. “Recently they’ve become the concert tours of the retail world,” said Madisen Sanders (COM ’15). “You’ll see a store open up for a two-week period in Chicago, close down, then repeat the process in New York or LA.”

22

The movement has seen significant growth in the last decade, with unique locations sprouting up across the globe. LA-based marketing firm Vacant is often accredited with the development of the concept, after opening their first pop-up in NYC circa 2003 in partnership with Dr. Martens boots. The following year, the Japanese fashion brand Comme des Garçons opened the first internationally recognized pop-up in Berlin, Germany. The trend can arguably be traced back even further, with the opening of holiday-specific stores during certain times of the year. Think about it, have you ever seen a Halloween store in January? Uniqlo is not the first to bring the pop-up model to Boston. In April 2012, six Harvard University business students had the idea to rent out a vacant storefront on Newbury Street for two days. They wanted to showcase smaller, local businesses that otherwise would have been unable to afford the luxury of a Newbury address. The project, dubbed “POPstart,” featured 14 businesses, with products ranging from quinoa cereal to professional Quidditch gear. So far, pop-ups have been well-received in the city. Their

short-lived nature creates a sense of immediacy and exclusivity among forward-thinking shoppers. Jugos Juice Bar, for example, launched a pop-up last summer in The Clubs, a fitness center in the Charles River Park. The in-crowd, with knowledge of a secret password, was waived the otherwise required entrance fee of $40 a day. Turns out that the password, “Visit Jugos,” was not so secret, and frankly, not so creative. There has been a call for city officials to create incentives for landlords to offer their empty properties for the use of pop-ups. Just one month after the POPstart experiment, Boston.com published an open letter to former Mayor Thomas Menino suggesting breaks on real estate taxes for landlords who opened their buildings to pop-ups. Other indirect benefits the letter included were “potential permanent tenants” and “increased foot traffic to their location, making it more appealing for other prospective renters.” The letter’s author, Globe columnist Scott Kirsner, cited Oakland, California’s “Popuphood” model as a tool for urban development in neighborhoods around the city with too many open


storefronts. Applying this concept could help revitalize areas such as Downtown Crossing or Dudley Square. He referred to an effort by Oakland business owner Alfonso Dominguez and urban planner Sarah Filley who offer five previously vacant storefronts in the historic Old Oakland district to businesses rent free for six months. Afterwards pop-ups are given the option to either establish a permanent residence or close down so another business can move in. This model would serve as a catalyst for bringing local businesses back to once vibrant areas, while simultaneously supporting other nearby shops with increased traffic around their stores. Samuel Sklar (Questrom ’11), a graduate student of city planning at the University of Pennsylvania, describes pop-ups as a good “quick fix” for communities with underutilized space, but mentioned a pitfall to the pop-up model. “The only downside to a pop-up, if it can really be called

a downside, is the inconsistency for long-term community development,” said Sklar. “People want identifiable landmarks, and establishing those becomes more difficult when you have a rotating cast of characters every few months.” Most recently, Boston has seen a significant rise of e-retailers and restaurants taking a stab at the pop-up model. These Internet startups, such as clothing e-retailer Tucker Blair, have used pop-ups as an affordable way to supplement their existing online infrastructure. Tucker Blair’s temporary 750 square foot location on 111 Charles St. was primarily established to give customers an opportunity to get a more intimate understanding of Tucker Blair, its products and its overall message. Other startups are likely to follow suit, given the insurmountable number of young (both in establishment and the age of its employees) companies that call Beantown home.

Pop-ups seem to be the ideal tool for restaurateurs, as eateries are widely regarded as one of the most high-risk business ventures. A limited run location is the perfect way to gauge a restaurant’s potential success. Kitchen Kibitz, a traveling pop-up, which hosts previews of local Jewish restaurants, recently partnered with Boston chef Nookie Postal. In a one-night event last December, guests were invited to dine on select dishes featured in Postal’s 2015 Kendall Square Jewish BBQ joint, Steinbones. Pop-ups thrive on the spontaneity of their consumer base, so be sure to keep an ear to the ground as more are established throughout the city, especially as the warmer months draw closer. There is nothing that draws BU students out from their wintery slumber like promises of exclusive food and shopping.


Bars Outsidethe Box For When T’s and T.I.T.S. Don’t Cut It

BY JESSICA BACCHI PHOTOGRAPHY BY GRACE STAUFFER DESIGN BY KARINA CROSS

Being of-age means you can order a glass of wine with your dinner, pass through the doors of Blanchard’s and finally find out what the hype of “T’s Tuesdays” and “T.I.T.S. Thursdays” is all about. But for those who prefer a less crowded scene, there are great bars in Allston outside the typical options that have unique drinks and atmosphere to offer.

DEEP ELLUM/LONE STAR 477 Cambridge St. Self-defined as a “cozy gastropub with microbrews and eats,” the combination destination of Deep Ellum and Lone Star offers two different food menus with drinks available from either side, open from brunch to late evening. Deep Ellum’s menu includes everything from truffled Gorgonzola fries to fresh soft pretzels with warm Harpoon stout cheese dipping sauce. The bar also makes a variety of cocktails including the famous Hemingway daiquiri made with rum, grapefruit, Maraschino and lime. Next door, Lone Star Taco Bar specializes in mezcal, tequila and Mexican street food. They offer both a mezcal and tequila tasting menu, drafts and cervezas, margaritas and for the adventurous, the “Mexican Happy Meal:” a blanco tequila shot, side of sangria and a pint of Dos Equis.

24

SILHOUETTE LOUNGE 200 Brighton Ave.

MODEL CAFE 7 N. Beacon St. “To be honest, customers own the bar, I just pay the rent,” said owner Harry Anthony about the bar’s philosophy. Model has maintained a quirky atmosphere and late night “party vibe” since its beginning, as it has been passed down in the same family. Understandably, the bar has kept its status as a popular neighborhood watering hole. Anthony hopes to soon return the restaurant aspect to the Model with simple American foods like burgers and fries. He refuses to serve pitchers like neighboring bars in fear of patrons drinking straight from the 32 oz. jug.

Named after a popular doo-wop group and voted #1 Dive Bar in Boston for many years, the Silhouette, sometimes referred to by locals as “The Sil,” has been serving patrons since 1964. While sipping on their incredibly cheap beer and munching on a basket of their endless free popcorn, customers can play darts, challenge a friend to a game of pool, pick a song from the jukebox or chat at the bar. This place takes no snow days; if another blizzard-filled winter is coming next year, Silhouette is the place to be. If that hasn’t got you sold, Narragansett featured “The Sil” as Bar Of The Week a while back.


SPORTS BY: ZACH HALPERIN PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL IVINS/BOSTON RED SOX AND CARA DIFABIO DESIGN BY MARTINELLI VALCIN


T

he Boston Red Sox headed into the 2015 season with a roster full of new faces. Completely revamping their pitching rotation, the Red Sox feature three new starters: Rick Porcello, Wade Miley and Justin Masterson. But the Sox’s biggest free-agency moves were not made on pitchers like in past seasons, as Boston was unable to lure back lefty ace Jon Lester, who signed a 6-year, $155 million deal with the Chicago Cubs. Instead, the Sox spent most of their budget on batters, signing Pablo Sandoval to a 5-year, $95 million deal and inking Hanley Ramirez to a 4-year, $88 million contract. Following their 2013 World Series victory, the Red Sox finished last in the A.L. East at 71-91. For the first time since 1994, neither Boston nor the New York made the playoffs. Fans were shocked to see the Sox fall from World Series champs to the bottom of their division. The most obvious reason for the team’s decline is the drastic drop in batting average. The Sox hit .244 in 2014 (22nd in the MLB) compared to .277 in 2013 (2nd in the MLB). The loss of outfielder Jacoby Ellsbury, who hit .298 and stole 52 bases in 2013, hurt, as did the injuries of both Dustin Pedroia and Shane Victorino. Victorino missed most of the season, recording only 123 at-bats. Even slugger David Ortiz contributed to the sluggish 2014. The 39-year-old designated hitter kept his home run and RBI numbers pretty constant in 2014, but had 24 less hits than he did in 2013 with the exact same number of at-bats (518). Boston’s pitching was also a major problem last season. The team’s earned run average of 4.01 ranked 23rd in the MLB. In particular, workhorse Clay Buchholz (170.1 IP) disappointed, posting a 5.34 ERA. “I think the Red Sox will be in the thick of it to win the A.L. East,” Emma Crain (SHA ’17) said. “They did a lot to add more offense with Hanley Ramirez and Pablo Sandoval. Also [Rusney] Castillo in his

26

first full season should be a major uptick in center field. And Pedroia should be healthy.” The offense is expected to improve. Ramirez and Sandoval are both elite hitters, who have career averages of .300 and .294, respectively. “Sandoval is a much better infielder than people think he is,” Peter Abraham, a Red Sox reporter for the Boston Globe, said. “The big questions, I think, are Ramirez in left field and Bogaerts at shortstop. And with Ramirez, I think he’s a good enough athlete that he should be at least an adequate left fielder,” Abraham said. Ramirez, a former shortstop, will need to learn how to deal with the Green Monster in left field. He’s even tried to reassure Sox fans by posting pictures of himself fielding off the Monster. As for Bogaerts, the 22-year-old star will need to prove he can field his position, as he will be the starting shortstop. The highly touted prospect batted .240 last season, but finished strong hitting .313 in September. Another young rookie expected to produce this year is projected starting outfielder Mookie Betts. Betts, also only 22-years-old, was a minor league sensation who quickly rose in the Sox’s farm system. Originally a second baseman, Betts learned to play the outfield in 2014 as he spent time in Double-A, Triple-A and the big leagues. In 52 games with the Sox, Betts hit .291 and

It’s a little too quick for a last place team to worry about who will be a playoff series. stole seven bases, after stealing 100 bags in his minor league career. Among the crowded outfield in Boston are also Rusney Castillo, Allen Craig, Daniel Nava and Jackie Bradley Jr. Castillo figures to start in center field; the Sox signed him to a 7-year, $72.5 million contract in August. But if the Cuban-born player does not perform, the Sox may go with the hot hand. As of now, Craig and Nava seem to be the men left out of the starting lineup, while Bradley will most likely end up in Triple A. Known for his high average in St. Louis (he hit over .300 in 2011, 2012 and 2013), Craig hit a shockingly low .215 with the Cardinals and Red Sox in 2015. With a plethora of talent in the outfield, and Ortiz penciled in as designated hitter, Craig will have to battle for playing time. As for Ortiz, the question is whether his age has finally caught up with him. That question, though, has been asked for years and the hitter has consistently proved his doubters wrong. Pedroia (31), Victorino (34) and Mike Napoli (33) all have age and injury concerns


as well. This is why the Red Sox offensive depth is so important. As far as pitching staff, the Sox have an extremely interesting crop of starters. All five projected rotation men (Porcello, Buchholz, Miley, Masterson and Joe Kelly) have had success in the major leagues, but none of them have anchored a staff. “They made good moves to add depth to their starters…but none have been a number one starter in the past,” Crain said. Of the Sox starters, Porcello is the one most likely to take the reigns and become the Sox ace. As a Detroit Tiger last season, Porcello posted a career-high 3.43 ERA with 15 wins and three complete-game shutouts.

The 26-year-old may just be entering his prime, but as an innings-eater (204 2/3 IP last season), Porcello should be able to give the bullpen a break. “A lot of people like Porcello,” Abraham said. “The best is yet to come from [him].” “Beyond that, I think people are getting a little too carried away with the ‘ace’ thing because teams have proven they can [win] without an ace,” Abraham said. “It’s a little too quick for a last place team to worry about who will be starting the first game of a playoff series.” Masterson is the starter Sox fans may want to worry about the most. As a member of the Cleveland Indians and St. Louis

Cardinals last season, Masterson posted an ERA of 5.88, as his hits per nine innings pitched ballooned from 7.3 in 2013 to 9.9 in 2014. Both Masterson and Porcello will be highly incentivized to have effective years, as they were both signed to one-year contracts. Overall, the consensus in Boston is that the Sox are in for a comeback season. “I think the Red Sox will have a better year than they did last season, and they may even sneak into the playoffs. But as always, the A.L. East is competitive,” Alex Greenberg (COM ’16) said.

THE THE BUZZ BUZZ | SPRING 2015


AFTER THE GAME BY KELLY LANDRIGAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARA DIFABIO DESIGN BY SOPHIA RICHARDSON

28


Student-athletes enter college expecting to be drafted either before or shortly after graduation. For most, that ends up not being the case. “I just always kept busy, which was a good thing and a bad thing,” Meghan Riggs (COM ’14), a former member of the Boston University women’s ice hockey team, said. “It was good because I had great time management, but it was bad because I had minimal down time between attending classes, maintaining a 3.5 GPA, going to practices, workouts, games and interning.” Riggs, like many former student-athletes, did not continue to play sports professionally after graduation. She currently works fulltime in the fashion industry as a showroom coordinator for Exposure, holds two freelance communication jobs and works part-time at a spin studio in Manhattan. The reality is that for 98 percent of student-athletes, life goes on in other ways. They pursue careers very similar to those many of us hope to enter ourselves. The National Collegiate Athletic Association, the overarching governing body of all Division I, Division II and Division III athletics, is proud of this fact. It is even infamous for the following tagline: “There are over 460,000 NCAA student-athletes, and most of us go pro in something other than sports.” Statistically speaking, a professional United States sports league will draft less than two percent of seniors in men’s and women’s basketball, men’s ice hockey, soccer and football, according to research conducted by the NCAA. However, that small percentage does not diminish the student-athletes’ zeal. According to the 2010 NCAA GOALS (Growth, Opportunities, Aspirations and Learning of Students in College) Study, the most recently published survey of 20,000 student-athletes, 76 percent of Division I men’s basketball players think they will play professionally, while only 1.2 percent of them actually do play professionally. Baseball is the leading sport of collegiate athletes who actually go on to play in the majors, coming in at 9.4 percent. To put the numbers in perspective for BU’s most popular sport, over 60 percent of Division I men’s ice hockey players believe they will play in the National Hockey League. Yet, less than one percent ever make it big. The president of the NCAA, Dr. Mark

Emmert, even devoted an entire section of the annual “2015 NCAA State of the Association” address to this issue, imploring NCAA member schools to “look differently at the relationship between college sports and professional sports.” “College athletes often have incredibly unrealistic perceptions of their professional prospects,” Emmert said. For some professional leagues, such as the National Football League or the National Basketball Association, college is the de facto breeding ground for the next set of career athletes. Due to strict eligibility requirements set by these leagues, those student-athletes that fall into that elite top two percent are often not students for long. The NFL allows players to be drafted three years after their high school graduation; for the NBA, players only need to wait one year. Some never get the chance to pick up

career center and videos and written stories by former collegiate athletes who have achieved success off the field. While the NCAA lacks programming and information, this is where the individual colleges and universities step up. For BU athletes, Student-Athlete Support Services plays an important role throughout their collegiate experience. The unit primarily provides academic services such as tutoring, designated study rooms, a computer lab and conference rooms. It also offers career-counseling services. “The only thing the NCAA mandates that we do as far as programming is alcohol and drugs,” Phil DeCarlo, Director of SASS, said. “Everything else we do is things that are either hot topics as far as students in this generation, or things that our students have said they want to do.” “The challenge is that society seems to

AS AN ATHLETE YOU INVEST SO MUCH TIME IN SPORT DURING YOUR LIFE. IT IS VERY DIFFICULT AND SCARY TO IMAGINE LIFE DIFFERENTLY. the phone call from the general manager of a pro team to hear, “We’d like you to come and play for the…,” or to walk across the stage to put on their new team hat and hold up a jersey for the iconic photo opportunity. “As an athlete you invest so much time in sport during your life. It is very difficult and scary to imagine life differently,” Dr. Adam Naylor, a player development and sports psychology consultant, said. “Passions accidentally get limited to only sport.” According to the NCAA’s “Who We Are” webpage, it is a “membership-driven organization dedicated to safeguarding the well-being of student-athletes and equipping them with the skills to succeed on the playing field, in the classroom and throughout life.” With the NCAA alumni family in the millions, the organization launched NCAA: After the Game, with the goal of “celebrating former student-athletes.” This section of the NCAA’s website provides resources such as a

see sport and life out of sport as an either-or phenomenon. You’re either focused on being a great athlete or on life after sport,” Naylor said. “I truly believe it is about helping athletes find the ‘and.’” According to Naylor, who teaches Psychology of Sport in the School of Education at BU, it comes from developing a “robust self-identity” and an “exploration of life outside of sports.” “I think most realize they will not play professionally,” Naylor said. “It comes back to the challenge of thriving on the field and finding other things that are as fulfilling and exciting as a practice and game day.”

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


on MIRACLE ICE BY CHRIS PICHER PHOTO BY CARA DIFABIO DESIGN BY CAT YU This past winter marked 35 years since the U.S. Olympic hockey team captured the gold medal in an unforeseeable miracle, beating the nearly invincible Soviet Union in the process. This underdog run in Lake Placid captivated the entire nation, huddling around television sets during the dark days of the Cold War after the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. College students at an average age of 21 represented the country in 1980, including four Boston University players: Mike Eruzione, Dave Silk, Jack O’Callahan and Jim Craig. Eruzione, the U.S. captain, graduated from BU in 1977, and the following year, Silk, O’Callahan and Craig won a National Championship for the Terriers, finishing the season with a 30-2 record. The Soviet Union dominated international hockey from the early 1960s until the Olympics in 1980. The Soviets had won the last four gold medals in the Olympics in addition to winning 14 World Championship gold medals. Entering the games at Lake Placid, many Soviets believed that the 1980 team was the best one assembled. “It would be like a high school football team beating Ohio State in football,” Silk (Questrom ’79) said. “We never really thought we could win until the last five minutes.” There was no reason to believe that the U.S. had any chance to win other than that it would be an incredible story. The Soviets had defeated the NHL All-Star team three times and defeated the U.S. by a score of 10-3, all during the same winter. Due to the political strife with the tournament favorite Soviets, the U.S. rallied behind the youngsters looking to win a gold medal and bring a needed victory to the American people. “It became much less about hockey and more of social and political commentary,” Silk said.

30

The idea of a miracle took on a new meaning for Americans after Al Michaels’ famous line during the live broadcast against the Soviets in the semi-final: “Do you believe in miracles? Yes!!...Unbelievable.” BU players headlined the 4-3 victory over the Soviet Union as Eruzione netted the game winner, as goaltender Craig stood on his head with 36 saves. Even though the victory against the Soviets seemed like the emotional gold medal, the U.S. would go on to beat Finland in the finals, standing atop the podium as Olympic champions. In Boston, these four men were great players, but by the winter of 1980, they became U.S. heroes. This underdog story captivated the entire country and by the turn of the century was considered the best sports moment of the 20th century, according to Sports Illustrated. “1980 is the reason I am a sports writer,” Mike Felger (COM ’92), host of 98.5 The Sports Hub and CSN Sports Net, said. “I was a hockey fan since I was a little kid and I loved that team.” The excitement and fairytale-like finish was captured again in 2004 when the Disney movie, “Miracle” was produced, uplifting a younger generation. “The movie captured what the moment was to the nation and it captured what it meant to our team,” Eruzione (SED ’77) said. Herb Brooks’ radical coaching approach pushed his players to the physical and emotional limit. It helped propel the U.S. past the Soviets, who were regarded as the best hockey team in the world. “I am not here to be your friend. See coach Patrick or Doc if you need a friend,” Brooks infamously said. “He was tougher in real life than in the movie. He wanted to make sure we were the best-conditioned team in the world,” Silk said. Silk was not the only teammate that recognized his intense tactics. “There was a method to his madness because when the smoke cleared, he was right and the end result was winning a gold

medal,” Eruzione said. Brooks’ coaching style and constant success remains unique and unparalleled by most. However, Eruzione was quick to draw the comparison between Brooks and BU Hockey coaching legend, Jack Parker, who retired in 2013 after 40 seasons. “They both had a passion to coach and teach, and both [were] very disciplined and in-your-face type coaches,” Eruzione said. “If I had a problem tomorrow, the first person I would call would be Jack Parker to ask for his advice.” Jack Parker became the face of Terrier Hockey, leading the scarlet and white to three National Championships and 24 NCAA Tournament appearances. He made BU the pinnacle of college hockey in Boston. “What really defines Jack Parker is his manner away from the ice,” Silk said. “His legacy speaks more than wins and losses—it speaks more to the extent to which he impacted players and made them be better people.” Silk had a unique hockey experience at BU, as he played and coached under Parker, serving as the assistant coach for a few seasons. He recalled a time when he found Parker cleaning the minimal dust on the floor of the bench before a game, so his players would not get dirt on their skate blades. This attention to detail helped shape his legacy, and more importantly, changed BU Hockey. Instilling qualities of school pride and excellence while embracing the great tradition at BU are at the forefront of what Terrier Hockey is all about. BU will forever recognize the four members of the 1980 U.S. Olympic team as some of the best BU Hall of Famers to ever wear the scarlet and white. “It was a great honor for me to play at BU,” Eruzione said. “BU was the mecca of hockey and I couldn’t believe I was going to play for them. It was a great honor to represent my country in the Olympic games. I was fortunate to fulfill two dreams.”


THE BUZZ SPRING 2014


ALIVE AND KICKING THE RISE OF SOCCER IN THE UNITED STATES BY BRITTANY BELL PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIGID KING DESIGN BY KARINA CROSS

W

ithin the next decade, the world will recognize the U.S. as one of the foremost soccer nations in the world. “It’s not like a switch got flipped,” Adam Vaccaro, a sports writer for Boston.com, said. “It’s been building up for decades and it’s gotten to the point where it’s been able to become ingrained in a way that it hasn’t in the past. We’ve reached a point where people are paying attention.” This past summer, the world’s largest gathering of elite soccer players took place: the FIFA World Cup. Throughout Brazil, fans gathered from across the globe to cheer on their country in hopes that they would take home World Cup gold. The U.S.was no different. With a global reputation as an average soccer nation, no one expected much of anything from the U.S. Men’s National Soccer Team. They were placed in a group with Germany, Ghana and Portugal—what soccer analysts referred to as the “Group of Death,” due to the immense soccer talent of the other nations. The U.S. finished second in the bracket, advancing out of the group stage to the round of 16 with a win over Ghana, a tie against Portugal

32

Within the next decade, the world will recognize the U.S. as one of the foremost soccer nations in the world.


and a loss to Germany. Instead of playing like a team from a nation where soccer comes second to many other sports, they kept up with the best teams in the world, including the gold medalist Germans. In the elimination rounds, the U.S. almost upset powerhouse Belgium. This year’s World Cup was available on primetime television, making the games more accessible to U.S. residents. Dedicated fans and casual viewers alike tuned in and excitement ensued. Children were inspired by the pursuit of global competition while current soccer players found inspiration to continue. “[The World Cup] showed people a new side of the team, and knowing that your country is getting better at something makes you want to care a little bit more,” Ritika Shah (CAS/COM ’15) said. “It’s exciting to see something you care about actually succeed.” Another inspiration for these generations of soccer players will come with the arrival of Barclay’s Premier League—the most elite soccer league in the world—stars Frank Lampard and Steve Gerard to play in Major League Soccer. Lampard, a midfielder for Manchester City, arrives in the U.S. this summer for the New York City Football Club’s inaugural season. Gerard, a fan favorite of Liverpool FC, will make the journey to the U.S. to play for the LA Galaxy. With these two major British stars coming to the MLS, a more exciting and competitive style of play will emerge in the league. They will become role models for

young soccer stars across the nation and evoke a new wave of fans. “[The arrival of Gerard and Lampard] will add to the quality of the play in the MLS, which will make it a more enjoyable game,” Coach Neil Roberts of the Boston University Men’s Soccer Team said. “Hopefully it will allow for a better style of play, and I think that will help younger [soccer] players.” Another new group of fans will emerge with the 2015 MLS expansion. Two new teams will make their debut this coming season: NYCFC and the Orlando City Soccer Club. These two new teams mark one of many expansions to the MLS since the league first began in 1996. “When the MLS first started twenty years ago, they had to pay for TV time,” Roberts said. “Now this year for the upcoming season, they just signed a $90 million a year contract with different stations for three years. That’s how far they’ve come [as a league].” In New England, MLS fans also had something to cheer about: the New England Revolution’s run to the MLS Championship. Although they lost to the LA Galaxy in the final, they had a successful playoff run, which sparked excitement in New England communities. U.S. World Cup star Jermaine Jones gave them the extra push they needed and scored crucial goals for the team. The Revolution might also be getting a new home. The Kraft family, owners of both the New England Patriots and the Revs, has

been in talks about building a new stadium in South Boston for the team. A new stadium in the city would mean more accessibility to Boston residents and fans coming from across New England. Their current location in Foxborough is more secluded than a Boston stadium would be, and they also have to split use of the field with the Patriots. A new stadium would not only mean a better home for the team, but also an entirely new feel for the organization. “I think having a stadium would make a huge difference because it would be a solid place for fans to come together, and see each [other] celebrate the thing they care so much about,” Shah said. “A physical location really enhances any fan spirit.” Another possible treat for Boston soccer fans: the Boston 2024 Olympic bid. If Boston were to land the Games, the most elite soccer players from around the world would come to compete for Olympic gold. If the Revs’ new stadium is built by then, Bostonians will get a taste of some of the best soccer in the world. “People care [about soccer] in a way that they never have before,” Vaccaro said.

[The World Cup] showed people a new side of the team, and knowing that your country is getting better at something makes you want to care a little bit more.


MUSIC

TAPE THIS Time for Boston Bands

BY VICTORIA WASYLAK PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEPHEN VOCATURO DESIGN BY KARINA CROSS


A

s a fundamental style that dominated the 1990s and 2000s as the universal sign of “I’m with the band,” Converse is now even more synonymous with the rock scene as a sponsor of local music through Rubber Tracks. Before the pulsating crowds, before the diamond records, before the glossy Rolling Stone cover, bands face the gritty hustle of working in a studio. The pleasure of unrestricted time in lofty recording studios is a reality for Top 40 hit makers, but as little as a day in the studio can be a luxury for local musicians. Converse Rubber Tracks is a program that allows local bands to apply for free studio time to record and mix up to five songs. Originally based in Brooklyn, the program has since expanded to San Francisco, Los Angeles, Toronto and, fortunately for Massachusetts bands, Boston. Local bands who have been accepted by Converse include rock band Beware the Dangers of a Ghost Scorpion and band Mellow Bravo. Ghost Scorpion bassist Rob Sutherland summed up their day in the studio. “It was a great recording experience for us, honestly. We recorded five songs live before lunch and mixed it all after lunch,” he said. “From this session we were able to take four of those songs and release it as a seven-inch called ‘Caught Dead’ that has been doing really well since we

36

released it last summer.” The Rubber Tracks’ home is a graffiti-covered studio haven, while its Boston headquarters is at Q Division, a Somerville studio that makes musicians salivate solely at the mention. The studio has hosted the likes of Guster, Skrillex and the Pixies. Bands sponsored by Converse have the privilege of using Studio A, an expanse of equipment— including a vintage eight-track recorder— and even a lounge to themselves. Although studio recording time is limited to one or two days for most bands, the resources are seemingly endless. From reverb and special effects gear to a qualified staff of sound engineers to assist with mixing, the only thing that is missing from the official recording experience is the hefty price tag. That, and worries about who has rights to the music. Even though Converse sponsors the studio time, the music produced in the studio is still the property of the band. Bands have the option of giving Converse limited rights to the music so that they can publish it on their website and social media pages. A day or two in the studio is a huge financial relief for bands. Richard Boucher, the manager for local band Sidewalk Driver, commented on the varying expenses that musicians face when recording in a professional studio. “Sometimes it’s per song, sometimes you get the place for the day and bang out what you can, often it’s hourly,” he said. “$500 to $800 per song, depending on where you’re going.” If you are looking to record at a studio like Q Division, it


will not be cheap. “There are bands that will put every penny they earn into their band in order to get a nice recording,” Boucher said. “Cameron Keiber from Eldridge Rodriguez used to do medical experiments, for instance. Some bands are great at hustling and selling merch, getting on good shows that pay, finding sponsored gigs that usually pay more than a club and then crowdfunding.” Even recording from home can be pricey—Lowell indie artist Jon Kohen records from his own home with his own interface and microphone for $200. It may be hundreds less than studio time, but $200 is far from pocket change for starving artists. Dan Masterson, a Boston solo artist, funds his own studio time by teaching private lessons and performing at liturgical services and other gigs. “Studio time is the biggest expense I have each year,” he

said. “As a solo act, I not only have to finance recording on my own, I also have to pay my bandmates and session players.” Masterson, who has applied to the program before, plans to apply again in the future. Due to limited studio time, Converse encourages artists who are not accepted the first time to re-apply within a few months. For the few minutes it takes to fill out the simple application, it is well worth the shot. “It’s absolutely worth every penny, but if you’ve got a chance to go in there on Converse’s dime, that’s a godsend,” Boucher said. You can apply online at www.converse.com/rubbertracks.

IT’S ABSOLUTELY WORTH EVERY PENNY, BUT IF YOU’VE GOT A CHANCE TO GO IN THERE ON CONVERSE’S DIME,

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


BY KENNY RAMOS DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION BY SOPHIA RICHARDSON arefully selected artists on a study playlist are a priority along with high doses of caffeine to get through a semester’s worth of material. The varying genres of music students study to reflect their own unique preferences and personalities. In the past, researchers have looked at the effects of music on an individual’s performance in completing various tasks correctly. More recent investigations, however, have been more concerned with an individual’s needs for music, personal preferences and self-awareness. The latest research understands the complexity of human behavior as well as the limitations of previous studies. A 2010 study titled, “The Perceived Impact of Playing Music While Studying: Age and Cultural Differences,” by Anastasia Kotsopoulou, an educational psychologist, and Susan Hallam, a dean at the University of London’s Institute of Education, gathered data on the usage of music in students from different countries at various age groups. Their research looked at music’s effect on mood and arousal while studying. According to the investigation, “Music played while studying was most strongly reported to relax, alleviate boredom and help concentration. Students reported that they mainly played music while studying when they were happy or bored, and that mood was a determinant of their decision.” Overall, Kotsopoulou and Hallam concluded, “Students are aware of its effect on performance, use it to support their learning, seem to know instinctively which tasks will be most affected and generally know when the music is interfering.” Reasons for why music can be helpful

38

vary among students. Emma Perez (SAR ’16) said, “I play music while studying to make it less dreadful. Sometimes I even use a certain song that I’m really into as a reward for when I finish a reading, a PowerPoint or a chapter.” Students can find studying arduous or bland, and may see music as a means to make it more bearable. Furthermore, using music as an incentive for completing a study goal is helpful because students may be motivated if they know they will be rewarded. In addition to this, Zach Lucey (ENG ’16) said, “I even notice that sometimes when I recall information, I can remember what music was playing when I was going over that particular material.” Perhaps for some students, the particular music they listen to can help with memory recall. Professor David Somers, the Department

Chair of Brain, Behavior and Cognition in Boston University’s Psychology department, helped clarify why music is used as a study aid. “People may feel under-stimulated or under-rewarded if they study in silence,” he said. “Music that is lively and makes you feel good then serves two purposes. It keeps your cognitive arousal high and serves as a reward, both of which help you stay on task. Also, music blocks out other environmental stimuli that might distract.” Overall, music serves our brain’s needs. The brain needs stimulation while studying because it prevents us from feeling as if we are undermining our abilities. A particular kind of music can help students create a conducive study environment since its prevalence helps narrow focus. It is possible that our music hinders our work, but Professor Somers believes this is not the case. Music is not the problem so long as


1. we are able to keep our attention on the task of processing and solidifying information. “Music can be distracting in at least two ways: if it is too loud or unfamiliar, it may be difficult to ignore as a stimulus,” Somers said. “Also, if it evokes specific episodic memories that also can be distracting.” If your study music is distracting you, it is because that particular music is not a good fit. Take Professor Somers’ advice and leave that “hot new single” along with the Bright Eyes song you listened to after getting dumped off your study playlist. Again, Professor Somers advises that “the best [study] music is probably familiar to the listener because they don’t have to focus much attention on it. The ideal music will vary, and even for a single listener may vary by time of day and location as internal arousal levels and external distractions change.” Heidi Auvenshine (COM ’16), prefers

electronic artists like Phantogram, Hippie Sabotage, XXYXX and Flume. “I prefer less lyrics and interesting beats as opposed to music that is anxiety-inducing, distracting or too upbeat,” she said. Matthew Weintrob (SAR ’16) tends to go for alt-rock chill vibes like Cage The Elephant, Animal Collective and Mac DeMarco. “They are more laid back and mellow, and fit better as background noise for me,” he said. When it comes to study music, it is a different-strokes-for-different-folks pattern. It all depends on your individual music tastes and how you react to certain genres. Preferably, opt for music that you are well acquainted with, that will not trigger a negative response and that will not divert much of your attention. Whether it’s Drake, Built To Spill or Marvin Gaye, there is no universal type of music to listen to. Find the right kind, hit the books and ace those exams.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

AMERICA Simon & Garfunkel RASBERRY BERET Prince HEART OF GLASS Blondie ONCE IN A LIFETIME Talking Heads CHAMBER OF REFLECTION Mac DeMarco SHABOP SHALOM Devendra Banhart THERE, THERE Radiohead DRIVIN’ ON 9 The Breeders THE FIRST SONG Built to Spill FADE INTO YOU Mazzy Star TONIGHT’S DA NIGHT Redman ONE TIME 4 YOUR MIND Nas CHUM Earl Sweatshirt TRAP QUEEN Fetty Wap KNOW YOURSELF Drake


BOSTON A GUIDE TO LOCAL VENUES

BY KERI MCALPINE PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARA DIFABIO DESIGN BY CAT YU

THE SINCLAIR 52 Church St. Cambridge, MA 02138

GREAT SCOTT 1222 Commonwealth Ave. Allston, MA 02134 With live music or comedy every night of the week and entrance fees rarely exceeding $20, Great Scott is a great place to hang out with friends. This venue is above all else a bar, and the majority of its shows are 21+. Local and small-time bands make up most of the Great Scott’s lineup. Student bands often play here too, giving students an opportunity to see their friends play at a live venue.

THE HOUSE OF BLUES BOSTON 15 Lansdowne St. Boston, MA 02215 The House of Blues is great because it is conveniently nestled in the Fenway area and books many popular acts. There is a lot of space to maneuver on the ground floor as well as two upper mezzanine levels. One shortcoming is that The House of Blues is a corporate chain, which can take away from the intimacy of certain shows and means more expensive tickets.

T.T. THE BEAR’S PLACE 10 Brookline St. Cambridge, MA 02139 T.T. the Bear’s is similar to Great Scott, but is in Cambridge and offers many 18+ shows. There are also pool tables and darts to keep audience members entertained between sets. The stage is small and low, which gives it a more personal environment and allows more interaction between the acts and the audience. T.T. the Bear’s is another venue where you can expect to see local or student bands play.

THERE IS A PRETTY GOOD CHANCE the act you have always

wanted to see will make a stop in Boston during your college career. Here is a list of great local music venues to check out for a memorable musical experience.

PARADISE ROCK CLUB 967 Commonwealth Ave. Boston, MA 02215

40


of

DONUTS Union Square Donuts: From Farmers Market to Brick and Mortar BY KELLY GAUTHIER PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARA DIFABIO DESIGN BY ERICA MAYBAUM

Maple Bacon.

Brown Butternut Hazel Crunch. SeaSalted Bourbon Caramel. Peanut Butter and Jelly. They might not sound like it, but these are all doughnut flavors. Union Square Donuts in Somerville, MA has been serving up unique and delicious doughnut flavors for the last two years. Co-owners Josh Danoff and Heather Schmidt make average doughnuts into delightful works of art. Schmidt is a baker by trade, but Danoff began his career as a stonemason. The pair started making doughnuts together and selling them at farmers markets before investing in the brick and mortar store in Union Square.

FOOD

Daydreaming


Have a bite: 20 Bow St. Somerville, MA Tuesday-Friday 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday-Sunday 7 a.m.-3 p.m.

42

With such a variety of flavors, these doughnuts don’t seem much like breakfast. “We can have a doughnut for anyone who walks in,” said Danoff. According to Danoff, nostalgia was the main reason for switching his profession to the food industry. “You smell the smell of doughnuts and remember when your parents or grandparents took you to get doughnuts,” said Danoff. “There’s something really amazing about what food can do.” While Union Square certainly has standard doughnut flavors, it’s their variety and quality that really make them stand out. The base for all of their doughnuts comes from brioche dough, making them light and fluffy.

According to Danoff, creating new flavors is about pushing the boundaries or taking a classic and putting a twist on it. “It’s all about keeping your eyes on global food trends,” said Danoff. Doughnuts aren’t the only things that Union Square makes. Recently, they’ve started using the same base dough to make their signature savory pastry squares. If a doughnut flavor a customer wants hasn’t been made yet, that won’t stop Union Square from trying it. “We’ve gotten flavor suggestions online,” said Danoff. In fact, social media is a huge part of what has made Union Square so successful. “It’s like an ingredient in what we do,” said Danoff. Danoff said that social media gives


customers the ability to interact, like they’re having a conversation. “I first saw Union Square Donuts on Instagram,” said Kira Keshavan (Questrom ’15). “I’ve seen a lot of pictures of their doughnuts and they all looked amazing.” Danoff loves when people post a picture of their doughnuts on social media. “Because there’s that closeness, people are willing to tell you what they really like,” said Danoff. That closeness has turned Union Square Donuts into a community landmark. Though the building itself is small, they get a lot of regular customers in the busy Union Square area. “It’s part of people’s routines,” said Danoff. The store itself is tiny. “You have to pack as much as you can

into a small space,” said Danoff. They start making their doughnuts three hours before the store opens. Employees come from various backgrounds. Some have never even made doughnuts before. “We have people who were accountants and are looking for a change,” said Danoff. Danoff said that the variety of backgrounds helps bring diversity to the environment. Danoff himself said that he brings a strong work ethic from his days as a stonemason. “We have so many incredibly smart and hardworking people here,” said Danoff. The only real requirement is the ability to work with people. Danoff said that if he didn’t like working with people, he definitely wouldn’t be able to interact with customers so frequently. There’s even a wall in the store where people can leave comments on Post-it notes. Danoff credits a lot of their success to their loyal customers. “The support we’ve gotten from the community has been amazing, but you have to earn it,” said Danoff. But, with their store location in Somerville, it can be hard to get there during store hours. “I wish it were easier to get over to Somerville,” said Emma Cheevers (COM ’16). “I’ve never tried their doughnuts because it seems difficult to get to.” Danoff said that in the future there might be a few more stores around Boston. Until then, Union Square also delivers with online ordering available. The store isn’t the only place to get fresh doughnuts, either. Union Square still frequents the farmers markets of their

origins. All of their upcoming pop-up store or farmers market appearances are listed on their website. Farmers markets have helped further integrate Union Square Donuts into the Boston community. All of their ingredients are also locally sourced. Everything Union Square Donuts uses is from scratch and nothing is processed, such as the dairy from a local family farm. “Quality is the absolute number one,” said Danoff. “Upwards of 90% of our vendors are all from New England.” Creating a thriving and sustainable business hasn’t been easy. “If it was just making doughnuts, it would be a lot simpler,” said Danoff.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


THE TIMES THEY ARE A CHANGIN’ SUSTAINABILITY IN MEAT INDUSTRY HITS CLOSE TO HOME AT BU BY CORINA PINTADO PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARA DIFABIO DESIGN BY EDEN WEINBERG Very few students consider how their meat got from the farm to their plates. It would be erroneous to ignore the legacy of the meat industry in this country, which has had its fair share of controversies. From the publication of Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle to Robert Kenner’s documentary exposé Food Inc., there has been much shock, disgust and disagreement reflected on the industry. Stigmas attached to meat production have been difficult to shake over the years. “As much as I love to eat meat, I still think the industry is flawed. We have a long way to go in fixing it and making sure animals aren’t over-bred or killed inhumanely,” said Elizabeth Herron (SAR ’16). 44

Herron’s sentiments, like many others, are reflected in the decrease of meat—most notably beef— production and consumption in the country. According to the United States Department of Agriculture’s “Livestock, Dairy and Poultry Outlook” report from January 2015, commercial red meat production in November 2014 was down 9 percent from November 2013. A growing nationwide interest in sustainability has had an impact on the industry. More than a trend, sustainability has become a way of life and BU has been an advocate. BU has been a frontrunner in sourcing locally grown food (within a 250-mile radius) and plans to “increase the percentage of sustainable and socially responsible food purchases to 20 percent of total food purchases by 2018,” according to the BU Dining Services site. “We prefer humanely raised meat, which takes into account the quality of the feed, as well as


antibiotic and growth hormone use, as well as slaughtering methods, access to outdoors and quality of conditions and more,” said Sabrina Pashtan, BU’s Sustainability Coordinator. “New England’s poultry and meat production is very limited, especially compared to other parts of the country, so there is no doubt we have our work cut out for us,” said Pashtan. “Most farms that raise animals are small, and there are very few meat processing plants. With time, we hope that as demand grows for New England meat, farmers and infrastructure will be able to scale up and provide the region with local, humanely raised meat.” Such is the case with Maine Family Farms and Murray’s Chicken, two local farms BU partnered with last semester to purchase meats from. “We’ve been Certified Humane for over 13 years, but it’s only recently that people have become concerned over how animals are raised and the different humane programs involved,” said Ashley Born, the Chief Field of Marketing Officer at Murray’s Chicken. Murray’s Chicken has operated for over 30 years and from a plant in South Fallsburg, New York for the past 15 years. It is a miniscule operation compared to other sectors of the poultry industry, but, as far as business goes, Murray’s is expanding. The company has been working with distributors like Cisco Boston and Bon Appétit in the area to sell their recently launched antibiotic-free chicken. “We’re happy that we’ve been a fit for Boston University because from what we’ve seen, they’re very concerned about the kind of food they’re feeding their students,” said Born. Established in the 1940s, Maine Family Farms shares similar sentiments about spreading sustainability and safety concerns to a variety of restaurants, colleges and supermarket chains. “We are Certified Humane, which entails caring for the animals and how they’re processed when

killed. We are also a USDA-approved company and believe that our products should not have Genetically Modified Organisms or antibiotics,” said Tom Masselli, of Maine Family Farms’ sales division. “A lot of the consumers are looking for clean-labeled products without any fillers. They want to know where the products are coming from and what’s in the product and overall, they want to buy locally.” Antibiotics have been widely used in modern livestock and poultry to promote growth and production. According to the USDA site, the use of subtherapeutic antibiotics can increase productivity, but its extensive use can create drug-resistant pathogens in humans and animals. Thus, an increased resistance to animal antibiotics can lead to outbreaks of livestock disease that can be transmitted to humans. Similarly, GMOs have become a significant component of our nation’s agriculture and economy. GMOs are plants or animals that have undergone an alteration of genes with DNA from different species of living organisms or bacteria. These genetic modifications allow organisms to gain resistance to disease and tolerance of pesticides. GMOs are a direct extension of chemical agriculture and, although approved by the government, they continue to be unlabeled on products. Demolishing the extensive use of GMOs and antibiotics is something both Murray’s Chicken and Maine Family Farms have incorporated into their practices. Following the Certified Humane protocol, both farms take every detail into account to ensure that the animal is treated humanely throughout the slaughtering process. “The Certified Humane protocol is really the gold standard,” said Born. All of the chickens at Murray’s

are halal, which means they are hand-slaughtered and handprocessed based on protocol. Animals are stunned to limit pain and then put through a production line. From there, they are put in a chiller and, depending on what the orders are, cut a certain way. Such an extensive program has its downsides in cost and increased labor, but the outcomes are well worth it and evident in the final product. “We hand-slaughter because it also changes the taste, making the chicken more ‘butter-like’ and richer,” said Born. “And because of that, we’re also known as being a ‘chef ’s chicken.’ There is also a difference in color because our chicken tends to be pink as opposed to a yellow-grayish tint that other chickens have.” “The farmers that we work with provide their animals with grass-fed grains that are antibioticfree and GMO-free, so the product ages well,” said Masselli. “When we process it, we let the product hang for 14 to 21 days, so the actual product is stretching, which makes it more tender and easier to eat, especially for meats like steak and burger patties.” Freshness is a key feature of both companies. They know what their customers want and guarantee them just that. In some respects, the farms also provide education about sustainability to their customers. “[Sustainability] is very important to us,” said Born. “I think it’s incredibly important to our customers as well. Overall, we’re always seeking ways to do things better for the company and our customers.”

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


BY KELSEY KING PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARA DIFABIO DESIGN BY GABRIELA ARRIAGA Popular on newspapers and news feeds alike is constant discussion of the “Paleo Diet,” which, as the name suggests, is limited to the foods that were available to the earliest of humans. This means that most of the foods in your pantry and fridge right now—multi-grain bread, string cheese, Nutella— are all off limits. This idea of stepping back in time, which may sound like an eternal season of Lent to some, stems from the findings of Dr. Weston Price. In the 1930s, he traveled to nearly every corner of the globe and studied the dietary habits of indigenous tribes to compare with modern diet in developed nations. What he found from physical examinations is what became most shocking: among the thousands of people that he was in contact with—none of whom consumed processed foods—not a single case of cancer, heart disease or diabetes was present. In reality, cancer cells are surprisingly delicate and require precise environmental conditions, such as an adequate supply of glucose from refined sugars, to exist and thrive in the human body. “The World Health Organization’s admission that sugar causes cancer is concern enough for alarm,” says Dee McCaffrey, author of The Science of Skinny. “Normal cells get their energy for reproduction from oxygen, while cancer cells reproduce by fermenting glucose. […] When you eat [refined] sugar, you are actually feeding cancer cells.”

46

There is a widespread assumption that malignant cells are nearly indestructible. However, the body’s pH levels greatly determine the ability of cancer cells to grow. The optimal range for a healthy individual is a slightly alkaline pH of 7.365 to 7.450. “[Your body] must be in an alkaline state; it is alkaline by nature, but acidic by function,” said Dr. Susan E. Brown, co-author of The Acid Alkaline Food Guide. This alkaline state provides a base for optimal cell function by making it easier to transport oxygen and nutrients into cells and to transport wastes out. Chronic acidity leads to diminished nutrients and oxygen and a buildup of wastes, which leads to cellular fatigue and disease. One of the easiest ways to raise the pH of—or alkalinize—the blood is through diet. The effect a food has on blood pH is a result of how the body metabolizes its chemical components, not a measure of the pH of the food itself. For this reason, acidic foods such as lemons and grapefruit can have an alkalinizing effect on blood, while some basic foods like eggs can have an acidifying effect. Foods with the most alkalinizing properties fall into two categories: vegan and paleo. Vegan foods are derived from only plants, while paleo foods are those presumed to have been eaten by early humans—meat, fish, eggs, nuts, seeds,

Essentials for 1. Nuts & Seeds 2. Fruits & Vegetables 3. Oils

4. Beverages

healthy oils and fresh fruits and vegetables. The golden rule to follow is not to only eat alkalinizing foods but to consume a meal that has a net alkalinizing effect. This is accomplished by a primarily vegan-paleo diet with small amounts of animal protein. The diet is not cutting out, but cutting back. As a growing interest and awareness of nutrition and health spreads, it may be only a matter of time before simpler remedies for disease—such as this one—catch fire. “People are saying, ‘Look, you know, I want something different’ and they’re seeing that the traditional, conventional drug therapies are not necessarily a big help,” said Dr. Brown. “It’s better to build [and sustain] your health and try to maintain the amazing functioning of the human body rather than trying to alter it with drugs.”


D TCH NG THE DINING HALL RESTAURANT S WORTH LEAVING BU FOR STORY AN PHOTOGRAPHY BY ELISHA MACHADO DESIGN BY ALEENA QAZI While the dining hall can be a great pit stop between classes, Boston’s best foods are just a T-ride away. Whether you are craving a big bowl of ramen or are in the mood for a sit-down for two, you are sure to find one of these spots satisfying.

Le’s

Cuisine: Vietnamese, Noodle Soup, Dinner Plates 682 Washington Ave. Boston, MA 02111 If you are tired of eating Top Ramen, try Le’s (formerly known as Pho Pasteur) variety of authentic Vietnamese noodle soups ranging from beef to vegetarian. Le’s also serves a variety of dinner plates, with generous helpings of fried rice and lo mein. Closest T-Stop: Boylston Street

Crema Café

Cuisine: Soups, Sandwiches, Coffee 27 Brattle St. Cambridge, MA 02138 Crema Café is a bustling coffeehouse located just off the Harvard Square stop on the Red Line. Their menu offers a variety of warm soups and unique sandwiches, like their Crema Grilled Chicken Panini with avocado and zesty cotija-corn spread. Crema even offers vegan, gluten-free and dairy-free items to cater to many palates. Be sure to save room for dessert, as you will want to try a few of their freshly baked pastries or cupcakes. Closest T-Stop: Harvard Square

Finale

Joe’s American Bar and Grill Cuisine: American Classics, Burgers, Ribs, Chicken 181 Newbury St. Boston, MA 02216

Joe’s menu offers a variety of classic American dishes, such as roasted chicken and New York strip steak that will not break the bank. Finish off your meal by sharing one of Joe’s delicious desserts, such as their warm skillet cookie served a la mode or butterscotch bread pudding. Closest T-Stop: Copley Station

Zinneken’s

Cuisine: Desserts 1 Columbus Ave. Boston, MA 02216

Cuisine: Waffles 1154 Massachussetts Ave. Cambridge, MA 02138

For your sugar cravings, Finale offers many delectable desserts from petite pastries to classic cakes for two. Treat yourself to one of their featured items, such as their Chocolate Symphony cake with white chocolate mousse or Razzmatazz cake with lemon raspberry mousse. Finale is the best place to eat dessert first, but if you would also like a main meal, it has a lunch and dinner menu to indulge in. Closest T-Stop: Arlington

If you crave breakfast for dinner, Zinneken’s is definitely the place to be. This quaint café in Cambridge offers free Wi-Fi and soft French tunes, making it an ideal hang out spot. Try their popular liège waffle topped with strawberries and whipped cream that will transport you to Belgium. Closest T-Stop: Harvard Square

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


STUDY ABROAD WORLD-CLASS INTERNSHIP AND STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS.

/BUabroad

bu.edu/abroad

@BUabroad

See individual program descriptions at bu.edu/abroad for details. An equal opportunity, affirmative action institution.


FASHION

sunshine let the

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARA DIFABIO PHOTOGRAPHY EDITED BY CAT YU ART DIRECTION BY ERICA MAYBAUM AND EDEN WEINBERG STYLED BY KATE RADIN

in

With a wink and nod as tribute, the spirit of the ‘70s has been awakened–reborn on the runways and exuding the languid mood of the decade. Flowery prints paired with bold colors, structured suits mixed with flowing silhouettes, leather fringe and suede accents, all evoking an era of change and expression. Trade in your skinny jeans for bellbottoms and your winter coat for a waistcoat; it’s the second coming of the Age of Aquarius.


“Someone told me there’s a girl out there with love in her eyes and

flowers

in her hair.” – Going To California, Led Zeppelin, 1971

[LOCATION] SOWA VINTAGE MARKET / 369 ALBANY ST. TWITTER: @SOWAVINTAGEMKT INSTAGRAM: SOWAVINTAGE 50 SUNDAYS 10 A.M.-4 P.M. OPEN


[COVER] TAYLOR: DECEMBER THEIVES, LURDES BERGADA KNIT TUNIC, $158; JY’S VINTAGE MARKET AT SOWA, VINTAGE FRINGE SKIRT; NO REST FOR BRIDGET, ANENOME BRALETTE, $9.99; H&M, PLATFORM SANDALS, $34.95; LOU LOU, OOR HEADBAND, $20; LOU LOU, IZU SILVER HOOPS, $10 MARKET AT SOWA [PREVIOUS PAGE] ALI: JACK WILLS, SALCOMBE PRINTED POPLIN SHIRT (RED GEO), $79.50; JACK WILLS, BUCKINGHAM SUIT TROUSER (GREY), $148; H&M, LEATHER DERBY SHOES, $49.95 SCOTT: JACK WILLS, SALCOMBE PRINTED NEVIS SHIRT, $79.50; JACK WILLS, BUCKINGHAM SUIT TROUSER (TEAL PRNCE WALES), $168 KYLE: JACK WILLS, SALCOMBE PRINTED POPLIN SHIRT (BLU/GR GEO), $79.50; GANT RUGGER, THE HOPSACK SMARTY PANTS, $295; H&M, SUEDE DERBY SHOES, $69.95 [THIS PAGE] MORGAN: LIT BOUTIQUE, JEALOUS TOMATO SWEET HEART CROP TOP, $44; LIT BOUTIQUE, JEALOUS TOMATO SWEET HEART KNEE LENGTH SKIRT, $48; LOU LOU, IZU SILVER HOOPS, $10

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


52


[THIS PAGE] TAYLOR: ZARA, LEATHER WAISTCOAT, $99.90; H&M, PATTERNED JERSEY SHIRT, $39.95; H&M, FAUX SUEDE SHORTS, $24.95; NO REST FOR BRIDGET, QUPID SUEDE FRINGE SHOES, $42.99; LOU LOU, OOR HEADBAND, $20 ALI: JACK WILLS, CROMLEIGH FORMAL SHIRT (WHITE DOT), $118; JACK WILLS, WIDMORE CHINO SHORT (NAVY STRIPE), $74.50 KYLE: H&M, COTTON SHIRT, $29.95; GANT RUGGER, STICK BOY BULL DENIM JEANS, $195; H&M, SUEDE DERBY SHOES, $69.95; MORGAN: FREE PEOPLE, LOVE IS ALL AROUND ROMPER, $128; H&M, LEATHER ZIP SANDALS, $59.95; LOU LOU, PIN FLAT DOT RING, $12 SCOTT: RALPH LAUREN DENIM & SUPPLY, SLIM-FIT OWEN’S ARTISAN JEANS, $198; RALPH LAUREN DENIM & SUPPLY, POCKET TEE CREWNECK, $29.50; RALPH LAUREN DENIM & SUPPLY, HOODED MILITARY JACKET, $198; H&M, FAUX SUEDE SHOES, $39.95 JIA: NO REST FOR BRIDGET, BAJEE COLLECTION BUTTON-DOWN BLOUSE, $24.99; FREE PEOPLE, DRAPEY POCKET PANT, $78; H&M, PLATFORM SANDALS, $34.95; DECEMBER THIEVES, ADINA MILLS QUARTZ RING, $145; WATCH, STYLIST’S OWN

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


“I just love the Seventies style, the way all the players dressed nice, you know, kept their hair looking good, drove sharp cars and they talked real slick.” —Snoop Dog

TAYLOR: LIT BOUTIQUE, LUCY PARIS CROP TOP, $68; LIT BOUTIQUE, LUCY PARIS SKIRT, $64; LOU LOU, OOR HEADBAND, $20; LOU LOU, IZU SILVER HOOPS, $10 54


MORGAN: RALPH LAUREN DENIM & SUPPLY, EMBROIDERED BEACH TOP, $98; RALPH LAUREN DENIM & SUPPLY, TOLME BOYFRIEND CUTOFF SHORT, $69.50; RALPH LAUREN DENIM & SUPPLY, HOODED MILITARY JACKET, $198; NO REST FOR BRIDGET, QUPID SUEDE FRINGE SHOES, $42.99; NO REST FOR BRIDGET, CRYSTAL CUFF BRACELET, $14.99 JIA: NO REST FOR BRIDGET, LUSH TUNIC, $38; FREE PEOPLE, DESTROYED 5 POCKET FLARE JEANS, $78; H&M, WEDGE-HEELED LEATHER SANDALS, $99; LOU LOU, IDE NECKLACE, $20; LOU LOU, EPO FLOPPY FELT HAT, $25; DECEMBER THIEVES, SPECIES BY THE THOUSANDS PALMISTRY BRASS STAR RING, $64; DECEMBER THIEVES, SPECIES BY THE THOUSANDS PALMISTRY BRASS CIRCLE RING, $64 SCOTT: JACK WILLS, SALCOMBE PRINTED NEVIS SHIRT, $79.50; JACK WILLS, BUCKINGHAM SUIT JACKET (TEAL PRNCE WALES), $348; JACK WILLS, BUCKINGHAM SUIT TROUSER (TEAL PRNCE WALES), $168; H&M, FAUX SUEDE SHOES, $39.95 KYLE: JACK WILLS, SALCOMBE PRINTED POPLIN SHIRT (BLU/ GR GEO), $79.50; GANT RUGGER, HOPSACK BOMBER JACKET, $595; GANT RUGGER, THE HOPSACK SMARTY PANTS, $295; H&M, SUEDE DERBY SHOES, $69.95 ALI: JACK WILLS, SALCOMBE PRINTED POPLIN SHIRT (RED GEO), $79.50; JACK WILLS, BUCKINGHAM SUIT JACKET (GREY), $298; JACK WILLS, BUCKINGHAM SUIT TROUSER (GREY), $148; H&M, SILK TIE, $24.95; H&M, LEATHER DERBY SHOES, $49.95

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


KYLE: GANT RUGGER, WAFFLE UNCONSTRUCTED BLAZER, $595; GANT RUGGER, SLUB TEE, $98; GANT RUGGER, WAFFLE UNCONSTRUCTED SHORTS, $285; H&M, SUEDE DERBY SHOES, $69.95; H&M, SILK HANDKERCHIEF, $12.95

56


TAYLOR: ZARA, LEATHER WAISTCOAT, $99.90; H&M, PATTERNED JERSEY SHIRT, $39.95; H&M, FAUX SUEDE SHORTS, $24.95; NO REST FOR BRIDGET, QUPID SUEDE FRINGE SHOES, $42.99; LOU LOU, OOR HEADBAND, $20 JIA: NO REST FOR BRIDGET, BAJEE COLLECTION BUTTON-DOWN BLOUSE, $24.99; FREE PEOPLE, DRAPEY POCKET PANT, $78; H&M, PLATFORM SANDALS, $34.95; DECEMBER THIEVES, ADINA MILLS GEODE RING, $145, WATCH, STYLIST’S OWN


STREET

STYLE BY TARA RUDOMANSKI PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARA DIFABIO DESIGN BY TAISIA IVANOVA

DAVID IMANI

CAITLIN JACOBS

KATHERINE MERWIN

Scarf: Lost & Found in Myles Jacket: Element Shoes: Clarks

Blazer: H&M Skirt: Tobi Boots: DSW

Skirt: J.Crew Sweater: Brooks Brothers Boots: Frye

WHY WE LOVE THIS LOOK:

WHY WE LOVE THIS LOOK:

WHY WE LOVE THIS LOOK:

COM ‘15 Instagram @DavidShahin

The subtle pops of color

58

CGS ‘15 Instagram @cjskye

The red blazer with leather contrast

CFA/CAS ‘18 Instagram @katherinemerwin

The comfy yet put-together look


BUSINESS BY SAM PETERS AND KATE RADIN PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARA DIFABIO DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION BY TAISIA IVANOVA

M

iuccia Prada called it an “instant language” and Alexander McQueen referred to it as “a form of escapism.” Coco Chanel once said it is “ideas, the way we live, what is happening,” while Oscar Wilde found it so insufferable he once referred to it as “a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months.” Fashion has been described and redescribed, reinvented and reshaped as an art form, lifestyle or expression. Often overlooked and unspoken, however, is its core: the business aspect. By definition, fashion is a business. After all, it is often referred to as an industry and criticized for being a blatant symbol of

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


commercialism and consumerism. It has been a scapegoat for body image issues and has been condemned for its vapid nature and glossing over “real” issues, proving to be materialistic and shallow. “Concepts like ‘status’ or ‘elitism’ are oftentimes attached to the idea of ‘fashion’ simply because of the type of person the industry attracts,” said Samantha Kirshon (COM ’16), an intern at Prabal Gurung. Behind the pretty faces and luxury fabrics, however, are the movers and shakers, running a $1.5 trillion dollar capitalist enterprise. The U.S. alone spends upwards of $250 billion on fashion apparel a year, while New York City’s economy grows about $20 million annually during Fall/Winter Fashion Week. With roughly 60 percent of the luxury goods market tied up in 35 brands, fashion has become not only socially and economically impactful, but also a monopolized business driven by power plays. Two French luxury good conglomerates drive the fashion world. Paris-based LVMH owns leading fashion subsidiaries such as Dior, Donna Karan, Céline, Kenzo, Fendi, Givenchy, Marc Jacobs and Louis Vuitton. LVMH’s top competition is Kering (formerly PPR), another French luxury company that owns Gucci, Saint Laurent, Stella McCartney, Alexander McQueen and Balenciaga. Richemont, a Dutch company, is also a powerful player, owning Chloé and Cartier. Italy’s Aeffe Group owns Moschino and Alberta Ferretti. Privately owned designers include Ralph Lauren Corporation, Burberry Group, Chanel S.A., Versace and Prada Group, which owns both Prada and Miu Miu. These ownerships do not even begin to cover the cosmetics and accessory lines, which often are owned or co-owned as separate entities. “The fashion industry is a multibillion dollar global enterprise. Just like any other business, it exists because products are created and sold,” said Kirshon. “However, creativity and artistic capacity facilitate the business that perpetuates the success of industry.” It is not just artistic capability when it comes to the actual design of clothes, it is creativity on all fronts: business models, marketing strategies and ad campaigns, to name a few. While many focus on the twodimensional, consumer aspect of fashion, they miss the big picture. The “creative and

60

business people” as Imran Amed, a Harvard Business School graduate and founder of businessoffashion.com, stated are also an integral component of the business. Amed created the first website dedicated to expressing “an informed, analytical and opinionated point of view on the fashion business,” something he found was severely lacking. The website is now used as a resource for predicting trends, commenting on the luxury goods industry’s heavy reliance on China, helping bridge the gap between traditional fashion and modern electronic retail, profiling major players, dissecting the various fashion empires and proving how vital fashion is to the economy. Amed explained that fashion is not just about its societal or cultural impact, but also how it “creates significant economic impact and employs millions of people.” From PR and marketing execs to those who are in charge of clothing distribution, there is an organized aspect of fashion that goes on behind the scenes. A fashion business can only be as successful as the team of experts who are entrusted to promote it. PR and marketing staff cover a range of operations from managing the company’s brand image to reaching out to press to garner coveted media attention. The staff ensures brand visibility and aims to present it in the best light possible. While social media outlets allow these brands to become more apparent than ever, managing a company’s image takes careful consideration. Zahra Shivji (CGS ’15), Director of PR at Boston University’s Fashion and Retail Association, is in charge of external relations and stressed the importance of maintaining a positive brand image that will appeal to audiences. “Running the social media pages is difficult because I need to 100 percent make sure that I keep the brand’s message as consistent as possible,” said Shivji. “You need to make sure the audience is in relation to the product you are marketing.” From the outside, fashion appears a highly cultivated, fluid industry. Cracking into the fashion business can be a difficult feat, however. From being extremely knowledgeable and conversant about the latest trends to garnering a name and consistent clientele, being successful in this field requires nothing less than hard work and dedication. Take, for example, the fashion buying trade.

The job of a fashion buyer entails purchasing clothing for retail, wholesale or independently owned stores with whom they have a relationship. Fashion buyers attend “viewings,” in which designers display their collections and buyers pick the samples they want to sell in their showrooms for clients. These stores rely on their fashion buyer to provide a wealth of apparel and accessories that are both desirable for the upcoming season and coincide with the store’s image and style. When purchasing clothing, buyers must take into consideration the customer’s needs, fashion trends, potential suppliers and prices. A buyer must ensure that a client will profit from the purchase. “[As a fashion buyer, you must] have the ability to know your market and its demands,” said fashion buyer Stephanie SchneiderRittmann, who co-owns Manasseri Sales & Trade based in Dusseldorf, Germany. “Every market is different. For example, in Germany, they look for much more conservative styles and colors than say in Italy or Spain...so we choose accordingly.” Most buyers work 35-40 hour weeks. Beyond having an eye for design and color, they must be willing to devote the time and creative effort required of such a fast-paced environment. For those just starting out, it is necessary to start from the bottom and work up in order to gain the experience that will lay the foundations for a successful career. “I assisted the Public Relations and Marketing Manager,” said Kirshon, describing her internship. “[I assisted] collecting, managing and documenting corporate print and online press, conducting local, domestic and international Women’s RTW sample send-outs to magazines and celebrities to wear for photo shoots and events, respectively, and assisted in the execution of Press Day, where the designer showcased his pieces for his Resort 2015 collection.” Yes, that is all the work of an unpaid intern—and although the field can often be synonymous with elevated stress levels and caffeine driven days, the fashion business still manages to maintain its unique allure. “Fashion is about always being aware of the latest and hottest trends and that is a proactive as well as challenging job,” said SchneiderRittmann. “That is what inspires me.”


Fashion is about always being aware of the latest and hottest trends and that is a proactive as well as challenging job...That is what inspires me.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


changing the nature of what we use on our bodies BY BRITTANY PONTBRIAND PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARA DIFABIO DESIGN BY ERICA MAYBAUM

62


MAKE YOUR OWN { Vanilla Brown Sugar Scrub }

If it is difficult to pronounce a product’s ingredients, perhaps it shouldn’t be put on your body. As many consumers

become more aware of what they are feeding their bodies, many are also becoming more conscious of what goes on their skin. Bodies can absorb up to 64 percent of what is placed on them, and it is important that the skin absorbs natural ingredients, not chemicals. Sodium laureth sulfate, tetrasodium EDTA, methylisothiazolinone, panthenyl ethyl ether and even lead are only some examples of the harsh chemicals found in many beauty products. In other words, the cosmetic aisle is toxic. Often, large corporations will advertise their products using phrases such as “herbal” and “organic.” However, these words have no legal definition in advertising, so it is important to be an educated consumer. Amanda Lucidi (COM ’17) started using organic products about four years ago when she discovered the startling truth about the body’s heavy skin absorption. “I figured it made more sense to use things that I was okay with having in my system,” said Lucidi. “I liked the idea of being conscious of what the products I was using were actually made of.” LUSH Cosmetics, Eco Emi, Etsy and Follain are a few businesses that are breaking through the chemicals and providing consumers the resources to get access to truly organic products. The au naturel beauty trend has swept the nation in a “going green” beauty routine. “For me, it is really simple—the closer to nature the product is, the closer it is going to react with how our skin would naturally behave,” said Kathleen LeBlanc, the LUSH Cosmetics Senior Sales Ambassador at their Newbury Street location. LUSH is one of the many companies that genuinely wants to change the nature of

beauty products by standardizing natural and non-harmful ingredients. The LUSH brand is geared toward making effective products with ingredients customers can easily recognize. Their mission statement calls it “green washing,” and they aim to produce products that are environmentally compatible. All of LUSH’s products are made in a kitchen— rather than a factory— and shipped to LUSH distributors on a weekly basis. “The less you fuss with it, the better,” said LeBlanc in regards to the product ingredients. “Keep it simple.” From fragrant and fizzing bath bombs to their newest shampoo bars, LUSH is not only making going organic easier, but is also making it more fun. With various stores across the country, and multiple in the Boston area, LUSH is the ideal starter place for transitioning to organic products. However, organic products are not just found in stores anymore. With a mission of establishing eco-friendly products as the norm, Eco Emi is a monthly subscription box that provides customers samples of organic products. For $15 a month, members can start transitioning to a greener lifestyle. Each box is themed and filled with all natural goodies. There are various samples of skin, hair, nail products and even some healthy snacks in every delivery. Another easy way to find beauty products with familiar ingredients is through independent sellers on Etsy. Many individuals who are passionate about knowing exactly what they are applying to their face and body take initiative to make their own products. Jess Piestrup and Whitney Acheson, better known as the Moody Sisters, are a popular seller on Etsy. They first became interested in developing their own skin care line after growing tired from always struggling with the results, or lack of, that they were getting from mass produced skin care products. With prices ranging from $4.95 to $19.95, the Moody Sisters make being natural accessible and affordable. Their products include blemish serums, lip balms, deodorants,

Ingredients:

>> 2 Cups brown sugar >> 1 Cup granulated sugar >> 1 Cup coconut oil >> 1-2 Tablespoon(s) pure vanilla extract

Steps:

Mix the brown sugar and granulated sugar until there are no lumps. Add coconut oil, stir until texture is consistent. Add vanilla extract and stir. Use one to three times a week!

cleansers, dry shampoos, toners, moisturizers, eye creams, soaps and even body scrubs. With a five-star rating from over 2,000 sales, the Moody Sisters offer a large variety of organic homemade products for a price that is practically a steal. With locations in Boston and Nantucket, Follain is another company with the goal of promoting healthier and greener beauty routines. Their mission statement reads, “We exercise and eat our greens, but don’t stop there. We also feed our skin beautiful ingredients that it knows how to use.” Advertising their “clean, pure and effective spa-grade and U.S. made” products, Follain is a user-friendly way to gain access to over 30 U.S. brands that make organic beauty products. Follain’s organized list of brands makes it a great avenue for acquainting yourself with more organic beauty vendors and expanding your green cosmetics collection. Going green is not intimidating or scary—but the chemicals found in a lot of products are. Use these brands as suggestions to overhaul your beauty regimen.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


, h s a

W , nse

T A PE

Ri

RE TH

64

L LICA C Y EC

SIDE

A SH OF F

ION


DANNY MCCARTHY PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARRON ROTH DESIGN BY ALEENA QAZI

I

t was June 2014 when Authentic Brands Group made the announcement that all Juicy Couture stores would be closing in efforts to rebrand. The label, famous for its bedazzled velour tracksuits seen on the likes of Paris Hilton, was a staple of the early 2000s. A fad had once again come and gone. While velour tracksuits have not found their way back into the hearts and closets of millions, other early 2000s trends have resurfaced. Gauchos made their mark last season, Moschino brought back the logo belt and long denim skirts were a staple on Spring/Summer 2015 runways like Kenzo and Chloé. It was not just the skirts, either. Tie-up denim found a place in Gucci’s show while Fendi, Valentino and Stella McCartney proved denim and denim on denim is still trendy. Justin and Britney may be over, but their ensemble at the ’01 American Music Awards lives on. So, what is with the ghost of fashion’s past? Perhaps it is a lack of originality plaguing designers, proving fashion has run its course—pulling a rinse, wash and repeat on old styles. Or maybe the nature of fashion is just that: the constant reuse of old trends turned new with minor adjustments to make a statement about the era. “I think trends are always cyclical,” said Allyson Rees, fashion journalist and co-founder of ThePolitesse.com. She credits the ’90s as a key influence on today’s fashion. “Calvin Klein’s Justin Bieber ads, modeled after the original Marky Mark ads are a very good example,” said Rees. “They shocked then, they shock now. Since that ad debuted, [Calvin Klein] added more than 3.5 million followers on its collective social mediums.” The cyclical aspect of fashion does not go ignored. Vogue and The New York Times confirmed that the ’70s are back as a fashion influence. Fringe, suede and some Wild West inspirations are reappearing. Wide-brimmed hats and bandanas became increasingly common in 2014 and are expected to grow in popularity throughout this year. The ’70s, in small doses, can be very glamorous and compliment the 2014

trends of bohemian and natural aspects. It is about piecing together the past with the present. It is not what you are wearing but how you wear it. 2015 promises to be a year of juxtapositions: natural tones and bold patterns. The crisp white balances with vibrant touches of red while ’70s free-form cuts with ’90s grunge play off strong fabrics like suede and denim. Slim shapes, clean lines and bold patterns all mix to create a fresh palette unlike anything in previous years. Jack Wills, the British clothing brand, is just one example of a brand influenced by the past. “The [2015] collection draws a ton of inspiration from British ’60s mod and British pop,” said Montana Rispoli (COM ’17), a marketing intern for the USA Jack Wills Team. “The colors in the collection are bold—like flaming red and bubblegum pink!” The aforementioned denim on denim look dominated the runways, but in the regular day-to-day it could potentially be a catastrophe. When matching denim with denim, heavily contrasting pieces complement each other, like an acid wash jacket with darker skinny jeans. Darren Bunch, a senior at The Boston Conservatory and sales associate at Jack Wills, offered up an alternative to denim for 2015. “One of the pieces I’m really loving for men this season is the Buckingham Suit wool trousers. They come in a few different patterns and are super versatile,” said Bunch. “You could throw on your favorite knit or wear it belted with a fitted tee for a sleek, smart look. It’s a really fun way to break away from your daily denim.” With pulling off double-denim duty—or rocking any alliterative fashion choice—remember that confidence is key. Trends come and go, and are inherently flighty. Don’t worry about mastering every trend; rather, focus on the ones that ring true to your current or desired style. And despite what the top houses tell us, fashion should be functional, or at least a little.

In keeping with bold patterns from 2014, gingham is a strong option for 2015. It is not just for Dorothy Gale anymore and avoiding classic colors like red will make your outfit look less costume-y. Black and white or charcoal grays create a sleeker profile, making it look more “haute” and a little less “hot mess.” Skin tight and “skinny” is a trend finally dwindling in 2015, swapping out in favor of boxier cuts for tops and tapered, slim cuts for bottoms. “Jack Wills is releasing their first tapered fit for men, which gives a cool modern look while being flattering for more body types,” said Bunch. While these trends, cuts and patterns fluctuate between what is “in” and what is “out,” there are some constants—a little black dress will always be a go-to, loafers will always be a classic and a trench coat will always be a must-have. Despite this, why not play with the “what goes around comes back around” aspect of fashion. If not, things could get incredibly boring. It may have been Meryl Streep’s character, Miranda Priestly, in The Devil Wears Prada who expressed the sentiment best: “Florals? For spring? Groundbreaking.”

It is about piecing together the past with the present. It is not what you are wearing but how you wear it. THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


FREE DELIVERY

OPEN ‘TIL 3AM FRI & SAT

BUY 2 LARGE PIES

OTTOPORTLAND.COM | 617.232.0447

PROMO CODE: BUZZ

888 COMMONWEALTH AVE

GET 1 SMALL FREE


TRAVEL

My Greatest Mistakes How my worst travel “mistakes” became my best stories WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY EL NEVERS DESIGN BY GABRIELA ARRIAGA


Buying a One-Way Ticket for a Round-Trip Journey This travel mishap was somewhat of a planned disaster. We bought a one-way ticket from Shanghai to Bangkok and decided to trace our way back by land through Cambodia and Vietnam. All tickets had to be purchased upon arrival—we were asking for a challenge. Two overnight buses, one 30-hour journey across the Cambodian border, and countless tuktuks and taxis later…we had finally made it back to our country of origin—China. We slept on tile floors, rode buses infested with roaches, and even once had a Buddhist monk buy us a corn dog and tea. It was truly the adventure of a lifetime; the kind of adventure that simply cannot be planned. It was a trip that forced me to throw my notion of “itineraries” out the window and just go with the flow.

F

rom spending a night “homeless” in Amsterdam to nearly getting stranded in the northern mountains of Morocco, I have had my fair share of travel mis-adventures. Whether you are the type of traveler who brings a printed itinerary or you make it up as you go, nothing ever goes exactly as planned— but what would be the fun in having everything go right, anyway? In fact, many of these “mistakes” have become my favorite travel memories (or they at least taught me some valuable lessons about adapting to challenges). Most people don’t have “miss a flight” written on their bucket lists, but here are some of my favorite travel mishaps and why I think that you should welcome some mis-adventures on your next trip! Getting on the Wrong Train “Attention, passengers! Welcome aboard the SNCF express train—final destination, Paris”. Wait, what?! After standing in a long line at the small coffee shop around the corner, I had suddenly found myself running to catch my overnight train to

68

Amsterdam. I quickly scanned the departures board for my platform number and raced up the stairs. Unfortunately, as we pulled out of the Lyon train station, I discovered that I had boarded the train on the wrong side of the same platform. I would arrive in Paris before midnight…with no where to stay and no idea how I would find my way to Amsterdam. I was also riding a train without a valid boarding pass. To confess or not to confess to the train conductors? I opted for honesty, rather than hiding out in the train bathroom for the next four hours. The conductor made me pay for a new ticket, but he laughed with me about my mix up. Once I had a (valid) ticket, I sat down and began calling everyone I knew who might be in Paris. As it turned out, a close friend of mine was spending the week in Paris with her family—la chance (as they would say in French)! While my hard-earned travel fund took a bit of a hit, I ended up spending the night in Paris with her and arriving in Amsterdam no later than planned on the bus the next morning. No harm, no foul! I learned that most travel mishaps were easily solvable and that I should use them as an opportunity for new adventures.

Language Barriers and Miscommunications Before arriving in Morocco, I had done some research and saw that Arabic and French were both listed as official languages. Being a French major, I felt newly (and falsely) confident in my ability to navigate through northern Morocco; I did not bother to learn a single word in Arabic—worrying instead about packing and making sure I had all of the reservations lined up. It was not until I was standing in the bus terminal of the small town of Chefchaouen that I realized my mistake. The bus back to Tangier was full and my friends and I had no choice, but to search the streets for a taxi that would take us 2 hours back across the mountains to the coast. However, each taxi driver stared back at us with confusion as we tried to explain ourselves in French, then English, and even German! While it can be exciting to arrive in a new place without knowing a single word of the local language, this is the one travel mistake that I would not recommend. It’s nice to at least know the essentials, like “hello”, “thank you”, and “where can I buy coffee” (well, this last one is at least essential to me). Booking a Hotel Upon Arrival The advantage to making travel arrangements as you go is that it allows for spontaneity; you can choose to extend your stay a few days in one place, shorten your stay in others, or make the last minute decision to follow the new friends you met at the hostel on the rest of their trip (another adventure I would highly recommend). However, sometimes neglecting to book accommodations in advance leaves you stranded on the streets—


quite literally. After walking into more than thirty hotels and hostels in Amsterdam, only to be turned away with a half-hearted “sorry, we’re full”, we were quickly running out of options. Night had already fallen, the shuttlebus back to the airport had already stopped running (making an overnight stay in the airport lobby impossible), and the train station was closed to visitors after midnight. We had to face the reality—we were homeless for the night. However, if nothing else, this experience showed me the overwhelming kindness of complete strangers. From the Canadian tourists who gave us a free map to the hotel concierge who kindly turned a blind eye as we hid all night in the back of the hotel lobby, a situation that had, at first, seemed hopeless became quite bearable. Leaving Luggage Behind Crossing a border by land is rarely a trouble-free experience—especially in southeast Asia. However, crossing from Vietnam into China became particularly exciting when I realized I had left part of my luggage on the other side of the border…all the way back in Vietnam. Okay, “luggage” is not quite the right word; I had left the giant, eleven-dollar box of Kit Kats I had bought while desperately hungry in the customs line. Still hungry, I was not ready to part with the chocolate that had cost me all of my remaining RMB. So, I dragged my friend back with me to the border patrol officer, who reluctantly let me back across the border with an escort to reclaim the “bag” I had forgotten. Upon learning that I had actually dragged them back for a box of candy, the officers could not contain their laughter. They insisted on patting down each individual Kit Kat to make sure I was not smuggling anything into the country and I, jokingly, left them each with a Kit Kat is a “tip” for helping me retrieve them. While my travel partner was not particularly pleased with my decision to return to Vietnam for a box of Kit Kats, she kept a sense of humor about the situation—they best way to approach any travel mishap. So, go explore, wander, get lost! After all, getting lost is really just finding yourself in some place new.

PASSPORT

United States of America

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


house turned

HOME

on living in a homestay in a foreign country WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY COURTNEY RYDER DESIGN BY GABRIELA ARRIAGA

70


AIR

I

MAIL

remember my mother’s face as I waved goodbye at the end of the TSA line. Both of us had tears in our eyes. I was leaving the country for the next three and a half months to study abroad in Madrid, Spain; my feelings at that moment were bittersweet. I was anxious about going abroad. I had imagined what it would be like since high school, but had no idea what to expect. You can read as much literature as you want about a culture and its people, but you’ll never fully experience it until you get there. I prepared myself and hoped for the best. I was especially nervous about living with a host family. I am an independent person who has lived on my own for all my college years. I like to be able to come and go as I please, to have my things in a certain order and to be 100 percent myself at all times. I found out in early August that I would be living with a single woman named Nuria, an architect in her early 50s. This immediately settled some of my fears, because I knew she would understand what it was like to be independent. However, I was worried that my host mother wouldn’t like me, which I found was a general fear amongst my peers. I was also concerned about any stereotypical perceptions she might have of me. I didn’t want her to think that I was a crazy American girl who didn’t have my priorities straight and just came to Spain to party for a semester. From orientation, I took a cab to Nuria’s house to meet her for the first time. She lived in a gated building that I rolled my two suitcases into before she buzzed me in. When Nuria opened the door, she had the biggest smile and gave me a huge hug. It was strange to me because if I had met someone for the first time in the United States, we would have just shook hands, but Nuria had no interest in that. She immediately wanted to know everything about my life: what I was studying, what I like to do, what my favorite foods were, who my favorite actors were and so on. It was like making a new best friend in seconds.

Nuria was extremely interested in the fact that I wanted to become a lawyer and how serious I was about school. She was working toward her Ph. D. while I was there, so she understood the importance of academics and wanting to aim high. She was also very much into fashion and all the latest trends just as I am, so we had things to talk about for hours. We bonded over our shared interests and what to expect for the rest of the semester as I unpacked my belongings and tried to find my bearings in this new country. Nuria and I developed a special relationship when I became ill the second week of classes. I had somehow managed to get severe food poisoning from a very popular restaurant and could not move from my bed for almost a week. Nuria took great care of me; she gave me medicine every four hours on the hour, and took my temperature constantly. When it was deemed necessary, she took me to the hospital. She was as scared for me as my real mom was and did absolutely everything she could. Once the doctor told her what was wrong with me, she asked about 20 questions as to what I needed and then immediately went to the grocery store to pick up the recommended foods and to the pharmacy for my prescriptions. Nuria turned into my superwoman, reminding me of my mother, which comforted me through my recovery. We got to spend more time together than many of my friends and their host families—mostly because they didn’t have to stay home for a week—but regardless, it made Nuria and my relationship that much closer. Once I was fully recovered, Nuria and I lived in perfect harmony for the rest of my stay. We would text each other all the time and have lunch and dinner together most days. Nuria, like me, was lactose intolerant, so she never made food I could not eat. She also learned which foods

were my favorites and would always leave them for me when I returned from a weekend excursion. Nuria was resourceful when it came to my travels; she had been to most of the countries I visited, so she was able to give me great advice and recommendations. She would drive me to the airport at crazy hours for my discounted flights and always wanted all the details when I returned home. Living with Nuria was all I could have ever hoped for and more. She became a great friend that I still talk to regularly and offered me great insight as to what typical life is like in Spain. I had arrived with many reservations, but the house became a home and a stranger turned into a second mom.

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


Study Abroad What You Wish Someone Had Told You BY THE BUZZ STAFF ILLUSTRATIONS BY JORDAN FORD DESIGN BY ALEENA QAZI

HACKS

There are valuable insights that no one tells you about going abroad. No matter the amount of research and advice, you never know all the quirks of a new city until you are immersed in its culture. While we recommend talking to locals and listening to their expertise, we’ve compiled a few tips from abroad pros for you to know before you pack your suitcase.

1

CONNECTIONS ARE EVERYTHING

The only thing scarier than not graduating on time is the possibility of not having access to Netflix for a semester. Just because you’re in college abroad doesn’t mean you aren’t procrastinating. By connecting to BU’s Virtual Private Network (VPN), your computer links to BU’s network wherever you are, giving you access to American sites that would otherwise be unavailable.

2 3

Each country has its own system of plugs and voltages. Even in neighboring countries, they can vary. Know what kind of adapter to bring so that you can still charge your phone, but be warned that adapters can still short out. For tools like a hair straightener, you would be better off buying an inexpensive one when you arrive rather than risking frying your own.

FREE FROM FEES

Unless you plan to open a new bank account, chances are that you will be using an ATM that charges a fee for its services. But, you may not realize that most ATMs are charging you two fees, one for the withdrawal and one for the currency exchange. Before you know it, your bar money will be lost to banking fees. Find out which ATMs will waive the withdrawal fee for your bank to minimize extra charges and maximize your spending money.

4 72

ADAPT TO NEW PLUGS

TIPS FOR TIPS

In America, we all know it’s customary to tip your friendly waiter or bartender, but in other countries it’s untraditional—and at times even insulting. Before you start throwing cash, find out if it’s customary to tip service workers where you are. Either ask a local, or pay attention when someone else pays his or her bill if you can’t find out beforehand.


ARTS

COFFEE

HOUSE

AESTHETIC BY CALLIE AHLGRIM PHOTOGRAPHY BY IGOR ZHANG DESIGN BY ERICA MAYBAUM

In 2014, The Daily Caller ranked BU as the 17th ugliest college campus in America. “There is arguably nothing about Boston University that is aesthetically pleasing,” the website wrote. It is true that nobody has ever accused Commonwealth Avenue of being a scenic destination. Aesthetic—or the idea of visual stimulation and appealing surroundings—can be a bigger problem than we realize. According to Scientific American, “the places we inhabit can affect our thoughts, feelings and behaviors.” Thus, we are happier and more productive when our surroundings are prettier.


That’s not who we are; we’re not this minimalistic, corporate, unwelcoming, white, pure space.

74


Luckily, there is an antidote to the drab and monochromatic—and we have one located right across the street from CAS. As you walk into Pavement Coffeehouse, the gentle whir of polite conversation and espresso machines immediately greets you. The air around your head begins to hum with scraps of poetry. Students often spend hours here, sipping lattes in the comforting ambiance. “It isn’t just about the service the customer receives at the register, or the quality of the latte or sandwich,” said Emily Moeck, the manager of Pavement. “It is about the quality of the whole experience from the moment they are walking towards our shop and read our little a-frame out front, to [the] moment they finally pack up their laptop and leave a few hours later.” For students, coffeehouses offer the opportunity to refuel—not only with coffee, the college student’s lifeblood—but also with a soft, soothing backdrop where they can calm down and unwind. “I think coffee shops have always been that creative, intellectual haven since Paris in the ’20s. I love that Pavement is a part of that long tradition,” said Moeck. Neuroscientists all over the world are hard at work “unearthing tantalizing clues about how to design spaces that promote creativity, keep students focused and alert and lead to relaxation and social intimacy,” according to Scientific American. Blue State Coffee, nestled in a corner of West Campus, is another convenient antidote. “We want to be that space where people come and feel very comfortable and very welcome. We want people to feel at home here,” said Kaileigh Mulligan, the manager of Blue State. Blue State is a family-owned coffee boutique that exists almost exclusively on college campuses and is designed to reflect the American democratic system. “We’re very used to dealing with students; it’s a big piece of why we are who we are,” said Mulligan. “We offer a place

for students to have intellectual discussions [and] to wind down with a cup of coffee.” Mulligan attributes much of their success as a “sort of ‘mom and pop’ shop” where students can feel at home in their interior aesthetic. Last year, Blue State hired the owner of Brilliance Tattoo (located next door) to paint a large mural to help capture their desired persona. “Before we had this mural, it was just this bare wall. That’s not who we are; we’re not this minimalistic, corporate, unwelcoming, white, pure space,” said Mulligan. Blue State is dedicated to the community; it donates a percentage of its sales to organizations like the Big Sister Association of Greater Boston and other worthy causes. Now, the space reflects their familial vibe. Moeck agrees wholeheartedly, and says the design of Pavement is an essential part of its image and business. “We believe that a huge reason people come to Pavement is to get away from that cookie-cutter existence of decor and food they have elsewhere—in their dorm, or IKEA-filled apartment, or at Starbucks—and sit in a place that feels like home,” she said. “I’d like to think this is especially important at our shop because most of our customers are students, where maybe Boston isn’t what they think of as home,” said Moeck. “If we can change that, or at least contribute to them having a second home, that’s important.” The popularity of coffee shops shot up at exactly the same time as another generational trend: Instagram. According to the Pew Research Center, over half of Internet users age 18-29 use Instagram (53 percent). Nearly half of all Instagrammers actively use it daily (49 percent). This reflects a huge cultural shift brought about by Millennials. Nikon’s new advertising campaign calls us “Generation

Image,” characterized by an obsession with documenting and aestheticizing every moment of our lives. With Instagram filters, even the most mundane pictures can become saturated with color or mysteriously transformed by a black and white contrast. Days, events and objects that used to be routine are now artistic. There is even an Instagram called “Coffee Shop Corners” (@coffeeshopcorners) that, according to their page biography, celebrates “visually enticing interiors.” There is something about this unfussy, clean, calming aesthetic that captures the hearts of our culture. “If anything, [the popularity of Instagram] means aesthetics matter more now than ever, as people want to be in places that they can photograph and have their other friends appreciate,” said Trevor Coar (CAS ’17). The Wall Street Journal covered a social experiment that studied human reactions to sculptures and found that “there’s a unique way that the brain activates when we view compelling artwork, something philosophers have called the ‘aesthetic emotion.’” Now even a simple morning routine like drinking coffee, reading the newspaper or munching on a pastry has been aestheticized. The setting in which we do these things lends themselves to the function. We thrive on a pleasant and artistic atmosphere.When we take pictures of our routines, we are driven to feel better about them. As students, we need as much aesthetic emotional stimulation as possible. Perhaps BU’s campus on the surface is a gray and blocky cityscape, but “Generation Image” is on to something. “You can only sit at your desk at home for so long before you’re no longer productive. We designed the back half of our shop for that exact reason,” said Moeck. “So come on over and relax; we can all do this together and maybe even get a mobcreativity thing going.”

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


76


The

Minds Behind DIVINATION X

BY GRACE GULINO PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEPHEN VOCATURO DESIGN BY ALEENA QAZI

A

s soon as you approach the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, you will see it: “Divination X,” a piece created by the most recent artist-inresidence Nari Ward. The large display on the outside of the museum is impossible to miss. An actual x-ray of cowry shells in a basket, the image draws attention to the façade of the building, typically a space graced by banners or advertisements at other museums. The Gardner Museum is a tucked away marvel in the Fenway neighborhood, as it showcases both historical and contemporary art and dedicates its Anne H. Fitzpatrick Façade to public art displays year-round. “Divination X,” one of these vast artworks, has been up since Jan. 6 and will remain on display until the end of June. The display of Nari Ward’s work can be attributed to Tiffany York, the Residency and Contemporary Program Manager. Through her efforts, Ward became an artist-in-residence at the Gardner Museum, meaning he was able to live in an apartment in the museum where he could create pieces while utilizing the museum’s vast artistic resources. It was during his time in residence at Gardner that he created “Divination X.” “I brought him to the conservation department because I thought he would be really excited to see what our new conservation labs looked like,” said York of Ward. “While he was up there, he saw an x-ray of a wooden angel carved into a candlestick that they’re currently working on. It’s such a beautiful object in and of itself and you kind of peer through the wood and you see the cracks where the pins have

repaired it before and it has this kind of like halo effect all over.” York said Ward was astonished at the image of the angel, and she found it incredible how he could detect each crack and pin visible through the x-ray. It was a method of art Ward had never experimented with before. Not wanting to use an image as religiously symbolic and recognizable as the angel, Ward went for a more uncommon approach. He depicted items that are traditionally used in divination rituals and practices in Africa, such as cowry shells and baskets, earning the exhibit its name “Divination X.” “He knew he wanted to use an x-ray process because he really liked that idea of looking through something and seeing the other side. It was very mysterious, very telling,” said York. With a keen eye for innovative talent like Ward, York plays an instrumental role in maintaining the museum’s avant-garde image. Each month, she helps find new artists to stay at the museum and works closely alongside them during their entire stay. “It’s a very rich program and a very diverse program,” said York. “Part of my job is working with the residents to ensure that they have a really good experience here and [have] everything that they need. I also manage all of the programs that come out of the residencies, including the exhibitions.” While the museum has no official curator, York is responsible for not only overseeing the exhibits that go out on the Façade, but also the spaces reserved for pieces made by the artist-in-residence. The Artist-In-Residence Program

maintains a unique allure for artists. It allows residents to live inside the campus of the museum, interact with the artwork and utilize the artistic resources the museum has to offer. Although artists-in-residence are not required to produce works for display, most find the inspiration to do so by the end of their stay. With the museum’s distinctly historical feel and wealth of different artistic styles, York notes that it can be challenging to figure out ways to incorporate contemporary exhibits into the mix. “We have to be very careful when working with a collection,” said York. “We work with live artists, whereas the other curatorial department works with mostly dead artists. So working with live artists in an institution that’s typically a historic institution—you end up running into some snags.” Beyond the composition of the art, its placement around the museum is also important. York noted that the museum values public art, which made “Divination X” the perfect addition to the Façade. Any passerby can admire the work without even stepping foot in the museum. York’s cultivated efforts ensure that pieces like “Divination X” receive their due recognition among the public. From the careful handpicking of artists to the strategic installation of art, York proves that behind every great exhibit is a great coordinator. “I think I probably have the most fun job of anyone here, besides maybe conservation, because I get to work with living artists as well as the collection,” said York. “I get to work with artists from all over the world who come and live here.”

THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015


UNDERNEATH THE GLITTERS

BY MARIA POPOVA DESIGN BY ERICA MAYBAUM

Herb Ritts MFA, Herb Ritts and Clementine Brown Galleries Highly glamorous, endlessly elegant, strikingly emotional and provocatively sensual—the works of Herb Ritts are truly multilateral. The exhibition presents some familiar faces: Jack Nicholson sharing his poignant smile, Dizzy Gillespie immersing himself in an imaginative melody and Naomi Campbell resembling the Oscar Statue with her golden glow. There is something earthly and internally tangible about these externally alluring gelatin silver photographs. Yet, Ritts is not only about Hollywood Glamour. His work also challenges gender and race, explores the richness of African ethnicity and turns sexuality upside-down.

“I WANT YOU FOR THE U.S. ARMY!” PATRIOTIC POSTERS FROM THE US AND EUROPE

Tickets: Adults: $25; Students: $23; Boston University Students: free.

TALKING ABOUT GENIUS

The artist behind the one and only “Mona Lisa” is familiar to people throughout the world. Yet, we tend to forget that art was only one of the many fields mastered by Leonardo Da Vinci. For example, the Codex on the Flight of Birds featured at the exhibition may be viewed as one of the first steps towards the development of the modern airplane. The other sketches attract attention not only because of their aesthetic value, but for the way they enable us to trace the daily observations of one of the greatest minds in human history. This subconsciously makes the lucky viewer a little greater and more ambitious. Tickets: Adults: $25; Students: $23; Boston University Students: free.

THE LIFE OF THE ARTIST

To us he is a true embodiment of classic Japanese art, as we tend to imagine woodblock prints and universally recognized colorful masterpieces such as “The Great Wave of Kanagawa.” Ironically, Hokusai was truly inspired by the works of Chinese painters and developed his style at the very crossroad of these two cultures. The collection presented is a unique opportunity to see this development as Hokusai’s personal artistic revolution. Covering everything from convoluted paintings such as “Thirty Six Views of Mount Fuji,” to real drawing talent, the exhibition is no less than a map of the artist’s life. Tickets:Adults: $25; Students: $23; Boston University Students: free. 78

VISITING MASTERPIECE GUSTAV KLIMT’S “ADAM AND EVE” The famous and beloved Austrian artist Gustav Klimt makes his debut at the MFA with his last painting and masterpiece: “Adam and Eve.” It is to be exhibited along with Oskar Kokoschka’s painting, “Two Nudes.” Such juxtaposition is organic and harmonious, not only because the two artists were friends and colleagues, but also because of the similar styles and subjects. Both paintings are grandiose, colorful, sexual and stylistically novel for the time period they were created. Needless to say, the combination carries a curious story of friendship and admiration. Tickets: Adults: $25; Students: $23; Boston University Students: free.


STUDY ABROAD WORLD-CLASS INTERNSHIP AND STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS

1422#+2 4#-.2ũ(1#2 4 +(#-#5 #-#5ĵ .-".1#- .+#

(,

.-". .-".-ĵ1(2

.2ũ-%#+#2 "1(" Padua 1(2  3 (.ũ"#ũ -#(1. '-%'( 8"-#8 #-(!# 2'(-%3.-Ĕũ -9( 1

INTERN ABROAD All Internship Placements Are:

ěũ 41-3##"ũ$.1ũ#!'ũ234"#-3 ěũ #12.-+(9#"ũ$.1ũ#!'ũ234"#-3 ěũ 1.)#!3ı 2#"ĵ!"#,(!++8ı"(1#!3#"ũ

Common Program Features: ěũ /#-ũ3.ũ++ũ,).12 ěũ 4+(38ũ!"#,(!ũ!.412#2ũ3.ũũ ũũũũ!.,/+#,#-3ũ3'#ũ(-3#1-2'(/ ěũ 4++ı3(,#ũũ23Ăũ3ũ#!'ũ2(3# ěũ .42(-%ũ/1.5("#"ũ ěũ 1%-(9#"ũ#7!412(.-2ũ-"ũ!3(5(3(#2 ěũ (--!(+ũ("ũ5(+ +#

STUDY ABROAD Common Program Features: ěũ /#-ũ3.ũ++ũ,).12 ěũ 4+(38ũ!"#,(!ũ!.412#2 ěũ 4++ı3(,#ũũ23Ăũ3ũ#!'ũ2(3# ěũ .42(-%ũ/1.5("#"ũ ěũ 1%-(9#"ũ#7!412(.-2ũ-"ũ!3(5(3(#2 ěũ (--!(+ũ("ũ5(+ +#

The Leader in International Internships.

/BUabroad

/BUabroad

bu.edu/abroad (--!(+ũ("ũ(2ũ5(+ +#ē

An equal opportunity, affirmative action institution.


FASHION EDITOR

ART DIRECTOR

MANAGING EDITOR

EF EDITORS-IN-CHI

PUBLISHER

PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR

COPY EDITOR ECTOR CREATIVE DIR

MEET OUR STAFF This issue wouldn’t have been possible without the fabulous faces you see on this page. Through the sleepless nights and the countless editing sessions, we are so thankful to have been able to work with such a talented and dedicated team. We’re going to miss our graduating staff members dearly, but we can’t wait for what’s in store next issue. Until next time! #getbuzzed

80


THE BUZZ | SPRING 2015

CINEMATOGRAPHER

CO-EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS

PR COORDINATOR

CITY EDITOR

CAMPUS EDITOR

R MUSIC EDITO

FOOD EDITOR

EDITOR TRAVEL EDITOR TRAVEL

SPORTS EDITOR

EVENT COORDINATOR

ARTS EDITOR


/#@THEBUBUZZ 82

Profile for The Buzz (Boston University)

The Buzz | Spring 2015  

The Buzz | Spring 2015  

Profile for thebubuzz
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded