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2019/20 SEASON HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

The Broad Stage presents

HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

STUDENT MATINEE FRI NOV 8, 2019 10 AM & 12:30 PM GRADES 3-4 THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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2019/20 SEASON HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

Rob Bailis Director, Performing Arts Center EDUCATION & COMMUNITY PROGRAMS STAFF

Ilaan Mazzini, Director of Education & Community Programs

Olivia Murray, Education & Community Programs Coordinator Mandy Matthews, Curriculum Consultant Katherine Buckner, Educator Daniel Ho, Artist EDUCATION & COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Phone 310.434.3560 education@thebroadstage.org thebroadstage.org/education THE BROAD STAGE 1310 11th Street Santa Monica, CA 90401 Box Office 310.434.3200 Fax 310.434.3439 info@thebroadstage.org thebroadstage.org

Education and Community Programs at The Broad Stage is supported in part by The Herb Alpert Foundation Johnny Carson Foundation City of Santa Monica and the Santa Monica Arts Commission The Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation Leonard M. Lipman Charitable Fund Los Angeles County Arts & Culture The Ralph M. Parsons Foundation Sidney Stern Memorial Trust Dwight Stuart Youth Fund The Plaza at Santa Monica

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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GREETINGS FROM THE BROAD STAGE! Dear Educators, We are so proud to have Daniel Ho partnering with the Broad Stage this year as part of the Hawaiian 'Ohana student matinee. Daniel Ho is a six-time GRAMMY Award winner, fourteentime GRAMMY Award nominee, six-time Taiwanese Golden Melody Award winner, and recipient of multiple Hawaiian Music awards. He is a 'ukulele virtuoso, slack key guitarist, multiinstrumentalist, composer, arranger, singer-songwriter, producer, audio engineer, and record company owner. He is the designer of the iconic Romero Creations Tiny Tenor 'ukulele and Ohana Bongolele and Shakerlele. His custom-designed six-string 'ukulele is on exhibit at the GRAMMY Museum at LA Live. Daniel’s collaborations transcend genres from traditional to contemporary Hawaiian, and beyond. Daniel’s original songs are woven together throughout the performance piece in order to tell a uniquely Hawaiian story of family, empathy, and being true to oneself. Throughout, the students will learn about elements of Hawaiian music, culture, and traditions. It is my hope that you take the time to explore the activities in this guide with your students. The lessons are based on the Common Core Content Standards for English-Language Arts, California’s Visual and Performing Arts Standards, and Teaching Tolerance’s Social Justice Standards. I worked alongside Daniel Ho to ensure that the lessons accurately portray and celebrate Hawaiian art and culture authentically and without presumption. It is our hope that students will deepen their cultural appreciation and that the Hawaiian 'Ohana performance will serve as a window into Hawaiian culture, while concurrently serving as a mirror that helps them to see themselves reflected in the themes and lessons presented in the show.

Sincerely, Katherine Buckner

4th Grade Teacher, McKinley Elementary Teacher/Artist Collaborative

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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CONTENTS LESSONS LESSON 1: Introduction to Hawai'i: The Aloha State.............5 HANDOUT 1: Vocabulary Flashcards..........................................8 HANDOUT 2: Hawai'i: The Aloha State.......................................12 LESSON 2: Hawaiian Vocabulary..............................................14 HANDOUT 3: Pua I Ka Ua Lyrics..................................................18 HANDOUT 4: Hawaiian Alphabet and Words............................19 LESSON 3: Art Develops Around Social Issues.....................20 LESSON 4: Theme and Connections in Hawaiian Music......23 HANDOUT 6: No Nā Kamali'i Lyrics............................................26

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES GLOSSARY...................................................................................27 'WHAT I LEARNED' LETTER.......................................................28

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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LESSON 1: INTRODUCTION TO HAWAI'I: THE ALOHA STATE LESSON AT A GLANCE LESSON OBJECTIVE: Students will be able to name and describe elements of Hawaiian culture and art. DURATION: 70 mins MATERIALS: Chart paper, white board, or projected paper, White paper (one per student), Art supplies (e.g. crayons, markers, colored pencils), Handout 1: Vocabulary Flashcards, Handout 2: Article: “Hawai'i: The Aloha State” STANDARDS: CCSS ELA, RI.3.7 Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur). CCSS ELA, RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. CCSS ELA SL.3.1, SL.4.1, SL.5.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade-level topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. CCSS ELA SL.3.3 Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail Social Justice Standards ID.3-5.3 I know that all my group identities are part of who I am, but none of them fully describes me and this is true for other people too. Social Justice Standards DI.3-5.8 I want to know more about other people’s lives and experiences, and I know how to ask questions respectfully and listen carefully and non-judgmentally. CONCEPTS/VOCABULARY: 'Aumākua - An ancestral spirit guide, which can also be an animal. Hula - A traditional Hawaiian dance that tells a story. 'Ohana - a Hawaiian word which refers to a person’s extended family, which can include friends and other important social groups. 'Ukulele - a musical instrument that is like a small guitar with four strings, often used in Hawaiian music. GUIDING QUESTIONS: What are some unique elements of Hawaiian culture?

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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LESSON PLAN WARM UP Ask the class to gather together. Ask students to close their eyes and take some silent “think time.” As their eyes are closed, ask them to think about the following questions: What do you know about Hawai'i? What are some images that you can see when you think about Hawai’i? What do you know about Hawaiian culture? After students have been given time to reflect on each question, give them an opportunity to share what they know with a partner. Ask students to share with a partner for one minute each. Bring the class back together, and ask volunteers to share what they know about Hawai'i, Hawaiian culture, and art. Chart student responses on the white board.

Part 1: Hawaiian Vocabulary and Images Let students know that they will be learning about Hawai'i, Hawaiian art, and Hawaiian culture because of an upcoming field trip at The Broad Stage. Begin by presenting the flashcards of the four vocabulary terms: 'ohana, 'aumākua, hula, and 'ukulele. Continue by projecting a slideshow of Hawaiian images and facts, which can be found at https://kids. nationalgeographic.com/explore/states/hawaii/. The class can read the information together while viewing the images. If anything that is brought up during the brainstorm appears again during the slideshow, circle it on the brainstormed list. Part 2: Close Reading About Hawai’i Pass out Handout 2: Hawai'i: The Aloha State. Have students read the text independently from start to finish. As they do, have them circle details in the text that appeared in the earlier brainstorm. Have students underline information that they consider to be new or interesting.

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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Part 3: Mind-map Hawaiian Concepts TASK: Using words and images, students will create a mind map in order to demonstrate their understanding of Hawai'i, Hawaiian culture, and Hawaiian art. Students will create a mind map of their current understanding of Hawaiian culture. Students may use paper and art supplies in order to create a mind map, and they are encouraged to be colorful. If the class is not familiar with mind mapping, examples can be found at https://mindmapsunleashed.com/10-reallycool-mind-mapping-examples-you-will-learn-from ASSESSMENT CRITERIA: • Students use vocabulary related to Hawai'i on the mind map. • Students draw images that accurately represent Hawaiian culture. • Students drawings and descriptions demonstrate understanding of concepts. PURPOSE: To determine our accurate prior knowledge and understanding of Hawaiian culture and to make connections between Hawaiian geography, people, culture, and art. Student Reflection After completing the mind maps, students may do a gallery walk of the completed work. Ask students to place their mind map on their desk, and just as in an art museum or gallery, participants should observe the work silently and without touching the artwork.

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HANDOUT 1: VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS

'Ohana A Hawaiian word which refers to a person’s extended family, which can include friends and other important social groups.

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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HANDOUT 1: VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS

'Aumākua An ancestral spirit guide, which can also be an animal.

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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2019/20 SEASON HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

HANDOUT 1: VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS

Hula A traditional Hawaiian dance that tells a story.

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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2019/20 SEASON HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

HANDOUT 1: VOCABULARY FLASHCARDS

'Ukulele A musical instrument that is like a small guitar with four strings, often used in Hawaiian music.

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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HANDOUT 2: HAWAI'I: THE ALOHA STATE Hawai'i

BY JAMIE KIFFEL-ALCHEH FAST FACTS NICKNAME: The Aloha State STATEHOOD: 1959; 50th state POPULATION (AS OF JULY 2015): 1,431,603 CAPITAL: Honolulu BIGGEST CITY: Honolulu ABBREVIATION: HI STATE BIRD: nene, the Hawaiian goose STATE FLOWER: yellow hibiscus HISTORY About 1,500 years ago a group of canoes came ashore to some of the islands now known as Hawai'i. These people—the islands’ first known residents—had rowed about 2,000 miles from the Marquesas Islands to get here. People from what is now Tahiti—over 2,500 miles away— followed 500 years later. These cultures brought traditions of their own and over time created new traditions such as surfing, hula dancing, and exchanging flower garlands called leis. In 1810 Kamehameha became Hawai'i’s first king. The islands continued to have royal rulers into the 1880s. In 1898 Hawai'i became a U.S. territory. It was named the 50th state in 1959, and to this day you can still visit Iolani Palace—the only royal building on U.S. soil. WHY’S IT CALLED THAT? Hawai'i may have been named for Hawai'i Loa, a legendary figure who is said to have first discovered the islands. Hawai'i’s nickname, the Aloha State, is no mystery: Aloha is a Hawaiian way to say hello and goodbye. GEOGRAPHY AND LANDFORMS Hawai'i sits over 2,000 miles west of California. Hawai'i is the world’s largest island chain, and it’s the only U.S. state completely made up of islands. But only 7 of its 132 islands are inhabited: Hawai'i (also known as the Big Island), Māui, Moloka'i, Lāna'i, O'ahu, Kaua'i, and Ni'ihau. The Hawaiian Islands are volcanic islands. They have formed as the Earth’s crust, made up of giant rocky slabs called tectonic plates, moves over a particularly hot spot in the molten layer beneath the crust. The heat melts the rock that makes up the crust, turning it into magma. Then once the magma breaks through to the surface of the Earth’s crust it cools and forms new land. The Earth’s crust is always moving just a little bit, but the hot spot that produces magma isn’t. So over time as the crust moved, but the hot spot remained—creating a series of volcanic islands. Hawai'i’s most active volcano is Kilauea, and you can see it at Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island. Kilauea has been erupting for over 30 years, and each year, its lava expands Hawai'i by over 40 acres.

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HANDOUT 2: HAWAI'I: THE ALOHA STATE, CONT’D Hawai'i is known for its beautiful beaches—some of them with unusual colors. Many beaches are filled with white sand, but other Hawaiian shores are covered with green, red, pink, and even black sand. Whether you like hiking, biking, kayaking, sailing, swimming, or just sitting on the beach, Hawai'i is the state for you. Near the water, you can relax as palm trees blow in the island breeze. Travel toward to the center of one of the big islands and you can hike through dense tropical rain forests and experience stunning waterfalls. Don’t forget to dive in the waters and snorkel near Hawai'i’s coral reefs. On Hawai'i you can experience yet another environment: the volcano Mauna Loa’s dry lava is so much like parts of the moon’s surface that astronauts once walked on it to practice for lunar voyages. Mount Waialeale on Kauai is considered on of the rainiest spots on Earth, getting 384 inches of rain a year on average. WILDLIFE Though Hawai'i has thousands of plants and animals, it has only one native land mammal: the Hawaiian hoary bat. Hawai'i’s other mammals, including the mongoose, rat, and feral pig, were brought to the islands by humans. Hawai'i is teeming with native birds like the pueo (also called the Hawaiian owl), the noio (a type of tern), and Hawai'i’s state bird, the nene (it’s related to the Canadian goose). Hawai'i’s waters are home to sea life such as monk seals, hawksbill turtles, and lizardfish. Humpback whales visit the waters from December to May to mate, give birth, and nurture their calves. Thousands of species of trees—from perfumed magnolias and plumeria to fruit-filled ohi'a 'ai trees—grow on the islands. Thousands of flowering plants grow there too, including exotic orchids. NATURAL RESOURCES Hawai'i’s rich soil is considered one of its most important natural resources. Sugarcane, pineapples, coffee, macadamia nuts, and flowers are all important sources of income for the state’s economy. Tourism is the state’s leading source of income.

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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LESSON 2: HAWAIIAN VOCABULARY LESSON AT A GLANCE LESSON OBJECTIVE: Students will learn about Hawaiian culture by exploring the Hawaiian alphabet, and identifying key words. Students will understand the different ways to express a word using movement and gesture. DURATION: 60- 90 mins MATERIALS: Handout 3: “Pua I Ka Ua Lyrics,” Handout 4: “Hawaiian Alphabet and Words”, a large open space for movement, Internet access and playback capabilities for recordings STANDARDS: CCSS, Literacy.SL.4.1.C: Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others. VAPA Music, Grade Three: 1.6 Identify simple musical forms. VAPA Music, Grade Three: 3.1 Identify the uses of music in various cultures and time periods. VAPA Music, Grade Three: 5.1 Identify the use of similar elements and other art forms. VAPA Music, Grade Four: 5.3 Relate dance movements to express musical elements or represent musical intent in specific music. Social Emotional Learning competencies: teamwork CONCEPTS/VOCABULARY: Active listening - When you listen to music carefully and give it your full attention. 'Aumākua - An ancestral spirit guide, which can also be an animal. Call and Response - The interaction of two phrases of music, where the second phrase is heard as a direct commentary on or in response to the first. Glottal Stop - A consonant formed by the audible release of the airstream after complete closure of the glottis. It is widespread in some nonstandard English accents and in some other languages. Kahakō - Indicates that the vowel over which it is placed is drawn out, and, therefore, that it is a long vowel in Hawaiian. Indicated with an – over the vowel. Melody - Sequence of musical notes that sound good together. 'Okina - A glottal stop, similar to the sound between the syllables of “oh-oh.” It is used in Hawaiian language as a stop of sound between and within words. It is symbolized by an '. Pua – The Hawaiian word for flower. Rhythm - Combination of long and short, even and uneven sounds that convey a sense of movement in time. Ua – The Hawaiian word for rain. GUIDING QUESTIONS: What do I already know about musical form? Are all languages “spoken”? Can they be used with gestures or signs? THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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LESSON PLAN

Warmup: “Mirroring flocking” game In a large open space, ask the class to make a pyramid shape where one student is the point, two stand behind, three behind, and so on. The students should all be facing in the same direction. Discuss how there are different points to the shape and how looking in different directions can change the entire make-up of the group. Explain the directions for the “Mirroring Flocking” game. What does flocking mean? Have you ever seen birds fly in the sky in a big group all making the same motion? That’s flocking. The students should have enough room from a standing position. The student at the front most part of the group leads everyone in controlled movement. You should model this first. Let the students know that they you will move slowly and they have to mirror or follow the exact movement as closely as possible. The second line follows the leader, the third follows the second, and so on. If you move to face a new direction, the students at the next furthest point is the leader and can control the “flock.” The object of the activity is for all the group to move as one. All movement should be improvised by the students and it can be done with or without music. In fact, try both methods. You can also call out particular motions to give variety to the movement. “Move like you’re swimming. Like you’re in outer space. Like you can only use half of your body. Etc.” This is where different types of music queued up can really be fun; hip hop, swing, classical, rock, etc. A variation on this is to split the groups evenly into 4 different shapes with points. Explain the rules to the students and follow the same steps. After a while, combine the groups to create two different groups, and finally one large group. After playing the game, lead a class discussion. Sample reflection questions are below: What did you notice about being a leader of the group? What are some characteristics of being a good leader? What did you notice about being a follower? What are some characteristics of being a good follower? How did we work together as a group in this activity? Did anything change when you heard music? How did it feel to communicate to your group through movement and no words? Part 1: “Pua I Ka Ua” or “Flowers in the Rain,” by Amy Ku'uleialoha Stillman and Daniel Ho Have students listen to the song, “Pua I Ka Ua.” While listening, encourage students to actively listen to the beats, lyrics, and instruments in the song. Active listening is when you listen to music carefully and give it your full attention. https://soundcloud.com/broadstage/pua-i-ka-ua/s-cEDGm?in=broadstage/sets/hawaiian-ohana/s-pYKF0 After listening, have students write down or draw any words, feelings, or thoughts that come into their mind. You could use the prompt: I Hear? I Think? I Wonder? Hold a short discussion about anything that they observed in the song or that activated their curiosity (call and response, echo, instruments, meaning of the song, etc.) Review the translation of “Pua I Ka Ua” lyrics together and pass out Handout 3: “Pua I Ka Ua” Lyrics.

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“Pua I Ka Ua” is a song from Hawaiian 'Ohana written by Amy Ku'uleiaaloha Stillman and Daniel Ho. This song follows a strophic form pattern in music, where each verse of the song is sung by the same melodic line. Read Handout 3: “Pua I Ka Ua” Lyrics together. The lyrics refer to flowers blooming after the rain. Ask students to consider these questions: What significance does this hold? Can it mean that after something dark and cold, even scary passes, something beautiful can sprout in front of you? The thematic nature of the song can be applied to bad things happening and good things coming out of it. Or there is “light at the end of the tunnel.” Have students listen to the song again with a partner. Ask the pair to identify when the new verse starts with different lyrics. This can be challenging since the melody stays the same each time! As a hint, the melody repeats itself over 8 measures. Have the students try to identify the 8 measures by counting during the melody. If time permits, play the song again and encourage the student partners to improvise movements to the lyrics of the call and response. Remind students of the definition of call and response. Partners can switch their roles as caller and responder as well. For a wrap up, allow students some time to discuss any additional observations upon further listening, as a class or in small groups. Part 2: Learning Hawaiian alphabet, words, and motions. NOTE: This part of the lesson uses the Curriculum Video for “Hawaiian 'Ohana” featuring Keali'i Ceballos. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISheO7ROdEw&t=21s TASK: Students follow along and learn the Hawaiian alphabet, words, and hula gestures. There are five vowels and seven consonants and one 'okina. The vowel sounds are quite similar to English, but can be combined to create different sounds. For example, when vowels are paired to have a different sound such as the word “ouch.” The language only includes 7 consonants with the following consonants not represented in the alphabet: b c d f g j q r s t v x y z. The 'okina is a glottal stop that creates space within a word. For example, when we say “uh-oh!” when something surprising happens, we are essentially using an 'okina to break the vowels. Keali'i will explain the alphabet, the 'okina, and the kahakō; which is a macron or line over a vowel that indicates the vowel sound to be much longer. Follow the video and have the students demonstrate the “hula” motions for the words “pua” (flower) and “ua” (rain). Gestures in hula can be used to “say” words and tell a story. In the performance “Hawaiian 'Ohana,” the song Pineapple Mango has motions for each fruit. Ask the students if they know of any other gestures with their hands that mean anything? Some might be a “thumbs up” for good, and maybe a “wave” to say hello.

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Pass out Handout 4: Hawaiian Alphabet, words, and phrases. Practice the pronunciation of the words with students. AEIOUHKLMNPW' Aloha = Hello/Goodbye Ua = Rain Mahalo = Thank You Hale = House/Home 'Ohana = Family Hula = Dance Pua = Flower Mele = Music 'Aumākua = Ancestral Spirit Guide Part 3: Discover Nonverbal Communication After learning a few words in Hawaiian, and with hula, “’ohana, aloha, mahalo, flower, rain, pineapple and mango” ask the students if they can create their own hula gestures to represent different things in the environment with a partner. Each student will get half of a list of words that they will create a hula movement for. The students will trade off and figure out what is trying to be said. You are welcome to use whichever words you’d like, but here are a few options for you. TREE CLOUDS RIVER MOUNTAIN BEACH WAVES ROCK BIRD After they each get a chance to demonstrate their gestures for each word, have the groups share with the class. You’ll see that a lot of the movements will be similar, and a lot will be wildly different. ASSESSMENT CRITERIA: • All students participate and collaborate. • All students demonstrate understanding of nonverbal communication. • All students demonstrate the role of listener and speaker. PURPOSE: To understand why people come together to play, sing, or dance and to make connections between elements of music like rhythm, beat, and tempo. Student Reflection Students write a short paragraph on what their favorite activity was in this unit and why.

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HANDOUT 3: “PUA I KA UA” LYRICS Pua I Ka Ua (Flowers in the Rain)

by Amy Ku'uleialoha Stillman and Daniel Ho

Hawaiian

English

He pua, he pua, he pua i mohala He pua he pua, he pua nani e

A flower, a flower, a flower has bloomed A flower, a flower, a beautiful flower

'Elua, 'elua, 'elua mau pua Elua, 'elua, 'elua pua e

Two, two, two flowers Two, two, two flowers

Kāua, kāua, e 'ohi i nā pua Kāua, kāua, e 'ohi mai e

We two, we two gather the flowers We two, we two gather

He ua, he ua, e iho mai ka ua He ua, he ua, e iho mai e

Rain, rain, the rain is falling Rain, rain, falling

Puana, puana kēia mo'olelo 'Elua kāua, mau pua nani e

Told, told is this story Two of us beautiful flowers

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HANDOUT 4: HAWAIIAN ALPHABET AND WORDS

A E I O U H K L M N P W '

¯

Aloha = Hello/Goodbye Ua = Rain

Mahalo = Thank You Hale = House/Home 'Ohana = Family Hula = Dance Pua = Flower Mele = Music 'Aumākua = Ancestral Spirit Guide

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LESSON 3: ART DEVELOPS AROUND SOCIAL ISSUES LESSON AT A GLANCE LESSON OBJECTIVE: Students will use the performing arts in order to discuss social issues. DURATION: Day 1: 70 mins Day 2: 60 mins MATERIALS: Post-It notes or pre-cut small pieces of paper, paper and pencil STANDARDS: VAPA Theatre, Grade Three: 1.2 Identify who, what, where, when, and why (the five Ws) in a theatrical experience. VAPA Theatre Grade Three: 2.1 Participate in cooperative scriptwriting or improvisations that incorporate the five Ws. VAPA Theatre Grade Three: 5.2 Develop problem-solving and communication skills by participating collaboratively in theatrical experiences. VAPA Music, Grade Three: 4.2 Explain and demonstrate what it means to be a good audience member. CCSS ELA, W.5.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences CCSS ELA SL.3.1, SL.4.1, SL.5.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade-level topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. Social Justice Standards DI.3-5.9 I feel connected to other people and know how to talk, work and play with others even when we are different or when we disagree. CONCEPTS/VOCABULARY: Dialogue - A conversation between two or more people in a book, play, or movie. Performing arts - Forms of creative activities that are performed in front of an audience, such as drama, music, and dance. Skit - A short play or performance. GUIDING QUESTIONS: How can people use performance in order to discuss important issues in their lives? What happens when a group of performers collaborate to create performance art?

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2019/20 SEASON HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

LESSON PLAN WARM UP Start by having students sit in groups of 4-6. Pass out several slips of paper or post-its to each student. Present students with the following question: What are some challenges kids face in your school or community? Students will write and announce as many ideas as they can in the allotted time (provide several minutes for the brainstorm), one idea per slip of paper. Each slip of paper is placed in the center of the table. Students attempt to cover the table with as many ideas as possible. After several minutes, bring the class together to discuss the question. As volunteers share challenges that kids face within their school or community, write appropriate responses on chart paper. Be sure to save this paper for lesson 4. DAY 1 Part 1: Art as a Method for Addressing Social Issues As an example, watch this clip of male hula dancers together, and determine what story they are trying to tell as they hula. Why is hula important to them? What is their aim for performing hula to the community and around the world? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BFT-M18N2A4 Part 2: Create a Skit about Overcoming Challenges TASK: Students will work collaboratively to create theatrical skits about their brainstorm of challenges kids face within their community. In the same groups of 4-6, students will create a skit about overcoming one of the challenges written on the chart paper from the mini lesson. Each skit should be between 3-5 minutes long and all members of the group should participate as an “actor” in the skit, either by dialogue or gesture. Provide students with time to outline and plan their skit. Tell students that their skit should have a clear beginning, middle, and end and address the 5 W’s: who, what, where, when, and why. While planning, ask students to discuss and decide on a clear message about a social issue in their school or broader community. As an option you can provide students with some examples, or help them refer back to the chart paper from the earlier discussion. Examples include, bullying, healthier food options at lunch, planting more trees on campus, etc. After students plan, remind them that it is very important to rehearse their skit. The rehearsal process is important for all of the performing arts, and ask students to edit their skit as they rehearse. It is okay if ideas or things change during the rehearsal process. Let students know that they will have an opportunity to perform their skit to the class the next day. THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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2019/20 SEASON HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

DAY 2 Part 3: Performance of skits Before the performance, allow student groups to rehearse their skit a few times. After rehearsing, set up the room with a clear performance space. Prior to their performance, remind students of good theater-going etiquette. You could brainstorm etiquette as a group, or use the suggested etiquette below. Write the performance etiquette on the board to remind students when they are audience members. 1. Listen with your ears and watch with your eyes. 2. View quietly so as not to distract the performers. It is okay to laugh or react when appropriate, but talking during a performance--even if it is a compliment--can be very distracting for hard-working performers. 3. Body language should show that the viewer is interested in the performance. Ask students to perform their skits for the class. After each performance, have a few student volunteers provide details of what they noticed in their classmates’ skits. Encourage students to start their comment with one of these three sentence starters: I noticed, I wondered, I observed. Part 2: Create a Skit about Overcoming Challenges ASSESSMENT CRITERIA: • All students will participate in the performance either with dialogue or gestures. • Skit has a clearly defined problem faced by children in the community, and a solution to how the problem was overcome. • Skit has a clear beginning, middle, and end. PURPOSE: To understand the impact of the performing arts on expressing ideas, storytelling, and addressing social issues. Student Reflection After all student groups performed, conduct a discussion about their experience creating their skits, being audience members, and if they felt they were successful with portraying the message they wanted to share. Encourage students to approach the Hawaiian 'Ohana performance with an appreciation for creating a performance with a small group of performers who present a problem that must be solved and use art to teach others about how to overcome obstacles in their own lives.

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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2019/20 SEASON HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

LESSON 4: THEME AND CONNECTIONS IN HAWAIIAN MUSIC LESSON AT A GLANCE LESSON OBJECTIVE: Students will be able to write lyrics applicable to their own lives within the context of Hawaiian music. DURATION: 60 mins MATERIALS: Previously-generated (or newly-generated) list of topics that are important to students, “No Nā Kamali'i” mp3, Handout 7: "No Nā Kamali'i" Lyrics STANDARDS: VAPA Music, Grade Three: 3.1 Identify the uses of music in various cultures and time periods. VAPA Music, Grade Five: 1.4: Analyze the use of music elements in aural examples from various genres and cultures. CCSS ELA, RL.5.2: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. CCSS ELA SL.4.2 Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally CCSS ELA SL.4.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. Social Justice Standards ID.3-5.3 I know that all my group identities are part of who I am, but none of them fully describes me and this is true for other people too CONCEPTS/VOCABULARY: Lyrics - The words in a song. Theme - A message or lesson that an author or artist wants you to learn. Typically a broad idea about life, which is inferred instead of stated. GUIDING QUESTIONS: What are some reasons why people make music and art? How do elements of rhythm and melody pair with lyrics to create music? How can music be used as a form of self-expression?

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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2019/20 SEASON HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

LESSON PLAN WARM UP: Post-Show Discussion on the Hawaiian 'Ohana Performance Lead a class discussion on the students’ experience of the Hawaiian 'Ohana performance at The Broad Stage. Ask students to share thoughts, feelings, reactions, and what they learned from the performance. Have students brainstorm what they believed the theme, or central message of the performance was. In other words, what life lesson(s) did the artists hope that you would learn from this performance that you could apply to your own lives? It is possible that students may talk about Hawai'i, Hawaiian culture, the ukulele, or other artistic elements. Celebrate these answers, but continue to guide students toward analyzing the theme. Part 1: Art as a Method for Addressing Social Issues Review the previously-generated list of challenges that kids often face in their community. If this list is no longer available, work as a class to generate a new list. Ask students to select one challenge that they face in their lives. It might be a challenge on the list, or it could be one that had not been written about. If students are struggling to find some examples themselves, it may be helpful to provide a few potential topics such as bullying, feeling stressed when taking a test, or other topics that apply to students in grades 3-5. Part 2: Create a Skit about Overcoming Challenges Play the mp3 of the song “No Nā Kamali'i.” First, listen to the song without the lyrics. Ask students to listen to the rhythm, melody, and instruments. Can they identify which instruments are being played? https://soundcloud.com/broadstage/no-n-kamalii/s-aSVFA?in=broadstage/sets/hawaiian-ohana/spYKF0 Pass Handout 7: “No Nā Kamali'i” Lyrics. Before listening again, discuss how each verse contains 1-4 lines, and that each line contains a short phrase. Most phrases are not full or complex sentences. Ask students to closely listen to the lyrics and see if they can follow along as the song plays. NOTE: Although we hear the song in Hawaiian, there is also an English translation for each verse. While the music is being played, students may begin to hum or tap their fingers to the song. Encourage this kinesthetic learning for the students, as long as they are allowing others to still hear the rhythm and lyrics of the music. After listening, let students know that they will be writing their own lyrics to the song. The lyrics should express the issue or challenge that students selected in Part 1. Provide students an example for inspiration, or write a stanza together as a class. Provide students with time to write their lyrics to the same rhythm and beat of the song.

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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2019/20 SEASON HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

TASK: Write a song about a personal challenge using rhythm, structure, and beat of the song, No Nā Kamali'i. ASSESSMENT CRITERIA: • Song is related to a topic important to the student. • Song matches the style and structure of “No Nā Kamali'i.” PURPOSE: To increase understanding of the structure of Hawaiian music, and foster a connection between our own lives and the art in which we interact. Student Reflection Allow students to share their lyrics with the class, while playing “No Nā Kamali'i” aloud. Ask students to orally reflect upon the joys and challenges of creating their songs.

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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2019/20 SEASON HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

HANDOUT 5: “NO NĀ KAMALI'I” LYRICS No Nā Kamali'i

Lyrics by Amy Ku'uleialoha Stillman Music by Daniel Ho (Daniel Ho Creations)

Hawaiian

English

'Ae, 'auhea 'oe e ke hoa

Where are you, friend?

'Auhea 'oe e ke hoa Ka'apuni i ke ao nei

Where are you, friend? Traveling around the world

Holo ana holo a'e 'oe Ulu a'e ka 'ikena la

You go here and there Increasing your horizons

Nā mauna ki'eki'e loa Nā wai hohonu nei

Majestic mountains, Profoundly deep waters

Nā 'āina 'ōma’oma'o Nā kaona uauahi

Lush green lands, Hazy towns

Nā kahiko i mālama 'ia Nā 'awa i ka malina

Traditions sheltered In calm harbors

Nā aupuni ku'oko'a Nā lāhui i ka pono

Independent countries Nations in righteous balance

Ha'ina mai ka puana Ka'apuni i ke ao nei

The story is told Of worldly travels

He mele no nā kamali'i Hiwahiwa maolo nō

A song for the children Who are truly cherised

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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GLOSSARY

2019/20 SEASON HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

Active listening - When you listen to music carefully and give it your full attention. 'Aumākua - An ancestral spirit guide, which can also be an animal. Call and Response - The interaction of two phrases of music, where the second phrase is heard as a direct commentary on or in response to the first. Dialogue - A conversation between two or more people in a book, play, or movie. Glottal Stop - A consonant formed by the audible release of the airstream after complete closure of the glottis. It is widespread in some nonstandard English accents and in some other languages, such as Arabic, it is a standard consonant. Hula -A traditional Hawaiian dance that tells a story. Kahakō - Indicates that the vowel over which it is placed is drawn out, and, therefore, that it is a long vowel in Hawaiian. Indicated with an – over the vowel. Lyrics - The words in a song. Melody - Sequence of musical notes that sound good together. 'Ohana - A Hawaiian word which refers to a person's extended family, which can include friends and other important social groups. 'Okina - A glottal stop, similar to the sound between the syllables of “oh-oh.” It is used in Hawaiian language as a stop of sound between and within words. It is symbolized by an '. Performing arts - Forms of creative activities that are performed in front of an audience, such as drama, music, and dance. Pua – The Hawaiian word for flower. Rhythm - The combination of long and short, even and uneven sounds that convey a sense of movement in time. Skit - A short play or performance. Synonym - A word or phrase that means exactly or nearly the same as another word or phrase in the same language, for example shut is a synonym of close. Theme - A message or lesson that an author or artist wants you to learn. Typically, a broad idea about life, which is inferred instead of stated. Ua – The Hawaiian word for rain. 'Ukulele - A musical instrument that is like a small guitar with four strings, often used in Hawaiian music. THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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2019/20 SEASON HAWAIIAN 'OHANA

WHAT I LEARNED... Write a letter to the artist. Be sure to include your favorite part of the performance and what you learned.

Dear _________

Your friend,

THE BROAD STAGE AT THE SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THEBROADSTAGE.ORG/EDUCATION 1310 11TH ST., SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 / 310.434.3560

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Profile for The Broad Stage

Hawaiian 'Ohana