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Vol. 88, No. 40 Thursday, March 1, 2012

Contentions, errors in club budgets

Poultry power

SGA debates over funding for organizations By Georgina Buckley The Breeze

laura wilkins / the breeze

Panel discusses poultry-themed energy as option to clean up Chesapeake Bay By Sean Byrne The Breeze

An energy activist organization thinks it may have a solution to the energy consumption problem – one that lies in poultry waste. 25x’25 Alliance’s goal is to support 25 percent of the United State’s energy spending with renewable resources by the year 2025. The organization, which has a branch at JMU, held a panel on Tuesday and discussed its plans for renewable energy. Brent Bailey, a state facilitator for 25x’25 was the keynote speaker. The panel consisted of five professionals associated with the topic at hand and five professionals from the poultry industry with Craig Honeycutt moderating. Poultry litter is made up of the waste from poultry birds, mainly chickens and turkeys. “When we utilize natural resources, think sustainably, move past non-renewable resources and grab what we have in front of us, we can come up with better solutions,” Bailey said. The basic idea revolves around burning the excess poultry litter not used as fertilizer. Currently farmers spread all the poultry litter across their fields and the litter ends up as run-off and dips into the watershed, causing phosphorous and nitrogen spikes. These spikes have led to an increase of toxins in fish that’s potentially harmful to both humans and marine life in the Chesapeake Bay. John Logan, a poulterer from Eagle Green Energy Inc., found that his own production had environmental issues and wanted to find a way to resolve them. “I began to seek out a methodology and means to solve the problem,” Logan said. “It became obvious that this poultry manure could become a very successful anaerobic digestive project.”

ryan freeland / the breeze

A panel of poultry farm and green energy representatives share plans for renewable energy solutions in Virginia on Tuesday.

Lauren Ingram, an employee of poultry litter energy company Fibrowatt, has proposed a poultry litter plant here in Virginia. The plant will produce 55 megawatts of power and have the potential to burn approximately 50 percent of poultry litter and other woody bio-grass for energy. “In our proposal, we have identified how the plant actually reduces nitrogen and phosphorous dumping to the bay,” Ingram said. “We came up with 2.3 million pounds of nitrogen reduction.” Fibrowatt plants meet the highest Environmental Protection Agency standards, according to Ingram. “Our plant takes the litter that produces the chemicals and does something else with it,” Ingram said. “In our process the nitrogen is released into the air as di-nitrogen and the phosphorus is contained in the ash which can be used for other projects.” Scott Laskowski from Bio-Burner, Inc., see Poultry, page A4

SGA’s budget approval of some of the most active organizations on campus didn’t go as smoothly as planned on Tuesday. A conflict arose when some SGA members went beyond the call to approve EARTH club’s front-end budget and instead voiced their dissatisfaction with its position as an FEB club. FEB organizations are clubs that receive consistent yearly funding from SGA. Non-FEB clubs can only receive SGA funding from the contingency fund, and applications for funding are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Susanna Chacko, speaker for the Senate, had to remind the senators this was the incorrect time to debate EARTH club’s position. “It doesn’t make them lose their FEB status if you vote against their budget,” Chacko said. She added that SGA can vote on the club’s FEB status in the fall. Every two years, SGA votes on whether FEB organizations can maintain this status. After the meeting, Rheanna Martino, senior class president, said she couldn’t speak for SGA as a whole but personally feels EARTH club hasn’t reached its potential with the money it’s allocated. “The reason you’re granted FEB status is because you make a large impact on the campus,” Martino said. “Ever since their initial funding, I don’t think they’ve done anything that has been monumental or far reaching on the campus.” UPB’s budget also came under heavy fire. This year, a miscalculation on UPB’s behalf meant that its budget was cut by roughly eight percent instead of the three percent that SGA requested all FEB clubs to cut from their budgets. Jordan Descovich, SGA finance committee chair, said no one

laura wilkins / the breeze

caught the mistake when UPB’s budget was submitted, and by the time it had been noticed, it was too late to edit. This three percent cut was required because SGA wanted see SGA, page A4

paul jones / the breeze

The SGA finance comittee members Aaron Brown (right) and Priyen Patel (left) motioned an increase in UPB’s budget at the meeting on Tuesday.

Psych through art

Filmmaker creates documentary on late grandfather, a Holocaust survivor, psychologist By Laura Weeks The Breeze

corey crowe / contributing photographer

Alex Vesley traveled the world for three years collecting interviews from friends and family of his late grandfather for his documentary, “Viktor & I.”

For Austrian filmmaker Alex Vesely, what began as a small archive project of his late grandfather Viktor Frankl turned into a documentary of transforming human tragedy into triumph. While many students attending Monday’s screening of “Viktor & I” credit Frankl, a Holocaust survivor, for establishing “logotherapy” — a psychotherapeutic school defined as healing through meaning — the film isn’t centered around his experiments or his tragedies at Auschwitz. “It’s a very personal film … about the man who came up with this concept, Vesely said. “It’s Viktor seen through the eyes of the people who knew him best.”

Vesely traveled the world for three years interviewing his grandfather’s friends, family, colleagues and former students. The interviewees’ anecdotes of Frankl’s life and work illustrate the impression Frankl made on their lives. Frankl, who lost his entire family over three years in various concentration camps, authored 39 books over his lifetime. In 1991, The New York Times cited “Man’s Search for Meaning” as one of the “10 most influential books in America.” According to the American Journal of Psychiatry, Frankl’s work is “perhaps the most significant thinking since Freud and Adler.” He received 29 honorary doctorates from universities worldwide. The film incorporates home videos of Frankl with his children, grandchildren and wife.

news opinion A5 3/1 Inside A3 Making money Name-calling Students get creative in order By refering to Obama as a

to earn some extra cash.

snob, Santorum continues his mission to only appeal to extreme conservatives.

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There were also photographs of Frankl rock climbing, a therapeutic activity that Vesely said his grandfather pursued until age 80. Among the interviews are clips of Frankl speaking at Holocaust commemoration events and lecturing on logotherapy. JMU psychology professor William Evans invited Vesely and Mary Cimiluca, CEO of Noetic Films to JMU when he heard about the completion of the film. Evans reads Frankl’s book, “Man’s Search for Meaning” at least once every year, because it “gave me a sense of hope that life is worth living.” Sharon Lockaby, a secondyear graduate student in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program, appreciated the hands-on documentary about

sports Double the trouble

Softball loses Tuesday’s doubleheader to Radford University.

“famous people’s lives, people who’ve really changed the psychology world.” Frankl’s life maxim of overcoming tragedy by searching for meaning in life was one of the film’s messages. The film reminded John Clarke, a second-year graduate student in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program, of the importance as a therapist to live out what you teach. “Once we’ve found meaning, so many things like anxiety and depression might be underlying a lack of meaning,” Clarke said. “Viktor & I” had its first screening last week at the University of Mississippi, as part of a college tour around the United States and

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see film, page B4

life ‘Beer heaven’

An inside look at Capital Ale House’s premiere selection of brews.


Page 2 EDITORS Matt Sutherland

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Corrections

 In an article titled “1 Meet, 13 records” in Monday’s

issue, The Breeze incorrectly reported that some team members would be attending the NCAA championships. However, these members actually achievd a B qualifying time, meaming they are in a pool of reserve teams who will attend the championship if spots remain.

horoscopes

IF YOU WERE BORN TODAY: Saturn spends most of 2012 in Libra, your Eighth House of joint resources. Target debt reduction this year and then build savings and retirement funds. Saturn’s about learning and responsibility. Career and education both sparkle. Love and social life’s not bad, either.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF TORIE FOSTER breezeeditor@gmail.com

Today

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your family helps you to overcome a difficult situation. Lean on them more than you might normally. Thank them.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don’t jump the gun; listen for the timing. Step carefully, and watch where you’re going. Pay attention and master the dance.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Finish a job carefully. A solution to an old problem becomes apparent. Reviewing the cards reveals new strategies.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Imagine the finished product and you can spot potential problems before they arise. If you get stuck, take a walk.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Wait until later to discuss an upcoming purchase. The timing’s not right. Heed a warning.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Stay close to home, but make sure to recharge with a stroll. Don’t miss the forest for the trees.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Impulsiveness can cause accidents, so slow down a bit. Check your footing, and play strong.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) At first, the task may seem impossible. Create teamwork to make it happen.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) Think it over a little longer. It should be ready to go later. Traffic’s blocked for now. Stick close to home.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Keep working on it with as few distractions as possible. But don’t cut corners to get the job done.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Belt it out: You’ve got something to say, and they’re listening. You have some wonderful friends. The best things in life are free. Enjoy them with gusto.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Don’t throw your money away; be creative with what you’ve got. Open windows and let a romantic breeze fill your heart. When all else fails, use humor.

North Korea nuclear pause in exchange for US food assist McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON — North Korea will suspend longrange missile launches, nuclear weapons tests and activities at its key nuclear site, including the enrichment of uranium, as part of an agreement under which it will receive desperately needed food aid from the United States, the two countries announced Wednesday. The surprise breakthrough, reached in talks last week in Beijing between U.S. and North Korean negotiators, appeared to raise the prospects of resuming

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long-stalled international enrichment activities,” State negotiations on eliminating Department spokeswomNorth Korea’s nuclear weap- an Victoria Nuland said in a statement. ons program. U.N. International AtomThe deal is a “modest first step,” Secretary of State Hill- ic Energy Agency inspectors ary Clinton told a Senate will return to the Yongbyon nuclear complex to monitor committee. If implemented, the deal compliance with the accord, would signal a major pol- Nuland said. The deal gives President icy shift by North Korea — known officially as the Barack Obama a boost just Democratic People’s Repub- weeks before he joins some lic of Korea — after the death  other heads of state in of dictator Kim Jong Il from South Korea to review proga heart attack in December ress on his initiative to lock and the accession of his son, up the world’s nuclear weapKim Jong Un. North Korea ons materials by the end of has refused for nearly four . The State Department years to suspend its nuclear announcement of the deal activities. “To improve the atmo- noted that “the United States sphere for dialogue and still has profound concerns demonstrate its commit- regarding North Korean ment to denuclearization, behavior across a wide range North Korea has agreed of areas.” But it added that the to implement a moratori- agreement “reflects imporum on long-range missile tant, if limited, progress in launches, nuclear tests and addressing some” of the U.S. nuclear activities at Yong- concerns. byon, including uranium Down-Home Cooking

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Shanksville remains aren’t in landfill, Air Force head says McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON — The head of the Air Force on Wednesday disputed a report that some unidentified remains from the Sept. , , plane crash site in Shanksville, Pa., had been disposed of in a landfill, casting more confusion on an episode that’s embarrassed the Pentagon and Dover Air Force Base, which handles the remains of the nation’s war dead. A report commissioned by Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and released Tuesday had found that some unidentifiable remains of victims from the terrorist attack on the Pentagon and the United Airlines Flight  crash in Shanksville were “placed in sealed containers that were provided to a biomedical waste disposal contractor.” The contractor eventually disposed of the remains in a landfill, the report said. But during a breakfast with

reporters Wednesday, Gen. Norton Schwartz, the chief of staff of the Air Force, said that those remains belonged only to victims at the Pentagon, not on Flight . “Overnight, we’ve had an opportunity to review the report quickly and have had an opportunity to do some research on one of the fundamental questions that came up related to the remains of the fallen from /,” Schwartz said, according to an official Pentagon account. After whistleblowers reported mishandling of troop remains at the mortuary, an Air Force probe concluded last fall that the partial remains of  service members had been incinerated and disposed of in a landfill. An independent panel led by retired Gen. John Abizaid conducted its own review, which reported Tuesday that some / victims’ remains had also been disposed of in this way. Pentagon officials offered little clarity on Schwartz’s claim Wednesday. Schwartz and Michael Donley, the secretary of the Air Force, said they’d first learned about the improper disposal of / victims from the report.


News

slideshow of other students, quirky jobs at breezejmu.org.

Editors  Georgina Buckley, Alison Parker & Jen Eyring  Email breezenews@gmail.com

Thursday, March 1, 2012  

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Sex in the classroom: A new perspective

Class dedicated to sexuality; healthy discussion of controversial topics helps students deepen understanding By Anne elsea The Breeze

Sperm travels 25 miles per hour. This is one of many things James Fey has learned in a class that covers some of the more unusual sexual behaviors. “I learned about some of the stranger sexual acts,” Fey said. “We watched a video on a man who had a balloon fetish.” Fey, a junior health sciences major,

is taking HTH 372 this semester, a class taught by Maria Wessel, a public health professor, and Katherine Ott

“We watched a man who had a balloon fetish.” James Fey

junior health sciences major

Walter, a health sciences professor. HTH 372 is a human sexuality class offered through the health sciences program. The class emphasizes the development of sexuality with attention given to the mental, physical, social and cultural effects of sexuality. Amid current controversy over a live sex toy demonstration at Northwestern University, some human sexuality courses have been in the limelight more than ever. JMU,

however, hasn’t received much scrutiny for its course. “This class is appropriate for all students, and I wish we had the teachers to open up more sections to other majors,” Wessel said. “We don’t do live demonstrations like they did at Northwestern. The topics we teach [are] very typical to nationwide health education classes.” The course was first implemented 30 years ago, but it has changed since

then. It used to be focused on personal issues with sexuality and was open to all JMU students, but now a professional responsibility component has been added to it for future medical professionals. “ T h e y h av e t o k n o w w h a t they might be involved with, s u c h a s S T D s,” We s s e l s a i d . see Sexuality, page A4

Getting creative for cash Some students have found on-campus jobs that are a little on the stranger side By Elizabeth Dsurney The Breeze

Working is often a necessary evil for college students trying to earn extra money. But for some students, that doesn’t mean it can’t be fun, too.

The model

Senior studio art major Katelyn Wood models nude for drawing and painting classes for the art department. Wood will pose anywhere from five minutes to an hour for each class, earning $12 an hour. Some classes even last up to three hours. She admits it can be difficult to stay still for a long time, but she enjoys being able to see what the students have painted. “Being an art major, I always thought it would be interesting to gain the perspective from the model’s viewpoint,” Wood said. “I do enjoy modeling a lot and find it interesting to see what each student comes up with at the end of the class period.” Wood said it wasn’t awkward at all, even during her first time modeling. “Being an art student and having sat through model sessions before, I know that the students don’t really focus on the fact that you are nude but more the drawing itself,” Wood said. Wood believes that all the students are talented in what they do and bring forth a wide variety of perspectives and styles on one subject matter. Anyone with any body type who is interested in modeling and a free couple of hours is able.

The craftsman

Paul Jones / the breeze

Senior theatre and dance major Christopher Jett enjoyed getting to see the end result of his worked behind the scenes in the stagecraft shop for “Sweeney Todd.”

Instead of inspiring the art, senior theatre and dance major Christopher Jett creates art with his sets for main stage plays in the Forbes Center for the Performing Arts. “I enjoy all aspects of my work. There’s no other job quite like it,” Jett said. Jett worked about 10 hours a week on the set for “Sweeney Todd” and said it was one of the most intricate sets they’ve built at JMU so far. Jett enjoys getting to see the end result of his work.

“The best part is watching the play as a member of the audience and seeing all the work that’s been put into it finally come together and seeing how it actually looks during the play,” Jett said.

The sexpert

Brie Dill, a sophomore anthropology major, calls herself a “JMU sexpert.” College women may host “Slumber Parties” and invite Dill, a sales consultant, to give a two-hour presentation about everything from shaving cream to sex toys. “Through the products, I teach JMU girls about their bodies and give them new ways to enhance their sex lives,” Dill said. “It is a girl’s night only — no boys allowed, 100 percent confidential — to get together and have fun, and at the end of the night, buy some goodies to take home with you.” Dill likes her job because of the flexibility and the fact that she’s her own boss. She gets 35 percent of the profit she makes from selling the items. “Even while I’m working, I get to go out and meet awesome new people, while educating them, as well,” Dill said. Dill said that occasionally there are some nervous party attendants, but she can usually alleviate their butterflies by reminding them of the confidentiality policy. “I never feel awkward, but I’m sure some girls might feel a little weird opening up to a stranger about their sex lives,” Dill said, “but I’m not there to judge and I will give honest advice and answer any questions they have.”

The entrepreneur

Matt McKeon, a junior management major, created a company that sells rain boots. It’s set to launch in the next few weeks. McKeon’s company, Greek Feet, is creating rain boots with customizable sorority letters. He’s not in a fraternity, but works closely with a few people involved in Fraternity and Sorority Life to help out with decisions. He wanted to create something different that a lot of people would enjoy. see Work, page A4

Booze blues

Some students with hefy charges are having difficulty registering for alcohol education class By Ij chan contributing writer

The Alcohol Safety Action Program, which provides classes to individuals charged with alcohol- and drug-related offenses, is having a hard time keeping its schedule open. District court may require students to attend certain classes through ASAP and participate in community service, in addition to sanctions given by JMU Judicial Affairs. However, some students said it’s harder to get into the ASAP classes than it is to take them. Junior Brandon Hope, an ISAT major, received an alcohol violation strike last semester, but has been delayed for months to take ASAP. Hope, who was charged with underaged possession in September, lost his driver’s license, must complete 60 hours of community service and attend ASAP classes, in addition to fulfilling his requirements with Judicial Affairs. According to Hope, a high volume of participants, scheduling conflicts, and poor communication tactics on behalf of the ASAP program have made it difficult to fulfill both the ASAP and community service requirements. “I’ve been having difficulty because apparently, the volume is so high of

katie Baroody / the breeze

The most common on-campus offenses are alcohol related, according to JMU Judicial Affairs. These may result in students having to take classes from four to eight weeks through the Alcohol Safety Action Program, costing about $325.

JMU students that are all trying to do community service,” Hope said. “And there’s only, you know, this finite list you can go through. So it’s even harder to get community service that I don’t want to do done.” Despite being charged in September, Hope, who was originally scheduled to begin classes in February, will begin ASAP classes this coming April.

However, Hope claims that although ASAP had sent the notification letter in December, he never received it. “They don’t call to make sure you got the letter or email you or anything like that,” Hope said. “So I had no idea and I actually missed my first class. So if you miss you the first class, you automatically like, can’t do it, so they rescheduled me.” Like Judicial Affairs, ASAP offers

several classes, including Alcohol Education, Spanish Alcohol Education, Young Offender Alcohol Education, Intensive Education and Drug Education. Currently, the Rockingham/Harrisonburg ASAP, located on 350 N. Main St. of Harrisonburg, runs 26 classes on its schedule, 12 of which are Young Offender Alcohol Education Classes. ASAP classes usually have a

capacity of 13 to 18 participants and run Monday through Friday in the evenings, but daytime and weekend options are available. The program most frequently serves offenders within the college-age range, and JMU students are significantly involved in ASAP, according to Pam Simmons, director of the Rockingham/Harrisonburg ASAP program. In the previous year alone, Simmons said ASAP received 864 people who were charged with underage possession. Also, Simmons said that due to the high volume of underage offenders that go through the program, the ASAP program and schedule has been re-worked to accommodate college students’ schedules. “We’re always trying to make it more convenient for students,” Simmons said. “Classes don’t meet over spring break, for example, and we try to get people finished before finals week.” Simmons said ASAP tries to schedule students as soon as possible, and that there are currently only four unscheduled students on a waiting list. Corey Birkel, a freshman engineering major, said he didn’t start ASAP classes until months after his violation. see ASAP, page A4


A4   Thursday, March 1, 2012

breezejmu.org news

Sexuality | All are ‘respectful’ ASAP | More than education from page A3

from page A3

The course covers not only the usual sex ed basics of safe sex and relationships, but also sexual dysfunctions, legal issues, prostitution and porn, according to Wessel. Johannah Roberts, a sophomore health science major, thinks these topics are important for students to study. “Just because JMU has a really high sexual activity rate, even though people know about sex and contraception, they don’t take it upon themselves to find out more about preventative measures,” Roberts said. Even though some of the topics the class covers, such as abortion, sexual orientation and pornography can be controversial; Wessel said the class maintains a courteous environment. “We talk about very sensitive

issues, where there is no right or wrong opinion,” Wessel said. “I think we have interesting discussions, and everyone is very respectful.”

“We talk about very sensitive issues, where there is no right or wrong opinion.” Maria Wessel

health sciences professor

How e v e r, Fe y , o n e o f eight men in Walter’s class, remembers one discussion about the recently proposed abortion and birth control regulations made many students emotional. “It would mean that women wouldn’t be able to get birth control,” Fey said, “being that

the class is mostly women, that didn’t go over well.” He also said that although the class is mainly lecturebased, Walter does try to use intriguing questions to start discussions. “Sometimes she calls on the guys to answer something or give a guy’s opinion,” Fey said. “But not in an embarrassing way. She is very understanding and cautious about that. She doesn’t ask you to stand up and say what your weird sexual fantasies are.” Roberts said that he finds the class especially interesting because he has learned strange facts about both physical sexual functions and sexual practices at JMU. “I also learned that condom use is around 2 4 p e r c e n t a t J M U .” contact Anne Elsea at elseaav@dukes.jmu.edu.

sga | Executive council to review clubs’ budgets today before finalizing from front

more money for the contingency fund, which can be used for events by all other student organizations on campus. SGA cut budgets to increase the amount of money in the contingency fund, which had been shrinking over the last few years. “Funding from the state has gone down overall, and JMU can only do what it can to keep up,” said Pat Watral, SGA president. “We get the money to fund these organizations from tuition, but we’ve had to take the smaller slice of the pie for the past couple of years.” UPB faced further frustration when freshman finance committee member Aaron Brown’s motion to give an extra $6,000 to UPB failed. “I was very surprised that it did not pass because usually people want to see more of an increase for UPB,” Descovich said.

“Six thousand dollars wouldn’t make the difference between Ice Cube and Lil’ Wayne.” Morgan Shaughnessy

SGA contingency liaison

UPB finance director Marc Fernandes, who was at the meeting, said the money would have been useful because performing artists are getting more expensive. Contingency liaison Morgan Shaughnessy, who oversees applications from non-FEB clubs, said the money would be better used elsewhere. “Si x t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s wouldn’t make the difference between Ice Cube and Lil’ Wayne,” Shaughnessy said,

“whereas putting this money in contingency could help out five groups go to conferences.” SGA also became divided over its budgeting for Student Ambassadors. Brown’s motion to add $400 to the stipends for the executive board of the club passed, but Martino disagreed with it. “How many organizations are just as big as Ambassadors and do just as much as Ambassadors, but their executive board gets zero?” Martino said. Martino argued the extra money should go to the contingency fund instead, saying $400 could really help another club’s budget. The budgets will go through SGA executive council today for review before finalization. Any changes that they make will force the budget for re-approval before SGA. Contact Georgina Buckley at breezenews@ gmail.com.

poultry | Burning litter causes large amounts of nitrogen pollution from front

suggested burning poultry litter in small-scale incinerators, rather than in large power plants like those proposed by Ingram. “We are trying to create microeconomics on a local basis all over the place,” Laskowski said. “Let local entrepreneurs create their own fuel and distribute it without the extra costs.” Some of the panelists and audience members had their doubts. Bailey explained that 17 percent of nitrogen and 26 percent

of phosphorous runoff into the bay is produced by manure runoff. “In certain watersheds we exceed the land application of animal manure and that is where concerns arise,” Bailey said. Jim Schaberl, the Natural and Cultural Resource Division Chief of Shenandoah National Park, Jim Schaberl argued that simply burning the poultry litter doesn’t stop the pollution. “The large-scale burning of litter produces large amounts of nitrogen in the air,” Schaberl said. “Moving the pollution

from the water to the air doesn’t stop the problem.” John Bernhardt, a junior health sciences major, also shared concerns, but agreed renewable resource options should be looked into. “I think that there are so many opportunities for great innovation and thinking that could come from having to find new sources of energy,” Bernhardt said. “Anything that can be explored should be looked into.”

Birkel was given a ticket for underaged possession of alcohol early last semester and just began his ASAP classes three weeks ago. He’s taking his final class this week. Birkel was given a choice of either attending one twohour class a week for eight weeks or two two-hour classes a week for four weeks. He chose the latter to finish his requirements more quickly. According to Birkel, his Young Offender Alcohol Education class of 20 to 25 people

is almost entirely composed of fellow students. Birkel added the class is taught by an instructor who identifies well with the students and educates them on topics including alcohol-related risks, police procedures and tactics in regard to alcohol-related offenses at JMU. “My teacher [is] nice, so we also do fun stuff,” Birkel said. “You share your funniest story when you were drunk, and that takes up like a full week. I mean, a normal teacher wouldn’t do that.” ASAP fees, court fees, a

drug test and an alcohol education course through JMU cost Birkel nearly $500. The ASAP course alone cost him $325. Birkel wants to inform other students about the consequences of alcohol violations, so they might avoid the same fate. “I didn’t realize how big of a fine it was and how much time it would take out of my day for the next year,” Birkel said. “I’m still dealing with it now.” contact IJ Chan at chanij@dukes.jmu.edu.

Work | Began in business class from page A3

“We wanted to create an original idea that hasn’t been done before,” McKeon said. McKeon will go to sorority chapter meetings and events to sell the boots to see how Greeks like the product. “We started this job as a project in our entrepreneurship class and hope to continue the business,” McKeon said. “I love the entirepreneurial aspect of business, and it has been a lot of fun setting up Greek Feet.”

The tutor

Elizabeth Cozzati, a senior psychology major, uses her

Doing anything newsworthy over break? Tell us about it.

Paul Jones / the breeze

Matt McKeon (left), Joe D’Arezzo and Katie Hall customize sorority rainboots.

talents to tutor athletes. Cozzati tutors them in the Plecker Athletic Center on any subject in which she has earned an “A” at JMU. So far,

she has mostly tutored for General Education geography and American studies classes. “It doesn’t pay a lot but it’s nice to have some extra cash on the side,” Cozzati said. “I really enjoy working with some of the students I tutor and it’s not very stressful.” Tutoring has helped give Cozzati a newfound respect for student athletes. “They really do juggle a lot between games, practices, classes and anything else, and I think it’s pretty impressive,” Cozzati said. Contact Elizabeth Dsurney at dsurneeg@ dukes.jmu.edu.

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Opinion

USE YOUR SPRING BREAK WISELY. WRITE DOWN SOME OPINIONS. Send them to breezeopinion@gmail.com.

EDITOR Katie Sensabaugh EMAIL breezeopinion@gmail.com

CONVERSATION CORNER Rick Santorum called Obama a snob because the president said he wants everyone to go to college. What are your thoughts? CODY WILLIAMS He came to our SGA meeting a couple months back and really dove into the topic. He just threw it all out there, was straight up, and realistic @MEGHANKATHLEEN I think it’s rather ironic being that Santorum has a B.A., M.B.A. and J.D. ZEPHAN BLAXBERG At least he doesn’t think he can see Russia from his house

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Spring break reality

A5

@PHILLIPSJMU going to college should not be mandatory & many have done well w/o college ALYSSA RICHARDSON college is not for everyone, many find successful employment and careers by . . . and not going to college SCOTT AMES Why does the Government continue to believe that they should dictate what a person should and should not do?

>> Join the conversation! “Like” us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter. PARNIA GHAZANFARI

| guest columnist

Speak up, save a life

Intervention in potentially abusive relationships could prevent a tragedy Last week, former University of Virginia lacrosse player George Huguely V was convicted of second degree murder in the May  beating and death of his on-and-off girlfriend and U.Va. lacrosse player Yeardley Love. After a two-and-ahalf-week trial and more than  hours of jury deliberation, Huguely was sentenced to  years for the murder and one year for grand larceny. On Sunday, May , , Huguely, after having nearly  drinks over the course of the day, went over to Love’s apartment to talk. Though we can only guess exactly what happened that night, Huguely has admitted to shaking Love and hitting her head against the wall. She eventually died two hours later, though Huguely wasn’t aware of how serious her injuries are when he left her apartment. But the most gut-wrenching part about this story is that it could’ve been prevented. To put it in perspective, this wasn’t the first incident of violence in Love and Huguely’s relationship. In February , Huguely, in a drunken rage, put Love in a chokehold, nearly strangling her until some friends intervened. There was also an incident about a week before Love’s death in which she entered Huguely’s apartment and hit him repeatedly with her purse for talking to other girls. As was the case in the most infamous incident, alcohol was involved. In an apology letter to Love after the February incident Huguely wrote, “I’m horrified by my behavior.

DARTS

I’m scared to know that I can get so drunk I can’t control my life … Alcohol is ruining my life.” Often, after a tragedy occurs, we replay it in our minds and think about what if things had been different. Yet no matter how many times we play it over and over, no matter how many different scenarios we imagine, nothing can ever change what has happened.

Although Love and Huguely’s story is an extreme example, it should serve as a painful reminder of a very real threat to college students. Even knowing this, I haven’t stopped asking “what if.” What if Huguely hadn’t been a binge drinker, on the verge of alcoholism? What if someone had an intervention (as his friends were allegedly going to do but never did)? What if Love had taken legal action to protect herself from Huguely? What if any of the number of friends and family members who knew about Love and Huguely’s tumultuous and abusive relationship had spoken up? As a student at a Virginia university, this case has felt especially close to home for me. I have thought and been frightened about this happening to one of my friends. Walking around campus, I have wondered how many Loves and how many Huguelys I’ve seen.

PATS

Darts & Pats are anonymously submitted and printed on a space-available basis. Submissions creatively depict a given situation, person or event and do not necessarily reflect the truth.

Submit Darts & Pats at breezejmu.org

I’ve hoped my fellow Dukes and I would speak up about a situation that didn’t seem right to us. Yet I have also felt shame and fear about how many times we fail to do so. Especially in a college setting, the dangers of violence and excessive drinking are apparent. Sadly, those involved in these acts are often unaware of their severity. Sadder still is the fact that those who witness these acts just as often stand idly by. Although Love and Huguely’s story is an extreme example, it should serve as a painful reminder of a very real threat to college students. I know the stigmas associated with speaking up. We don’t want to be seen as a party poopers, or worse, snitches. We don’t want to get any of our friends in trouble. But how would you feel if you didn’t speak up and the unthinkable happened? It would’ve taken only one person speaking out about Huguely’s excessive drinking, or only one person seeking help on behalf of Love for this tragedy to have been prevented. How many times have you seen someone drinking to a point where they put themselves or others in danger? How many times have you seen or heard about a seemingly insignificant act of violence but chose to ignore it? It’s our duty as human beings to speak up when we feel that others are in danger. Parnia Ghazanfari is a senior media arts & design major. Contact Parnia at ghazanpx@dukes.jmu.edu.

A “what-happened-to-whatyou-said-when-explainingthe-syllabus” dart to my professors who never answer my emails. From a frustrated student who will not believe any more professors that say the best way to contact them is through email.

A “no-YOU’RE-awesome” pat to whoever put up the inspirational sticky notes around Carrier. From a stressed-out senior who got her work done a little faster because of you.

A “why-are-you-in-thelibrary-if-you-can’t-read?” dart to the girl talking on her cellphone right next to the quiet area sign. From a guy who learned his ABCs in preschool.

An “are-you-colorblind?” dart to the girl walking around campus with an orange face and pasty-white legs. From someone who thinks you need to invest in a full-length mirror.

A “you’re-not-living-up-toyour-name” dart to the East Campus Library -hour lab. From an exhausted student who would have been much more productive if you’d been open.

A “you-were-an-angel-indisguise” pat to the guy who randomly parked his car next to mine and happened to have jumper cables. From a girl who doesn’t even know what a starter is and cannot thank you enough for your kindness.

A “you-know-who-you-are” pat to my long-lost roommate. From someone who hasn’t seen you in days and misses your company.

An “I’d-report-intereston-your-smile’s-incomestatement” dart to the accounting girl who sits next to me. From an accounting guy who wants to report an extraordinary gain before taxes are due.

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A “thanks-for-not-filing-arestraining-order” pat to the people I creep on in the parking decks. From a parking spot stalker.

A “you’re-the-one-whoshould-be-more-polite-nexttime” dart to the girl on the bus who said, “next time, use a please and thank you” in a rude tone. From a bystander who doesn’t know what the issue was, but thinks you could’ve handled it better.

The Breeze welcomes and encourages readers to voice their opinions through letters and guest columns. Letters must be no longer than 250 words. Guest columns must be no more than 650 words. The Breeze reserves the right to edit submissions for length, grammar and if material is libelous, factually inaccurate or unclear. The Breeze assumes the rights to any published work. Opinions expressed in this page, with the exception of editorials, are not necessarily those of The Breeze or its staff. Letters and guest columns should be submitted in print or via e-mail and must include name, phone number, major/year if author is a current student (or year of graduation), professional title (if applicable) and place of residence if author is not a JMU student.

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CHRIS JUSTIS | justice is served

Remarks keep adding up

Santorum will say anything to appeal to conservatives Rick Santorum is in the middle of yet another controversy. Who’s surprised? His latest slipup came when he called President Barack Obama a snob. You might think he called Obama a snob because of his wealth or style, but it’s actually because the president said “everyone should go to college” during his State of the Union. “They’re good, decent men and women who go out and work hard every day and put their skills to test that aren’t taught by some liberal college professor to try to indoctrinate them,” Santorum said after calling Obama a snob this weekend. “Oh, I understand why he wants you to go to college. He wants to remake you in his image.” Of course, Obama telling kids to go to college is obviously a conspiracy to make the liberal college professors to recreate students in his image. But his problem with these comments is that they attack everyone who thinks people should go to college, which is a wider segment of the population than just Obama. “I have to make a point here,” Obama said Monday at a White House conference. “When I speak about higher education, we are not just talking about a four-year degree.” He was referring to any training beyond high school, like community college or vocational training. This is a perfect example of how Santorum simply wants to disagree with Obama about everything — even the little things — to make himself more appealing to the radical conservative crowd. But this is going to alienate him even more in the general election if he makes it that far. He doesn’t even need to disagree

with Obama’s minute policies to make him sound like an extreme right-wing conservative. Santorum’s had plenty of examples in the past, including a comment on the Piers Morgan show. “I think the right approach is to accept this horribly created — in the sense of rape — but nevertheless a gift in a very broken way, the gift of human life, and accept what God has given to you,” he said on the show in January when talking about abortion.

Of course, Obama telling kids to go to college is obviously a conspiracy to make the liberal college professors to recreate students in his image. His comments even go back to . “In every society, the definition of marriage has not ever, to my knowledge, included homosexuality. That’s not to pick on homosexuality. It’s not, you know, man on child, man on dog, or whatever the case may be,” he said in an interview with the Associated Press. No doubt, these comments spread the word that Santorum is an extreme right-winger. This is only scratching the surface; throughout his campaign he has continued to drift further right. Because of these comments, I know if he makes it to the general election, he won’t become president. I have faith in the American people that they will show that they’re rational people and will not pick such an extreme candidate. Chris Justis is a junior public policy & administration major. Contact Chris at justisjc@dukes.jmu.edu.

MEET THE EDITOR Sports Editor: Meaghan MacDonald We think it’s important for you to be able to learn about the people who edit your newspaper. Each week, we will introduce you to one of our editors so you can put a face to the paper we publish. 4. I went cliff diving in high school in

1. I am one of the sports editors, which

means I edit stories, help design the layout for our pages and write my own stories. Lately, I have been writing the spotlight pieces on JMU club sport teams. 2. I have been a DJ for WXJM for three years. 3. I have been surfing since I was  years old. I have a -foot Gordon & Smith board and surf mostly at home in New Jersey.

Florida. 5. I had a short story published at age . 6. I marched in the New York Giants Super Bowl Parade in  and met Michael Strahan. 7. I am a die-hard New York Yankees fan. 8. I’ve seen Third Eye Blind in concert six times. 9. New York Knicks guard J.R. Smith came into Tilly’s, the store I work in at home, and I sold him $, worth of clothing. 10. I always win free tickets to concerts while listening to the radio. Recently, I won front-row tickets to see Foster the People and I won tickets to see the Black Keys in Philadelphia. Meaghan MacDonald is a junior media arts & design major. Contact Meaghan at breezesports@gmail.com.

“To the press alone, chequered as it is with abuses, the world is indebted for all the triumphs which have been gained by reason and humanity over error and oppression.” — james madison,  LIFE EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JEFF WADE LIFE EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LAURA WEEKS SPORTS EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CARLEIGH DAVIS SPORTS EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MEAGHAN MACDONALD COPY EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MARY CLAIRE JONES COPY EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MATT SUTHERLAND

PHOTO EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . PAUL JONES PHOTO EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . .JAMES MOORE DESIGN EDITOR . . . . . . . CHRISTINE POMATTO GRAPHICS EDITOR . . . . . . . . . LAURA WILKINS VIDEO EDITOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . LANI FURBANK MULTIMEDIA DIRECTOR . . . . . . .ROBERT BOAG


A6   Thursday, March 1, 2012

breezejmu.org


Sports

follow the Dukes’ CAA tournament on twitter, friday at noon

@TheBreezeSports

Thursday, March 1, 2012  

Editors  Carleigh Davis & Meaghan MacDonald  Email breezesports@gmail.com

B1

softball (2-3, 3-6)

Dukes tagged out

meet the player

Highlanders’ pitching and Dukes’ errors cause JMU’s demise in Tuesday’s doubleheader By Carleigh Davis and Chase Kiddy The Breeze

photo courtesy JMU ATHLETICS

Sean Tierney

Few things favored the Dukes as JMU softball dropped a doubleheader at the home opener against Radford on Tuesday. JMU (3-6) took the mound against Radford (4-3) in what looked like a promising afternoon. The fireworks started early for both sides, as each team scored twice in the first inning. Radford scored again in the third to take a 3-2 lead. That’s when a hard-fought defensive struggle began. “We’re just going through a couple bumps and bruises,” said Caitlin Sandy, sophomore third baseman. “I think it’s better to go through [this at the] beginning than [in the] end. Hopefully, we turn it around.” Neither team would score after the third inning, but not from lack of trying. JMU came close to tying things up in the bottom of the fifth when junior Megan Shinaberry led off with a single. The Dukes ended up with two on base thanks to one of Radford’s three errors, but the inning would end before any of the runs could be converted. Both teams demonstrated strong defensive qualities by not converting hits into runs. Radford’s offense loaded the bases in the top of the seventh, but JMU came up with another defensive stop to hold the Highlanders’ lead to one. “I thought we had pretty strong performance from pitching, not the offensive performance we want on a consistent basis,” said Ashley Burnham, a senior shortstop. “I think it was definitely a collective loss. Both games were team losses. I guess you could say it was

redshirt senior pitcher By tony schaffner | The Breeze Sean Tierney is a redshirt senior left-handed pitcher who graduated with a bachelor’s in kinesiology. Tierney is originally from Midlothian and played for University of Virginia his freshman year, appearing in two games in 2008. He was redshirted after transferring to JMU. Tierney also played high school baseball for Clover Hill High School.

When you’re pitching, what’s your mental checklist while on the mound? Basically just throw

strikes, get ahead of the batters and give our defense a chance to make a play. If runners do get on base, just try and minimize the runs that are scored.

Are there any major league pitchers you try to model your game after?

Tom Glavine. I feel like I have kind of similar stuff to what he had: a similar fastball, similar changeup and a similar curveball. Just try and locate [pitches] similarly to how he did. He never really tried to blow anyone away. He just worried more about location and throwing strikes.

What’s the fastest your fastball has ever been clocked at? Ninety-four mph.

It’s been awhile since then, though. It was recorded after my freshman year.

How’s the scouting process going as far as being an MLB prospect? I’m

not really trying to pay attention to it. I’m just trying to go out there and throw strikes, compete and give our team a chance to win. If something happens down the road, great. If not, at least I know I did whatever I could to help the team out.

Goals for the upcoming season? To win the conference,

go on to win a regional and make it to Omaha [for the College World Series].

What are your favorite pitches to use in descending order? I think

striking people out with a fastball is probably my favorite. If not, then a curveball, my slider, and then last, a change-up.

see SOFTBALL, page B2

megan trindell / contributing photographer

Sophomore Caitlin Sandy tries sliding safely into first base during Tuesday’s doubleheader against Radford, who outscored the Dukes by a combined 9-5 runs.

club gymnastics

Setbacks push Dukes to get back on the horse Despite Title IX limitations, team uses fun, relaxation to compete on national level

By Meaghan MacDonald The Breeze

Across college sports, gymnastics is slowly becoming a relic. With varsity programs constantly getting cut due to a surplus of expenses and a lack of money, the men and women of JMU’s gymnastics club team are just happy to be competing. The 2006-07 season was the last time gymnastics was a varsity sport. But because of the Title IX law, JMU cut the program to give more opportunities to other sporting programs. “It’s kind of disheartening to see a varsity program get cut where it’s kind of a dying breed, so it’s hard to get interest going,” said Beck Shasky, junior men’s team captain, “but for those who are very interested, maybe varsity was their goal and you come to a school that doesn’t have a varsity team … it’s kind of a letdown when they don’t have that.” Competing at the club level hasn’t

alex thornton / THE BREEZE

One of the members of the gymnastics club extends in a flip during practice. The team practices in Godwin Sundays through Thursdays, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

discouraged the rest of the team or taken away their fighting spirits. Senior

vice president Emma Simpkins prefers the team at the club level over varsity.

If I took a look in your fridge what would I find? A

“Varsity can only accept so many people, and club — we take anyone,” Simpkins said. “It was hard for people who got on varsity and then it got cut and they didn’t get to finish with it.” The loss of the varisty program does benefit other athletes who wouldn’t have been able to compete at that level. At the club level, the gymnastics team doesn’t have a coach or any official superviser to run the program. It’s up to the executive board to plan meets, decide where to compete and run things smoothly. There are nine total executive board members who help each other and make sure every task is accomplished. Having no coach at practices and competitions, for some team members, is a blessing in disguise. “It’s really relaxed, which I like, because if I have a lot of work to do and I still want to come to practice I can see GYMNASTICS, page B2

Dodgeball hosts home tournament

lot of lunchmeat and cheese, Hot Pockets and pizza rolls.

Do you have any quirky or secret pre-game rituals you go through to get ready for games? I always

Saturday boasted the first time JMU’s club dodgeball team hosted a tournament. The Dukes, who are currently 7-2-1, are now ranked sixth nationally after hosting Miami University of Ohio, Ohio State University, the University of Kentucky, the University of Maryland, Kent State University and Towson in the JMU BEASTournament. The tournament was held at UREC and JMU went 3-0 against Miami, Ohio State and Towson. The team ran out of time during its half-match against Kent State, losing 1-3. The Dukes’ second team, which acts as a junior varsity team, played Maryland, Towson and Kent State and lost all three matches.

throw the exact same number of warm-up pitches, and I never step on the foul line.

Favorite movie? “Top Gun.” Do you have a specific power animal you identify with? I’m going to go ahead and

say giraffe because I’m big and lanky like them. That’s probably the closest related animal I can think of.

Favorite concert you’ve ever been to? I’ve actually

only been to one concert in my life. It was a Kid Rock concert this past summer, so I don’t have too many different concert memories, but it was a good time.

ryan freeland / the breeze

chase kiddy

| fanatic and proud

Conference title will determine who gets to the Big Dance

The CAA had a record-setting three teams in last year’s NCAA tournament, outstripping all other mid-major competition. While the conference is unlikely to repeat the feat this year, the question going into next week’s CAA tournament

remains: how many NCAA bids will the CAA get in 2012? It all depends on who comes up with the CAA tourney title next week. Last year, conference torchbearers Virginia Commonwealth, George Mason and Old Dominion were all awarded NCAA bids. ODU lost to the eventual national runnerup Butler in the first round, while George Mason won a game before

being eliminated by No. 1 overall seed Ohio State University. VCU, of course, went on to the Final Four after an improbable win over nationally ranked Florida State University and Kansas University. The usual suspects are all in position to make a run at the Big Dance once again this year.

Drexel Seed: 1

Ratings percentage index: 66 Strength of schedule: 234

The Dragons may not be a CAA powerhouse, but they did win a closely contested regular season title last Saturday after eking out a one-point road win at ODU. As the No. 1 seed in next week’s tournament, Drexel will be favored

to win the Colonial’s automatic NCAA bid. Should Drexel falter in the tournament, they would be an interesting case for the selection committee to consider. Drexel made it through conference play with just two losses and hasn’t dropped a game since Jan. 2. The Dragons road domination of Cleveland State during see CHASE, page B2


B2   Thursday, March 1, 2012

breezejmu.org SPORTS

gymnastics | ‘It’s up to you’ from page B1

come in, work on something, or come in and just condition, and I can leave,” said Serena Kinsella, junior treasurer. “It’s not like you have a coach that’s like ‘You have to come from this time, this time.’ You stay the whole entire time and are being forced to practice the whole time … you can make it your own.” The relaxed atmosphere is a refreshing change for most members who have been coached their entire lives, following strict orders and having little creative control over their routines. “It’s up to you to motivate yourself and you get out of it what you put into it,” Simpkins

chase | CAA winner will be safe from page B1

said. “With varsity, you have a coach who’s telling you what to do during your entire practice and with club you get to call the shots with your gymnastics career.” The team is only required to make one practice a week. When it comes time for competitions, participating members need to make four of five practices before a normal competition and at least eight of ten practices before nationals. “Gymnastics is a sport where it’s kind of hard to compete in a lot of meets because you can get burnt out really easily,” Kinsella said. “You are always flipping around and stuff and it takes a toll on your body.” Although practices are

unstructured and the environment is loose, the team still works hard and has produced positive results at their competitions and at the national championships. According to Simpkins, the team has made it to finals as a women’s team for the past six years. “Last year we placed fourth and the year before that we placed seventh out of over 60 teams in the country.” This year’s national championships will be held in Salt Lake City, from April 19 to April 21. Contact Meaghan MacDonald at breezesports@gmail.com.

the Bracketbusters weekend gave them a marquee out-ofconference win. But past that, the CAA’s “best team” had poor strength of schedule, which is usually something the committee places a lot of emphasis on.

VCU Seed: 2 RPI: 60 SOS: 178

One of the best Cinderella stories of the modern era enters March this year unsure of whether or not it will return to the scene of their greatest triumph. VCU joins the CAA tournament in second place after a recent

domination of third-place George Mason. VCU actually has a stronger argument for an at-large bid than firstplace Drexel, despite losing both the regular season and its head-to-head matchup to them. If VCU fails to win the CAA tournament, it will once again be a bubble team the committee will be forced to strongly consider for the “First Four.”

George Mason Seed: 3 RPI: 83 SOS: 199

George Mason seems to be clearly behind Drexel and VCU but clearly ahead of everyone else in the conference. The Patriots were 1-2 against Drexel and VCU, but 13-2 when playing the rest of the conference. Saturday’s game between GMU and VCU seemed a bit like an NCAA elimination game, and the Patriots came out on the wrong end of it. They’ll need to win the conference tournament; they probably don’t have the résumé to grab an at-large bid this year.

Old Dominion Seed: 4 RPI: 113 SOS: 126

Old Dominion has struggled to find its identity

as a team this year, but that’s no reason to count out one of the most storied programs of the CAA. Behind big man senior Kent Bazemore, ODU certainly has the ability to sneak up and add another CAA tournament title to its celebrated program. That’s the only way the Monarchs will find themselves in the NCAA tournament with such a low RPI. I don’t have the stats on this, but I’d be willing to bet that no team outside of the RPI top 100 has ever been awarded an at-large bid in the NCAA tournament. ODU must win the CAA tournament to get a NCAA bid. The CAA could potentially grab two NCAA bids this year, though which two teams will ascend to the NCAA is anyone’s guess. If the tournament favorites win out, a Drexel-VCU final would probably result in both teams going dancing. If any other school wins, VCU would probably stand a better chance than Drexel at earning an at-large NCAA berth. Unlike last year, the autobid seems to be the only known commodity going into this year’s CAA tournament. The only safe team will be the one that wins it all next week. Contact Chase Kiddy at kiddyca@dukes.jmu.edu.

Softball ‘Chompin’ at the bit’ from page B1

more on our defense and hitting because our pitchers definitely pitched good enough games to win.” The defensive momentum carried into the second game for each team. The Dukes’ frustrations were visible after giving up two runs because of errors in the seventh. Their rally came up short, making the the final score 6-3. One of the questions coming into the season was the pitching rotation, which has a freshman flavor to it. Sarah Mooney took the loss for the first game of the afternoon. Her reliever, Heather Kiefer, pitched a shutout for the final two innings. Nightcap starter Reba DePriest also only

allowed three earned runs. “I think our pitchers are having to grow up a lost faster than they were expecting, but I think they were holding their ground pretty well,” Sandy said. JMU will take its squad to Baltimore this weekend for the UMBC Retriever Classic, where it will play Canisius College, Princeton University, Niagara University and Iona College twice. “I think we’re excited coming off of two losses, two tight losses,” Sandy said. “We’re kind of chompin’ at the bit to play other teams and prove ourselves. We want to bounce back from those two losses.” Contact Carleigh Davis and Chase Kiddy at breezesports@gmail.com.


Life

Does the new ‘SSX’ Nail the landing? Review on page B4

Editors  Jeff Wade & Laura Weeks  Email breezearts@gmail.com

Thursday, March 1, 2012  

B3

Pick your

Poison Capital Ale House taps into art of beer, thorough training

By Alicia Hesse The Breeze

photos by paul jones / the breeze

Capital Ale House boasts more than 100 premium draughts from micro and craft breweries.

Album Review

One room with about 120 kegs stacked up to the ceiling. Capital Ale House, located in Court Square, keeps more than 100 different brews in this 25-by-30-foot beer cooler. The kegs on tap are attached to tubes and funnel the beer out to 80 spouts on the first floor and 20 spouts upstairs. “It takes efficiency and organization to fit everything in here,” said manager Sally Myers. The kegs are grouped by style in the beer cooler behind the downstairs bar. Customers can see the range of beers at the bar from the lightest wheat and amber beers on the left, to stouts, India pale ales, Scottish styles and nitro blends on the right. Customers won’t find any domestic beers like Coors Light or Bud Light at Capital Ale House, as all the beers are from micro or craft breweries. Some kegs are imported straight from Europe, according to Christine LaTouche, a bartender at the restaurant. “We make special orders and have to compete with distributors,” said LaTouche, a graduate student in the biology program. The beer cooler is kept at 38 degrees. The shank wall where the lines carry the beer to the spouts are also chilled. There are two tubes, or lines, connected to each keg. One line pours while the other controls the pressure of the beers, with the exception of Guinness and nitro beers, which use nitrogen instead of carbon dioxide to force the creation of small bubbles. “Every keg has its own pressure level,” said Matt Patrol, a bartender and server at Capital Ale House. “By turning up the pressure, it’s like pouring as opposed to shaking the beer, so it’s better.” Capital Ale House works with about 10 distributors who come in to restock the beer cooler at least once a week. Some of the more popular beers are consumed at the rate of two kegs a week. For the more particular beers with a specific niche of consumers, the bar drains a keg in about two

weeks, Myers explained. Nearly half of the brews are rotated and replaced with a new brand of a similar style once the keg is finished, LaTouche said. According to LaTouche, the most popular seasonal beer right now is Long Winter’s Nap, from the Blue Mountain in Afton. Some of the most popular staple beers are Hoegaarden, Allagash White and Bell’s Two-Hearted Ale. All of the bartenders have a few years of experience behind the bar and were required to attend a three-day beer training class in Richmond upon hiring. “We all had years of experience but none of us had worked in a bar with 100 types of beer before,” LaTouche said. The trainees had to learn everything from yeast strands to the best serving temperatures for the beers, according to LaTouche. “Staff, chiefs — everyone has to go to Beer 101,” LaTouche said. The two-part class totals eight hours, in which they had to learn the history, science and current developments of beer. With a full bar, mixed drinks, wines and about 25 bottled beers in addition to the 100 kegs on tap, Patrol considers many aspects when helping a customer decide on a beverage. Patrol might suggest a new brand similar to their preferred beer or factor in the time of year or the meal they’re having. One of the signature features of the menu is that the food complements the beer. “The menu has a good variety of food to accent the beer,” Patrol said. Some menu options are beer-inspired, such as the Mexicali wings with a habañera pale ale sauce, the smokehouse burger with house beer-b-cue sauce and beer-b-cued ribs with a malted barley beer-b-cue sauce. Capital Ale House in Harrisonburg is one of four other locations, including restaurants in Fredericksburg and Richmond. Perhaps Patrol describes Capital Ale House best when he said, “It’s like beer heaven here.” Contact Alicia Hesse at hesseam@dukes.jmu.edu.

TV Review

‘Awake’ worth staying up for Smell of success for Perfume Genius By Jeff Wade The Breeze

Angel Ceballos / Matador Records

Musician Mike Hadrea of Perfume Genius shows fragility and strength in his songs. By Jack Knetemann The Breeze

With a genre as storied and populated as folk, taking on another album can come with a sense of apathy. Perfume Genius’ second album, “Put Your Back N 2 It,” never strays sonically from the bedrock of folk history. The same piano chords and light percussion that have adorned many an Avett Brothers ballad characterize the band’s sound as well. But there’s something about “Put Your Back N 2 It” that doesn’t sit right. Perhaps it’s the unsightly title, or the constantly sluggish tempos. With every song only two or three minutes in length, there is the peculiar feeling that they’re purposefully stunted. And it’s what captivates through the 30-minute runtime. Singer Mike Hadreas expresses so much with only eight or ten lines of lyrics, leaving the rest up to introspection. Every track, most notably “17” and “No Tear,” are

Perfume Genius

Put Your Back N 2 It  Released Feb. 28

so short because elaboration is unnecessary. The fact that none of these songs are permitted to expand only intensifies the feeling of claustrophobia. There is a sense of hopelessness and fear protruding from every syllable out of Hadreas’ mouth that comes from a perspective far from any of his contemporaries. Maybe it’s empathy. Maybe it’s the empathy of the listener. With often unintelligible lyrics, it’s hard to pinpoint exactly what these songs are about. The only thing to be sure of is that a work like “Normal Song” won’t leave you quickly. A rare climactic moment on “All see genius, page B4

A car crashes. Time slows as shattered glass cascades and the vehicle careens off a cliff. Then, suddenly, another layer of reality appears, hidden inside a dream. An easy description for NBC’s new show “Awake” (Thursdays, 10 p.m.) is “Inception: The Show,” but there’s enough here to suggest that it’s worth going a layer deeper. Following a devastating car crash, detective Michael Britten (Jason Isaacs) finds himself between two realities. Every time Britten goes to sleep, he shifts between a world where his wife Hannah (Laura Allen, “Terriers”) survived the accident and one where his son, Rex, (Dylan Minnette, “Lost”) is still alive, but only one exists in each world. Britten wears a colored rubber band to differentiate where he is, with a red wrist band for his wife and a green one for his son. Shifting through these two separate lives has resulted in ordered therapy in both worlds. The sessions with his two therapists serve as a narrative framing device and offer a necessary source of exposition for the show’s complicated premise. While this is going on, “Awake” finds time to be a more standard cop show as well. Britten remains a detective in both realities, so each week actually has two distinct cases going on. In the red reality, Britten is paired with a rookie partner (Wilmer Valderrama, “That ’70s Show”) while in the green he’s still with longtime partner Isaiah Freeman (Steve Harris). It almost feels like they didn’t know which cop cliché to use so they went with both. The police elements feel like a bit of a concession to the realities of making an ongoing TV show, but at least in the pilot episode, details from one reality lead him forward in the next, and both partners are incredulous about Britten’s methods. The show’s complicated nature

Courtesy of NBC

Jason Issacs’ performance sells the complex premise in the new drama “Awake.”

never yields to being purely convoluted. “Fringe” comes to mind when thinking about the whole alternate realities thing, but “Awake” focuses on Britten’s personal struggles and perpetual sense of loss to keep everything grounded.

Awake 

NBC Thursdays at 10 p.m. Starring Jason Issacs, Laura Allen, Dylan Minnette

The amount of material and the constant shifts mean the editing has to do some heavy lifting, responsible for keeping the two separate storylines and dimensions from becoming overwhelming. It’s often impressive without being flashy, using some interesting parallels to play up the contrasts, and subtle red and green hues offer visual reference points for which reality viewers are seeing. Of course, all the flashy editing in the world wouldn’t work if the show weren’t grounded by Issacs’ performance. Issacs unifies the two halves of the show, and his

perpetual sense of loss shines through. He carries himself in a clearly pained way, while still occasionally breaking from his stoicism for more emotional moments and outbursts. It’s compelling and does more than the interesting premise to keep viewers watching. The other key to the long-term prospects of “Awake” will be to flesh out the rest of the cast. It’s a little bit natural that the characters specific to each reality get a little bit shafted in screen time. The premise kind of cuts characters’ screen time in half, which mostly impacts Britten’s family. But both Allen and Minnette have done good work before, so with time, they could flesh out their half of the show. Minor reservations aside, “Awake” is one of the most intriguing premieres of the season, and it’s nice to finally see it on the air after it was held from its planned fall debut. Hopefully, the continuing quality of “Awake” won’t be a dream. Contact Jeff Wade at breezearts@gmail.com.


B4   Thursday, March 1, 2012

breezejmu.org LIFE

Video Game Review

Film | Vesely’s first US release from front

Canada. It’s Vesely’s first U.S. film. “I originally thought this would only be interesting to people who were already familiar with Frankl and his teachings,” Vesely said, “but I got this tremendous feedback from people.” The event began with an introduction by Vesely and Cimiluca, followed by the 90-minute documentary and a question-and-answer session. “What really struck me about hearing [Vesely] speak and seeing the movie was that even though I revere [Frankl]

as being this great psychologist … he was such a down-toearth human being, and that was really refreshing,” said Whitney Nelsen, a senior psychology major. The audience of about 50 was mostly made up of psychology students who had learned about Frankl during class lectures or read one of his books, as well as a graduate students hoping to apply Frankl’s theories to their own counseling work. The film gave Clarke “a new understanding of what logotherapy is. It’s reminded me of the importance of speaking in a language that is universal.”

“I took away how easily you could impact people’s lives by just taking the time to show people you care,” said Derek Chaudhuri, a senior psychology major. Vesely hopes that his grandfather, who died in 1997 at the age of 92, would have enjoyed the film. “He was by no means perfect,” Vesely said. “He was not a saint. He was a human being, a doctor, a therapist, and he tried to use the time he was given best and fill it with as much meaning as possible.” Contact Laura Weeks at breezearts@gmail.com.

genius | Hushed, wounded from page B3

Waters” still falls short of expansion; Organs start off quietly enough, then swell up to meet Mike Hadreas at the highest climax of the entire album until the dissonance and energy gently resolve. This all happens in two minutes, accomplishing a peak that

would have taken Sigur Ros eight. The truth is that two minutes is all these songs need. Hadreas’ wispy vocal delivery often draws comparisons to Sufjan Stevens. But while Stevens standouts like “Casimir Pulaski Day” play out like short stories, “Put Your Back N 2 It” are more like mood

pieces. “Put Your Back N 2 It” isn’t a record that explicitly tells you what to think. But whatever the interpretation, you won’t forget the sensation. Contact Jack Knetemann at knetemjw@ dukes.jmu.edu.

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‘SSX’ shreds fresh powder By Lewis Creech The Breeze

“SSX,” and the snowboarding genre as a whole, have been out cold for years. But an impressive, modern reboot offers a fresh take that’s as pure as the first snowfall. When first announced, “SSX” was a dark shift away from what it used to be, Courtesy of electronic arts but the finished game is much more in line with its A tradition of over-the-top tricks continues in the rebooted “SSX.” predecessors. It showed the modified to allow previously dilemma of modern extreme SSX impossible control. There sports games: whether to  is a learning curve, but go for a realistic experience PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 the flexibility in the three or throw physics out the possible control schemes window and go completely just feels like going through allow the player to adapt over the top. the motions. the game to their skill set. So it’s refreshing to see The mode where “SSX” The ability to rewind time “SSX” mix a realistic riding truly shines is in its fantastic and correct mistakes keeps feel with impossible gravityyet unconventional online defying feats. The remarkable it from ever getting too gameplay. The online racing frustrating. tricks at the player’s disposal against strangers is intense, “SSX” really gives see characters flipping even if you aren’t going you the sensation that completely off their boards head-to-head with friends. you’re snowboarding. The for speed. It adds to the Challenging friend’s times mechanics are so good that adrenaline and fun while and scores makes the game it makes the impossible feel also retaining enough of the incredibly personal. There realistic. physics to at least resemble are a large variety of trails to The game’s biggest nod traditional snowboarding. try and beat the competition, to reality comes in the level “SSX” comes across and the game does a great design. Developers used as tricky at first. Players job challenging the player satellite data of mountains are forced to constantly to find them. Each attempt for the foundation of their balance racing aspects along makes you want to practice levels. with pulling off big tricks. and explore to discover ways Each of the nine locations Performing these stunts to gain an edge against the give the exhilaration of gives players the ability to competition, adding a lot to discovery from the minute boost, but at the danger of the games replay ability. you start your run, and all of crashing, giving it a classic This game brings the regions feature creative risk-reward balance. Though snowboarding games back challenges that keep the trick and racing events are into the forefront and ushers player learning throughout separate, players really in a new standard. the experience. The result have to be good at both to is a tour across Earth’s rich succeed. Contact Lewis Creech at topography that at no time The controls have been creechlg@dukes.jmu.edu.

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