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R E D M O N D C EN T R A L C O N N EC T O R M A S T ER P L A N

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REDMOND CENTRAL CONNECTOR M A S T E R

P L A N

Strengthening Redmond as.... an increasingly urban community | a city strongly connected to nature a small town rooted in history | a forward-looking city shaping the world’s future


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | IntRoduCtIon

forEword

The railroad has been at the heart of Redmond since 1889, before the City incorporated in 1912. It brought commerce, and with that, jobs and people. As the City grew, the railroad began to divide the City—the north from the south, the new from the old, and eventually split the commercial area in two. Over the past 15 years, the City has continued to develop and is now an urban center. In 2008, the railroad abandoned the tracks in Redmond. Now the rail corridor is owned by the City, and the Redmond Central Connector will play a key role in the revitalization of Downtown Redmond. This place will build community through enhanced pedestrian and transit connections, personal interaction, and opportunities to connect businesses with customers. Redevelopment of this corridor allows us to connect to the heart of our downtown and build a stronger community for our citizens. In the future, Downtown Redmond will have a vibrant mix of businesses, residences, and open spaces for recreation and relaxation. The City is taking tangible steps toward realizing its vision for Downtown Redmond, signaling its commitment to private developers to encourage continued investment in the neighborhood. The implementation of the comprehensive plan policies and master plans for proposed developments in Downtown will: • Create an economically healthy, vibrant Downtown that emphasizes pedestrian activities 18 hours a day. • Develop a cohesive system of public places in Downtown that attract people and build community through interactive events and features. • Link the north and south parts of the Downtown through various pedestrian and vehicular connections. • Improve the aesthetic appeal of Downtown through enhanced landscaping, integration of iconic and interactive art, thoughtful preservation of historic elements, highlight local landmarks, and develop gateways and gathering places. • Increase mobility and promote environmental quality by providing for convenient transit, pedestrian, and bicycle routes to and from the Downtown. Downtown Redmond is creating choice by becoming a vibrant urban center with a variety of dining, shopping, recreating and living options. As a regional growth center, more than 6,000 new residents and 4,000 new workers are expected in Downtown Redmond by 2020. In preparation for this growth, private development has recently completed nearly 1,500 new residential units in Downtown.


To support and encourage future developments of this nature, the City is planning projects that make Downtown Redmond a more attractive place to live and work, including: • Continued acquisition and development of Downtown Central Park, which is integral to attracting residents and businesses to Downtown and the future hub for entertainment and recreation. • Implementation of the Downtown East/West Corridor projects, which include an overhaul of the Downtown street grid system, eliminating one-way streets and construction of complete streets. • Development of the Redmond Central Connector—a regional trail and linear park, utility corridor, and transit way for East Link light rail. The Redmond Central Connector could see up to 50,000 users a month during peak season. The goal is to make the Connector a year-round destination and even attract users to local businesses and cultural attractions. Bringing tens of thousands more people to the Redmond Central Connector is an economic benefit to all Downtown businesses. In the end, this project will be a key element to growing a sustainable urban center in Redmond by making significant aesthetic improvements in Downtown, increasing access to trails, parks and art; improving transportation alternatives; enhancing the environment through stormwater and park projects; and spurring economic growth.

Yours Truly,

Mayor John Marchione


Redmond Central Connector Master Plan | Introduction


ACknowledgements

City of Redmond

Collaborating Partners

Consultants

Mayor John Marchione

Leonard McGhee, Sound Transit

Berger Partnership, Landscape Architecture & Urban Design

Craig Larsen, Director of Parks and Recreation

Monica Clarke, King County

KPG, Engineers

Bill Campbell, Director of Public Works

Kevin Brown, King County

Weinstein A|U, Architects & Urban Designers

Rob Odle, Director of Planning

Perri Lynch, Artist

Greg Byszeski, Deputy Director of Parks and Recreation

Norton-Arnold & Company, Public Involvement

Ron Grant, Deputy Director of Public Works

GeoEngineers, Environmental Assessment

Lori Peckol, Long Range Planning Manager

BOLA, Historic Interpretation

Carolyn Hope, Senior Park Planner

PB, Light Rail Consultation

Joel Pfundt, Principal Transportation Planner Mike Haley, Senior Engineer Gary Lee, Senior Planner Pete Sullivan, Senior Planner Tim Cox, Principal Planner Mike Paul, Manger of Construction Management Rob Crittenden, Manager Transportation Operations


Redmond Central Connector Master Plan | Introduction

cool image! Teaser...


Contents project overview

1

the vision

2

the site

4

urban analysis

8

Design Principles

17

Design Framework

23

Fluctuations

24

landings

31

Islands & eddies

32

ties

33

The design

37

2016: a vision

40

design evolution: 2012-2025

64

sammamish valley

78

art integration

82

design Considerations

95

Planning Guidelines

95

Transportation

99

planting considerations

105

materials and furnishings

106

stormwater/low impact development

107

site grading

108


project overview

1


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | PRojeCt oveRvIew

the R edmond CentRal ConneC toR - vI sIon

2


Redmond has been shaped by the railroad that ran through the City’s heart since 1889 when the

The master plan process started by engaging every City department, the Parks and Trails

Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railway (SLS&E ) began to serve Redmond. The City and its economy

Commission, the Arts Commission, the Pedestrian and Bicycle Advisory Committee, the

matured and grew around the railroad. Today the railroad is gone, yet the railroad right-of-way

Planning Commission, the Design Review Board, the Lodging and Tax Advisory Committee, the

remains, currently as a no man’s land dividing the Downtown and running through the beautiful

City Council, the Redmond Historical Society, neighboring businesses and property owners,

Sammamish Valley. The Redmond Central Connector will reclaim the abandoned railroad corridor

and partner agencies including Sound Transit and King County. Hundreds of members of the

by creating a regional trail with park and cultural amenities that becomes a dynamic destination for

community were also engaged through public open houses, helping to shape the project as a

people to experience Redmond and create community. The Connector will be a catalyst for economic

reflection of Redmond. (Public involvement summaries are included in Appendix D.)

growth in Downtown by bringing more people to Redmond to live, work, socialize, and recreate.

This master plan process has resulted in two distinct components. The first was the Infrastructure

This corridor has long been recognized for its importance to a growing Redmond and the City

Alignment Plan (IAP) (Appendix A), which was developed in coordination with partner agencies

adopted comprehensive planning policies and goals relating to the acquisition and development of

to identify where different infrastructural elements would be located within the corridor to facilitate

the railroad corridor for nearly a decade. In 2004, the City adopted comprehensive planning policies

and not interfere with the long-term development of the corridor. The IAP includes memorandums

to support the many possible uses of the corridor that are generally described below.

of understanding from partner agencies and environmental and critical areas analyses. The IAP

The City recognizes the value of the former rail corridor to serve the community as a site for valued and needed infrastructure, including: • A regional trail. • Sound Transit’s planned light rail transit way. • Improved transportation connections. • Providing local and regional utility needs such as King County, Puget Sound Energy (PSE), etc. The City’s vision for the corridor was bold, imagining an inspired public open space converting miles of unused space into a corridor that integrates a trail, open space, historical elements and art into the community as a whole, by:

PRojeCt oveRvIew

thE vision

was adopted by the Redmond City Council in October 2010 and became the basis from which the remaining master plan work was developed. The IAP is available for review at: http://www. redmond.gov/PlansProjects/Parks/RedmondCentralConnector/documents/. The second component of this planning effort is a master plan design that gives form to the City’s vision for the Connector. What has emerged is not just a trail to Downtown and through the City, but a new destination filled with the energy and vitality of the community that surrounds it. The Connector will unite Downtown Redmond as a cohesive whole and eventually extend through the Sammamish Valley and beyond. Beyond physical connections, it will be an experience by drawing people in to enjoy the City’s culture, art, and environment. The Downtown section of the Connector will enliven Downtown, bring commerce, reinforce community, and create a strengthened

• Creating a new and exciting entry to Downtown.

residential and commercial heart for the City. The Sammamish Valley section of the Connector will

• Improving the corridor’s aesthetic appeal through park and art amenities.

enhance the pedestrian experience through one of the most beautiful view corridors in the City and

• Honoring Redmond’s history.

improve access to many businesses along Willows Road and West Park.

• Incorporating iconic, interactive art. • Linking the corridor to Central Park and other Downtown attractions. • Enhancing the economic vitality of Downtown.1 In June 2010, the City of Redmond acquired the Redmond section of the former Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) corridor and immediately began master planning the corridor. The Redmond Central Connector Master Plan accomplishes all of the Redmond Comprehensive Plan goals for the corridor.

1

More City policies from the Comprehensive Plan can be found at http://www.codepublishing.com/WA/redmond/

CompPlan/PDF/index.html

3


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | PRojeCt oveRvIew

the R edmond ConneCtoR s I te The Redmond Central Connector is a 3.89-mile-long linear property ranging in width from

NE 124th St.

approximately fifty feet to one hundred feet. It starts from the end of King County’s East Lake Sammamish Trail, just west of the SR 520/SR 202 interchange and Bear Creek, to 60 Acres Park

NE 116th St.

h sammamIs

draw upon in creating a trail and linear park connection unlike any other.

Sammamish Valley Park

ad NE

make it a uniquely inspiring series of spaces that the Redmond Central Connector can

Willows Ro

NE 124th Street. The corridor passes both natural and cultural features and qualities that

154th Ave NE

Sammamish River Trail

valley NE 90th St.

NE 85th St.

Downtown Park

Redmond Town Center Bear Creek Pkwy

SR 520 Marymoor Park

4

y

ee

kT rai l

le Wa

a Avond

Cr

nto wn

Red

ar

Anderson Park

Be

dow

Heron Rookery

mo

nd

Wa y


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downtown & sAmmAmish vAllEy The Redmond Central Connector Master Plan establishes a common vision for both the Sammamish Valley and Downtown, yet recognizes the different physical and cultural characteristics between the two areas. The Sammamish Valley area has more natural qualities and will be less intensively developed, keeping with a more typical design for multi-use trails in this region. There are currently no significant projects planned or funded within the Sammamish Valley length of the Connector. Conversely, the Downtown has numerous public and private projects in various stages of planning, design and construction including the construction of a regional stormwater trunk line, the extension of 161st Avenue NE and 164th Avenue NE across the corridor, construction of two mixed-use residential developments adjacent to the corridor, and eventually construction of light rail. In 2012, the first phase of the Redmond Central Connector regional trail will be constructed from Bear Creek to the Sammamish River. With the immediacy of funded projects within the Downtown section of the Connector and regional planning considerations such as light rail, the master plan provides a more detailed vision for the Downtown portion of the Redmond Central Connector than the Sammamish Valley section.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | PRojeCt oveRvIew

downtown Sammamish River Trail

The Downtown Study Area runs from the east bank of the Sammamish River to the west bank of Bear Creek. This stretch of trail includes seven zones: Sammamish River Crossing, Higher Ground, Station, Promenade, Open Space, Neighborhood, and Creekside. The Sammamish River Crossing and Higher Ground consist of elevated railroad grades perched on

the developers of the Redmond Town Center and the City took efforts to integrate the shopping center with the historical Downtown area by connecting street grids and having new buildings providing active storefronts toward Downtown, the corridor proved to be a stubborn and significant barrier between the two areas that still exists today. The creation of the Redmond Central Connector as a trail and linear park provides the opportunity to knit the two pieces of Downtown Redmond together in a way that they have never been before, providing seamless bike and pedestrian connections and complementing City transportation planning efforts to unite the two areas, notably the Downtown East/West Corridor Study (DEWCS).

sAmmAmish vAllEy The Sammamish Valley Study Area starts at the northern City limits of NE 124th Street and extends south to the east bank of the Sammamish River. The character of the corridor is predominantly rural, in spite of its location along a high volume road between three major metropolitan centers (Kirkland, Woodinville and Redmond). The trail parallels the west edge of the Sammamish Valley with views of natural and agricultural landscapes, evergreen forested hillsides to the east, and the Cascade Mountains beyond. The southern portions of the valley become increasingly developed with office parks and light industrial uses before reaching the Sammamish River. This is a historically important part of the City with the Sammamish River being a resource to Native American tribes and later to pioneers who farmed the valley on the banks of the river.

6

Promenade

k Tr

ail

Open Space Neighborhood

ree

Center from the Promenade to the Neighborhood zone, and commercial development and natural areas in Creekside. While

Station

rC

corridor includes from west to east a large City-owned property on the station block, NE 76th Street and Redmond Town

Higher Ground

Creekside

Bea

side of the railroad grade, and buildings turned their front sides away from the railroad. The southern side of the railway

Downtown StuDy AreA ZoneS

abutments west of 161st Avenue NE and east of 170th Avenue NE. Redmond’s Downtown historically occupied the northern

Sammamish River Crossing


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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | PRojeCt oveRvIew

uRban analys Is Existing and planned projects shape the Redmond Central Connector site, particularly in the Downtown, where multiple projects will change the corridor quickly. The master plan process has considered the many conditions of this evolving City and the resulting design is shaped to both accommodate and benefit from this change.

City And sound trAnsit EnvEloPEs At the onset of the master planning process, the City worked diligently with Sound Transit to determine the needs for current and future public works projects neAr-term envelope

within the corridor in order to optimize the planning of the regional stormwater trunk line and regional trail within the corridor. The City envelope for development is the northern portion of the corridor and the Sound Transit envelope for development is the southern portion of the corridor and part of NE 76th Street. These envelopes are documented in detail in the Infrastructure Alignment Plan (IAP) (Appendix A) and Section 5.2. Figure 1.2.1 shows the general location

Figure 1.2.1 8

long-term envelope

and a cross section of the envelopes.


PRojeCt oveRvIew Crossings And ConnECtions The master plan has been developed recognizing the Connector’s importance as a multimodal transportation hub. The Connector will be a pedestrian and exiSting vehiculAr connectionS

bicycle corridor and will connect with numerous other pedestrian connections such as other trails, pedestrian-friendly streetscapes, mid-block connections, sharrows, and bike lanes, which will provide a range of route alternatives for the diversity of bike users, ranging from family cyclists to advanced cyclists.

crossed by three street crossings; however, another three street crossings are planned as part of the Downtown East-West Corridor Study (DEWCS) and numerous mid-block and service street connections will provide pedestrian access to the Connector.

exiSting AnD propoSeD non-motoriZeD connectionS

exiSting AnD propoSeD multi-moDAl connectionS

In its existing state, the Connector is

9


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | PRojeCt oveRvIew

viEws And viEw Corridors

In its existing state, few buildings front on

The Connector’s location in the heart of Downtown near the intersection

the corridor, with many placing service

of several different City grids presents the opportunity to enhance visual

areas toward the historically undesirable

connections between key civic features such as Downtown Central Park

railroad. New developments are already

to the Connector or the current transit station to the Connector. Several

starting to respond to the future Connector,

new and planned streets end at the corridor, becoming important spaces

a trend that will surely continue as new

along the Connector and providing the opportunity for iconic elements

projects front on the corridor in more active

to reinforce street-end views. The Redmond Central Connector will

ways, infusing it with energy.

eventually bring more people to the Sammamish Valley, where there are spectacular views of key natural features from the Sammamish River to Mount Rainier and the Cascade foothills and mountains.

looking north Down 160th Ave ne to clevelAnD St.

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long-term frontAge

neAr-term frontAge

Corridor foCusEd growth


PRojeCt oveRvIew historiCAl AnAlysis And intErPrEtAtion Historically, Redmond emerged as a crossroads that became a village and then a town engaged in the production, harvesting and transportation of natural resources. It became a place from the presence of a river and the placement of a rail line and the activities of growing and moving resources that came from the land, and from the hands and then the minds of its occupants. The Redmond Central Connector is the evolution of the former rail corridor which played a significant role in shaping Redmond, a history that should be honored.

How does this history inform the future vision of the Redmond Central Connector Master Plan? How does the design use and re-purpose the specific history of Redmond? It does this by identifying broad patterns of the past and the present that remain the backdrop of daily living. History, through interpretation in the plan, becomes a means of identifying the special circumstances and soul of this place.

The master plan authenticates the character of Redmond. The design does not “caption� the past or place artifacts out of context as historic symbols in a new setting. Moreover, it does not attempt re-creation. Rather it interprets the elements of the rail corridor, early agriculture, and the emergence of technology by incorporating abstracted features of the past in new, inventive ways. In doing so, the Connector will promote curiosity, and encourage residents and visitors to discover the unique aspects of history that made the City what it is today.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | PRojeCt oveRvIew

the ConneCtoR evolves oveR t I me The City of Redmond has long had a vision for how the Connector could become an integral part of the City. The master plan gives form to that vision with a framework of recommendations and design guidance to lead the corridor forward to reality. The change to the corridor from its existing state to the full vision of the master plan is significant with many elements that are beyond the City’s control including developments by private parties (adjacent property owners) and other public agencies (Sound Transit). The master plan provides three distinct milestones on the way to realizing the full vision for the corridor. 2012 The first phase of development is a trail connecting the Bear Creek Trail and Sammamish River Trail through Downtown, creating the first physical connection and laying the foundation for the character and culture of the trail experience to be developed in the future. 2016 The 2016 vision is the build-out of the Connector to the degree the City can control it, respecting conditions and realities as the City now understands them to be. The design includes the space south to NE 76th Street (as no light rail is yet constructed) and properties along the north edge of the Connector are evolving with many existing corridor uses by neighboring property owners (primarily as surface parking) still remaining. 2025 The 2025 vision is the ultimate build out of the corridor including the completion of the light rail transit way and station in the heart of the City. The northern properties will evolve with new development fronting the corridor bringing commerce and activity, and more street and pedestrian connections to the Connector. By this time, all corridor leases will end, returning the space to the City as public open space. 2012 12


2016 2025 13

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | PRojeCt oveRvIew

the ConneCtoR evolves oveR t I me 2012

14

2016


PRojeCt oveRvIew

2025

15


design principles

2


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | desIgn PRInCIPles

PRInCIP les Several overriding opportunities emerged throughout the master plan design process and were embraced by the design team, City staff and the public. These ideas have inspired and guided the design of the master plan and should continue to shape the implementation of the Redmond Central Connector.

ma k e It Red mo nd : Pas t, PResent, FutuRe

not j us t a P l aC e wIth aR t, a P l aC e th at I s a Rt

Make the Connector unique to Redmond. Honor and celebrate

The Connector presents the opportunity not only to house art, but

Redmond’s past, but do not try to artificially recreate it. Acknowledge

to be art and to be a catalyst to shape an ever more artistically

Redmond of today and welcome its evolution into the future by

engaged community.

making the Connector a forward-looking place. Celebrate and welcome the opportunity for the Connector to evolve over time for a future we cannot predict.

how it might manifest itself in implementation: The master plan is shaped at its most basic structure by the artdriven concept of Fluctuations, detailed in Section 3.0. Within the

how it might manifest itself in implementation:

Connector there are numerous layers of art and art opportunities,

Save and reuse historic elements from the railroad in new and

ranging from art integrated into the design of functional elements

imaginative ways to bring history to life and give them new use.

of the corridor, permanent commissioned pieces of art to changing

Celebrate connections to existing historic structures such as the

curated collections. Required design elements in the Connector

Justice White House and to others in Downtown through connections

such as bollards, furnishings and visual utility elements should

beyond the corridor. Create a structure for celebrating history through

be completed in a more artful way, starting with site restoration

integrated art, to be implemented and changed over time, allowing

after installation of the trunk line producing inspired landforms and

responsiveness to the current cultural climate.

interim art where seeded meadow would typically suffice. Imagine the corridor as a catalyst for Redmond becoming home to artists and their studios.

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C o n n e C t th e C o mmunIt y

Cata lys t FoR C o mmeRCe

Create design elements that provide visual interest and invite physical

The physical connections made by the Connector are key to

The confines of the corridor are not enough to realize the vision for

interaction. This magnetic quality should encourage users of the

physically connecting the City. The more ambitious and rewarding

the Connector. The City around it must do its part by activating the

corridor to be engaged, to linger longer in specific spaces, and can

goal is for the Connector to create connections between people. The

corridor and broader Downtown with the commerce and activity

also be a means to encourage visitors to move down the Connector to

Connector will create experiences that bring strangers together in

that comes with it. The Connector can be both a catalyst for and a

more distant areas beyond their planned destination. These corridor

sharing a common experience and making personal connections that

beneficiary of new commerce and the urban activity that comes with it

qualities will also influence the unique design of private development

might otherwise not occur.

as new businesses choose to front on Redmond’s iconic public space

along the Connector.

how it might manifest itself in implementation:

desIgn PRInCIPles

make It m agne t I C . . .

and people solicit those businesses and activate the surrounding park spaces.

how it might manifest itself in implementation:

Interactive creations can connect people by drawing individuals in yet

Imagine human-scale building blocks that users of the corridor can

requiring more than one person to fully activate the artwork or park

how it might manifest itself in implementation:

move to make their own creations. Imagine a stormwater feature

element. Imagine a game that requires recruiting multiple players to

Buildings that currently turn their back on the Connector will be re-

where you control the flow of water. Imagine a zen-like garden

play. Imagine mobile elements that require multiple people to move

imagined to front on it. A range of appropriate commercial uses such

where you create never before made patterns. Imagine a puzzle that

them.

as restaurants, athletic clubs, galleries and artist studios will spill out

requires and inspires you to walk the whole of the corridor to solve

of buildings to outdoor spaces, blurring the line between the public

the challenge. Imagine furnishings and canopies that can be moved,

Connector and the adjacent private developments. Those attracted to

opened and closed by you to respond to sun, shade and rain.

Downtown Redmond for its retail and cultural quality will enhance their Downtown experience with a stroll down the Connector.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | desIgn PRInCIPles

CaPt u Re t h e s ky

C e l e bRate th e weath eR

ex Pe RIenC e th e nI ght

The Connector is a significant space in the heart of the City, yet the

The Connector, as with all parks, will be a heavily used and sought

It’s easy to imagine a lively, charged Connector bustling during

park and trail experience gets as narrow as 30 feet between the

after destination in times of dry weather, and particularly so in warmer

daylight hours; yet in the Northwest during much of the year our skies

buildings and future light rail transit way. Properties on the north side

weather. The opportunity of the Connector is to continue to be that

are dark for more than 15 hours a day and much of that time is when

of the Connector may reach 65 feet or higher, and light rail catenary

destination year round, continuing to be a gathering place and

key social activities occur, when we expect the City to come to life as

structures to the south can reach as high as 30 feet. Recognizing the

catalyst for community life in all types of weather. Instead of simply

a bustling hub of commerce and activity. The Connector embraces

narrow, linear quality and surrounding height, the treatment of the

trying to mitigate what might be considered inclement weather, the

the opportunity to be even more engaging in the evening than during

space above the corridor becomes a critical opportunity to enhance

Connector seeks to celebrate it and use it as one of the elements that

the day. Beyond mitigating the darkness of evening with ample light,

the corridor experience, celebrating the “urban canyon” quality, or

gives the Connector its identity.

the Connector seeks to utilize light as one of its defining experiential

helping to mitigate it.

how it might manifest itself in implementation:

how it might manifest itself in implementation:

Rain… it’s in our DNA and the corridor seeks to celebrate it in a

how it might manifest itself in implementation:

Portions of the Connector could be deliberately kept free of vertical

way that Redmondites will say, “it’s raining, let’s go down to the

Zone-based lighting and lighting strategies assure that there are a

and overhead obstructions, maximizing the valued open space to the

Connector!” The Connector provides strategic overhead weather

number of different lighting treatments along the corridor. In some

sky as a welcomed relief. Conversely some spaces might create an

protection to allow pedestrian links in the City with building canopies,

places the levels of light are specific and performance-based, such

overhead presence, be it lighting, vegetation, overhead canopy or art,

freestanding pavilions and even artwork. Integral to the experiential

as at intersections to meet defined guidelines. At locations more

emphasizing the space as an outdoor room both utilizing adjacent

design of the Connector are low impact development strategies

distant from intersections the lighting can be more subjective, while at

verticals and mitigating them. Another opportunity is to utilize the

that utilize stormwater to energize the site even as they provide

significant “events” along the trail the lighting is a powerful part of the

space over the Connector for park elements, particularly art, which

environmental benefit. Imagine stormwater from all adjacent

Connector experience, possibly including interactive light elements

might not best fit on the ground, helping turn people’s eyes to the sky.

structures being routed down facades facing the Connector to

that complement art or are art in themselves.

provide water features that celebrate the rainfall.

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elements.


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desIgn PRInCIPles


design framework

3


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | desIgn FRamewoRk

FluCtuatIons Through the master plan process, two powerful juxtapositions about Redmond emerged, one physical and one cultural. The master plan embraces the ever changing fluctuation of these juxtaposed conditions.

stRengthenIng Redmond as... An increasingly

uRban community

A community rooted in

hIstoRy

| A city strongly connected to

| A

natuRe

FoRwaRd-lookIng city shaping the world

a FluCtuatIon Is: •

a state of ongoing change

a wave-like motion

a critical combination of events

the motion of fluid, usually water, when collected in an artificial or natural cavity

thIs Image Is an exPloRatIon by PeRRI lynCh, the masteR Plan’s aRtIst, oF the Idea oF FluCtuatIons, whICh gReatly InFluenCed the desIgn FoR the Redmond ConneCtoR.

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25

desIgn FRamewoRk


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | desIgn FRamewoRk

NE 124th St.

a seRIes oF vaRyIng CondItI ons

Sammamish Valley Park

60 Acres Park

NE 116th St. d Willows Roa NE

natuRal k ee

l

Downtown Park

uRb

Heron Rookery

Cr

uRa

an

nat

y le Wa

a Avond

uRa

Redmond Town Center Bear Creek Parkway

SR 520 Marymoor Park

26

Anderson Park

l

Red

mo

nd

ar

nat

NE 85th St.

Be

Sammamish River Trail

154th Ave NE

an

b uR

NE 90th St.

Wa y

uRb

an


CulturAl fluCtuAtions

Redmond is an increasingly urban community filled with human activity and development,

Redmond has worked hard to maintain its small town feel and character, yet the

yet Redmond is also a City that is ringed and tied together with the natural environment

community and its residents are shaping the future of our world. Simply put, Redmond is

that surrounds it. The Redmond Central Connector exemplifies these conditions. From

small town/big tech.

the north:

• Small Town: Redmond’s Downtown core, centered on Leary Way, is a reflection of

• Natural: In the Sammamish Valley rural and natural conditions dominate the experience feeling well removed from the City. • Urban: West Park provides a glimpse of Redmond’s development, yet with a lower density than Downtown, and the area does not yet front on the corridor. • Natural: The Sammamish River crossing and the approaching abutment (from west

its historic small town character. One- and two-story buildings and historic structures are filled with locally owned and supported businesses. With the development of Redmond Town Center, the City avoided the creation of another typical regional mall, instead pioneering the trend toward lifestyle centers, creating a development style that reflects the values of Redmond. Redmondites foster a sense of pride in their

of 154th Avenue NE to Redmond Way) is perched above the surrounding City and

community as regionally unique and aspire to define their City on their own terms, not

immersed in trees.

on the expectation or perceptions of others.

• Urban: From 161st Avenue NE to 170th Avenue NE, the corridor is energized by

• Big Tech: Redmond is shaping the way the entire world sees itself and interacts

existing and planned new developments, and crossed by six planned or existing

with one another. Redmond is home to technological visionaries Microsoft, Digipen,

intersections mixing all modes for traffic, including pedestrians, bikes, cars and more.

Aerojet, Nintendo, more than half of the world’s gaming companies, and dozens

• Natural: The Bear Creek Crossing immerses the corridor in a restored natural landscape. • Urban: The trail passes through the SR 520 interchange and emerges in Southeast Redmond, connecting to the East Lake Sammamish Trail.

desIgn FRamewoRk

PhysiCAl fluCtuAtions

of other forward-looking companies that will shape our lives tomorrow. Beyond the presence of these companies is the social contribution of their workforce who makes Redmond home, bringing with them a diversity of backgrounds and a spirit that makes the City an incubator for new ideas that will shape our future. These juxtapositions, between natural and urban, and between small town and big tech, are positive and an ever-changing balance between one another and represent fluctuations within the Redmond Central Connector.

27


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | desIgn FRamewoRk

exPe RIentIal FluCtuat I ons These fluctuations give form to the corridor through the character and experiential quality of elements throughout the corridor, predominately through the fluctuations between Redmond’s character as both natural and urban, and a small town yet forward-looking and shaping the world.

sammam Is h R I v e R

28

downtown

beaR C Reek


desIgn FRamewoRk

othEr fluCtuAtions shAPing thE Corridor

Machined/Crafted

Passive/Active

Open/Enclosed

Stable/Dynamic

Light/Dark

Planted/Wild

Fixed/Evolving

Hardscape/Softscape

29


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | desIgn FRamewoRk

sPatI al FluCtuat I ons Fluctuations also give form to the corridor as physical elements. The design framework consists of a vocabulary of features and spaces that collectively make up the Connector. Although each feature serves a practical function for ensuring a safe, interesting trail experience, their composition and considerations for integrated art express the character of Redmond and contribute to the creation of the corridor as something more than just a trail.

landIngs

30

Islands & eddI es

tIes


Landings are major events along the Connector, and contained within the corridor. These spaces are infused with integrated art to produce a dramatic aesthetic when seen from afar and a strong experience from within, drawing people to the corridor and encouraging them to gather and linger. The spaces are typically located in mid-

desIgn FRamewoRk

landIngs block locations and aligned with existing or planned street-end connections with Cleveland Street. Landings may include sculptural landscapes of earthworks, canopies,

lighting features, and water features to create signature moments and punctuated points of interest and connectivity along the corridor. Each landing is a uniquely different experience that is meaningful and engaging, yet when experienced and considered as a collective whole, provides a greater understanding of Redmond’s unique social and environmental character.

31


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | desIgn FRamewoRk

Islands & eddI es Islands and eddies are secondary elements and events along the Connector, complementing but not competing with landings, providing small spaces that add visual and experiential interest. Recognizing how the flow of people along the corridor is inherently linear, islands and eddies provide relief from that flow as places for pause and escape. Islands could include landscape, site furniture, art, fountains, canopies, pavilions and more. Eddies are inseparably tied to islands, places where the flow of people in the corridor slows and gathering naturally occurs and is supported with seating and other discoveries that enrich the space.

32


Just as railroad ties connect two separate rails into a functioning whole, the ties in the Connector are linear design elements that create

desIgn FRamewoRk

tI es physical and visual connections across the corridor to produce a more cohesive, functioning corridor that is woven into the City’s urban fabric. The ties are expressed in a number of ways to serve a variety of functions. They may be flush, extruded or elevated. The ties are rhythmic elements that provide the visual cues and physical space necessary for trail and park users to intuitively slow down and respond to the changes and options that are present along the trail, such as approaching landings and intersections.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | desIgn FRamewoRk

34


The concept of fluctuations from impression, to experience, to physical space is physically anchored in the geography of Downtown Redmond, inspired from existing conditions and integrated in the master plan design.

desIgn FRamewoRk

fluCtuAtions ArE rootEd in rEdmond

35


the design

4


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

t he desIgn the downtown study aRea

thE rEdmond CEntrAl ConnECtor ExPEriEnCE

The Downtown Study Area is a series of zones shaped by different physical characteristics, growth and activity patterns (both urban and natural) that exist now and will evolve into the future. The zones include: • Sammamish River Crossing and Higher Ground • Station and Promenade Blocks • Open Space • Neighborhood Blocks • Creekside The design of these zones is a response to the unique existing and evolving conditions that surround them, yet their design is tied together with common elements. This vision of the downtown area focuses on the 2016 Vision showing the build-out of the corridor to the degree the city can control it, respecting conditions and realities as the city now understands them to be. This vision presents the NE 76th Street corridor in roughly its current use and configuration, and typically reflects adjacent privately owned properties as they exist now or with development proposals already underway. The Downtown Study Area is presented moving from west to east from the Sammamish River to Bear Creek. thE rEdmond CEntrAl ConnECtor’s Evolution

The Connector will undergo a significant evolution to move from its current state to fully realize the City’s vision for what it will become. The master plan provides

38

a framework for that evolution to occur, with design elements that provide physical cues to guide its evolution, as well as a flexible planning framework to guide future decisions and development that are beyond resolution at this time. This framework for evolution is presented as two additional milestones of the Connector’s development, 2012 and 2025, and the transitions that will occur between those visions: • 2012 Plan • The 2016 Vision • Transitioning to 2025 thE sAmmAmish vAllEy study ArEA

The development of the Redmond Central Connector in the Sammamish Valley will proceed on a longer term and yet to be established timetable. Its schedule for development will be honed as opportunities present themselves or new priorities and funding opportunities emerge. Because of the longer term timetable and undefined variables, a single vision for the Sammamish Valley is presented (Section 4.4) and provides for a number of options and flexibility for development as future conditions are further defined.


the desIgn

2012

2016

The first phase of development is a trail connecting the

The 2016 vision is the build-out of the Connector to the

The ultimate realization of the City’s vision for the Connector,

Bear Creek Trail and Sammamish River Trail through

degree the city can control it, respecting conditions and

East Link Light Rail ties the heart of the City to the broader

downtown, creating the Connector’s first physical

realities as the city now understands them to be. The design

region as part of a new NE 76th Street. Adjacent properties

presence and laying the foundation for the character

includes the space south to NE 76th (as no light rail is yet

have been redeveloped fronting on the corridor with lively

and culture of the trail experience to be developed in the

constructed) and properties along the north edge of the

edges that complete and merge with the Redmond Central

future. This vision reflects estimated scope for a Phase 1

Connector are evolving with many corridor leases and

Connector.

project that is currently funded.

encroachments.

vIsIon...

...tRansItIonIng to

2025

39


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

nd aoy Wm d ed oRn

ay W

161st ave ave ne ne 161st

the Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR

sammamish RiveR

t he desIgn: 2016

dm

Re

beaR cReek pkWy.

sammamIsh RIveR tRestle & hIgheR gRound

40

the statIon


the desIgn 170th ave ne

ve ha

ve ha

t 166

t 164

LeaRy Way

ne

ne

beaR cReek tRaiL

ne 76th st.

the PRomenade

oPen sPaCe

neIghboRhood stRoll

CReeksIde

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

sammamIsh RIveR CRossIng & hIgheR gRound Crossing the Sammamish River Trestle is one of the highlights of the Connector, providing views to the river, down the corridor, and to the evolving City beyond. Trestle railing has integrated art and historic interpretation elements while the new

2012 2016

decking preserves the effect of the heavy timber spacing and feeling of height. Ascending the north side of the trestle abutment, the Sammamish River Spur ties the Connector to the Sammamish River Trail, both in ramp and stair connections, anchored in a plaza along the Sammamish River Trail that provides a place for pause and rest while providing intuitive clues and signage for the Redmond Central Connector.

2025 exIstIng today....

42


the desIgn tRansItIonIng to

2016 43


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

beaR cReek

LeaRy Way

161st ave ne

ne 76th st. beaR cReek pWy.

170th ave ne

e ne

e ne

h av

h av

t 166

d

on

dm

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t 164

sammamish RiveR

cLeveLand st. ay W

Redmond toWn centeR

downtown key maP

sammamIsh RIveR CRossIng & hIgheR gRound 154th avenue ne to 161st avenue ne

2012 2016

The Sammamish River crossing and the higher ground that leads to it are a

railroad grade as the trail and seeks to preserve and enhance the unique qualities

powerful experience, defining a space the master plan call the “Higher Ground.”

of the route, improving the forests that line the trail, adding access points to the

While in the midst of humming urban activity, the combination of the higher

City below and providing unique experiences and vistas from the higher ground.

ground’s height and the trees that have reclaimed its slopes provides a feeling of placid natural escape from the surroundings, as though perched in a tree canopy. This zone and Creekside to the east, at Bear Creek, provide “bookends” that

2025

44

highlight Redmond’s strong connection to the natural environment and create transitions into the City’s urban Downtown. The design reclaims the historic


Existing deciduous and evergreen trees on the higher ground are maintained and enhanced for long-term forest health. The higher ground “touches down” in the heart of Redmond, at the plaza east of 161st Avenue NE, and future Sound Transit station. This is a transition area where the wooded hillside gives way to open sloping grass and views eastward along corridor and into the City.

Trail wayfinding signage identifies the Redmond Central Connector, provides direction to Downtown and amenities, and provides information about trails and bicycle routes in the Redmond area.

Visual portals and stairs at the Redmond Way Crossing create a gateway to the City and an iconic entry to the Connector, linking from the street to the top of the higher ground, while the East Portal also provides a secondary ADA accessible path connecting to the trail near 161st Avenue NE.

the desIgn

The historic and iconic Sammamish River crossing retains its iconic trestle, which is re-decked to allow safe crossing while honoring its unique character and experience, making it a “landing” and providing art and interpretation to celebrate the history of Redmond.

The trail alignment is perched on the higher ground and narrows to as little as 10 feet.

New development at 161st Ave NE includes a smaller scale pavilion anchoring the corner with retail and a plaza creating a mixing zone for all trail users crossing 161st Ave NE.

cLeveLand st.

161st ave ne

d on

ay W

dm

Re

h

is am

m

m

sa Ri R

ve

beaR cReek pkWy.

The “Sammamish Spur” consists of visual portals, an accessible ramp, and stairs create a gateway to the City from the Sammamish River Trail and provide for an iconic entry to the Connector and higher ground.

Redmond Way Crossing is an oddly introverted experience despite its perch, unlike the Sammamish River trestle, and becomes an opportunity for art to both benefit from and mitigate the obscured quality of crossing the bridge, perhaps including lighting and a cover over the bridge. (Eventually this bridge might be replaced due to a stormwater and road regrading project allowing increased transparency and improved views to the City.)

Perches provide areas for escape and pause from the trail, cantilevering off the higher ground and providing views to the surrounding community.

Stairs connect streets and midblock access points to the trail; in time, potentially linking to adjacent redeveloped properties.

45


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

the s tatI on

2012 2016 2025

exIstIng today....

46


the desIgn tRansItIonIng to 2025

tRansItIonIng to

2016

47


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

beaR cReek

LeaRy Way

161st ave ne

ne 76th st. beaR cReek pWy.

170th ave ne

e ne

e ne

h av

h av

t 166

d

on

dm

Re

t 164

sammamish RiveR

cLeveLand st. ay W

Redmond toWn centeR

downtown key maP

the s tatI on 2012 2016 2025

48

The station block will ultimately be the most intensively used of the Redmond

pavilions with station-like architectural character. The future light rail station is

Central Connector as it becomes the terminus for East Link Light Rail, bringing

“claimed� with playful topography and planting interconnected with paths and

thousands of riders a day. Until light rail arrives, the block is a valued link between

canopies suggestive of the spacing and rhythm of the future platform. This space

Downtown and Redmond Town Center. The block also links Downtown with the

is envisioned as an art platform for displaying works created by artists in the

recreational riches of the City, connecting to the Heron Rookery, the Town Center

community and with the community, and becoming a tool to promote and build

Open Space, and the Bear Creek and Sammamish River Trails. In setting the

support for the Redmond Connector.

tone for the future light rail station, the design for the block includes a paved linear plaza that incorporates the mixed-use trail along with canopies and retail


the desIgn

Evergreen groves are used throughout, providing year-round visual interest and buffering, bringing their ever-visible presence in Redmond into the heart of the City.

Ties reach out into the community, including connecting the future Downtown Park north of Cleveland Street.

The rhythm of ties increases approaching the end of the park blocks, intuitively warning and slowing those on the Connector approaching intersection points.

Brown Street “Jewelbox” provides a small-scale retail pavilion to infuse the Connector with commerce and its associated vitality and strengthens the connection to Cleveland Street.

Brown Street is transformed to a shared street where cars and pedestrians safely co-mingle, and its design draws people between Downtown Central Park on Cleveland Street and the Connector.

LeaRy Way

cLeveLand st.

161st ave ne

New buildings provide service/parking entry at mid-block connections between Cleveland Street and the Connector.

Artfully designed canopies provide weather protection, places for gathering, potential uses for Saturday Market vendors or other street vendors, and opportunities for inspired lighting to welcome Connector users in all weather and conditions. ne 76th st.

An interim forest edge of densely planted trees encloses the south edge of the Connector on the City-owned former King County shop site. This will provide a visual buffer to any interim uses, such as a proposed temporary parking lot.

beaR cReek pWy.

A single iconic “Heritage Tree” becomes a visual terminus of both the higher ground and the Downtown section of the Connector. The new 161st Avenue NE intersection provides connections to and from the Heron Rookery trail that provides a southern connection to Dudley Carter Park and the Sammamish River Trail as well as a northern connection to Cleveland Street and Old Town.

The future light rail station is occupied by landscaped mounds and depressions (potential rain gardens) interconnected with paths and canopies suggestive of the spacing and rhythm of the future station platform, while creating an interim “art platform” for displaying works created by artists in the community.

As a City-owned property, the “Shop Site” can be graded and prepared for any number of interim uses, from a grassy meadow that can become an interim home to Redmond events (Saturday Market, art sales, Derby Days, etc.) or an interim parking lot. However, the long-term goal for this property is for a performing arts center or similar civic use that will provide an economic benefit to the City.

As the visual terminus of Brown Street, a grassy berm invites interaction, seating for planned or spontaneous events and a passive spot for escape.

49


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

beaR cReek

LeaRy Way

161st ave ne

ne 76th st. beaR cReek pWy.

170th ave ne

e ne

e ne

h av

h av

t 166

d

on

dm

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t 164

sammamish RiveR

cLeveLand st. ay W

Redmond toWn centeR

downtown key maP

the PRomenade 2012 2016 2025

50

The promenade block has the opportunity to be the most urban of the Redmond

these blocks, the Connector is predominately paved with the character of an

Central Connector, particularly in the near-term, forging a strong link between

urban plaza through which the mixed-use trail has been routed and delineated,

the historic heart of Redmond and Redmond Town Center. This block is a space

but also integrated. The design creates conditions that allow for safe bike and

infused with art, commerce and activity, making it a connection as well as a

pedestrian behavior for such an intensively used “mixing zone.� Planting is used

destination with spaces for people to gather and stroll. The role of adjacent

strategically to shape behavior and provide the greatest impact and experience.

developments immediately abutting this block and close by is critical, providing

This softscape is also an important element on the southern edge of the corridor

retail and commercial frontages that enliven the Connector with uses that invite

in the near term as a buffer to NE 76th Street, while also occupying the future light

people in and encourage them to linger. With the intensity of use and activity on

rail transit way, minimizing investment in areas that would ultimately be removed.


the desIgn The Gilman landing is a visual endpoint to Gilman Street and becomes a significant “event” and gathering space on the promenade. It is predominately hardscape with strategically placed natural element intended to soften the space.

Adjacent buildings are encouraged to seamlessly blend with the Connector, providing an “activity zone” charged with energy from commerce within the building.

The Leary Way “Jewelbox” provides a small-scale retail pavilion as an iconic contemporary commercial building located in the NW corner of the block that can be an icon for the forward-looking quality of the Redmond Connector, and possibly a catalyst to move the Connector forward to reality.

The Promenade is a mixed-use space that includes the trail corridor and opportunities for parallel secondary pedestrian circulation routes.

e ne

h av

t 164

LeaRy Way

cLeveLand st.

Islands of vegetation buffer the corridor experience from vehicular street traffic, while creating eddies for small gathering spaces, seating, and art elements. ne 76th st.

The Leary Way intersection offers safe crossing for pedestrians and is a key element in tying Redmond’s historic Downtown to Redmond Town Center, creating a strong connection all the way from Cleveland Street to the Justice White House. Justice White House is a historical and architectural gem across from the SW corner of this block and is embraced by the Connector as materials and design elements “jump” NE 76th Street and engage the house, strengthening it as the gateway to the City. Its historic architecture is a complimentary juxtaposition to the Leary Way Jewelbox across.

Art walls/screens provide seating and become eddies for small gathering and aesthetic focal points moving down the Connector. Gilman Street becomes a shared street, safely mixing cars and pedestrians, providing public parking, rain gardens, and meeting the operations and access needs of adjacent buildings.

51


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

oPen sPaCe

2012 2016 2025 exIstIng today....

52


the desIgn tRansItIonIng to 2025

tRansItIonIng to

2016 53


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

ne 76th st. beaR cReek pWy.

beaR cReek

LeaRy Way

161st ave ne

170th ave ne

e ne

e ne

h av

h av

t 166

d

on

dm

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t 164

sammamish RiveR

cLeveLand st. ay W

Redmond toWn centeR

downtown key maP

oPen sPaCe 2012 2016 2025

54

The open space is unique along the Downtown portion of the Redmond

feeling of openness and the activity from the three adjacent streetscapes creating

Connector. While the majority of the Connector is bordered on the south by

the biggest gathering space of the Connector and the opportunity to make this

NE 76th Street (and eventually light rail) and the north is bordered by private

space the biggest “landing” along the Connector. The design seeks to be very

development rising to 65 feet and potentially higher, this block opens to Cleveland

deliberate and conscious of not “filling” this open space unnecessarily with clutter,

Street, providing a welcomed relief along the corridor. While the width and area

but using vertical and overhead elements strategically to capture the sky. The

of the Connector does not significantly increase, the perception of width and

open space is also unique in that the City controls most of its edges in existing

openness greatly increases because of the adjacent street rights-of-way including

conditions (as right-of-way) making it a candidate for this to be one of the first

Cleveland Street and 166th Avenue NE. The design celebrates and builds on the

permanent art/landing features to be developed.


the desIgn

The 164th Avenue NE crossing has a different character than all other crossings, with a reduced width and speed for vehicles and wider, potentially non-signalized crossings for those on the trail corridor.

The existing surface parking on the corridor is partially maintained, though the southern reach is eliminated to allow near-term use of the full expanse between Cleveland Street and NE 76th Street. New conifers and deciduous trees buffer the remaining surface parking lot. The Cleveland Street sidewalk is routed through the open space while a secondary pedestrian connection is maintained along the Cleveland Street curb.

164th Avenue NE is a slower speed shared street, where cars and non-motorized users safely coexist. This character may extend to the south matching the character of NE 74th Street as it passes through Redmond Town Center’s center court.

e ne

e ne

v th a 166

v th a 164 cLeveLand st.

A depressed rain garden provides a buffer along Cleveland Street without introducing a vertical obstruction. Existing conifers are maintained buffering the open space for 166th Avenue NE. A large, predominately hardscape area anchors the open space providing room for gathering and events. ne 76th st.

Vertical art/screen elements create a visual buffer of surface parking to the north and provide seating elements that reinforce views to the south and up and down the Connector while becoming eddies of small gathering and an aesthetic focal point moving down the Connector. Artistically designed canopy islands provide cover in wet weather and shade in hot weather for those moving along the Connector as well as providing places for pause and small gatherings.

The designated route of the multi-use trail is on the southern side of the site, allowing a gathering space to occur to the north between the trail and Cleveland Street.

Planting and earth-formed mounds provide visual interest to the Connector’s southern edge while also buffering NE 76th Street.

55


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

beaR cReek

LeaRy Way

161st ave ne

ne 76th st. beaR cReek pWy.

170th ave ne

e ne

e ne

h av

h av

t 166

d

on

dm

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t 164

sammamish RiveR

cLeveLand st. ay W

Redmond toWn centeR

downtown key maP

the neIghboRhood s tRoll 2012 2016 2025

Of all the Redmond Central Connector zones in the Downtown Study Area, this

eventually be separated into two blocks, is defined by more softscape and

stretch is likely to see the greatest change from existing conditions. In its existing

reduced hardscape, becoming more park-like. With this increased softscape

state, the north edge of the corridor is predominately low density commercial

and planting come more opportunities for rain gardens and other low impact

development surrounded by expansive surface parking lots, many of which

development strategies to have a bigger visual presence and become larger

are on City-owned Connector property. It is assumed redevelopment of these

functioning systems. As this new development takes shape, surface parking will

properties to the north is likely to occur over the next several years, bringing

transition back for the Connector’s use as public space. Because of the evolving

much taller and denser development. The master plan also assumes that when

and unpredictable nature of redevelopment of the adjacent properties, the

redeveloped, these projects will face onto the Connector, yet will do so with an

design for the Connector focuses on claiming the trail alignment and creating a

increasingly residential character such as urban townhomes and live/work lofts.

framework for future landings and other design elements to frame the character of

The Connector’s character on this block reflects the transition from the more

the space and evolve over time.

intensive areas to the west including commercial activity. This block, which will

56


the desIgn

Existing surface parking lots on the City-owned property are assumed to remain on a short-term basis, but cease with redevelopment of the properties prior to construction of light rail.

Art/screen elements along the north side of the trail provide visual relief from adjacent parking and back-ofbuilding uses, focusing views down the corridor and to the south.

Landings begin to claim the space in an interim form (until redevelopment of adjacent sites) with a combination of playful topography, planting, paving and interim or curated art, all inviting interaction and play.

t. ds

Lan

ve cLe

170th ave ne

e ne

h av

t 166 ne 76th st.

Rain gardens become gateways to the neighborhood blocks and may potentially form an interconnected system flowing east to existing wetland systems and Bear Creek beyond. A plaza with raised planters, seat walls and specialty paving provides cues for the trail users coming from the east to their arrival in an increasingly urban and high traffic area while also providing places for small gatherings and setting the tone for future Connector improvements to come.

Tie elements bring a rhythm to the trail that honors the future completion of the Downtown street grid, increasing in frequency, then stopping at the location of the future Avondale Way extension crossing.

A small plaza with planting and specialty paving creates an urban gateway to the Connector for those arriving from the east.

57


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

CReeksIde

2012 2016 2025 exIstIng today....

58


the desIgn tRansItIonIng to 2025

tRansItIonIng to

2016

59


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

Redmond toWn centeR

downtown key maP

CReeksIde From 170th Avenue NE to Bear Creek, the Redmond Central Connector is

2012

enveloped in nature, and in combination with the higher ground zone, forms a bookend that immerses trail users in a natural character and creates a transition to and from the urban environment of Downtown. A landing at the intersection with

2016

Bear Creek Trail alerts those passing that the Redmond Connector is a unique urban trail, and invites those wanting such an urban experience into Downtown. The trail reclaims the historic railroad grade, and existing wetlands adjacent to the

2025

60

trail are enhanced with new plantings of native trees and shrubs that buffer trail users from the service side of adjacent buildings and businesses.

beaR cReek

LeaRy Way

161st ave ne

ne 76th st. beaR cReek pWy.

170th ave ne

e ne

e ne

h av

h av

t 166

d

on

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sammamish RiveR

cLeveLand st. ay W


the desIgn A small plaza with planting and specialty paving creates a transition between urban and natural areas of the Connector.

Trail alignment on top of the existing railroad grade narrows to as little as 10 feet in width. Existing wetlands adjacent to NE 170th Street are crossed with a new bridge or abutment, with path geometry and character alerting trail users to the NE 170th Street intersection.

170th ave ne

The Bear Creek Trail proceeds north and provides a connection along Redmond Way in the near term to the East Lake Sammamish Trail.

The Connector terminates beyond the intersection with the Bear Creek Trail at an overlook of the creek that incorporates the historic railroad trestle.

Existing wetlands remain and are enhanced with native planting, particularly trees that screen the adjacent buildings.

Existing wetlands adjacent to NE 170th Street are crossed with a new bridge or abutment, with path geometry and character alerting trail users to the NE 170th Street intersection.

beaR cReek

ne 76th st.

The creekside landing is located west of the junction of the Bear Creek Trail and has character and materials unique to the Connector, intuitively transitioning trail users to the unique mixed-use qualities of the trail as it passes through Downtown Redmond. Trail wayfinding signage identifies the Redmond Central Connector, provides direction to Downtown and amenities, and provides information about trails and bicycle routes in the Redmond area.

61


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn evolutIon

the Redmond C entRal C onneCtoR’s evolutI on thE rEdmond CEntrAl ConnECtor’s Evolution 2012...The first phase of development will occur in 2012, which will include a trail connection from Bear Creek to the Sammamish River. The trail will claim the alignment of the 2016 vision by building a 12-foot paved trail with 2-foot shoulders. A goal of Phase 1 is to make the corridor feel like the urban trail it is envisioned to be, but to do so before the Connector has the urban critical mass to which the master plan is designed. Key elements include: • Trail amenities intended to welcome a full spectrum of trail users, including all skill levels of cyclists, pedestrians and other wheeled users. • Permanent or interim paving materials and finishes will provide a desired level of “friction,” mimicking the character of the intensively mixed-use trail that it will ultimately become. • Some ties are integrated into and abutting the trail, possibly with interim treatment, particularly at areas near intersections, intuitively warning and slowing trail users as they approach areas of potential conflict. • Limited planting, specialty paving, and furnishings will provide interest and places for pause along the trail and suggest the more developed corridor that is to come. • Interim art and playful grading is used to claim future landings and open space adjacent to the trail. The resulting first phase of the Redmond Central Connector will be firmly anchored in the realities of making a safe and functional connection between Bear Creek and the Sammamish River, yet also designed to the highest ideals and laying a foundation for the future.

62


the desIgn 2016... The Connector is built out to the degree the City can control it, respecting existing limitations and boundaries and laying the groundwork to shape future improvements, as described in the previous section. 2025...As a result of forward-looking planning, adjacent private properties have largely been redeveloped in keeping with the vision of the Redmond Central Connector Master Plan. Close coordination with Sound Transit has resulted in a light rail line along the corridor that adds visual interest and enlivens all Downtown with its thousands of daily riders. In spite of all the change, the design framework established in 2016 and 2012 remains largely intact. Key elements in this evolution include: • A side-running transit way of just under 30 feet in width creates the corridor’s southern edge, replacing what was predominately interim green space buffering NE 76th Street. • Surface parking lots and other private uses that once encroached on the Connector have been reclaimed as public open space. • Adjacent properties have been redeveloped, fronting on the Connector and enlivening it with compatible commerce or residential uses. • NE 76th Street is reconfigured, likely eliminating the center turn lane/median to allow for transit way width with consideration of bicycle accommodations, such as sharrows, bike lanes, or bikeway to accommodate advanced riders who might choose to avoid the slower speeds and conflicts of a multi-use trail. • Poles and catenary structures providing electrical supply to rail are typically centered between tracks. However, they could be located to one side or other with longer cantilevered arms and could provide an artistic element or be designed in theme with the corridor. • Trail routing at intersections is reconfigured to the north and intersections re-signalized for control with the addition of light rail trains to the corridor. While more distant, the 2025 vision provides an ideal build-out of the corridor providing guidance for future decision makers and development to fully realize the potential of the Redmond Central Connector. 63


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn evolutIon

201 2

ayy Wa dd W n n oo ddmm RRee

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the statIon


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the desIgn


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn evolutIon

dm

on

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sammamIsh RIveR tRes tle and hI gheR gRound

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2025 highlights With much of the trail realized in the 2016 vision, and no plans to extend light rail beyond 161st Avenue NE, the Sammamish River crossing and higher ground evolve as a result of the ongoing development of the City around this zone.

1

W ay

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the desIgn 2025 highlights 1. New denser and taller development likely abuts the Connector providing active frontage, most likely residential but possibly commercial as well. New developments may make direct, elevated, publicly accessible connections to the trail and abutment from the top of building podiums.* 2. New or enhanced furnishings, trail elements and permanent and curate art pieces continue to enrich the Connector quality and experience. *Proposed developments in the 2016 and 2025 visions are shown for illustrative purposes only to indicate potential treatments and interactions between adjacent private development and the Connector. With the exception of the “Shop Site,� all adjacent properties along the Connector are private property and decisions regarding redevelopment of those properties are by the private ownership.

2012 - first stEPs 1. The initial trail connection is made from the new 161st Avenue NE to the Sammamish River. 2. Sammamish Spur and Junction at Sammamish River Trail. (The trail does not reach west beyond the spur in 2012, meaning the Sammamish River crossing is not yet complete.) 3. Redmond Way crossing is modified including new decking to allow trail passage.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn evolutIon

the s tatI on

9 161st ave ne

2025 highlights With the arrival of light rail, and construction of the terminus station, this zone will undergo the greatest transition of any block along the Connector. At this location, the transit way has its greatest footprint as it widens to allow platforms and other station infrastructure. The construction of these facilities will also have an impact beyond their built limits. However, the design framework established in the 2016 vision serves as the basis for the redevelopment of the area.

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LeaRy Way

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the desIgn 2025 highlights 1. A consistent track/transit way width is maintained and is flanked by a side platform station.* 2. The north edge of the station is integrated into the adjacent linear park and trail zone, with multiple access points. 3. The south edge of the station is integrated into the adjacent “kiss ’n ride” and plaza. 4. New Jewelbox spaces may be added fronting on the corridor as supported by ever increasing trail and transit traffic. 5. The adjacent “Shop Site” may be redeveloped as a public or private project, possibly a performing arts center with interior parking. 6. A “kiss ’n ride” off Bear Creek Parkway and new bus stops provide multimodal connections to the light rail terminus. 7. A “Bike Barn” like no other provides infrastructure support to make biking an increasingly integral part of Redmond’s transportation system. 8. While the north side of the station is the primary circulation route, the south side of the station provides a secondary route for those choosing to avoid the areas of highest activity and circulations.* 9. The Brown Street connection to the Downtown Park and the park and ride beyond becomes increasingly important and heavily used as part of the City’s transportation infrastructure. 10. Replacing the 2016 landing, the station itself becomes a landing, and station architecture and surrounding elements provide the artistic landing and furnishing elements that assure the block continues to provide places for pause, escape, gathering and activity. * All light rail narrative elements indicate assumptions or preferred conditions for the City of Redmond at the time of the master plan development. The master plan recognizes Sound Transit design is a separate, more distant design process and any number of development scenarios may evolve with the structure of Infrastructure Alignment Plan.

2012 - first stEPs 1. The trail is “claimed” in the location around which the 2016 vision will take shape. 2. Some ties are integrated in and abutting the trail, possibly with interim treatments, to create desired “friction” of an urban trail, particularly at areas near intersections. 3. The future landing space is claimed with earth forms and limited temporary paving/edge elements. 4. Intersection treatments are completed to provide safe crossing, including limited use of specialty paving to intuitively increase awareness of traffic “mixing zones.” 5. Planting of trees in both interim and long-term locations is encouraged.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn evolutIon

the PRomenade 2025 highlights With the arrival of light rail transit way, the promenade block will be reduced in width, losing much of the green space along its southern edge, and becoming the narrowest portion of the Downtown trail. The design framework established in the 2016 vision remains largely intact.

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2

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the desIgn 2012 - first stEPs 1. The trail is “claimed” in the location around which the 2016 vision will take shape. 2. Some ties are integrated in and abutting the trail, possibly with interim treatments, to create desired “friction” of an urban trail, particularly at areas near intersections. 3. The future landing space is claimed with earth forms and limited temporary paving/edge elements. 4. Intersection treatments are completed to provide safe crossing, including limited use of specialty paving to intuitively increase awareness of traffic “mixing zones.” 5. Planting of trees in both interim and long-term locations is encouraged. 6. With the timing of design and construction of 164th Avenue NE unclear at this time, the 2012 trail may weave an interim treatment in this area awaiting the eventual completion of the new street.

2025

2016

2025 highlights 1. A transit way of just under 30 feet creates the promenade’s southern edge. 2. Linear art walls continue to provide seating and screening, but also become a barrier separating the Connector users from the adjacent transit way without taking on an undesirable barrier quality. 3. Planting between the Connector and transit way creates a buffer that reduces the impact and need of the required physical barrier separating them. 4. Trail alignment is modified at intersections, with trail crossings shifted further north from the 2016 location adjacent to the NE 76th Street travel lanes. 5. 164th Avenue NE intersection becomes a signalized crossing.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn evolutIon

oPen sPaCe 2025 highlights The elimination of surface parking and redevelopment of the adjacent “triangle site� and new buildings to the north of Cleveland Street further reinforces the unique qualities of the open space block.

6 5

cLeveLand st.

3 4 1

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the desIgn 2025 highlights 1. Surface parking lot has been reclaimed as open space for the Connector providing significantly increased width along the Connector. 2. Linear art walls continue to provide seating and screening, but are shifted to the south edge of the Connector where they become a barrier separating the Connector from the adjacent transit way without taking on an undesirable barrier quality. 3. The adjacent triangular property is redeveloped as a stunning architectural icon worthy of the most visible site in all of downtown Redmond. 4. A highly interactive building façade provides commercial activity that spills onto, utilizes and energizes the adjacent Connector. 5. New development along the north edge of Cleveland Street becomes the visual backdrop of the open space area providing a variety of building heights and design quality that breaks up one of Redmond’s largest single blocks into Redmond’s small-town scale. 6. A new shared street provides a mid-block connection between Cleveland Street and Redmond Way, connecting directly to the Connector’s open space (per DEWCS).

2012 - first stEPs 1. The trail is “claimed” with materials and finishes to convey the eventual “urban friction” it will possess. 2. The future landing space is claimed with a hardscape and crushed rock plaza and interim art element. 3. Intersection treatments are completed to provide safe crossing, including limited use of specialty paving to intuitively increase awareness of traffic “mixing zones.” 4. With the timing of design and construction of 164th Avenue NE unclear at this time, the 2012 trail may weave an interim treatment in this area awaiting the eventual completion of the new street.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn evolutIon

neI ghboRhood s tRoll Wa y

8

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2025 highlights With the surface parking lots replaced with open space and new landings, the neighborhood stroll evolves from being the most trail-like segment of the Connector to the most park-like, with secondary circulation, art and extensive passive green space.

ay dW

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the desIgn 2025 highlights 1. All leased surface parking lots to the north have been reclaimed as park space to replace green space used by Sound Transit to the south. 2. New developments, predominately residential fronts on the Connector, provide energy and activity. 3. Significant lawn areas reinforce the neighborhood stroll as park blocks, providing passive unprogrammed space that becomes the front lawn for the increasing number of people making downtown Redmond home. 4. The trail generally remains in its 2016 alignment, reconfigured at intersections, but with new or enhanced furnishings, paving and elements that continue to enrich the Connector quality and experience. 5. Secondary circulation routes along the northern side of the Connector provide access to adjacent residences and also enrich the experience for those moving through the Connector. 6. Low impact development features, particularly stormwater elements, provide environmental value while also enhancing the Connector’s aesthetic and providing a buffer between residences and the Connector. 7. Landings are developed as permanent installations, becoming mid-block destinations for gatherings. 8. New mid-block connections and street ends are shared streets where cars and pedestrians safely co-mingle, connecting Cleveland Street to the Connector, while also meeting service/parking needs of new developments. 9. Private open space of new developments is visually and physically connected to the Connector. 10. Art/screen elements are relocated from the north side of the trail (as they are no longer needed to screen parking) to the south side of the trail as a barrier separating the Connector users from the adjacent transit way without taking on an undesirable barrier quality. 11. The Avondale Way extension, now complete, is a slow speed shared street where cars and non-motorized users coexist. 12. The Avondale Way crossing has a different character than all other crossings, with a reduced width and speed for vehicles and wider, signalized crossings for those on the trail corridor. 13. The 170th Avenue NE intersection is reconfigured as light rail transitions from its bridge crossing of Bear Creek to the typical transit way alignment. 14. Planting, possibly a rain garden linking from 166th Avenue NE to 170th Avenue NE creates a buffer between trail paving and transit way, reducing impact of the required physical separation barrier. 2012 - first stEPs 1. The trail is “claimed” in the location it will ultimately be realized, placing it adjacent to surface parking and building service areas. 2. Fencing and screening buffer unattractive views to the north and focus users’ views up and down the Connector. 3. The future landing space is claimed with a hardscape and crushed rock plaza and interim art element. 4. Future intersection treatments are completed to provide safe crossing, including limited use of specialty paving to intuitively increase awareness of traffic “mixing zones.”

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn evolutIon

CReeksIde

170th ave ne

2025 highlights The creekside alignment and character will be significantly altered with the construction of Sound Transit’s light rail that will include a bridge over Bear Creek. The details of this alignment cannot be determined at this time; however, there are several identified factors about how this section of the trail will ultimately take form.

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the desIgn 2025 highlights 1. An on-grade connector will be maintained connecting the Redmond Connector Trail from 170th to the Bear Creek Trail. 2. The Sound Transit Bridge could potentially incorporate a parallel trail as part of the crossing of Bear Creek and SR 520, connecting to the East Lake Sammamish Trail beyond.

2012 - first stEPs The initial trail connection is made from the new 161st Street to the Sammamish River including the following elements: 1. Wayfinding signage is incorporated at the Redmond Connector “trailhead.” 2. Trail elements to provide desired “friction” for the mixed-use trail are provided, including ties, and specialty paving, but may be completed using interim materials that allow future evolution and development of the trail. 3. The future landing space is claimed with a hardscape and crushed rock plaza and interim art element.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

sammamIsh valley The Sammamish Valley Study Area starts at the northern City limits of NE 124th Street and

islAnds And EddiEs

extends south to the east bank of the Sammamish River. The character of the corridor is

While also less frequent than in the Downtown area, islands and eddies are created to give places for pause

predominantly rural, in spite of its location along a high volume road between three major

and discovery along the trail, occurring at natural features or key intersections with other roads and trails,

metropolitan centers (Kirkland, Woodinville and Redmond). The trail that will ultimately be

making them gateways to the Redmond Central Connector.

developed will be a more typical regional, multi-use trail, similar to the existing Sammamish River Trail, and much less urban than the Downtown Study Area. However, the language of “fluctuations” still shapes this portion of the Connector, particularly with landings, islands and eddies, and ties shaping the corridor. lAndings While considerably less frequent than in the Downtown area, landings exist at major events along the trail in the Sammamish Valley. • Sammamish Valley Park: The existing master plan for the park, and particularly the overlook feature, are embraced by the trail corridor and become a landing on the trail, as well as becoming a major destination for trail users from Downtown Redmond. • NE 90th Street Siding: Much as railroad sidings once gave trains in the corridor a place to pause off the side of the main rail line, the expanded width of the Connector at this point for a landing as a significant linear park, provides a place for pause and rest as well as a destination on the trail. The location at NE 90th Street allows the park to become a gateway to the City from Willows Road, and provides bikers and pedestrians a loop route to depart the trail and return to the City. • “The Switch”: A unique spot along the rail corridor, bound on the west by a green embankment, and to the east perched above West Park, the landing at this bend in the corridor highlights a distinct “switch” form the rural Sammamish Valley to the Sammamish River and Downtown beyond.

78

sammamish valley landing


the desIgn sammamish valley Park lookout serves as a natural place for a landing along the Connector

sammamish valley Plan 79


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

trAil AlignmEnt oPtions The precise layout for where the trail will be located in the corridor is yet to be determined, and is subject to a number of different variables. The master plan has identified three prototypical trail alignment scenarios to illustrate possible alignments and help guide design as the project moves forward. Central to these options is the decision to keep or remove the existing trackway. In addition to trail layout options, the prototypical exhibits show how the trail alignments fit with the full corridor width, as well as at reduced width “pinch points” (such as at Willows Golf Course). Existing tracks on abutment trollEy study One of the variables determining how the Sammamish Valley will be realized is the decision of whether or not the existing trackway will remain. In consideration of one option for retaining the trackway, the City of Redmond commissioned a Trolley Feasibility Study (Appendix D). This study was intended to evaluate the feasibility and requirements to operate a trolley on the existing tracks between Downtown Redmond and the Woodinville Winery District. The primary type of service would be tourist based; however, there is some interest in evaluating local commuter service along the same route due to peak hour traffic congestion on the City’s north-south arterials, Willows Road, and Red-Wood Road (SR 202).

trail without tracks on abutment

Existing tracks with trail on abutment

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the desIgn Bus Shelter

Bus Shelter

Bus Shelter

Soft Trail Existing Rails Remain

Existing Rails Remain

12’ Paved Trail

12’ Paved Trail

12’ Paved Trail

Ties (Paving Banding)

Ties (Paving Banding)

NE 116th St.

NE 116th St.

NE 116th St.

Willows Roa

trail with railroad tracks Eastside alignment 12’ paved trail Westside soft trail Vegetation buffer

d

d

d

Willows Roa

Willows Roa

trail w/o railroad tracks Center alignment 12’ paved trail over existing rail bed

Ties (Paving Banding)

trail with railroad tracks Westside Alignment 12’ Paved Trail Vegetation buffer

* As future trail planning and deisgn takes place in the Sammamish Valley, Public Works should be engaged to coordinate the potential widening of Willows Road.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

aRt I ntegR atIon Building on the City’s vision for the corridor, one of the design principles shaping the master plan is that it’s not just a place with art, but a place that is art. The Connector presents the opportunity to feature art, be art, and be a catalyst to shape an ever more artistically engaged community. The master plan process was designed to push the integration of art at every opportunity. The master plan team included artist Perri Lynch who was integral to the development of the design from the earliest stages of the project. The resulting framework is based on the concept of Fluctuations (Section 2.3) and makes the presence of art integral to the corridor. The master plan also recognizes that the high aspiration of arts integration throughout the Redmond Connector will be achieved with several layers of opportunity shaping implementation and long-term maintenance and operation of the corridor. The purpose of this Art Integration Plan is to identify opportunities for creative expression already integrated into the corridor design, as well as identify arts opportunities that can be developed in the future as the Redmond Connector is further realized. This plan identifies the role of art; where art happens; how art is incorporated; and how art is implemented.

Art goAls: whAt is thE rolE of Art on thE ConnECtor? The goals established for arts integration reflect the design principles for the project as a whole (Section 1.2) yet expand on them with arts-specific planning detail.

mAkE it distinCtly rEdmond

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mAkE it grEAt on All dAys, in All wEAthEr

insPirE A Community through ArtistiC ACtivity


the desIgn This collection of photos and textures inspired the concept of “fluctuations” and help convey the “mood” of the Connector. These images are derived from places along the corridor, precedent site visits and other sources that influenced the collaborative planning process. Associated with these images are a variety of words that inspired the plan which include: FLOW, CONNECTIVITY, CADENCE, RHYTHM, CONNECTION, LUMINOUS, CURIOUS, HI-TECH, ACCESSIBLE, VAST, LINKAGE, NARRATIVE, WAYPOINTS, LANDMARKS, PERCHES, PORCHES, PROMENADES, SWITCH, ANCHOR, VENTURE, SENSE. 83


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

mAkE it distinCtly rEdmond Program the Connector with events uniquely redmond The first opportunity to make the Connector uniquely Redmond is to make it different from other cities. Build on what Redmond has that makes it different instead of trying to do what other cities are already doing. Build on the strengths and character of the community in Redmond, and ideally expand on events that already “belong” to Redmond. So what are others doing?

Woodinville

Seattle

• Main stage performances

• Olympic Sculpture Park

• Picnics, wine tasting

• First Thursdays and various “firsts” art walks in neighborhoods

• Garden art

• Commercial gallery scene, “high” art – SAM, opera, symphony, ballet

Kirkland

• Live theatre

• Kirkland Art Center – classes for all ages

• Mercer Island

• Exhibitions in gallery settings Downtown

• I-90 outdoor sculpture gallery (rotating exhibition) saleable works

• Representational sculptures studio tour

• Music in the park

Bellevue • Bellevue Art Museum – focus on crafts, textiles, glass, pottery • Arts festival of saleable works Issaquah • Free film series • Art walk – gallery based • artEAST craft workshops

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the desIgn so whAt might rEdmond do? digital Arts festival

redmond lights

Celebrate redmond’s unique history

Redmond already hosts a Digital Arts Festival, building on

Everyone in the City talks about and loves Redmond lights, yet

Redmond is unique in its character, physically represented

its position of cutting-edge knowledge shaping the world.

it only occurs once a year. Consider building on the event’s

by its smaller scale Downtown, presence of historic (and

Capitalize on this event by:

great success by:

older, if not historic) buildings, and great natural setting. All

• Refocusing it to be multi-sited along the Connector, or at

• Bringing it into the Connector (and Downtown and its

of these can be a wealth of inspiration for arts in the corridor,

least make the Connector “home base” to the event.

commerce) connecting to the Sammamish River.

• Let the festival blend indoor/outdoor—Think Sundance Film Festival or a Jazz Fest, multiple venues that link together as a progressive party along the trail. • Curate digital works for the long term to assure that the trail serves as a year-round reminder of the festival.

• Integrating creative lighting into the design framework that supports Redmond lights. • Celebrating Redmond lights more than once a year,

including… • Celebrating the rail corridor that shaped the City. • Tell the natural history of the river valley. • Convey Redmond’s evolution from natural resources such

imagine it monthly. Whereas numerous cities have First

as lumber, to agrarian, to one of the technology capitols of

Friday art walks or some version of it, imagine Redmond

the world!

lights as a monthly event that no other City has, yet can integrate and celebrate the arts!

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

mAkE it grEAt on All dAys, in All wEAthEr Most public spaces are used and loved in the warmer dryer summer months; as Northwesterners, we do not waste the opportunity to enjoy being outside. The Redmond Connector strives to build on that love of being outside, making the Connector a place Redmond residents and visitors will make a destination year-round. • Use art as a tool to make it engaging year-round • Think of enduring or episodic art opportunities to attract people morning, afternoon, and night • Rain or shine, there’s something to experience Opportunities: • Celebrate the weather through sun, rain, and wind expressive art. • Emphasize events like the Digital Arts Festival for non-summer months. • Capitalize on darkness in the dead of winter. • Electronic art and sculptural lighting.

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the desIgn EngAgE A Community of ArtistiC ACtivity (EngAgE, don’t Just disPlAy) The Connector presents the opportunity not only to house art, but to be art and be a catalyst to shape an ever more artistically engaged community. • Support artists, not just the arts • Keep local artists local • Decentralize the arts – not just sculpture parks and art centers • More than placing art in the corridor • Focus on direct connections between the public and artists • Opportunities for public engagement and expression—art can come from anyone Opportunities: • The Connector is a studio space and gallery • Events and installations that are spread out over time and space along the Connector • Make it interactive – trail and park users participate in the creation and manipulation of art • Define new “Rules of Engagement” where ordinary elements and infrastructure is something special • Provide space and time for artists – live/work, outdoor studio zone, performance areas • Art extends indoor/outdoor

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

Building on thE frAmEwork: whErE doEs Art hAPPEn Along thE Corridor? The master plan’s arts-integrated concept of Fluctuations builds a framework for arts to occur through the corridor as experiential elements shaping the corridor and defining a hierarchy of spatial elements where art occurs along the corridor. These elements are landings, islands and eddies, and ties (Section 2.3), which form the framework of the Connector and the integration of art.

landings

islands and Eddies

ties

Landings provide the single largest, most iconic art

Islands and eddies, as secondary experiences along the trail,

Ties are permanent features of the corridor, inspired by the

opportunities along the corridor as sites for permanent site-

provide opportunities for art, though likely less iconic art than

Fluctuations concept. These elements have a strongly defined

specific art elements. These spaces are “claimed� in the near

the landings. These art elements afford the opportunity to

rhythm and character and are very architectural in nature,

term with simple cost-effective means that create a series of

be less interconnected from one area to another, unlike the

often acting as site furnishings along the corridor. Ties again

different yet complimentary spaces along the corridor. In time,

interrelated landings, and open the door to a great diversity

offer the opportunities for art, yet do so as permanent features,

likely in conjunction with development of adjacent properties

of art including permanent and non-permanent art, potentially

incorporating art to add richness to the tie elements, without

and/or the transit light rail line, these landings will become

curated. These spaces, being places of pause and rest, might

obscuring the immediately identifiable architectural character

more permanently developed as opportunities for large and

also be great opportunities for performance art and artists.

of the tie.

dramatic art installations.

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the desIgn variety of opportunities: how Art is integrated into the Connector Permanent Site Specific:

Integrated:

Curated:

• Artist takes location into account when designing the artwork.

• Integrated artworks are so tied to landscape and

• Curated artworks are primarily selected for exhibition.

surroundings that one could not exist without the other.

• These works may be sited indoors or outside.

constructed out of durable materials, lasting for 30-50 years

Often experiential in nature, encouraging audiences to

• Curated art is generally not intended to be permanently

or more. Stone, steel, wood, glass, and concrete are typical

move over, under, or through the sculptural elements.

• “Permanent” is generally defined as residing in one place and

materials for permanent, site-specific artworks. • Though this work is designed to endure the test of time, it does not have to be static. Sometimes work in this genre has kinetic elements, activated by the wind, sun, rain, etc. • Generally this work is large scale, resides outdoors in a prominent location, and designed for the public setting, not gallery exhibition. • Site-specific permanent works are likely to involve natural

• Integrated artwork is generally designed for a local rather than global audience. • This work may incorporate oral histories, indigenous language, historical photographs, or interpretive information on natural surroundings. • This work is generally multi-sited, inviting one to move along a path, along which the story of the artwork unfolds. • Another example of integrated artwork is when off-the-shelf

elements or be otherwise situated in the landscape, rather

or stock-issue urban amenities (railings, tree wells, refuse

than on a plinth or riser.

bins, etc.) are replaced with artist-made building parts.

sited. • The curator defines an overarching theme for an exhibition or festival and then selects work that fits that theme. • Because curated art is generally invitation-only, the curator will often interpret or define the artwork relative to their theme, which may differentiate from the artists own intentions. • The Venice Biennale, Documenta, and Art Basel are examples of large-scale curated exhibitions.

• Sometimes referred to as Environmental Art, Earth Art, Social Sculpture, and Land Art.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

how Arts may be implemented into the Connector Ephemeral:

The Art Commission’s 2009 Strategic Plan identifies three key strategies which include: Make art Accessible, Create

• Ephemeral artworks are not made of durable materials.

a Place for the Arts, and Nurture the Arts in Our Community. In addition to the integration of art in the basic design

Generally, ephemeral art is designed to fall apart, degrade

framework of the plan, visual and performing arts also play a significant role in the corridor and put the strategies of

over time, or last for only a short duration. This decay is

the Art Commission into action. This section builds on the strategies of the Art Commission as well as the goals and

often the conceptual basis for the work, with permanence

policies included in the Redmond PARCC Plan by identifying a number of opportunities for arts within the corridor, and

and impermanence being a common theme.

recommendations for ensuring that art contributes to the character and story of the Connector.

• Artworks that change due to storm events, wind direction, or tidal rhythms are also ephemeral. • This term also refers to event-based works such as performance art, outdoor puppet shows, projections, or busking.

Process for implementation

Procurement:

Phasing:

• Establish selection criteria to foster “tried and true” artists as

• Near-Term Opportunities o

Curated Outdoor exhibition (1-12

well as emerging talent. o

months) o

Community artworks

o

Festivals, Biennials

• Long-Term Considerations o

Consider art from “non-artists” within the community.

o

Capitalize on the talent bank of designers and engineers in the surrounding Tech industry.

o

Community Engagement

Permanently sited works that

Utilize the corridor as a catalyst that fosters art in Redmond.

share linkage

As with biking, how can Redmond embrace art, not by displaying

o

Designated “kid art” zone

art and saying it is embraced, but by becoming a more artistically

o

Artist-made building parts instead

active community?

of off-the-shelf (see matrix below)

• Community-based art workshops and projects

Call for Artists

• Housing artists

o Protocol:

• Opportunities for impromptu “making of art”

• Send Request for Qualifications (see matrix

• Celebrate creativity

below). • Assemble review panel from community, Arts Commission, parks and trails.

o

Art Budget Considerations

• Prioritize great art in a small space rather than light touches over a large expanse • Cost share with trail work whenever possible (footings, grading, installation, etc.)

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the desIgn Art Integration Matrix

Rules of Engagement Matrix

Why?

In making a place that is art, every opportunity should be taken to realize art, in big moves and

• To turn the whole place into art

small.

• To resolve the site without killing the buzz

Why?

• To encourage participation and creative expression without dictating or requiring

• Make the ordinary special and create opportunities for artists

How?

• Design mechanisms for order and safety that don’t feel like barriers

• Make passive observation pleasurable

How?

• Create a more vibrant and less scripted trail experience

• By meeting specific needs in unexpected ways

• To delight and bewilder, but not confuse

• By choosing artist-made over off-the-shelf

• Focus on what people will experience, and echo that in the necessities.

• By encouraging collaboration between artists and the community

Landings

Islands/ Eddies

Ties

Permanent

Large Steel Sculpture

Craftsman Benches

Embedded Steel Sections

Site-Specific

Interactive Stone Labyrinth

Artist-made Birdbaths

Major Landmarks Integrated

Curated

• By melding creative expression with functional and efficient means of engagement Bollards

Sandblasted,

Historical Waypoint Markers

Sculptors, Writers,

Bike-Activated Sound Art Elements

Wrapped, Twisted,

Poetry on Poles

Photographers

Funky Bike Racks

Trail Distance Indicators

Hammered

Giant Refrigerator Magnets

Big Recycled Train Track Art

Recycled Railroad Rest Spots

History of Redmond Storyline

Carved, Sandblasted,

Unexpected Objects

Sculptors, Painters,

Climbing Berms

Interactive Landforms

Indigenous Poetics

Molded

Repurposed Material

Printmakers, Writers

Natural Echo Chamber

Interesting Waypoints

Creative Navigational Aids

Outdoor Sculpturefest

Community Artworks

Map Art Exhibition

Lunchtime Concert Series

Creative Game Night Series

Artist-made Geological Timeline

Benches

Alice-In-Wonderland Moments Utility Boxes

Wrapped, Muraled,

Illustrated Trail Maps

Writers, Painters, Printmakers,

Texted

Photographic Imagery

Community Members,

Oral Histories

Call for Art from non-artists

Outdoor Open Mike Night Ephemeral

Digital Arts Festival

Kids Art Corner

Trail Chalk Art Competition

Outdoor Film Festival

Scavenger Hunt

Parades

Local Holiday Madness

Summer Music Festival

Sound/Light Art Tree Wells

Guard Rails

Sand blasted, Laser

Agricultural Motifs

Sculptors, Illustrators,

cut

Techno-Memorabilia

Historians,

Historical Signs and Symbols

Community Members

Hand-forged,

Felt Sense of Place

Sculptors, Writers

Hammered, Pelted

Poetry Symbols

Bike Racks

Flat Surfaces

Twisted, Knotted,

Redmond Icons

Illustrators, Sculptors

Bent

Historical Symbols

Textured, Colored,

Chalk Art (Temporary/Interactive)

Writers, Painters, Printmakers,

Inlaid,

Community Mosaics

Community Members

Interactive

Murals

Kid-centric

Opportunities,

Post-its

Temporary Works

Pin on the Map

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92


design considerations

5


the desIgn 5.1 PlAnning guidElinEs This master plan addresses design related issues within the corridor, adjacent to the corridor and connecting to the corridor. This section discusses how these public and private developments can realize the vision for the Redmond Central Connector and work together to implement it. (Additional detail provided in Appendix B.)

Adjacent development The master plan and the current policies of the City envision a lively and active corridor along the Redmond Central Connector. For the Downtown segment of the Connector, this vibrancy needs to be supported by lively and active edges of the corridor including Cityowned properties and private adjacent buildings.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

Adjacent developments should provide significant public benefit such as:

• Encourage retail, commercial and residential frontage on the corridor The realities of site planning for the properties along the corridor present challenges to activated frontages on both Cleveland Street and the Connector. Because parking can only be built one level below grade, projects along the corridor have been using the surface level and above-grade parking in addition to the below-grade level to meet the necessary parking requirements for the mixed-use projects. It will take creative problem solving between developers and the City to activate the ground level on both Cleveland Street and the Connector.

• Connect private open space to public open space of the Connector New residential and mixed-use buildings need to provide usable private open space for residents. This open space is often located in required setbacks (including the 14-foot setback along the Corridor) or on top of the parking podium on the second or third floor. Such private open spaces should have a visual and physical connection to the Connector. The physical connection can limit access to residents only. The visual and physical integration of the open spaces will magnify their impact for both residents and the public by contributing to the park-like character of the corridor.

• Enhance and preserve existing historic structures The nearby historic architecture gives Redmond character that is irreplaceable. The City should continue efforts and seek guidance for preservation of historic buildings and guidelines for new infill development. New architecture should not mimic historic buildings, but offer excellent design appropriate to current materials and construction methodologies that will become a valued part of Redmond’s architectural fabric.

• Be constructed of high-quality materials and well-detailed City policies call for new buildings to be of quality materials. Because jurisdictions typically find this provision difficult to actually enforce, there may need to be clarifications in City guidelines about the intent of design elements and quality of materials and design along the Connector.

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the desIgn development incentives To encourage the desired results from adjacent building developments the following incentives may be possible: Allow use of the setback for public benefit The 14-foot setback requirement for developments along the Redmond Connector right-of-way could be modified if using the setback creates an appropriately balanced public benefit that results in a better edge condition along the Connector. City policy would need to be specific in terms of the public benefits that would allow the use of the setback. Allow adjacent properties the option of building parking below City-owned land Because parking constraints impact the ability to activate the Connector, the option of allowing private parking below grade may be helpful to achieving City objectives. This would only be possible where utilities and other easements are not impacted or couldn’t otherwise be mitigated, and the City would need to work with property owners regarding timing of the project, the replacement of at-grade amenities, and legal issues. Consider flexibility in parking requirements The City has a Fee-in-Lieu of parking program, but it may need to be made more attractive to developers if it is intended to result in active uses along the Connector. The City should work with developers to see if there are acceptable methods to project lenders for providing parking in ways that reduce impacts on the Connector. Consider reductions in open space requirements The City may consider reducing the required open space requirement for residential uses along the Connector, provided that the proposed project design provides significant public benefits. Allow use of public property for project stormwater requirements Use stormwater as an incentive, specifically allowing stormwater (from non-polluting surfaces such as roofs) to be detained and infiltrated on the Connector site.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

life/safety, utilities and other services While beyond the scope of this master plan effort, this design process, especially with regard to adjacent developments and an evolving Downtown Redmond, identified many operational questions and challenges for the City to consider. Fire lanes and access Life safety services are critical, and the Connector master plan recognizes their importance to both the Connector and adjacent developments. It is accepted that these services require a 20-foot clear lane, though there is interest in providing different, yet equally effective means of delineating and preserving fire lane corridors in an urban setting. Fire lanes might be delineated with specialty paving and 20-foot clearances could be provided by “planting voids” or other non-structural elements providing visual interest and “softening” to urban fire lanes while maintaining their critical functions. Garbage and recycle As Redmond continues to densify and new efforts are put into creating a pedestrian-friendly Downtown, waste management providers and building operators will likely need to adapt and change their typical services similar to those in other high density neighborhoods in the region. Location of trash and recycle enclosures should be encouraged to be within buildings and not along valued pedestrian connections adjacent to new retail spaces or abutting new residential units. These new practices may include physical storage of trash and recycle enclosures within buildings to be temporarily placed in pick up areas by building management or waste management companies. Electrical: The location of transformers often increases in complexity with high density developments as contrasted with low density development where transformers can often be placed in landscaping. This often means transformers are located in sunken vaults under garage entry ramps or other spaces, freeing up valuable urban façades to become retail or other uses that enliven the streetscape. Careful consideration should be given to the location of electrical meters in relation to buildings edges, façades and desired pedestrian routes. Gas: Careful consideration should be given to the location of gas meters in relation to building edges, façades and desired pedestrian routes. Next Steps: These development recommendations and incentives have been supported through the master plan process and are critical to realizing vision for the corridor. A logical next step is to refine these recommendations and incorporate them into adopted City policy, possibly the development/modification of design guidelines for the Connector and potentially broader Downtown area. 98


the desIgn 5.2 trAnsPortAtion The Redmond Central Connector will be an integral part of the movement of people through Downtown. Beyond the multi-use trail that is integrated into the Connector itself, there are numerous street crossings of the corridor, numerous streets and pedestrian connections ending at the corridor, and a future light rail transit way paralleling the corridor. These transportation considerations have been integral in the development of this master plan and will be integral to its implementation in both short-term and long-term projects. A multi-use regional trail The Redmond Central Connector includes a multi-use regional trail running its full distance; make it an integral part of Redmond’s Downtown transportation planning, but also an integral part of the region’s regional trail network. In particular, the Downtown Study Area forms a secondary link between the existing Bear Creek Trail, East Lake Sammamish Trail, and Sammamish River Trail. The development of the master plan included preliminary engineering layout of the trail to meet AASHTO and King County regional trail standards between the Sammamish River and Bear Creek. In addition to the preliminary engineering, the master plan has identified phases and strategies for trail development that will realize the trail as an urban trail that will welcome pedestrians, bicyclists, and other users of all abilities. In addition, the master plan identifies strategies for how parallel routes and trails can be used to complement the Redmond Central Connector. A hierarchy of Crossings and Access Points With a total of six existing or planned road crossings over the Connector, and many street ends (public ROWs), service roads (private access roads), and pedestrian connections (sidewalks, trails, and midblock connections), potentially tying into the corridor, it is important to recognize the differing and potential qualities of the streets and access points.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

Primary Street Crossings (161st Avenue NE, Leary Way, 166th Avenue NE, 170th Avenue NE) These streets are high traffic crossings. The character of these crossings is that the trail is crossing the road, and trail users are expected to stop and wait for the appropriate time to cross, likely as part of a signalized crossing. While three of these four streets exist, when the Connector crossing is completed there should be intuitive cues to provide safe crossings, including signals, signage, lighting, and crosswalk markings and materials.

Secondary Street Crossings (164th Avenue NE, Avondale Way) These are new through streets planned as part of DEWCS and can have a different character and lower traffic volume and speeds from primary street crossings. The character of these crossings is to create a “slow zone” where the trail crosses the road, yet the road also feels it crosses the trail. The approach for this street is to make it a “shared street” where spatial treatments result in cars intuitively slowing, and pedestrians are mixing and crossings are welcomed. Trail crossings of these streets may or may not require signalization in the near term, although signalization will likely be required upon construction of

secondaRy

the Sound Transit Light Rail.

stReet

cRossing tRaiL

Light RaiL

ne 7th st.

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the desIgn Street Ends and Mid-Block Access (Brown Street, Gilman Street and more)

gaRage access

from Cleveland Street while also proving critical access for building function. Because these streets are not through streets, but vehicular dead ends, their character is more a plaza with vehicles, not a street. Design elements to encourage this character include:

• Cast in place concrete with small-scale saw cut

• Stone or precast concrete pavers • Flush or reduced curb height • Planting buffers along blank façades • Barriers can take the form of seating and furnishings to direct/block vehicular traffic (while providing pedestrian

• Pedestrian lighting can be mounted

stReet end

the connectoR

on or hang from buildings to minimize gaRage access

poles in the right-of-way

• Vehicular access via curb cut (not a road intersection)

• Provide canopies and/or arcades for pedestrians

• Rain Garden curb bulbs with planting extend Connector to Cleveland Street

amenities)

cLeveLand stReet

• Specialty paving (not just asphalt)

cLeveLand stReet

Existing and future street ends provide the opportunity to access the Connector

mid-bLock access

the connectoR

gaRage access

Pedestrian Mid-Blocks Existing or proposed pedestrian mid-block connections from Cleveland Street provide access to the Connector and allow access to large blocks of development. Pedestrian mid-blocks may be open to the sky or could become partially covered arcades.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

102


the desIgn intersection design: With the six existing or planned road crossings, thoughtful treatment of intersections along the Connector is critical. While engineering of intersections has not been completed as part of the master plan, it has been considered in great detail and will be designed in the Phase 1 trail engineering. It is assumed that in the near term (prior to light rail), Connector crossings will be incorporated into street stReet cRossing

intersections at NE 76th Street, as there is inadequate space between Cleveland Street and NE 76th Street for a mid-block crossing to be safely implemented, and Cleveland Street is more distant from the Connector and trail alignment. Future light rail design and construction conditions are not finalized. However, the master plan has considered how trail crossings would be modified to

stReet cRossing

tRaiL Light RaiL

accommodate side running alignment, the preferred alignment described in the Infrastructure Alignment Plan (Appendix A). Based on these assumptions, the Connector/trail crossing would be shifted to the north; it would likely continue to be operated as part of

ne 76th st.

signalized intersections at NE 76th Street and the light rail transit way. redmond Central Connector and sound transit East link Sound Transit East Link Light Rail is an essential element of the long-term Redmond Central Connector Master Plan vision. The master plan identifies locations for the Downtown East Link Light Rail Station and track alignment as well as many major City capital projects including a regional stormwater trunk line, a regional trail and linear park, and a number of street and mid-block connections across the corridor. The City reviewed many different station and track alignment options with Sound Transit in addition to Sound Transit’s preferred alignment during development of the master plan to identify an alignment that could meet the needs of both organizations in the corridor. The master plan does not accommodate Sound Transit’s preferred alignment as it is being evaluated in the Final Environmental Impact Statement described as the Segment E Preferred Marymoor Alternative (E2). However, the master plan does provide opportunities to accommodate Sound Transit alignment and terminal station facilities subject to additional design and potential changes to design criteria. The City and Sound Transit collaborated on various alternatives to the Sound Transit E2 preferred alignment along the former BNSF rail corridor that better take into account the property limitations or pinch points along the corridor as well as the City’s planned capital projects within the corridor, and achieve Redmond’s long-term goals of creating an active urban destination in the Downtown. The Infrastructure Alignment Plan identifies a preferred option where Sound Transit uses the southern portion of the former BNSF corridor and northern part of NE 76th Street for track alignment. It also shows Sound Transit using a side platform station instead of a center platform station, which minimizes the amount of property needed for the tracks at the station and provides more room for pedestrian circulation. Sound Transit stated that the master plan’s preferred option for East Link would require changes to its design criteria for permanent terminal stations. In comments made on the Supplemental Draft EIS for East Link, the City requested that Sound Transit 103


Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

locate support facilities in Southeast Redmond rather than in the Downtown and minimize the size of the tail track section in Downtown

pLaZa & tRaiL

in order to maintain the urban character of Downtown. Due to the lack of funding in Sound Transit’s ST2 Mass Transit Ballot measure, Sound Transit is unable to conduct the design work necessary to evaluate the options proposed in Redmond’s comments on the SDEIS. station pLatFoRm

The Redmond Central Connector Master Plan is a visioning document for the City of Redmond. It portrays how current City policies and goals can be realized. The master plan also shows the City’s preferences for East Link alignment and facilities within the Redmond

Light RaiL tRansitWay

Central Connector. The City will continue to work closely with Sound Transit as it moves forward with all development projects in the station pLatFoRm

Redmond Central Connector, including the ultimate design of East Link. Next Steps: These transportation concepts have been supported through the master plan process and are critical to realizing the vision for the corridor. With the development of Phase 1 design, some of these considerations will be developed, honed and implemented. Other elements, such as the development of street typologies and urban design guidelines may be addressed by other processes or projects.

104

kiss & Ride

ne 76th st.


the desIgn 5.3

PlAnting ConsidErAtions

While specific planting plans are beyond the level of detail of a master plan, planting has been considered through the master plan process. The transition between the natural areas of Bear Creek and the Sammamish River Crossing with the much more urban sections of the trail between give rise to one of the fluctuations that define the corridor, that of planted/wild. The more natural areas of the corridor are the “wild” and are intended to be predominately native plantings. As the Connector moves through Downtown and becomes more urban, its plantings become more structured for the desired and controlled experience, and may include more nonnatives. The Phase 1 design project will identify plants in the Downtown Study Area. trees in the corridor The master plan is conscious of not overplanting the corridor, therefore trees are intended to be used strategically where needed, but not used unnecessarily. As an open space in the City, one of the opportunities embraced by the master plan is the use of a few larger scale “legacy trees” that can become a living icon of the Connector and a nice compliment to the more vertical trees typically used along streetscapes. Another consideration for trees in the corridor is to bring conifers into the heart of the City since they’re so present in the “green ring” that surrounds Redmond. The evergreen presence of the conifers also brings the advantage of forming effective year-round buffers where desired. irrigation It is assumed there will be irrigation for plants and grass areas along the corridor. While irrigation will likely be needed, exactly how extensive irrigation is and how long it will be used will be determined in future development of the design. At the most minimal, irrigation can be used for plant establishment for the first 2-3 years after planting, decreasing volumes each year until eventually it is discontinued. More urban and intensively used areas of the corridor may warrant permanent irrigation to provide a more refined or ornamental landscape, and to assure plants and grass can withstand the increased intensity of an urban space. It is assumed Redmond municipal water would be used; however, in the future it might be possible to use clean stormwater sources, such as roof water from adjacent developments. Electricity There is a need for electricity within the Redmond Central Connector for lighting the trail, for key art elements and potentially for vendors. The Phase 1 design for Downtown will include wiring the trail area for electricity. However, the design will also evaluate alternative energy sources as appropriate such as the use of solar energy.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

5.4

mAtEriAls And furnishings

The selection and identification of materials has been considered in the development of this master plan, though definitive selections have not been made. However, strategies for how materials and furnishings are made in the future have been developed. A hierarchy of paving materials While specific materials have not been selected, a variety of materials have been considered. The City’s preference is to use higher quality materials than asphalt for most of the Downtown Study Area. The trail and associated plazas are envisioned to be constructed of a family of paving materials that are repeatedly used in similar or common situations. The City is interested in using sustainable materials and construction techniques to build this project, which will be a key factor in selecting materials for the corridor. Some materials considerations are:

• Asphalt – Asphalt is a common material used in multi-use trails, for example the Bear Creek and Sammamish River Trails, providing a smooth, seamless finish and allowing/ encouraging higher speeds. Asphalt may be used for portions of the Redmond Connector, particularly the Sammamish Valley. However, in the Downtown portion of the trail, in response to the more urban condition, the use of asphalt should be limited to emphasize that the Downtown section is a different, slower, urban trail.

• Concrete – Concrete can be finished in countless ways, providing a wide variety of textures and colors, making it an effective material to intuitively inform how the Connector is used. Concrete can be used as an accent material or as the primary paving material for a larger area.

• Pavers – Pavers, both precast concrete and stone, can be used as an accent at strategic points along the Connector, such as landings, nearing landings, or in active “building zones” where activity from adjacent buildings spills onto the corridor. These pavers can have a tactile quality to intuitively warn bikes and pedestrians they are approaching or in a space that requires attention and slow speeds. However, consideration should be given to the site conditions in which pavers are used as they may potentially require more maintenance for replacement and weeding.

• Crushed rock paving can be used on secondary trails to define small paved areas. Crushed rock may be a particularly cost-effective way to claim some of the spaces in early phases of corridor development without expending great cost or investment in temporary elements that might require change later.

• Other materials may also be considered including porous asphalt, concrete, or pavers, and reinforced grass paving.

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the desIgn 5.5

stormwAtEr And low imPACt dEvEloPmEnt (lid) oPPortunitiEs

Claiming the weather is one of the design principles for the Connector, with the intention to create a corridor that comes to life in wet weather. To realize that, we have identified several aesthetic and functional strategies to utilize stormwater. Celebrate the stormwater Our goal is that new and possibly existing development will route clean stormwater runoff down the south side of the buildings or along north/south streets or mid-block connectors in a way that is visible and interesting, and potentially interactive rainwater features. This water can be conveyed through hardscape runnels or rain gardens and eventually be tied into the appropriate stormwater management system. Collect stormwater Rain gardens along the corridor can collect runoff and infiltrate it in visual elements where it can be of aesthetic value, providing green relief in the corridor. Rain gardens can also play an important role in shaping use of the corridor, providing a buffer when desired, and in particular, creating a buffer between the corridor and the adjacent light rail, reducing the need for more imposing barriers separating the two. Stormwater elements can also be unseen as buried infiltration chambers that allow programmed uses to take place on the surface. Convey as appropriate: Stormwater might be conveyed to rain gardens as described above, which could infiltrate water in an important aquifer recharge area. These rain gardens might be isolated or combined into a larger system. If isolated, the rain gardens might need extra capacity in peak events and could be designed to flow into the underlying stormwater trunk line as necessary. Isolated rain gardens would still provide the benefit of infiltrating some water, and reducing or slowing peak flows.

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Redmond CentRal ConneCtoR masteR Plan | the desIgn - 2016

5.6

sitE grAding

The Redmond Central Connector’s existing topography is shaped largely by the railroad that once ran along this route. The regional trail will typically use the existing topography with little change. The railroad grade provided a small ridge through the Downtown area that has become a defining characteristic separating Redmond Town Center from the City’s historic center. This grading feature is maintained in the Connector master plan to both honor the history of the railroad and intuitively warn crossing vehicles to the presence of the Connector and its many users. To maximize useful grade in the corridor, the relatively narrow track way has been widened, merging into existing grade to the north, and maximizing the Connector width to the south, before dropping back down to meet existing grades near NE 76th Street. A preliminary grading plan has been completed as part of the master plan. Future grading is difficult to predict with Sound Transit occupying the southern edge of the Connector; however, it is clear that there will need to be grading transitions between NE 76th Street and the grade of the Connector. This grading transition could be provided on either side of the future transit way; however, this master plan recommends it be provided between NE 76th Street and the transit way, allowing Sound Transit to run at a consistent slope close to matching the elevation of the Connector.

APPEndiCEs: A.

Infrastructure Alignment Plan

B.

Planning Review & Recommendations

• Plan

C.

Art Review & Recommendations

• Appendix

D.

Public Involvement summary

• Goals and Policies

E.

Trolley Study

• MOU –Port, ST, City, County, CWA, PSE

F.

History

• Memos – Process Memos 1 & 2

G.

Master Plan Cost Considerations

• Environmental Assessment: Downtown Study Area

H.

SEPA

• Critical Area Evaluation: Downtown Study Area • Critical Area Evaluation: Sammamish Valley Study Area • Sound Transit Letter of Support 108



Redmond Central Connector