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NO. 11 | NOV 2018 | FREE

ƒƒ REGISTERING TO VOTE? IT’S EASY IN MINNESOTA | PG. 6 ƒƒ BULLDOG OF THE MONTH: MARY FRANZ | PG. 8 ƒƒ UMD ORGANIZATIONS BRING OVER 1,100 STUDENTS TO THE POLLS | PG. 14


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Word on Campus: How did Bulldogs feel the first time they voted?

As a Student: How self-segregation impacts my life

Puzzles, announcements and corrections

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Registering to vote? It’s easy in Minnesota

Movie Review: Venom

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Bulldog of the Month: Mary Franz

UMD organizations bring over 1,100 students to the polls

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

MULTIMEDIA REPORTER

Natalie Grant grant411@d.umn.edu

Megan Rowe rowex204@d.umn.edu

Sara Merchant merch048@d.umn.edu

INTERNAL OPS. MANAGER

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

REPORTER

Courtney Cornelius corne330@d.umn.edu

Karli Kruse kruse292@d.umn.edu

Addie Marzinske marzi012@d.umn.edu

EXTERNAL OPS. MANAGER

MARKETING

REPORTER

Drea Rabuse rabus011@d.umn.edu

Austin Steinmetz stei1215@d.umn.edu

Clare Cade cadex025@d.umn.edu

MANAGING EDITOR

SALES

REPORTER

Samantha Church churc254@d.umn.edu

Griffin Bryan bryan559@d.umn.edu

Jake Laakso laaks024@d.umn.edu

VISUAL DIRECTOR

EDITOR

REPORTER

Rebecca Kottke kott0103@d.umn.edu

Brianna Taggart tagga015@d.umn.edu

Jakob Bermas berma172@d.umn.edu

ONLINE DIRECTOR

EDITOR

REPORTER

Harmony Clarke clar1402@d.umn.edu

Maren Friemann friem027@d.umn.edu

Justin Flesher flesh018@d.umn.edu

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

EDITOR

REPORTER

Hannah Cornish corni076@d.umn.edu

Marta Rigstad rigst010@d.umn.edu

Vincent Harvieux harvi027@d.umn.edu

PHOTOGRAPHER

EDITOR

Morgan Pint pintx023@d.umn.edu

Zack Benz benz0067@d.umn.edu

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

MULTIMEDIA REPORTER

Jake Barnard barna123@d.umn.edu

Benjamin Mandebvu mande235@d.umn.edu

COVER PHOTO: MORGAN PINT

@THEBARKUMD . THEBARKUMD.COM

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WORD ON CAMPUS:

HOW DID BULLDOGS FEEL THE FIRST TIME THEY VOTED? By Clare Cade Voting in an election for the first time is a milestone for all young Americans. With the important midterm elections coming up, it’s imperative for citizens to make their voices heard. Here’s how Bulldogs felt the first time they voted.

OLIVIA OSEI-TUTU Second year student

“I voted in the 2016 presidential election, and I was really excited because it was the first time I could vote. I did an absentee ballot because I was going abroad-there’s never an excuse not to vote if you’re able!”

PHOTOS BY MORGAN PINT

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SPENCER BASARICH Third year student

“I voted in Obama’s second election in 2012. It was a very positive energy during that time, and my first time voting in a presidential election was very uplifting. It felt like I really participated in an important process.”


CORBIN SMYTH Associate Vice Chancellor of Student Life

“The first election I have memory of was the 1992 presidential election when I was 20. I felt really good and empowered. It was a long time ago, but I remember being excited to be able to vote in a presidential election.”

MARY OLMSTED University for Seniors

“I first voted last year in the city council election. I felt pretty important because it was my first time voting. Every vote matters and you can help make a change by voting in this upcoming midterm election.” NEAL BAHKTA Second year student

CINDY CHRISTIAN Director of the Royal D. Alworth Jr. Institute for International Studies

Mary remembers voting in the election where Eisenhower ran against Stevenson, in the year 1956. “I felt very excited and grown up,” she said. Her advice to first-time voters is to “know who you’re voting for and what they stand for!”

“I first voted in 1980 when Ronald Reagan ran against Jimmy Carter, who was president at the time. It was really exciting for me to be able to vote for the first time-it was also kind of depressing because the person I voted for lost, but... to act as a citizen was really empowering.”

@THEBARKUMD . THEBARKUMD.COM

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REGISTERING TO VOTE? IT’S EASY IN MINNESOTA By Maren Friemann

The midterm elections are rapidly approaching. On Nov. 6, 2018, Americans will hit the polls to elect politicians into government seats, including governorships and positions in the House and Senate.

» Have you been residing in Minnesota for at least 20 days before the election?

Have you registered to vote yet? In Minnesota, citizens are able to register to vote on the same day of the election.

» Are you free of felony convictions?

If you missed the opportunity to register before the election, here’s your guide to registering on Nov. 6. 1. Determine your eligibility to vote. There are a handful of conditions to be met before registering. » Are you a US citizen? » Are you at least 18 years old?

CHARTS BY: REBECCA KOTTKE

While many Americans turn out for the presidential election every four years, the midterms — taking place every two years — have a historically lower turnout rate. According to pewresearch. org, younger generations make up the majority of eligible voters but are less likely to show up to vote. However, with 435 House seats and 33 Senate seats on the ballots, the midterm elections

are notably significant because they could determine a new majority party in Congress.

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THEBARKUMD.COM . @THEBARKUMD

» Are you legally competent? If you answered yes to all of these, you are most likely eligible to vote. For a more complete list of voter registration stipulations, you can visit dmv.org. 2. Before registering and voting... Before you register and cast your vote, you can research the candidates you will see on the ballot.

In Minnesota there are many government seats to vote on this November. This includes Senate and House seats as well as lesser talked-about state office positions like state attorney general and state auditor. The Senate race is noteworthy in that, in addition to the general election, there is the special election, which is between Democrat Tina Smith and Republican Karin Housley to fill Senator Al Franken’s seat after he resigned before his term came to completion. To learn more about candidates you will see on the ballot, The Bark has a guide on its website of candidates who


are running in November. (https://www.thebarkumd.com/ news/2018/10/1/heres-whoyoull-see-on-the-duluth-ballot )

3. Register to vote! If you have only recently turned 18 or have just moved to Duluth for college, it’s likely you haven’t had the chance to register yet. Every time you change your address, you have to re-register to vote. To register at the polling place, you need either an ID with your current name and address, or a photo ID plus a document with current name and address.

Once you have registered to vote you will be able to fill out and cast your ballot, don your red “I Voted” sticker, and wait for the election results to come in. Editors Note: Both of the accompanying polls were conducted on Oct. 25, 2018 via The Bark’s public Facebook and Twitter pages. (@thebarkumd)

In Minnesota, citizens are able to register to vote on the same day as the election, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018.

NEED TO KNOW INFO:

The StarTribune also has a comprehensive side-by-side of each candidate on their website. (http://www.startribune. com/2018-minnesota-electionvoter-guide-who-is-runninggovernor-house-senatepolitics-issues/483224571/)

gov. The website also includes a sample voter registration application and voting ballot.

This can be a driver’s license, learner’s permit, United States passport, tribal ID card, or other forms of identifications and documents. For a full list of options, you can visit duluthmn.

WE DELIVER! 218.522.4506


MARY FRANZ PARTICIPATES IN NUMEROUS LOCAL MOVEMENTS, LIKE THE MARCH FOR OUR LIVES EVENT PICTURED HERE. PHOTO COURTESY MARY FRANZ

BULLDOG OF THE MONTH: MARY FRANZ

Get Out the Vote (GOTV) work.

By Jake Laakso and Zack Benz

“My political limits are really GOTV work,” Franz said. “I oversee all of the class wraps that are happening, the voter

UMD senior Mary Franz has always been focused on helping others. That is why she’s pursuing a degree with a double major in Political Science and Communications as well as a minor in Native American Studies. Franz hopes on getting a job in AmeriCorps, where she will be working with youth experiencing homelessness. She also hopes to help with Mayor Emily Larson’s vision plan. Franz’s long-term career is something she is still indecisive about. In addition to her studies at UMD, Franz is the Chief of Staff for Student Association and a Director of Minnesota Public Interest Research Group (MPIRG).

BULLDOG OF THE MONTH MARY FRANZ. FRANZ WILL BE GRADUATING FROM UMD IN SPRING 2019. PHOTO COURTESY OF MARY FRANZ

“I work with faculty, residence life, and chancellors on how we increase voter engagement and civic engagement for the election season,” Franz said.

“Our main ways in which we engage voters is making sure voter registration is everywhere, having voter events, and teaching all staff of the university all that is included with voting,” Franz said.

Franz stated that Student Association is obviously very political but she “can’t be very partisan” in her position.

In order for Franz to get more voters, she sits on the Civic Engagement Board for the University and oversees MPIRG’s

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engagement events. Every piece of voter registration that’s on this campus goes through me before it goes out.”

There is so much history behind why we have the privilege to vote and I think this often gets forgotten. MARY

FRANZ


According to Franz, this is done because our campus is a part of the All In Challenge.

“I also backpacked around China for two weeks then flew to Japan and did Mount Fuji overnight,” Franz said. “I did hikes in Okinawa, then last year I did mountains in Chile and before school started I spent time in Whistler, Ireland.”

“Every part of the U of M system does it,” Franz said. “All the voter registrations are counted, we make sure that no data information is being shared outside. It’s really just like increasing the awareness of it, increasing the events about it, and making sure that people are informed of every piece along the way.”

Franz’s dream is to trek Kilimanjaro before she turns 25. Franz spent five years in and out of the University of Minnesota’s Children’s Hospital for lung and nerve issues when she was younger, so she climbs mountains to prove a point.

Franz started working for the Democratic Farmer Labor Party as an intern when she was 13.

MARY FRANZ, ALONG WITH HER SIBLINGS PAUL AND SARAH, SMILE AT THE SUMMIT OF MOUNT FUJI. PHOTO COURTESY MARY FRANZ

“I care about a lot of different issues,” Franz said. “Whether that [can] be socioeconomic statuses or water and environmental issues. I think political science kind of works with everything.”

level, especially in Duluth, will be the mining,” Franz said. “The congressional district as a whole is getting a lot of support through Donald Trump, who supported Pete Stauber, and Barack Obama, who supported Joe Radinovich.”

Franz said that all elections are important to her. “I think people often forget that voting is much more than turning a ballot into a machine,” Franz said. “There is so much history behind why we have the privilege to vote and I think this often gets forgotten.”

Franz stated that Minnesota is the eighth top election in the United States of America.

Franz thinks this midterm election will change the way poverty, housing, sexual assault, gun regulations, education and so much more is handled over the next decade. According to Franz, midterms are directed towards more local and community based elections. They have the most direct effect on our local area. “A lot of the things that are going to be hitting the local

“This race is really going to make or break what is being passed nationwide,” Franz said. Franz has some advice to potential voters out there, especially faculty, students and staff at UMD. “I, as a white American, can stand here and be like ‘my vote doesn’t matter’ but there’s Native American communities and territories, immigrants and people with criminal records that don’t have the privilege to vote,” Franz said. “There’s a

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point in which you have to step back and check your privilege and realize how important your vote is. You represent the hundreds of other people that can’t vote. If you give that up, then you’re giving them up too.” Franz’s family has pushed her more than anything. Her brother works for Nintendo in Japan, while her sister works for US Senator Amy Klobuchar. Franz’s mother is an ER nurse and her father owns his own company. “I was pushed to do a lot more than a lot of other students,” Franz said. Franz’s passion for helping people and politics is only matched by her passion for exploration. Her first major exploration was a couple of years ago when she spent three weeks traveling from Los Angeles to Canada on the Hoh River Trail.

“When I get to the top [of the mountain] I prove not only the doctors wrong, but I also prove that just because people tell you that you can’t do something doesn’t mean you actually can’t,” Franz said. “It just means the road is going to be harder.” Franz said she also enjoys seeing the world from a different angle. “You never really know what your going to get but it’s a lot of pain, sweat, and tears to find the most beautiful places I’ve ever seen,” Franz said. Franz believes that students will show up to the polls because they have the demographic to make a difference. She just wants students to be educated when they vote. “Use your voice and stand up for what you care about,” Franz said. “No one can vote for you and not everyone has the right to vote at all. So don’t abuse or neglect your power.” Election Day will be Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018.


AS A STUDENT:

HOW SELF-SEGREGATION IMPACTS MY LIFE It is important to realize that the environment we grow up in can shape our values and impact who we are today. I grew up with two fathers that taught me a lot about life. I can say for myself, growing up with two gay dads, as well as being adopted from China, gave me a very unique perspective. As a part of this non-traditional family, I was given many pieces of advice from my parents, such as: be nice, listen to the teacher, don’t lie, get your work done, and don’t judge a book by its cover.

By Eli Sailer-Haugland Segregation has existed in the United States of America throughout its history. Danah Boyd, a researcher of technology and society at NYU suggests that America continues to segregate itself today. boyd argues, in her article “Why America is Self-Segregating,” that Americans self-segregate to connect with people they simply agree with, have common interests with, and who won’t go against their personal ideology. Self-segregation is the idea that people with common interests will form groups based on interests, opinions, beliefs and values, thereby segregating themselves away from people different from them. People can self-segregate based on culture, religion, race, and political beliefs just to name a few. I wonder if self-segregation is really always bad or unhealthy to our society. I agree with Boyd’s point that only experiencing content in social media you’ve personalized, based on your

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ELI SAILER-HAUGLAND, UMD FRESHMAN AND STUDENT ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVE. PHOTO COURTESY OF ELI SAILER-HAUGLAND

likes and dislikes, can be polarizing. Another argument could be made that when we self-segregate into smaller groups with like interests or cultural backgrounds, we gain knowledge about ourselves that can ultimately be shared with a larger society for a greater good.

THEBARKUMD.COM . @THEBARKUMD

I realized, starting in elementary school, that these pieces of advice actually helped guide me as I established my circle of friends. I began to notice, in my public school, who wanted to follow the rules and who didn’t. My circle of friends was always respectful to others and productive. I avoided students who didn’t focus on their schoolwork and I stayed clear of kids who bullied others. You could argue that this was self-segregation. I chose to find a group of people that

shared my values; they were like me. The trust I had in these new friendships built my social skills and allowed me to find common interests with others. In my high school, forms of self-segregation continued. High school groups were often created based on personal interests like sports, theater and music. Students found smaller communities that they could get involved with. For example, I was involved with theater, which connected me with other students who were interested in drama. Although I chose to self-segregate from some of the other students in high school, the diverse students in this program had world-views and personal experiences that were different from my own. The friendships we created, as well as the lifelong skills I gained throughout my time in the theater department, helped me become a more extroverted and responsible leader that could be helpful in a new community. Social media was also a big part of my high school experience. I


The confidence I gained when I self-segregated gave me a voice to break down stereotypes with a much larger group than I originally affiliated with. ELI

The confidence I gained when I self-segregated gave me a voice to break down stereotypes with a much larger group than I originally affiliated with.

opportunity for us to receive a different view on life, I would argue that it can also create a space for us to grow a stronger voice to share with others.

A similar argument could be made when we look at Multicultural Center on campus. Students get involved in multicultural groups to learn about their personal identity and appreciate others. When they get confident in their own identity, they join with others to promote cultural awareness and knowledge. Although Boyd makes a really good argument that self-segregation in America can destroy the

Eli Sailer-Haugland is a UMD freshman majoring in Computer Science BA. He is a freshman representative in Student Association.

SAILER-HAUGLAND

know, first hand, that Boyd’s arguments about technology causing self-segregation are true. I felt this polarization during the presidential election. I viewed Facebook posts of one of the presidential candidates mocking people with disabilities. I was born with a disability called Cerebral Palsy, which affects how my hands and feet move. In high school, I was unfortunately seen as the student with the “perks” in the classroom because of the accommodations I received. In the end, some individuals saw my accommodations as “perks” or “cheats.” Without an explanation from me, other students saw my accommodations (specifically my iPad) as an additional resource that they didn’t have. The problem was, I used my iPad for the same purposes other students used their school resources, just in a different way.

Throughout high school, I’ve learned to advocate for myself by asking, requesting, or, in some cases, demanding certain actions be taken so that I could receive the same education as other students. As time went on, I gained the confidence and knowledge of explaining to others about my disability and why I have accommodations. The growth of my advocating skills helped and will help me educate more people about my disability, as well as what abilities I have. My experiences demonstrate how, in some cases, being selfsegregated can actually help us become better versions of ourselves. For example, when I self-segregated into the theater group in high school, I gained so much confidence in being with a group of people that shared my values. As a result, I wrote a play, “CP for Dummies,” that was shared statewide.

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MOVIE REVIEW: VENOM By Jakob Bermas As a tween in the summer I would ride my bike to garage sales with my neighbor. We would search the blocks for comic books. Back in her cooled basement we never read them. No, we only saw the immaculate drawings and crisp colors of the pages. We traded solely based on what the covers looked like. Let this serve as a warning that I am no Marvel expert. I don’t like comic books. The last Marvel movie I saw was “Avengers: Infinity War” and I had no clue what was happening. The only other Marvel movies I have seen are the original “SpiderMan” movies with Tobey Maguire. I loved those movies.

ILLUSTRATION BY: JAKE BARNARD

“Spider-Man 3” was the last time Venom has graced the big screen. Topher Grace aka Eric Foreman was primarily Venom and I thought he did a weasel job of it. When Peter Parker

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(Tobey Maguire) was infected with the parasite I liked how it changed Peters whole nice guy persona. I liked it until that scene in the jazz club where he is wearing mascara and to make Mary Jane jealous starts to dance. I remember watching that scene in theaters and thinking, “.....what?” I wanted to write a review on the movie “Beautiful Boy” because I read the book and it was great and sad and informative. But, sadly, they aren’t playing that in Duluth or anywhere near me. So I was left with “Venom,” “A Star is Born,” or “The Finest Hour.” None of my friends wanted to see “A Star is Born” and I sure was not going to see it by myself. “The Finest Hour” looked really boring, like a movie my high school history teacher would have made us watch. So “Venom” it was. Tom Hardy plays Eddie Brock/ Venom in the movie. That part I was excited about. Tom Hardy is one of my favorite actors based on his past roles. He is a well-known dramatic badass in films like “Dunkirk,” “Mad Max Fury Road,” and “The Dark Knight Rises.” I was surprised to find out that he would accept to play Venom but my hopes were high.

Seeing the movie: It was odd to see so much comedy in the movie. Tom Hardy did not act as he usually does. He usually acts like a man’s man. Usually he is smart, strong and has a determined personality but in Venom he was outside his comfort zone. Hardy acted a bit goofy the entire movie like he had no clue what was going on. He seemed to be acting drunk the whole time even before he was infected with the parasite. I was surprised at how his voice sounded throughout the movie, like he was a drunk comedian going past his set time. The movie starts out with Eddie Brock (Tom Hardy), a journalist who has been recently engaged to a beautiful lawyer Anne Weying (Michelle Williams). He gets the task of interviewing Carlton Drake (Riz Ahmed), a billionaire science mogul who has a background in pharmaceuticals and has recently launched a rocket into space. Basically, he is like Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, and Martin Schelli mixed together. After Brock confronts Drake about rumors over his testing ethics, he gets thrown out of the interview and subsequently loses his job and his fiancée. Meanwhile, the rocket that Drake launched into space has crash-landed in Hong Kong and brought back the Symbiote virus, AKA the Venom parasite. Drake’s motive behind traveling to another planet was to find real estate because he believed that humans on earth are like parasites themselves. Using and using and using

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the planet. I liked that part of the movie because of it was kind of saying, “What if one of these Silicon Valley billionaires wasn’t such an ethical guy and used his wealth for bad?” The whole movie seemed really centered on Brock’s relationship with Anne. I’m not sure why. At times in the beginning I questioned if the movie was going to turn out to be a rom-com. This would have been a good idea to add to the complications that Brock faces but the movie didn’t develop the relationship enough. Besides some scenes in the beginning the two did not spend enough time together. I was never convinced that the two had known each other long. For the most part the action was lackadaisical. After being contracted with the Symbiote parasite Brock rides through the streets of San Francisco on his motorcycle. Avoiding flying drones and Drake’s cars, he and the Venom parasite start to work together. It’s fun but I always like action with as little CGI as possible. And this movie has a lot, as a lot of Marvel movies do I presume. If you like a lot of car crashes than you’ll enjoy this scene. The Venom virus itself is kind of terrifying. When it spread its mouth full of spiked teeth and screamed or spoke in its dark voice I got some chills. The voice would fill the dark theater and you would wonder if you actually heard it or not. I liked that effect.

that part and thought it was clever. After I got over hearing a dark “HUNGRY” over and over again, I warmed up to the voice. Again the humor came back with the voice. I give props to director Ruben Fleischer and his ability to give just the voice character. You can sense what kind of a person the Venom parasite is just from listening. There are two parts where I was just like, “...what?” One was with Hardy’s voice that I mentioned earlier. A drone was flying at his face and before it swung and hit him he said, “Holy shit.” But the way he said it was like he was trying to impersonate some old German man or something, almost like he were an SNL actor. The other time was after being contracted with the virus. Hardy went to a high-class restaurant where his ex-girlfriend and her new boyfriend were. There he went crazy, taking bites out of lobsters and being a mad man. He was infected but still it’s almost like Hardy was searching for laughs. I would have liked the movie more if Hardy was much more serious and more drama was written in.

strong but I enjoyed the dark voice and scariness of Venom. I enjoyed the fidelity of the rich science mogul not being ethical and trying to take advantage of his resources.

GENRE: THRILLER/ SCIENCE FICTION IMDB RATING: 7/10 RUN TIME: 2HR 20MIN

PG-13

Overall, I’m feeling a light six for Venom. If you want a movie to laugh at then this one’s for you. The story wasn’t

After being contracted with the disease, the parasite talks to Brock. It just sounds like a deep voice talking out in the theatre. I actually kind of liked @THEBARKUMD . THEBARKUMD.COM

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UMD ORGANIZATIONS BRING OVER 1,100 STUDENTS TO THE POLLS By Zack Benz Since the beginning of the semester, UMD clubs like the College Democrats at the University of Minnesota Duluth and Minnesota Public Interest Research Group (MPIRG) have been encouraging students to hit the polls and cast their votes in this years midterm elections. “We’ve done voter registration,” College Dems President Brian Muhs said. “We door knocked

both on campus, in the dorms and the on campus apartments.” According to Muhs, the College Dems have also worked on setting up candidate meet and greets. “We’re just trying to spread the word more generally about our candidates,” Muhs said. “We’ve been tabling with different literature and different information, trying

to have informative meetings where students can learn about the candidates.”

“We got over 1,100 students registered to vote this year,” Franz said.

According to MPIRG member Aaron Ashley the group has been recruiting student voters since this fall semesters activities fair in September 2018.

Franz stated that MPIRG has also reached out to local high schools and the community for voters.

“We’ve been tabling out in the Kirby Commons area for weeks with voter registrations, trying to encourage students to register,” Ashley said. “Some other members of MPIRG have been going door to door knocking, registering people to vote.” Ashley stated that if you are not yet registered, but live on campus, you still can vote by registering in the Kirby Ballroom on voting day.

ILLUSTRATION BY: KARLI KRUSE

“We have been registering people to vote and just hosted the Civic Engagement fair the other day to get people registered and give them information on where they will be voting,” Ashley said.

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According to Muhs, the College Dems has also done off campus knocks targeting college neighborhoods where students live. Muhs reports that the College Dems have helped register hundreds of voters. “MPIRG has done door knocks, they did class raps for voter registration, the civic engagement fair, voterpalooza and tabling two times a week for voter registration,” said Franz. “Moving forward [MPIRG] is planning get out the vote week, a voter party the day of in the Rafters and an ask me booth in the garage on November 6th as well.” According to Ashley, MPIRG has been trying to teach students about different political platforms to inform them on their candidates. “Voting is important but informed voting is more important,” Ashley said. The Bark attempted to reach out to the College Republicans but received no response.


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The Bark - November 2018  

The student news organization of The University of Minnesota Duluth's monthly magazine.

The Bark - November 2018  

The student news organization of The University of Minnesota Duluth's monthly magazine.

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