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NO.

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PRESENCE WINTER 2017

ISS

UE


THE PRESENCE ISSUE

theatlasmagazine.com issuu.com/theatlasmagazine info@theatlasmagazine.com

Designed + Edited by Megan Breukelman

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index 006. Cold Sand by Marijn Haertel 012. Belle by Dominic Eichler 018. New Geometry by Garrett Born 024. Runaway by Medici Robles 030. High and Dry by Łukasz Kuś 038. Traveler by Dennis Tejero 044. Haunted by Alana Tyler Slutsky 050. Disability in the Fashion Industry by Amelia Stewart 052. Love Story by Gray Hamner 058. Ever Present by Bailey Robb 066. Love Hurts by Yan Bleney 074. Michelle Hendley 078. Don't Forget Me by Sang-Hun Lee 086. Endless by Mikey Whyte 094. Presence by Lara Callahan 100. Shannon Downey of Badass Cross Stitch 102. Forward by Maria Dominika 110. Loyalty by Jang Choe 116. The Clams 120. Redemption by Kate Alexand 126. Next Issue

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contributors Alana Tyler Slutsky Amelia Stewart Bailey Robb Dennis Tejero Dominic Eichler Garrett Born Gray Hamner

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Jang Choe Kate Alexand Lara Callahan Łukasz Kuś Maegan Gindi Maria Dominika Marijn Haertel

Medici Robles Michelle Hendley Mikey Whyte Sang-Hun Lee Shannon Downey The Clams Yan Bleney


DEAR READERS

A NOTE FROM MEGAN BREUKELMAN I have thought a lot in the last few months about reality and authenticity; about what is genuine, rather than a façade. In news, in culture, in relationships, in our lives, there is a need to investigate what is presented to us. What does it mean to be present in 2017? When you're having a dinner with family and stop to check your phone, what world are you present in? Is your digital life the same as your analog life? Does it seem counter-intuitive for a primarily digital magazine to be questioning the authenticity of a digital age? The word "fake" has been tossed around a lot this year, and I want to avoid it because at its point of overuse, it loses its meaning. I wonder, rather, what realities we are present in. What world are we choosing to be present in? To put our focus, thought and attention? We are deeply entangled in our technological world. It affords us endless opportunities across all fronts that we couldn't imagine. Sometimes it is important to connect with others online; sometimes it is important to disconnect and appreciate what is in front of us. The theme of this issue is Presence and I truly feel that our features encompass that. From each and every editorial image, to our inspiring features on Michelle Hendley, Shannon Downey and more–– the idea of presence is weaved through our pages. I truly hope you enjoy this issue. Take your time, be conscious, absorb the content in front of you. Be mindful of the content you consume, and take something with you from the experience. Be present for those around you. It only takes a moment for everything to change.

With love, Megan

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cold sand PHOTOGRAPHER Marijn Haertel STYLIST Fanny Carlsson MAKEUP & HAIR Norien Voskulin MODEL Anneliek @ Elite Amsterdam RETOUCHER Lauren Bubb PHOTO ASSISTANT Lisa Ooijevaar

Top THE ROW; Trousers MARNI; Blouse MANGO

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Top ASOS

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Blouse ZARA; Trousers JIL SANDER

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Trousers + Crop Top STELLA MCCARTNEY; Leather Belt MCQ ALEXANDER MCQUEEN; Knitted Belt is Stylist's Own

Blouse COS; Culottes PHILIP LIM

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Knitwear ZARA

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Top THE ROW; Trousers MARNI; Blouse MANGO

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MAC PIGMENT MUSEUM BRONZE MIXED WITH MAC CLEAR LIP GLASS 12


BELLE

PHOTOGRAPHER Dominic Eichler STYLIST Omar Haqeem MAKEUP Phoebe Taylor HAIR STYLIST Linnea Nordberg MODEL Taii Gordon @ Premier Models Skin EMBRYOLISSE LAIT CREME CONCENTRATE, NARS ORGASM LIQUID ILLUMINATOR; Mascara CHARLOTTE TILBURY FULL FAT LASHES; Brows CHARLOTTE TILBURY LEGENDARY BROWS IN SUPERMODEL; Hair BUMBLE & BUMBLE; Jewelry TADA AND TOY

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LEFT PAGE 1: CHARLOTTE TILBURY COLOR CAMELEON IN SMOKEY EMERALD, MAC CLEAR LIP GLASS ON THE EYELIDS LEFT PAGE 2: CHARLOTTE TILBURY EYES TO MESMERISE IN BETTE, MAC PIGMENT IN ROSE GOLD MIXED WITH MAC CLEAR LIP GLASS RIGHT PAGE: CHARLOTTE TILBURY EYES TO MESMERISE IN BETTE, MAC PAINT POT IN INDIAN WOOD, MAC CHROMALINE IN GENUINE ORANGE, MAC LIP GLASS OVER THE EYELIDS

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LEFT PAGE: CHARLOTTE TILBURY EYES TO MESMERISE IN MONA LISA, CHARLOTTE TILBURY COLOUR CAMELEON IN INTOXICATING VIOLET, MAC CLEAR LIP GLASS ON EYELIDS RIGHT PAGE: CHARLOTTE TILBURY EYES TO MESMERISE IN MONA LISA, CHARLOTTE TILBURY ROCK N KOHL IN BEDROOM BLACK


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new GEOMETRY PHOTOGRAPHER Garrett Born for Ninethirty ART DIRECTION Joan Born for Ninethirty STYLIST Jesica Kurashima MAKEUP Jamrlyn Mallory @ The Drouin Agency MODEL Yulin Su @ TCM Models

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Left Page: Top JONATHAN SIMKHAI; Pants ADAM LIPPES; Shoe CHRISTIAN DIOR Right Page: Jumpsuit LU; Bralette HELMUT LANG


Entire Look ZARA

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Jumpsuit LU; Bralette HELMUT LANG; Shoe ZARA

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Dress ASOS; Bodysuit FOREVER 21; Shoe REEBOK

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Top JONATHAN SIMKHAI; Pants ADAM LIPPES; Shoe CHRISTIAN DIOR

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runaway PHOTOGRAPHER Medici Robles STYLIST Janina Cüpper @ Optix Agency MAKEUP & HAIR Claudia Tripp MODEL Nicolas Krohn @ Kult Model Agency

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Left Page: Pants RICHERT BEIL; Shirt S.OLIVER BLACK LABEL; Pullover + Coat RICHERT BEIL; Beanie KAPORAL JEANS; Bracelet PAUL HEWITT Right Page: Trenchcoat BRACHMANN; Jeans KAPORAL JEANS; Pullover IKKS MEN; Shoes TRIPPEN; Scarf S.OLIVER

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Chino Pants S.OLIVER BLACK LABEL; Shirt S. OLIVER; Cardigan QS DESIGNED BY; Beanie KAPORAL JEANS; Bracelet PAUL HEWITT; Shoes TRIPPEN

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Left Page: Pants IKKS MEN; Shoes TRIPPEN; Pullover + Scarf KAPORAL JEANS; Blazer BRACHMANN Right Page: Shoes SIOUX; Pants, Turtle Neck + Coat BRACHMANN

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HIGH & DRY PHOTOGRAPHER Łukasz Kuś STYLIST Magda Sokulska MAKEUP Kasia Biały HAIR STYLIST Gor Duryan MODEL Vlada @ Uncover Models

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Jacket DILLIGENT

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Body MAKOTA SWIM; Jacket DILIGENT; Jeans are Stylist’s Own

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Kimono JOANNA HAWROT

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34 Kimono + Hakamy JOANNA HAWROT


Vest JOANNA HAWROT 35


Body MAKOTA SWIM; Trousers are Stylist’s Own

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Coat MM6 MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA; Top ULLA JOHNSON; Pants VINTAGE YVES SAINT LAURENT; Necklace is Vintage

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Jacket, skirt + bag PRADA; Sweater, rings + shoes TOPSHOP; Socks HUE; Necklace + watch are Stylist’s Own

traveler

PHOTOGRAPHER Dennis Tejero STYLIST Virginia Ray MAKEUP Magdalena Major HAIR STYLIST Sergio Estrada MODEL Eve Delf @ Supreme Management CASTING Eric Cano PHOTO ASSISTANTS Dave Fitz + Michael Sawyer

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Coat STELLA MCCARTNEY; Turtleneck + shoes TOPSHOP; Skirt BOTTEGA VENETA; Gloves WING & WEFT; Bag VINTAGE FROM ANOTHER MAN’S TREASURE; Locket is Vintage

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Blazer + shoes ZARA; Dress VICTORIA BECKHAM; Rings TOPSHOP; Hat is Vintage

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Hat ZARA; Sweater LOEWE; Overalls PAUL & JOE; Belt + shoes TOPSHOP; Watch is Vintage 42


Coat GOLDEN GOOSE DELUXE BRAND; Dress + shoes ZARA; Belt ALEXANDER MCQUEEN; Bag VINTAGE FROM ANOTHER MAN’S TREASURE; Gloves WING & WEFT; Watch is Vintage

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haunted PHOTOGRAPHER Alana Tyler Slutsky MAKEUP Jaleesa Jaikaran using MAC Cosmetics HAIR STYLIST Niko Weddle using Kenra Haircare MODEL Crystal Noriega

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DISABILITY IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY IDEAL OR REAL?

The $1.2 trillion global fashion industry is all about selling an image, but how ‘real’ should this image be? Pressure has been intensifying on brands to use ‘real women’ models, but often with detrimental effects. Dove commendably uses ‘realistic’ models in their Real Beauty campaigns, yet its most recent ad has been branded as ‘racist’. Remember that 2008 BBC reality TV show Britain’s Missing Model where eight women – all some form of amputee – battled it out to win a photo-shoot with Marie Claire? There is a fine line between empowerment and exploitation. Despite these hiccups, the fashion industry has made great headway in the last decade. Back in 1997, Nordstrom’s catalogues featured disabled models; in 1998 double-amputee Aimee Mullins joined the Alexander McQueen runway show. More recently, Jillian Mercado, who suffers from spastic muscle dystrophy, signed with the highpowered IMG modeling agency after landing a job on a Diesel Jeans ad campaign, famously responding their question ‘Why should we choose you?’ with I want to change the world. The breakthrough of the disabled community onto the catwalk is a more recent phenomenon. In 2014, Danielle Sheypuk became the first model in a wheelchair to appear at New York Fashion Week, while in 2016, actress Jamie Brewer and Australian model Madeline Stuart became the first with Down’s syndrome, and Jack Eyers the first amputee, to strut the catwalk. At September’s London Fashion Week Teatum Jones showcased beauty in disability, paying homage to Natasha Baker, the British Paralympic dressage eleven-time gold medalist. Their AW17 The Body Part I collection took inspiration from the work of artist Hans Bellmer’s mutated forms – a rejection of the Nazi German ‘cult of the perfect body’. Continuing this theme, their SS18 The Body Part II collection aimed to demonstrate that the concept of perfection “is open to interpretation, deconstruction and ultimately reformation”. UK-based organisation Models of Diversity is determined to “change the face of fashion and modelling.” Initiatives such as their Mature Couture and Catwalk4Change have massively contributed to raising awareness. Likewise The Raw Beauty Project, which first launched in New York in 2014, “celebrates women with disabilities, educating viewers to redefine perceptions and beauty, unleashing potential for all.”

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And the models aren’t the only way the real world of disability and diversity is penetrating the fantasy of fashion. ‘Adaptive fashion’ - attire designed to suit disabled persons - is constantly evolving. Its aim is to produce clothing that is stylish without being inhibiting. Companies like Magna Ready make a range of shirts which help those with diseases such as arthritis or Parkinson’s to dress more easily. Similarly, organisations such as the 2014 Open Style Lab strive to create “accessible wearables”. Design for Disability (DfD), by the Cerebral Palsy Foundation, is a powerful example of the resolve to broaden the horizons of the fashion industry. DfD designer Derek Lam is currently working with FIT, Parsons & PRATT to create a line of live-able clothing.

The key to lasting change in the fashion industry is not only to be inspirational but also influential.

The recent LA fashion week featured the inclusive collection of Russian company Bezgraniz Couture (whose name means ‘without borders’), while Tommy Hilfiger’s collaboration with Runway of Dreams in creating an adaptive children’s collection was the first of its kind. Award-winning disabled designer Stephanie Thomas and founder of Cur8able’s Disability Fashion Styling System™ aims to “empower others with disabilities to dress with as much choice, dignity, and self-reliance as possible." Guided by this, as well as her personal experience (she’s a congenital amputee) she maintains that the key to lasting change in the fashion industry is not only to be inspirational but also influential. Yet though so much has been achieved, the fashion industry still has a long way to go. Exploitation is genuinely giving way to empowerment, but if we really want - to quote Mercado – to change the world, we first need to learn to see the real as the ideal. Written by Amelia Stewart of Cook First Image by Lara Callahan


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LOVE STORY PHOTOGRAPHER Gray Hamner @ Day Reps STYLIST Mercedes Natalia @ Exclusive Artists MAKEUP & HAIR Kerrie Urban @ TMG MODEL Natalie @ Vision LA

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Left Page: Suit ST STUDIO; Sweater MAJE Right Page: Shirt MARC JACOBS; Jacket MARNI

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You have to love yourself before you can expect someone else to.

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Jacket COS; Belt MM6; Skirt MAJE

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Top REFORMATION; Jacket SANDRO

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Dress SUNO

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Coat + Blouse IWFY; Pants ALLINA LIU; Necklace ANNDRA NEEN

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EVER present PHOTOGRAPHER Bailey Robb ART DIRECTION + SET DESIGN Cecilia Elguero @ Kate Ryan Inc. STYLIST Katie James MAKEUP Marcos Campos using MAC Cosmetics HAIR STYLIST Abraham Sprinkle MODEL Tsheca White @ Ford Models LIGHTING TECH Conor McIntyre

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Dress KELSEY RANDALL; Necklace THE SHINY SQUIRREL

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Dress VICTORIA HAYES; Necklace ANDRA NEEN

Blouse ARIANNE ELMY; Earrings HAARSTICK JEWELRY

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Dress VICTORIA HAYES; Necklace ANDRA NEEN

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Blouse MAGDA BUTRYM; Pants + Shoes MARYAM NASSIR ZADEH

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Blouse ARIANNE ELMY; Earrings HAARSTICK JEWELRY

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Bodysuit LIBSA; Trench NOMIA; Corset ALLINA LIU; Necklace CLOSER BY WWAKE

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Sweater DIESEL; Pants SUNCOO PARIS; Hat LARUEL


love HURTS PHOTOGRAPHER Yan Bleney ART DIRECTION Isabella Forget STYLIST Jenn Finkelstein @ Folio Montreal MAKEUP & HAIR Isabella Forget using Makeup For Ever & Shu Uemura Hair MODEL Agnes @ Montage Models

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Bottom Image: Dress MARK ANTOINE Top Image: Jumpsuit COS; Coat LUC ESTOWE; Boots MIMOSA AT BROWNS


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Left Page: Coat LARUEL; Top + Pants LUC ESTOWE Right Page: Top KEEPSAKE; Pants CARBOMB BY CAROLINA DOMINGUEZ

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Top MOTEL; Rain jacket TOPSHOP; Skirt MISSGUIDED; Boots ALDO

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Sleeves + Skirt COS; Top LARUEL; Boots ALDO

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MICHELLE HENDLEY

A CONVERSATION WITH ACTOR & INTERNET PERSONALITY, MICHELLE HENDLEY

From documenting her transition on YouTube to the big screen, Michelle Hendley is making moves. We chat with Michelle on hustling and being your authentic self. “As a kid, I was never afraid to be openly creative or feminine.” Living and hustling out of Brooklyn, Michelle Hendley knows who she is and what she wants. Working as an actor and internet personality, Michelle loves three things: superheroes, thunderstorms, and bitchy sharp comebacks. “I played with dolls and often pretended to be a warrior princess or a mermaid. It wasn't until I started school that I saw the binary between boys and girls, and what was considered socially normal, acceptable, and expected of me as a male bodied child.“ Michelle’s career started on YouTube, and was where she documented her transition. “YouTube was where I first learned about the process of gender transition, and where I first met people like myself.” She shares that she wanted to give back to the community of vloggers who helped her, by documenting her own story and sharing her experiences. Those around Michelle were accepting of her desire to transition. “I was very fortunate in that regard during my transition. Many trans people end up having to sever ties with toxic family members or friends, or are disowned altogether.” While enrolled in cosmetology school, director Eric Schaeffer came across Michelle’s YouTube page. “He liked my presence on camera,” she says, and this is when she was asked to be a part of Boy Meets Girl. The experience, Michelle says was life-changing. “I had never acted before [Boy Meets Girl], and at the time I was in desperate need of a new creative outlet in my life. Finding out I had ability and passion as an actor was surreal. I remember going home after we wrapped and crying to my mom about how I wanted to go back!” Her time on set inspired Michelle to move to New York and continue to pursue acting. “Right now I am auditioning for everything that comes my way, but I would love to play more roles that are not specifically transgender.” She continues, “Let me play a superhero or a scorned assassin out for revenge.” Strong, powerful female roles are Michelle’s ultimate goal, adding that she sees stunt school in her future. As a trans woman in the film industry, Michelle faces some hurdles. “Typecast is real, but it is a double edged sword in a way. If a casting director is seeking a trans actor, I have a better chance at getting the role than the average cis actor. However, trans actors are often relegated to trans specific roles only, which come few and far between. There is obviously still a lot of work to be done for trans representation in the industry.” Michelle’s advice for up-and-comers is to be as authentic with yourself as you can be. “Staying conscious of goals and the person I want to be keeps me motivated in my day to day. It allows me to focus on the bigger picture of what I want to achieve, and attract the types of people and energy I need in my life.”

Let me play a superhero or a scorned assassin out for revenge.

Lastly, on the subject of presence: “I think it is important to be aware of the people who gain our attention. Who are the individuals impacting our lives, and is their influence a positive one? It is easy to become fixated on celebrity or absorbed in social media culture, but we are each responsible for the content we choose to consume and share. Let the personal impact we leave be a positive force in the world.” Thank you for being true to yourself, Michelle. You can follow Michelle @chellehendley to keep up.

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PHOTOGRAPHER Maegan Gindi STYLIST Kira Sohn MAKEUP & HAIR Rebecca Colligan ASSISTANT Alexander Lane SPECIAL THANKS Jonathan Pivovar

We are each responsible for the content we choose to consume and share. Let the personal impact we leave be a positive force in the world.

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Dress TRICOT COMME DES GARCONS; Choker GCDS WEAR

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don't FORGET me PHOTOGRAPHER Sang-Hun Lee STYLIST Sojin Park MAKEUP & HAIR Nayeon Kim MODEL Ustyna Drul @ Marilyn Paris PHOTO ASSISTANT Jongjun Lee

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Left Page: Coat BURBERRY Right Page: Belt A.P.C

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Coat BURBERRY

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Shirt SAINT LAURENT; Bodysuit is Stylist’s Own 83


Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that. Coat LOW CLASSIC 84


Top LOW CLASSIC; Pants are Vintage

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ENDLESS PHOTOGRAPHER Mikey Whyte STYLIST Jamie-Maree Shipton MAKEUP & HAIR Nadine Muller MODELS Anei + Adut @ Chadwick Model Management

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Dress ARCHIVE YSL; Shoes VETEMENTS; Brooches are Vintage

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Jacket ARCHIVE YSL; Shoes BALENCIAGA; Tights are Stylist’s Own

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Pants + Jacket ELISA KEELA; Shoes BALENCIAGA; Top is Stylist’s Own

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Jumpsuit OBLANC; Jacket YAJUN; Gloves WING & WEFT; Shoes ONARINS

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PRES ENCE PHOTOGRAPHER Lara Callahan STYLIST Jess Mederos MAKEUP Michaela Bosch HAIR STYLIST Nicholas Shatarah using Amika MODEL Viktoria Lima @ VNY STYLIST ASSISTANT Bree Perry

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Left Page: Jacket ONARINS; Bodysuit KRISTINA VIIRPALU; Pants MOLA WALKER; Hat HEIKE; Gloves WING & WEFT; Shoes LAURENCE DACADE Right Page: Fur Jacket HEIKE; Vest SOSKEN; Gloves WING & WEFT

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Left Page: Knit Sweater CALVIN LUO; Hooded Sweatshirt MADHAPPY; Feather Detail Dress LIANA CAMBA; Jeans MOLA WALKER; Earrings VICTORIA HAYES; Socks VERSACE; Red Boots ALEXIS GAMBLIN; Gloves WING & WEFT Right Page: Hooded Jacket MOLA WALKER; Top ELENA RUDENKO; Pant HILDUR YEOMAN; Earrings ONARINS; Fur Stole HEIKE; Gloves WING & WEFT

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There is a madness in loving you, a lack of reason that makes it feel so flawless. Because I could watch you for a single minute and find a thousand things that I love about you. I wish I could turn back the clock. I'd find you sooner and love you longer. 99


BADASS CROSS STITCH

A CONVERSATION WITH CRAFTIVIST, SHANNON DOWNEY We chatted with cross stitch artist and craftivist Shannon Downey, whose work went viral at the peak of the 2017 Harvey Weinstein misconduct revelations. Shannon chats with us on her craft, using her platform to express and on going viral. Badass Cross Stitch was created by Bostonborn and Chicago-based Shannon Downey. “I've lived a wacky and adventurous life and my path only makes sense to me.” Her work has ranged from middle school teacher, to domestic violence/sexual assault advocate, to event producer, to writing teacher in the prison system, to entrepreneur, to college teacher. “his past June, I shut down the marketing company that I started 10 years ago in order to take on the position of Director of Development for one of my former clients, Asian Americans Advancing Justice | Chicago. I have spent 2 years of my life (collectively) traveling and living around the world. I want to be Indiana Jones, so I have a bachelors in Archeology and a masters in Outdoor Education.” She adds, “I have two of the cutest dogs that have ever walked this earth, and I got engaged this month to the most wonderful and talented woman ever.” Besides moonlighting as Indiana Jones, Shannon is a fiber artist, feminist, activist and craftivist. She started Badass Cross Stitch to inspire others to join on her journey to find a digital and analog balance. Additionally, “I wanted to inspire folks to put down their devices and create something meaningful, express themselves, and say something powerful.” The name stems from Shannon’s favorite word–– badass. “[It’s] sort of a sub-brand for me. I have a blog called Seriously Badass Women where I feature––wait for it––seriously badass women. I love associating embroidery and cross stitching with the term badass because it creates a real sense of cognitive dissonance.” She says it’s her own form of subliminal messaging to help folks think differently about the art form; to take it beyond a precious or easily dismissed “women’s craft”.

I wanted to inspire folks to put down their devices and create something meaningful, express themselves, and say something powerful.

Shannon describes craftivism as something built around action and outcomes. “I love to create opportunities for movements. Building and mobilizing community is my jam.” She continues with an example. “I live in Chicago and we have a pretty epic gun violence problem. My fiancée ––oh that was fun to say!–– co-founded a program called Project FIRE and works with young people who have been injured by gun violence, teaching them glass blowing and entrepreneurship. One day, I logged how many times I heard or read the word gun. At the end of the day it was 72 times. 72 times! So that night, I stitched a gun.” She posted it to Instagram and her community asked her to turn it into a pattern so that they could stitch one too. After creating the pattern, her Instagram feed flooded with guns. “I asked folks to stitch guns and mail them to me. They did. 200 from all over the world in just a few months. I partnered up with Project FIRE and we hosted an epic gallery show at Pilsen Outpost. Over 500 people attended the opening and we sold all of the pieces and all of the glass art made my Project FIRE. We raised over $5,000 to fund the next semester of Project FIRE.” The most moving part of this for Shannon was the letters received with the submissions. “Folks were so happy to have a way to do something that would have a real impact. So many of us feel so helpless when we are thinking about giant, systemic problems. Sometimes you just need an opportunity to take action.”

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That is just one example of how Shannon uses her platform to make a difference. “What’s the point of a platform if you don’t use it to speak up for what you believe in? I have very little tolerance for people who have earned fame or a community or a visible platform who are so afraid of losing it that they never stand for anything.” She believes her platform exists because she uses it to speak up. “People need that right now. They need to see that other humans are willing to say what needs to be said and do what needs to be done. I will always stand up and speak up as loud as I possibly can so that someday the folks who don't feel safe or strong enough to do it right now will be able to.” As the granddaughter of a Lowell Mill Girl and an actual Rosie the Riveter, and daughter of a Union president and entrepreneur, Shannon grew up on the picket line defending the labor movement. “There was no way I would ever be anything but an outspoken activist.” When the Harvey Weinstein sexual misconduct revelations came to light earlier this year, one of Shannon’s cross stitches in particular went viral: ‘Boys will be boys held accountable for their fucking actions.’ Though this piece went viral during that period, it was initially created during thenPresidential candidate Donald Trump’s ‘grab ‘em by the pussy’ video scandal. “I stitched that thinking this. This is the smoking gun.” Yet the piece didn’t garner the response from tens of thousands until the Weinstein allegations came about. She says it has been overwhelming, to say the least. “Millions of people used my art as a vehicle to take a stand against misogyny and abuse. They used my art as a catalyst to share their own stories. How fucking brave is that?! How humbling is that?” Tens of thousands of tags and gut-wrenching stories later, Shannon says she has read every single one. “I pause and thank them aloud for being so damn brave.” She continues, “I like where this is going. I like that women are fed up. I like that women are speaking up. I love that women are fucking angry and I love that they aren't backing down. I see a change. I feel it. I am bathing in it. I am so proud of women right now.” As for the future of Badass Cross Stitch? “I would love to find a way to travel the world teaching everyone how to use their talents and voice to create positive change; to teach everyone how to movement built, share stories, craft narratives, and win hearts and minds. I believe in people and my super power might just be seeing what they are capable of - even when they can’t.” Shannon’s advice for up-and-coming artists, stitchers, activists stands true to her overall message: “Say something. Do something. Take action: any action. Find your voice. Use your voice. Give credit. Honor other people's work and ideas. Start now–– no seriously, stop reading this and go do something right now!” Thank you, Shannon, for taking the time! You can follow along with her work @BadassCrossStitch.

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forward 102

PHOTOGRAPHER Maria Dominika STYLIST David Diniz MAKEUP & HAIR Victoria Reuter MODEL Maria D @ TFM Management


Left Page: Trousers ALEXANDRE HERCHCOVITCH; Shoes ZIGN FOR ZALANDO; Pullover KIOMI; Necklace CÈLLIA Right Page: Coat STEINROHNER

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Dress STINE GOYA

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Full Look VINTAGE GUCCI 105


Nothing remains as it was. If you know this, you can begin again, with pure joy in the uprooting.

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Shirt ARU; Skirt VINTAGE OSCAR DE LA RENTA; Shoes ONYGO

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Dress STEINROHNER

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PHOTOGRAPHER Jang Choe STYLIST Carol Jensky MAKEUP Erica Angelica MODEL Shalinda Clarke @ Salt Model and Talent

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loyalty


Left Page: White Shirt PARALLEL LINES; Green Shirt VERNACULAR; Pants OEUVRE; Earrings HARPER BOUTIQUE Right Page: Coat ZARA; Jumpsuit FREE PEOPLE; Top HALOGEN; Earrings CROGHANS JEWEL BOX; Shoes FOREVER 21

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Left Page: Pants ASOS; Sweater HOUSE OF SUNNY; Bag NEW LOOK; Turtleneck PRETTYLITTLETHING Right Page: Pants MINNIE ROSE; Button Up H&M; Knit Dress ANTHRO; Turtleneck PRETTYLITTLETHING; Shoes JEFFREY CAMPBELL

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Pants MINNIE ROSE; Button Up H&M; Turtleneck PRETTYLITTLETHING

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Dress FREE PEOPLE; Coat BANANA REPUBLIC; Top HALOGEN; Shoes ZARA

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THE CLAMS

THE RISING (CRIMSON) TIDE OF WATER BALLET Atlas spoke with The Clams, a feminist water ballet troupe by women, for women to learn more about the concept and execution of their charming crimson choreography. Images by Bri Hammond

Tell us about the background of The Clams –– how did this group get started? We formed towards the end of 2016. My friends and I had been joking for months about the idea of putting on a water ballet. We had already formed a feminist book club but we hadn't been very good at coordinating ourselves to read the same book at the same time. I don't know what possessed us to think we could therefore co-ordinate ourselves in a pool but the idea of performing a water ballet became a persistent joke. Eventually we realised there was a fair amount of genuine enthusiasm and we set about trying to make it happen! We approached a couple of local choreographers who were keen to help if we could build our numbers to 30. Everyone was so enthusiastic about the idea so we got to 30 within a matter of weeks.

Tell us a bit about the vision of The Clams. The Clams is a group of women who exist for women. We are kooky, fun, and silly. But we also are passionate about removing any barriers and stigmas that stand in the way of women being the best they can be. There's a cultural notion that women are naturally in competition with each other. I think this is really damaging. If we're going to achieve equality we need to be supportive of each other and help lift each other up. This project is a microcosm of that.

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Why is being open about periods important to you? The show has given us a platform to create conversation about the stigma that still exists around menstruation. It's incredibly damaging that we are socially conditioned from a young age to be ashamed of bodies do naturally. Shame makes us vulnerable to exploitation and it leaves us ill-informed about our own bodies. Being well-educated about your body is empowering and potentially even life-saving if it means you're more comfortable seeking medical attention. Shame also holds back social progress. If we can't talk about periods, how can we address the inequality of the 'tampon tax'? Here in Australia you can buy products like sunscreen, condoms, lube and nicotine patches without having to pay a 10% Goods and Services Tax (GST). These products all fall under the Government’s medical goods exemption. It seems inexplicable that sanitary products do not. The profits from our first show went to Share the Dignity, a charity that donates sanitary items to women in need. That was a really nice way of bringing the project full circle.

What has been the biggest challenge for you?

What is the most fun part about The Clams?

Just getting started was the biggest challenge. No one involved had ever done anything like this before. We'd never performed a water ballet, or choreographers Holly Durant and Gabi Barton had never choreographed one, the pool had never hosted one ... it was everybody's first time! While that was difficult, it also added to the fun and excitement in a lot of ways as it allowed us the freedom to make the project into what we wanted. It was a very collaborative project.

Getting to know all the amazing women who took part in the project. I know it sounds cheesy but I'm really proud of the culture of the team. Through this project I've met so many enthusiastic, supportive women. The variety and breath of talent within the team is humbling. We have accountants, musicians, marketing professionals, business-owners. You name it, they're on the team and they've all been so willing to lend their expertise to help this crazy project come to fruition.

What does the team wear? Are there props? Right now our uniform/signature look is our red one-piece swimsuits and white retro-style swimming caps. We each choose our own swimsuits and I’ve enjoyed how the variation has us looking like even more of a motley crew! I spent a great deal of my Summer crafting 30 giant tampons out of pool noodles and large white bus driver's socks. It was worth it though. They looked incredible being swung overhead in unison! Our other prop for Crimson Tide was 40 metres of red tulle which looked like a graceful blood trial as it was dragged through the water.

Do you have any advice? Is there anything else you'd like to add? Get out there, find some like-minded people and get collaborating. Getting started can be the hardest part, but the enthusiasm and momentum of a group is very powerful. There is an international water ballet community out there that we’ve been surprised and delighted to discover. It’s small, but mighty. Right now we have soul sisters in Portland, Brooklyn, Auckland, Sweden and lots of others around the world. It’s been awesome being able to support each other via the magic of the internet.

We'll be watching for the next water ballet in February 2018! Follow along @the_clams for more.

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Suit METROSEN; Shoes MANGO

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PHOTOGRAPHER Kate Alexand STYLIST Katerina Pavlenko MAKEUP Elizaveta Lisovets MODEL Alina Sergeeva


Poloneck + Trousers EVERSALE STORE; Shoes ZARA

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Poloneck + Trousers EVERSALE STORE; Shoes ZARA

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Suit METROSEN; Shoes MANGO


Suit EVERSALE STORE; Jacket TOPSHOP; Shoes MANGO

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Left Page: Suit METROSEN; Shoes MANGO Right Page: Blouse GZ DESIGN; Trousers EVERSALE STORE; Shoes are Vintage 124


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Atlas Magazine | Winter 2017 | The Presence Issue  

Digital fashion magazine for the new generation of creatives. Daily editorials, quarterly issues, constant vibes. Take your time, be consci...